Sample records for fabricated structural metal

  1. Fabrication of metallic glass structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cline, C.F.

    1983-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

  2. Method for fabricating an ignitable heterogeneous stratified metal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilayer structure has a selectable: (1) propagating reaction front velocity V; (2) reaction initiation temperature attained by application of external energy; and (3) amount of energy delivered by a reaction of alternating unreacted layers of the multilayer structure. Because V is selectable and controllable, a variety of different applications for the multilayer structures are possible, including but not limited to their use as igniters, in joining applications, in fabrication of new materials, as smart materials and in medical applications and devices. The multilayer structure has a period D, and an energy release rate constant K. Two or more alternating unreacted layers are made of different materials and separated by reacted zones. The period D is equal to a sum of the widths of each single alternating reaction layer of a particular material, and also includes a sum of reacted zone widths, t{sub i}, in the period D. The multilayer structure has a selectable propagating reaction front velocity V, where V=K(1/D{sup n}){times}[1-(t{sub i}/D)] and n is about 0.8 to 1.2. 8 figs.

  3. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA); Winter, Michael R. (Goleta, CA); Domeier, Linda A. (Danville, CA); Allan, Shawn M. (Henrietta, NY); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of metal-semiconductor-metal nanorod using template synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kyohyeok; Kwon, Namyong; Hong, Junki; Chung, Ilsub [Sungkyunkwan University Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan University Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology and Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors attempted to fabricate and characterize one dimensional metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) nanorod using a template. Cadmium selenide (CdSe) and polypyrrole (Ppy) were chosen as n-type and p-type semiconductor materials, respectively, whereas Au was chosen as a metal electrode. The fabrication of the nanorod was achieved by ''template synthesis'' method using polycarbonate membrane. The structure of the fabricated nanorod was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, the electrical properties of MSM nanorods were characterized using scanning probe microscopy (Seiko Instruments, SPA 300 HV) by probing with a conductive cantilever. I-V characteristics as a function of the temperature give the activation energy, as well as the barrier height of a metal-semiconductor contact, which is useful to understand the conduction mechanism of MSM nanorods.

  5. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, David K. (Knoxville, TN); Allgood, Glenn O. (Powell, TN); Mooney, Larry R. (Knoxville, TN); Duncan, Michael G. (Clinton, TN); Turner, John C. (Clinton, TN); Treece, Dale A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric.

  6. Multi-physics modeling of the fabrication and dynamic performance of all-metal auxetic-hexagonal sandwich-structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    -structures subjected to blast loading. The results obtained clearly showed that the effect of prior processing must to investigate the effect of the prior processing and the resulting microstructure on the performance of all when subjected to blast loading. Ó 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Within

  7. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, D.K.; Allgood, G.O.; Mooney, L.R.; Duncan, M.G.; Turner, J.C.; Treece, D.A.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric. 13 figs.

  8. The design and construction of fabric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Rosemarie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In its short history, fabric structures have fascinated architects and engineers alike. Architects appreciate their unusual shapes and forms while engineers delight in their "pure" structural expression. Capable of spanning ...

  9. Method of fabricating conductive electrodes on the front and backside of a thin film structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tabada, Phillipe J. (Roseville, CA); Tabada, legal representative, Melody (Roseville, CA); Pannu, Satinderpall S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating a thin film device having conductive front and backside electrodes or contacts. Top-side cavities are first formed on a first dielectric layer, followed by the deposition of a metal layer on the first dielectric layer to fill the cavities. Defined metal structures are etched from the metal layer to include the cavity-filled metal, followed by depositing a second dielectric layer over the metal structures. Additional levels of defined metal structures may be formed in a similar manner with vias connecting metal structures between levels. After a final dielectric layer is deposited, a top surface of a metal structure of an uppermost metal layer is exposed through the final dielectric layer to form a front-side electrode, and a bottom surface of a cavity-filled portion of a metal structure of a lowermost metal layer is also exposed through the first dielectric layer to form a back-side electrode.

  10. Low resistance barrier layer for isolating, adhering, and passivating copper metal in semiconductor fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palto Alto, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  11. Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFY 2008 FOIAFabricated Metals (2010 MECS)

  12. Tubular hydrogen permeable metal foil membrane and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieri, Stephen N.; Birdsell, Stephen A.; Barbero, Robert S.; Snow, Ronny C.; Smith, Frank M.

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A tubular hydrogen permeable metal membrane and fabrication process comprises obtaining a metal alloy foil having two surfaces, coating the surfaces with a metal or metal alloy catalytic layer to produce a hydrogen permeable metal membrane, sizing the membrane into a sheet with two long edges, wrapping the membrane around an elongated expandable rod with the two long edges aligned and overlapping to facilitate welding of the two together, placing the foil wrapped rod into a surrounding fixture housing with the two aligned and overlapping foil edges accessible through an elongated aperture in the surrounding fixture housing, expanding the elongated expandable rod within the surrounding fixture housing to tighten the foil about the expanded rod, welding the two long overlapping foil edges to one another generating a tubular membrane, and removing the tubular membrane from within the surrounding fixture housing and the expandable rod from with the tubular membrane.

  13. Microorigami: Fabrication of Small, Three-Dimensional, Metallic Structures Scott T. Brittain, Olivier J. A. Schueller, Hongkai Wu, Sue Whitesides, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    electrodeposition of nickel welded hinges into position, strengthened the structure, and joined separate pieces electrodeposition welds hinges into position, strengthens the structure, and joins separate pieces. By printing Structure and Consolidation of this Structure by Electrodeposition. Figure 1 illustrates the general

  14. Microfabrication of freestanding metal structures released from graphite substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarova, O. V.; Tang, C.-M.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Ryding, D. G.; Lee, R. H.

    2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A sacrificial layer is usually used to release electroformed microstructures. Because of the chemistry applied to the sacrificial layer, only a limited number of metals can be used for electroforming. A novel method to fabricate freestanding electroformed copper structures is presented. A graphite substrate allows the release of the metal part, by abrasive removal of the graphite after electroforming. Results on fabrication of high-aspect-ratio freestanding copper grids are presented; these can be used as x-ray collimator in medical imaging to reduce scattered radiation. This process has potential application to the fabrication of injection molds and microparts on pick-and-place carriers for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  15. Methods for freeform fabrication of structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Stephen G. (Albuquerque, NM); Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid prototyping methods and apparatuses that produce structures made of continuous-fiber polymer-matrix composites without the use of molds. Instead of using molds, the composite structure is fabricated patch by patch in layers or wraps, using a two- or three-axis stage connected to a rapidly-reconfigurable forming surface, and a robot arm to position the evolving composite structure, which are both programmable devices. Because programmable devices are included, i.e., a robot and a two- or three-axis stage connected to the reconfigurable forming surface, the control program needed to produce a desired shape can be easily modified to automatically generate the desired shape from an electronic model (e.g., using a CAD/CAM system) of the desired (predetermined) shape.

  16. Method of fabricating a honeycomb structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holleran, Louis M. (Big Flats, NY); Lipp, G. Daniel (Fort Collins, CO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating a monolithic honeycomb structure product involves shaping a first mixture of raw materials and a binder into a green honeycomb, extruding a second mixture of raw materials and a binder into one or more green members that each define an opening extending longitudinally therethrough. The raw materials of the second mixture are compatible with the raw materials of the first mixture. The green honeycomb and member(s) are dried. The binders of the green honeycomb and member(s) are softened at the surfaces that are to be bonded. The green member(s) is inserted into the honeycomb and bonded to the honeycomb to form an assembly thereof, which is then dried and fired to form a unified monolithic honeycomb structure. The insertion is best carried out by mounting a member in the shape of a tube on a mandrel, and inserting the mandrel into the honeycomb opening to bond the tube to the honeycomb.

  17. Method of fabricating a honeycomb structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holleran, L.M.; Lipp, G.D.

    1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating a monolithic honeycomb structure product involves shaping a first mixture of raw materials and a binder into a green honeycomb, extruding a second mixture of raw materials and a binder into one or more green members that each define an opening extending longitudinally therethrough. The raw materials of the second mixture are compatible with the raw materials of the first mixture. The green honeycomb and member(s) are dried. The binders of the green honeycomb and member(s) are softened at the surfaces that are to be bonded. The green member(s) is inserted into the honeycomb and bonded to the honeycomb to form an assembly thereof, which is then dried and fired to form a unified monolithic honeycomb structure. The insertion is best carried out by mounting a member in the shape of a tube on a mandrel, and inserting the mandrel into the honeycomb opening to bond the tube to the honeycomb. 7 figs.

  18. Fabrication of high aspect ratio silicon nanostructure arrays by metal-assisted etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to explore and understand the mechanisms involved in the fabrication of silicon nanostructures using metal-assisted etching. We developed a method utilizing metal-assisted etching in conjunction ...

  19. Method for fabricating beryllium-based multilayer structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA)

    2003-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium-based multilayer structures and a process for fabricating beryllium-based multilayer mirrors, useful in the wavelength region greater than the beryllium K-edge (111 .ANG. or 11.1 nm). The process includes alternating sputter deposition of beryllium and a metal, typically from the fifth row of the periodic table, such as niobium (Nb), molybdenum (Mo), ruthenium (Ru), and rhodium (Rh). The process includes not only the method of sputtering the materials, but the industrial hygiene controls for safe handling of beryllium. The mirrors made in accordance with the process may be utilized in soft x-ray and extreme-ultraviolet projection lithography, which requires mirrors of high reflectivity (>60%) for x-rays in the range of 60-140 .ANG. (60-14.0 nm).

  20. The design and analysis of tension fabric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Miriam Euni

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although tensioned fabric structures are increasingly in demand, since they are comparatively new to the engineering world, there are relatively limited resources available about such structures. This report reviews the ...

  1. Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) for consolidation of bulk amorphous metals (BAM) and amorphous metal matrix composites (AMMC) is investigated in this dissertation. The objectives of this research are a) to better understand processing parameters...

  2. MICROSCALE THREE-DIMENSIONAL HEMISPHERICAL SHELL RESONATORS FABRICATED FROM METALLIC GLASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M'Closkey, Robert T.

    MICROSCALE THREE-DIMENSIONAL HEMISPHERICAL SHELL RESONATORS FABRICATED FROM METALLIC GLASS M. Kanik.S. Abstract-- A novel use of bulk metallic glasses in microresonator applications is reported and a method scale glass blowmolding using quartz [2] and Pyrex [3], as well as the isotropic etching of silicon

  3. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA); Juntz, Robert S. (Hayward, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

  4. Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have displayed impressive mechanical properties, but the use and dimensions of material have been limited due to critical cooling rate requirements and low ductility. The application of severe plastic deformation...

  5. Solid materials for removing metals and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R.; Reynolds, John G.; Coleman, Sabre J.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid materials have been developed to remove contaminating metals and organic compounds from aqueous media. The contaminants are removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are sol-gel and or sol-gel and granulated activated carbon (GAC) mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards the contaminant(s). The contaminated solid materials can then be disposed of or the contaminant can be removed and the solids recycled.

  6. Method of fabricating a homogeneous wire of inter-metallic alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN); Blue, Craig Alan (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating a homogeneous wire of inter-metallic alloy comprising the steps of providing a base-metal wire bundle comprising a metal, an alloy or a combination thereof; working the wire bundle through at least one die to obtain a desired dimension and to form a precursor wire; and, controllably heating the precursor wire such that a portion of the wire will become liquid while simultaneously maintaining its desired shape, whereby substantial homogenization of the wire occurs in the liquid state and additional homogenization occurs in the solid state resulting in a homogenous alloy product.

  7. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Ramsey, P.B.; Juntz, R.S.

    1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method is disclosed for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite`s high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding. 11 figs.

  8. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor is described which is fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a ``notepad`` configuration composed of 200--300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The ``notepad`` capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density. 5 figs.

  9. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  10. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  11. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor is fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a ``notepad`` configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The notepad capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density. 5 figs.

  12. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  13. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  14. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  15. Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and silk screening, Figure 3 shows the simplified manufacturing process flow diagram. Raw steel and aluminum stock undergo processing which includes shearing, punching, drill-pressing, machining and welding to produce the desired framework structure... plant operations include machining, welding, bending, tinning, sand-blasting, painting, and assembly. The process flow diagram (Figure 2) shows the manufacturing processes which include the following: steel plates are cut and punched on CNC machines...

  16. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures provide solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one aspect the invention provides techniques for co-firing of device substrate (often an electrode) with an electrolyte or membrane layer to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another aspect, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe and Cu, or alloys thereof.

  17. Novel electrochemical method of fast and reproducible fabrication of metallic nanoelectrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, E. L., E-mail: elsilva@ua.pt; Silva, R. F.; Oliveira, F. J. [CICECO – Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, Aveiro (Portugal); Zheludkevich, M. [CICECO – Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, Aveiro (Portugal); MagIC, Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel electrochemical wire etching method of fabrication of ultrasharp nanoelectrodes is reported. Tungsten wires can be sharpened to less than 10 nm tip radius in a reproducible manner in less than 1 min by using controllable hydrodynamic electrolyte flow combined with optimized electrochemical etching parameters. The method relies on the variations of the electric field at the surface of a metal wire, while the electrolyte solution is in motion, rather than on the ionic gradient generated in a static solution.

  18. Layer-by-Layer Fabrication of Oriented Porous Thin Films Based on Porphyrin-Containing Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with number of growth cycles. Polarization excitation and fluorescence measurements indicate, Papanikolas et al. have reported on the fabrication and energy migration dynamics of metal for its exploitation for the preparation of molecular devices.19 Example materials include HKUST-1

  19. A hot isostatic pressing fabrication technique for particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McRea, Shana Aline

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of composite materials are regulated by the combination of traditional metallic materials with a reinforcing phase. Aluminum alloys are generally chosen as the metallic matrix material due to its low cost, low density, and good structural perfor...- mance. These materials, unlike steel, have finite fatigue life, which is undesirable for certain applications. However, due to the applica- bility of the processing methodology to other metal matrix materials, guidelines for aluminum systems can...

  20. Thin-film solar cell fabricated on a flexible metallic substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuttle, John R.; Noufi, Rommel; Hasoon, Falah S.

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin-film solar cell (10) is provided. The thin-film solar cell (10) comprises a flexible metallic substrate (12) having a first surface and a second surface. A back metal contact layer (16) is deposited on the first surface of the flexible metallic substrate (12). A semiconductor absorber layer (14) is deposited on the back metal contact. A photoactive film deposited on the semiconductor absorber layer (14) forms a heterojunction structure and a grid contact (24) deposited on the heterjunction structure. The flexible metal substrate (12) can be constructed of either aluminium or stainless steel. Furthermore, a method of constructing a solar cell is provided. The method comprises providing an aluminum substrate (12), depositing a semiconductor absorber layer (14) on the aluminum substrate (12), and insulating the aluminum substrate (12) from the semiconductor absorber layer (14) to inhibit reaction between the aluminum substrate (12) and the semiconductor absorber layer (14).

  1. Thin-Film Solar Cell Fabricated on a Flexible Metallic Substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuttle, J. R.; Noufi, R.; Hasoon, F. S.

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin-film solar cell (10) is provided. The thin-film solar cell (10) comprises a flexible metallic substrate (12) having a first surface and a second surface. A back metal contact layer (16) is deposited on the first surface of the flexible metallic substrate (12). A semiconductor absorber layer (14) is deposited on the back metal contact. A photoactive film deposited on the semiconductor absorber layer (14) forms a heterojunction structure and a grid contact (24) deposited on the heterjunction structure. The flexible metal substrate (12) can be constructed of either aluminium or stainless steel. Furthermore, a method of constructing a solar cell is provided. The method comprises providing an aluminum substrate (12), depositing a semiconductor absorber layer (14) on the aluminum substrate (12), and insulating the aluminum substrate (12) from the semiconductor absorber layer (14) to inhibit reaction between the aluminum substrate (12) and the semiconductor absorber layer (14).

  2. ARIES-CS COIL STRUCTURE ADVANCED FABRICATION APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    : ARIES-CS, advanced fabrication, additive manufacturing Note: Some figures in this paper are in color with conventional means would be very challenging and costly. A new fabrication technology is "additive manufac

  3. Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-modulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-dimensional nano-structure arrays by passing a pulsed atomic beam through an intensity-modulated continuous of ``cooling'' along the longitudinal direction. This enables fabrication of vertically heterogeneous nano

  4. Safeguards and security concept for the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) and Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel cycle, SAF line technical support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaubert, V.J.; Remley, M.E.; Grantham, L.F.

    1986-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a safeguards and security concept system review for the secure automated fabrication (SAF) and national liquid metal reactor (LMR) fuel programs.

  5. Role of Metal Coordination Structures in Enhancement of Electrocatalyt...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures in Enhancement of Electrocatalytic Activity of Ternary Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Role of Metal Coordination Structures in Enhancement of Electrocatalytic...

  6. ThreeDimensional Metallic Microstructures Fabricated by Soft Lithography and Microelectrodeposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitesides, Sue

    will require new approaches not drawn from existing tech­ nologies. Electroforming (electrodeposition structures by repairing any strain­induced defects with electrodeposition of ad­ ditional metal over bubblememorydevices, 11 thin­ film chip carriers, 2 and components for MEMS (nickel turbine rotor, 5 magnetic

  7. Micromilling of Metal Alloys with Focused Ion Beam-Fabricated Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS,DAVID P.; VASILE,M.J.; BENAVIDES,GILBERT L.; CAMPBELL,ANN N.

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This work combines focused ion beam sputtering and ultra-precision machining as a first step in fabricating microstructure in metals and alloys. Specifically, {approx}25{micro}m diameter micro-end mills are made from cobalt M42 high-speed steel and C2 micrograin tungsten carbide tool blanks by ion beam sputtering. A 20 keV focused gallium beam defines tool cutting edges having radii of curvature < 0.1{micro}m. Micro-end mills having 2, 4 and 5 cutting edges successfully machine small trenches in 6061-T4 aluminum, brass, 4340 steel and polymethyl methacrylate. Machined trench widths are approximately equal to the tool diameters and surface roughnesses (rms) are {approx}150 nm or less. Microtools are robust and operate for more than 6 hours without fracture. Results from ultra-precision machining aluminum at feed rates as high as 50 mm/minute are included.

  8. Selective Electroless and Electrolytic Deposition of Metal for Applications in Microfluidics: Fabrication of a Microthermocouple

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Peter B.; Rodriguez, Indalesio; Kuyper, Christopher L.; Lorenz, Robert M.; Spicar-Mihalic, Paolo; Kuo, Jason S.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a general strategy for the fabrication of a microthermocouple based on the spatially defined electroless deposition of metal, followed by annealing and electroplating. We present scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy characterizations of the deposition and annealing process, as well as the performance of the microfabricated Ni-Ag thermocouple. The temperature-voltage curve for this Ni-Ag microthermocouple is linear over the range 0-50 C with a slope of 61.9 C mV{sup -1}. The sensitivity of our temperature measurement, which is limited by the uncertainty of our calibration curve, is {approx}1 C. The optimum figure of merit (Z{sub opt}) is 1.0 x 10{sup -5} for this type of Ag-Ni thermocouple. We have fabricated microthermocouples ranging in size from 50 to 300 {micro}m. The microthermocouple was integrated into microchannels and used to measure the in channel temperature rise caused by the following: (1) a simple acid-base reaction, HCl + NaOH {yields} H{sub 2}O + NaCl, and (2) an enzyme-catalyzed biochemical reaction, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + catalase {yields} H{sub 2}O + 1/2 O{sub 2}. We have also profiled the temperature increase in the presence of electroosmotic flow for a 100-, 200-, and 300-{micro}m channel.

  9. Fabrication and crushing behavior of low density carbon fiber composite pyramidal truss structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaziri, Ashkan

    Fabrication and crushing behavior of low density carbon fiber composite pyramidal truss structures Jian Xiong a , Li Ma a , Linzhi Wu a,*, Bing Wang a , Ashkan Vaziri b a Center for Composite Materials t A new method for fabricating carbon fiber composite pyramidal truss cores was developed based

  10. Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yufeng [Ames Laboratory

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and compositional properties of the Al6061-CNT composites. A shear lag model was applied to predict the mechanical property (hardness) of the composite. This work demonstrated the promising potential of SPP in the fabrication of particle/fiber (nanotube) reinforced MMCs.

  11. Nanotechnology 10 (1999) 221223. Printed in the UK PII: S0957-4484(99)99981-6 Fabrication of stable metallic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    motor, or a piezoelectric transducer. A nanowire fabricated by the mechanical method cannot be Author the gap between the STM tip and the metal surface drifts due to thermal expansion, acoustic noise and mechanical vibrations, which is also undesirable for practical applications. This paper describes a simple

  12. Electric field based fabrication methods for multi-scale structured surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joung, Young Soo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of micro/nano scale surface structures and properties is crucial to developing novel functional materials. From an engineering point of view, the development of scalable and economical micro/nano-fabrication methods ...

  13. Recycling Of Uranium- And Plutonium-Contaminated Metals From Decommissioning Of The Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluth, T.; Quade, U.; Lederbrink, F. W.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning of a nuclear facility comprises not only actual dismantling but also, above all, management of the resulting residual materials and waste. Siemens Decommissioning Projects (DP) in Hanau has been involved in this task since 1995 when the decision was taken to decommission and dismantle the Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant. Due to the decommissioning, large amounts of contaminated steel scrap have to be managed. The contamination of this metal scrap can be found almost exclusively in the form of surface contamination. Various decontamination technologies are involved, as there are blasting and wiping. Often these methods are not sufficient to meet the free release limits. In these cases, SIEMENS has decided to melt the scrap at Siempelkamp's melting plant. The plant is licensed according to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance Section 7 (issue of 20.07.2001). The furnace is a medium frequency induction type with a load capacity of 3.2 t and a throughput of 2 t/h for steel melting. For safety reasons, the furnace is widely operated by remote handling. A highly efficient filter system of cyclone, bag filter and HEPA-filter in two lines retains the dust and aerosol activity from the off-gas system. The slag is solidified at the surface of the melt and gripped before pouring the liquid iron into a chill. Since 1989, in total 15,000 t have been molten in the plant, 2,000 t of them having been contaminated steel scrap from the decommissioning of fuel fabrication plants. Decontamination factors could be achieved between 80 and 100 by the high affinity of the uranium to the slag former. The activity is transferred to the slag up to nearly 100 %. Samples taken from metal, slag and dust are analyzed by gamma measurements of the 186 keV line of U235 and the 1001 keV line of Pa234m for U238. All produced ingots showed a remaining activity less than 1 Bq/g and could be released for industrial reuse.

  14. Electronic and structural dynamics in transition metal complexes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic and structural dynamics in transition metal complexes - recent results from synchrotron and XFEL experiments Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk...

  15. (110) Orientation growth of magnetic metal nanowires with face-centered cubic structure using template synthesis technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xuewei, E-mail: xwwang@tjut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Tianjin Key Lab for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin 300384 (China); Yuan Zhihao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Key Laboratory of Display Materials and Photoelectric Devices (Tianjin University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li Jushan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A template-assisted assembly technique has been used to synthesize magnetic metal nanowire arrays. Fe, Co, Ni nanowires are fabricated using direct-current electrodeposition in the pores of anodic alumina membranes. The morphology and the crystal structure of the samples are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometer. The results indicate that Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires all have face-centered cubic (FCC) structure and a preferred orientation along the [110] direction. The ability to prepare well-defined orientation growth of magnetic metal nanowires with FCC structure opens up new opportunities for both fundamental studies and nanodevice applications. - Research Highlights: {yields} Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires are fabricated in the AAM templates by electrodeposition. {yields} Well-defined orientation growth of the nanowires with FCC structure were investigated. {yields} The electrodeposition parameters affect the crystal structure and growth orientation.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of microscale sandwich beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    /metal cores were produced through fabrication methods that combined photolithography and electrodeposition prototyping strategy consisting of photolithographic, electrodeposition, and face-sheet bonding steps sandwiched between two sheets of nickel. We also investigate the structural response--load, flex- ural

  17. Fabrication of Ceramic Microscale Structures and Paul J. A. Kenisw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    such as microturbines,22 piezoelectric structures,23,24 and struc- tures in micro-electro-mechanical-system devices.1

  18. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobson, Craig P. (El Cerrito, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, such as solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), are low-cost, mechanically strong and highly electronically conductive. Some preferred structures have a thin layer of an electrocatalytically active material (e.g., Ni--YSZ) coating a porous high-strength alloy support (e.g., SS-430) to form a porous SOFC fuel electrode. Electrode/electrolyte structures can be formed by co-firing or constrained sintering processes.

  19. Structures and fabrication techniques for solid state electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, such as solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), are low-cost, mechanically strong and highly electronically conductive. Some preferred structures have a thin layer of an electrocatalytically active material (e.g., Ni--YSZ) coating a porous high-strength alloy support (e.g., SS-430) to form a porous SOFC fuel electrode. Electrode/electrolyte structures can be formed by co-firing or constrained sintering processes.

  20. Metal finishing and vacuum processes groups, Materials Fabrication Division progress report, March-May 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Romo, J.G.; Jones, L.M.

    1984-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in fabrication and coating activities being conducted for the weapons program, nuclear test program, nuclear design program, magnetic fusion program, and miscellaneous applications. (DLC)

  1. Fabrication of Robust Nanoporous Polymer Films with Cocontinuous Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFY 2008 FOIAFabricated Metals- Energy

  2. Solar-blind deep-UV band-pass filter (250 -350 nm) consisting of a metal nano-grid fabricated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-blind deep-UV band-pass filter (250 - 350 nm) consisting of a metal nano-grid fabricated, fabricated and demonstrated a solar-blind deep-UV pass filter, that has a measured optical performance, the filter offers simple yet effective and low cost solar-blind deep-UV detection at either a single device

  3. Electrochemical fabrication and optical properties of porous tin oxide films with structural colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Hua; Shu, Shiwei; Lee, Chris; Zeng, Shanshan [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong); Lu, Zhouguang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: yangli@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Centre for Advanced Structural Materials, City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, 8 Yuexing 1st Road, Shenzhen Hi-Tech Industrial Park, Nanshan District, Shenzhen (China); Li, Yang Yang, E-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: yangli@cityu.edu.hk [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Av. Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong); City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, 8 Yuexing 1st Road, Shenzhen Hi-Tech Industrial Park, Nanshan District, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals with porous features not only provide the capability to control light but also enable structural colors that are environmentally sensitive. Here, we report a novel kind of tin oxide-based photonic crystal featuring periodically arranged air pores fabricated by the periodic anodization of tin foil. The existence of a photonic band gap in the fabricated structure is verified by its vivid color, and its reflective spectra which are responsive to environmental stimuli. Furthermore, the sample colors (i.e., the photonic band gap positions) can be easily adjusted by manipulating the anodization parameters. The theoretical modeling results of these tin oxide photonic crystals agree well with the reported experimental ones.

  4. Process for fabricating device structures for real-time process control of silicon doping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon device structures designed to allow measurement of important doping process parameters immediately after the doping step has occurred. The test structures are processed through contact formation using standard semiconductor fabrication techniques. After the contacts have been formed, the structures are covered by an oxide layer and an aluminum layer. The aluminum layer is then patterned to expose the contact pads and selected regions of the silicon to be doped. Doping is then performed, and the whole structure is annealed with a pulsed excimer laser. But laser annealing, unlike standard annealing techniques, does not effect the aluminum contacts because the laser light is reflected by the aluminum. Once the annealing process is complete, the structures can be probed, using standard techniques, to ascertain data about the doping step. Analysis of the data can be used to determine probable yield reductions due to improper execution of the doping step and thus provide real-time feedback during integrated circuit fabrication.

  5. Top-down structure and device fabrication using in situ nanomachining Xiaodong Lia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, South Carolina tool for the fabrication of nanoscale structures and devices. A nanoindenter integrated with an atomic or photolithography. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2139991 In this letter, we present

  6. Three-dimensional Composite Lattice Structures Fabricated by Electrical Discharge Machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaziri, Ashkan

    to carbon fiber composites is the low electrical conductivity of the composite material [21]. To address present a novel method for fabricating carbon fiber composite sandwich panels with lattice core structuring composite materials show promise for filling gaps in the strength versus density map of all known

  7. Improved Structure and Fabrication of Large, High-Power KHPS Rotors - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corren, Dean [Verdant Power, Inc.; Colby, Jonathan [Verdant Power, Inc.; Adonizio, Mary Ann [Verdant Power, Inc.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Verdant Power, Inc, working in partnership with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Minnesota St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL), among other partners, used evolving Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) models and techniques to improve the structure and fabrication of large, high-power composite Kinetic Hydropower System (KHPS) rotor blades. The objectives of the project were to: design; analyze; develop for manufacture and fabricate; and thoroughly test, in the lab and at full scale in the water, the improved KHPS rotor blade.

  8. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200601787 Microsolidics: Fabrication of Three-Dimensional Metallic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    in flexible sensors and displays has fueled the development of polymer­metal composites. Re- search in this field includes composites of metal in PDMS with optical functions,[21] conductive PDMS­carbon nanotube oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors,[26] and flexible gold­polymer nano- composites as passive

  9. Oxidized film structure and method of making epitaxial metal oxide structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gan, Shupan [Richland, WA; Liang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable oxidized structure and an improved method of making such a structure, including an improved method of making an interfacial template for growing a crystalline metal oxide structure, are disclosed. The improved method comprises the steps of providing a substrate with a clean surface and depositing a metal on the surface at a high temperature under a vacuum to form a metal-substrate compound layer on the surface with a thickness of less than one monolayer. The compound layer is then oxidized by exposing the compound layer to essentially oxygen at a low partial pressure and low temperature. The method may further comprise the step of annealing the surface while under a vacuum to further stabilize the oxidized film structure. A crystalline metal oxide structure may be subsequently epitaxially grown by using the oxidized film structure as an interfacial template and depositing on the interfacial template at least one layer of a crystalline metal oxide.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of combined metallic nanogratings and ITO electrodes for organic photovoltaic cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Frank

    photovoltaic cells D.A. Gollmer a,,1 , F. Walter a,1 , C. Lorch a , J. Novák a,b , R. Banerjee a , J. Dieterle to conventional silicon based photovoltaic cells, due to potentially lower material costs and energy consumption during the fabrication process. However, the energy conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells

  11. Fabrication of metal field emitter arrays on polycrystalline silicon II Hwan Kim and Chun Gyoo Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Duk

    of the gate aperture which rendered a stable emission characteristic. © 1997 American Vacuum Society. S0734 a large FEA panel using this fabrication process since the size of the single-crystal silicon wafer and the undoped polysilicon is completely con- sumed in the oxidation to form a gate insulator. The diffu- sion

  12. Method and apparatus for diamond wire cutting of metal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parsells, Robert; Gettelfinger, Geoff; Perry, Erik; Rule, Keith

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for diamond wire cutting of metal structures, such as nuclear reactor vessels, is provided. A diamond wire saw having a plurality of diamond beads with beveled or chamfered edges is provided for sawing into the walls of the metal structure. The diamond wire is guided by a plurality of support structures allowing for a multitude of different cuts. The diamond wire is cleaned and cooled by CO.sub.2 during the cutting process to prevent breakage of the wire and provide efficient cutting. Concrete can be provided within the metal structure to enhance cutting efficiency and reduce airborne contaminants. The invention can be remotely controlled to reduce exposure of workers to radioactivity and other hazards.

  13. Physical understanding of electron mobility in asymmetrically strained InGaAs-on-insulator metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated by lateral strain relaxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, SangHyeon, E-mail: dadembyora@mosfet.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: sh-kim@kist.re.kr; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Ikku, Yuki; Nakane, Ryosho; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ichikawa, Osamu; Osada, Takenori; Hata, Masahiko [Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd., 6 Kitahara, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-3294 (Japan)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we fabricated asymmetrically tensile-strained In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As-on-insulator (-OI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) using a lateral strain relaxation technique. A stripe-like line structure, fabricated in biaxially strained In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As-OI can lead to the lateral strain relaxation and asymmetric strain configuration in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As-OI with the channel width of 100?nm. We have found that the effective mobility (?{sub eff}) enhancement in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As-OI MOSFETs with uniaxial-like asymmetric strain becomes smaller than that in In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As-OI MOSFETs with biaxial strain. We have clarified from a systematic analysis between the strain values and the ?{sub eff} characteristics that this mobility behavior can be understood by the change of the energy level of the conduction band minimum due to the lateral strain relaxation.

  14. Electrospun carbon nanofiber electrodes decorated with palladium metal nanoparticles : fabrication and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurpiewski, John Paul

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method was investigated to produce a novel oxygen reduction electrode comprised of carbon nanofibers for use in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells and metal-air batteries. The process involved electrospinning ...

  15. Modeling of pattern dependencies in the fabrication of multilevel copper metallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Hong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilevel copper metallization for Ultra-Large-Scale-Integrated (ULSI) circuits is a critical technology needed to meet performance requirements for advanced interconnect technologies with sub-micron dimensions. It is ...

  16. A hot isostatic pressing fabrication technique for particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McRea, Shana Aline

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have seen the development of a wide range of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Until recently, the primary support for these composites had come from the aerospace and defense industry. Now as current materials reach their performance...

  17. Fabrication of carbon nanotube films from alkyne-transition metal complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iyer, Vivekanantan S. (Delft, NL); Vollhardt, K. Peter C. (Oakland, CA)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the production or synthesis of carbon nanotubes as free-standing films or nanotube mats by the thermal decomposition of transition metal complexed alkynes with aryl, alkyl, alkenyl, or alkynyl substituents. In particular, transition metal (e.g. Co, Ni, Fe, Mo) complexes of diarylacetylenes, e.g. diphenylacetylene, and solid mixtures of these complexes with suitable, additional carbon sources are heated in a vessel. More specifically, the heating of the transition metal complex is completed at a temperature between 400-800.degree. C. and more particularly 550-700.degree. C. for between 0.1 to 24 hours and more particularly 0.5-3 hours in a sealed vessel under a partial pressure of argon or helium.

  18. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and Structural Transformation of A Condensed Rare Earth Metal Coordination Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Synthesis, Characterization and Structural Transformation of A Condensed Rare Earth Metal metals under hydrothermal conditions.5 In this work, 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid has been selected

  20. Method for fabricating a seal between a ceramic and a metal alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelsey, P.V. Jr.; Siegel, W.T.

    1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating a seal between a ceramic and an alloy comprising the steps of prefiring the alloy in an atmosphere with a very low partial pressure of oxygen, firing the assembled alloy and ceramic in air, and gradually cooling the fired assembly to avoid the formation of thermal stress in the ceramic. The method forms a bond between the alloy and the ceramic capable of withstanding the environment of a pressurized water reactor and suitable for use in an electrical conductivity sensitive liquid level transducer.

  1. Fabrication and testing of nano-optical structures for advanced photonics and quantum information processing applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Mughees Mahmood

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -based metal nanostructures offer the promise of scalable devices. This is because the small optical mode volumes of such structures give the large atom-photon coupling needed to interface solid-state quantum bits (qubits) to photons. The main focus...

  2. Three-Dimensional Metallic Microstructures Fabricated by Soft Lithography and Microelectrodeposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    existing tech- nologies. Electroforming (electrodeposition and electromachin- ing) is a technique with electrodeposition of ad- ditional metal over the damaged areas. Most techniques that are used in conjunction (nickel turbine rotor,5 magnetic microactuator,12 microgears, microvalves and pumps,13 capacitive

  3. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Sandhya (Bloomington, MN); Tuttle, Gary L. (Ames, IA); Sigalas, Mihail (Ames, IA); McCalmont, Jonathan S. (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  4. 3D PRINTING FOR INTELLIGENT METALLIC STRUCTURES M. Strantza1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    3D PRINTING FOR INTELLIGENT METALLIC STRUCTURES M. Strantza1 , D. De Baere2 , M. Rombouts3 , SSHM system is produced by 3D printing or additive manufacturing. Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a "process to enable its implementation. This work demonstrates the feasibility study of eSHM systems produced by 3D

  5. Relationship between fabrication parameters and structural characteristics of sintered lithium orthosilicate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, C.Y.; Bar, K.; Singh, J.B.; Poeppel, R.B.; Billone, M.C.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/) powder was synthesized by the solid-state reaction of lithium oxide with amorphous silica, and the effects of fabrication parameters on the structural characteristics of the product were investigated. Processing considerations such as milling media, drying technique, calcination time and temperature, pressing behavior, sintering time and temperatures, and impurity concentration were addressed. The initial powder particle size was observed to be important in achieving high sintered density, with densities as high as 98% TD achieved with a particle size of approximately 1 ..mu..m. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  6. A Patterned 3D Silicon Anode Fabricated by Electrodeposition on a Virus-Structured Current Collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X L; Gerasopoulos, K; Guo, J C; Brown, A; Wang, Chunsheng; Ghodssi, Reza; Culver, J N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical methods were developed for the deposition of nanosilicon onto a 3D virus-structured nickel current collector. This nickel current collector is composed of self-assembled nanowire-like rods of genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV1cys), chemically coated in nickel to create a complex high surface area conductive substrate. The electrochemically depo­sited 3D silicon anodes demonstrate outstanding rate performance, cycling stability, and rate capability. Electrodeposition thus provides a unique means of fabricating silicon anode materials on complex substrates at low cost.

  7. Large Scale Laser Two-Photon Polymerization Structuring for Fabrication of Artificial Polymeric Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinauskas, M.; Purlys, V.; Zukauskas, A.; Rutkauskas, M.; Danilevicius, P.; Paipulas, D.; Bickauskaite, G.; Gadonas, R.; Piskarskas, A. [Vilnius University, Physics Faculty, Department of Quantum Electronics, Laser Research Center, Sauletekio ave. 10, LT-10223 Vilnius (Lithuania); Bukelskis, L.; Baltriukiene, D.; Bukelskiene, V. [Institute of Biochemistry, Vivarium, Mokslininkuo str. 12, LT-08662 Vilnius (Lithuania); Sirmenis, R. [Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiuo Klinikos, Santariskiuo g. 2, LT-08661 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gaidukeviciute, A. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Sirvydis, V. [Vilnius University, Faculty of Medicine, Heart Surgery Center, Santariskiuo 2, LT-08661, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a femtosecond Laser Two-Photon Polymerization (LTPP) system of large scale three-dimensional structuring for applications in tissue engineering. The direct laser writing system enables fabrication of artificial polymeric scaffolds over a large area (up to cm in lateral size) with sub-micrometer resolution which could find practical applications in biomedicine and surgery. Yb:KGW femtosecond laser oscillator (Pharos, Light Conversion. Co. Ltd.) is used as an irradiation source (75 fs, 515 nm (frequency doubled), 80 MHz). The sample is mounted on wide range linear motor driven stages having 10 nm sample positioning resolution (XY--ALS130-100, Z--ALS130-50, Aerotech, Inc.). These stages guarantee an overall travelling range of 100 mm into X and Y directions and 50 mm in Z direction and support the linear scanning speed up to 300 mm/s. By moving the sample three-dimensionally the position of laser focus in the photopolymer is changed and one is able to write complex 3D (three-dimensional) structures. An illumination system and CMOS camera enables online process monitoring. Control of all equipment is automated via custom made computer software ''3D-Poli'' specially designed for LTPP applications. Structures can be imported from computer aided design STereoLihography (stl) files or programmed directly. It can be used for rapid LTPP structuring in various photopolymers (SZ2080, AKRE19, PEG-DA-258) which are known to be suitable for bio-applications. Microstructured scaffolds can be produced on different substrates like glass, plastic and metal. In this paper, we present microfabricated polymeric scaffolds over a large area and growing of adult rabbit myogenic stem cells on them. Obtained results show the polymeric scaffolds to be applicable for cell growth practice. It exhibit potential to use it for artificial pericardium in the experimental model in the future.

  8. Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFY 2008 FOIAFabricated Metals (2010Fuel

  9. Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals Using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFY 2008 FOIAFabricated Metals

  10. Structure of liquid transition and rare earth metals S. N. Khanna and F. Cyrot-Lackmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-45 Structure of liquid transition and rare earth metals S. N. Khanna and F. Cyrot-Lackmann Groupe It is shown that the observed structure factors of transition and rare earth liquid metals can be reaso- nably. The difference is particularly large for V, Ti, and rare earth metals which are precisely the metals where

  11. Fabrication of Metal/Oxide Nanostructures by Anodization Processes for Biosensor, Drug Delivery and Supercapacitor Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po-Chun

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    . Then, the microneedles were further built as an array by combining micromachining technique. The microneedle array provides a 3-D structure that possesses several hundred times more surface area and capacity than a traditional nanochannel template...

  12. Method of fabricating metal- and ceramic- matrix composites and functionalized textiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, James L. (Jemez Springs, NM); Chavez, Craig A. (Los Alamos, NM); Black, Marcie R. (Lincoln, MA)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing an article comprises providing a first sheet, wetting the first sheet with a liquid precursor to provide a first wet sheet, and irradiating the first wet sheet in a pattern corresponding to a first cross section of the article such that the liquid precursor is at least partially converted to a solid in the first cross section. A second sheet is disposed adjacent to the first sheet. The method further comprises wetting the second sheet with the liquid precursor to provide a second wet sheet, and irradiating the second wet sheet in a pattern corresponding to a second cross section of the article such that the liquid precursor is at least partially converted to a solid in the second cross section. In particular the liquid precursor may be converted to a metal, ceramic, semiconductor, semimetal, or a combination of these materials.

  13. Thermoelectric-transport in metal/graphene/metal hetero-structure This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Thermoelectric-transport in metal/graphene/metal hetero-structure This article has been downloaded. B Vol. 19, No. 3 (2010) 037202 Thermoelectric-transport in metal/graphene/metal hetero-structure Hu 27 October 2009) We investigate the thermoelectric-transport properties of metal

  14. Process for fabrication of cermets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cermet comprising ceramic and metal components and a molten metal infiltration method and process for fabrication thereof. The light weight cermets having improved porosity, strength, durability, toughness, elasticity fabricated from presintered ceramic powder infiltrated with a molten metal or metal alloy. Alumina titanium cermets biocompatible with the human body suitable for bone and joint replacements.

  15. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ozbay, E.; Tuttle, G.; Michel, E.; Ho, K.M.; Biswas, R.; Chan, C.T.; Soukoulis, C.

    1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap. 42 figures.

  16. Toughened and corrosion- and wear-resistant composite structures and fabrication methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Ripley, Edward B; Hallman, Russell L

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite structures having a reinforced material interjoined with a substrate and methods of creating a composite material interjoined with a substrate. In some embodiments the composite structure may be a line or a spot or formed by reinforced material interjoined with the substrate. The methods typically include disposing a precursor material comprising titanium diboride and/or titanium monoboride on at least a portion of the substrate and heating the precursor material and the at least a portion of the substrate in the presence of an oxidation preventative until at least a portion of the precursor material forms reinforced material interjoined with the substrate. The precursor material may be disposed on the substrate as a sheet or a tape or a slurry or a paste. Localized surface heating may be used to heat the precursor material. The reinforced material typically comprises a titanium boron compound, such as titanium monoboride, and preferably comprises .beta.-titanium. The substrate is typically titanium-bearing, iron-bearing, or aluminum-bearing. A welding rod is provided as an embodiment. The welding rod includes a metal electrode and a precursor material is disposed adjacent at least a portion of the metal electrode. A material for use in forming a composite structure is provided. The material typically includes a precursor material that includes one or more materials selected from the following group: titanium diboride and titanium monoboride. The material also typically includes a flux.

  17. DNA Transport in Hierarchically-Structured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    porous metallic tubes.3 The fabrication of spherical, cylindri- cal, and hollow colloidal crystals using-dimensional periodic structures with micrometer-scale periods have been fabricated with nano- particle inks.8 Well definition, is a promising approach for the fabrication of complex micro- and nano- structures.15

  18. Fabrication of planar quantum magnetic disk structure using electron beam lithography, reactive ion etching, and chemical mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrication of planar quantum magnetic disk structure using electron beam lithography, reactive ion, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 Received 2 June's size and location, and reactive ion etching was used to form an SiO2 template. Nickel electroplating

  19. Fabrication of novel 3-N and 3-V modulator structures by ECR plasma etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Mackenzie, J.D.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum well microdisk laser structures have been fabricated in the GaN/InGaN, GaAs/AlGaAs and GaAs/InGaP systems using a combination of ECR dry etching Cl2/CH4/H2/Ar, BCl3/Ar or CH4/H2/Ar plasma chemistries respectively, and subsequent wet chemical etching of a buffer layer underlying the quantum wells. While wet etchants such as HF/H2O and HCl/HNO3/H2O are employed for AlGaAs and InGaP, respectively, a new KOH based solution has been developed for AlN which is completely selective over both GaN and InGaN. Typical mask materials include PR or SiN(x), while the high surface recombination velocity of exposed AlGaAs (approximately) 10(exp 5)cm(center dot)/sec requires encapsulation with ECR-CVD SiN(x) to stabilize the optical properties of the modulators.

  20. Fabrication of novel III-N and III-V modulator structures by ECR plasma etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKenzie, J.D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum well microdisk laser structures have been fabricated in the GaN/InGaN, GaAs/AlGaAs and GaAs/InGaP systems using a combination of ECR dry etching (Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar or CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma chemistries respectively) and subsequent wet chemical etching of a buffer layer underlying the quantum wells. While wet etchants such as HF/H{sub 2}O and HCl/HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2} O are employed for AlGaAs and InGaP, respectively, a new KOH based solution has been developed for AlN which is completely selective over both GaN and InGaN. Typical mask materials include PR or SiN{sub x}, while the high surface recombination velocity of exposed AlGaAs ({approximately} 10{sup 5} cm{center_dot}sec {sup {minus}1}) requires encapsulation with ECR-CVD SiN{sup x} to stabilize the optical properties of the modulators.

  1. Fabrication and Optimization of Nano-Structured Composites for Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Kenneth Russell

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials for Hydrogen Storage. ” PhD thesis #1217. InstitutStatus of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks. ”Oxide Adsorption and Storage in a Metal-Organic Framework. ”

  2. Brazing of ceramic and graphite to metal in the fabrication of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) antenna and feedthrough components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.E.; Sluss, F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of some of the more critical components of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna and feedthrough assemblies has involved the brazing of alumina ceramic and graphite to various metals. Copper end pieces have been successfully brazed to alumina cylinders for use in feedthroughs for TEXTOR and in feedthroughs and capacitors for a Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) antenna. Copper-plated Inconel rods and tubes have been armored with graphite for construction of Faraday shields on antennas for Doublet III-D and TFTR. Details of brazing procedures and test results, including rf performance, mechanical strength, and thermal capabilities, are presented. 14 figs.

  3. Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.

  4. Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.

  5. Design and Fabrication of a Supporting Structure for 3.6m Long Nb3Sn Racetrack Coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Caspi, Shlomo; Cheng, Daniel; Dietderich, Daniel; Gourlay, Steve; Hafalia, A. Ray; Hannaford, Charles; Lietzke, Alan; Nobrega, A.R.; Sabbi, GianLuca; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, R. J; Zlobin, A.V.; Ferracin, P.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP), three US national laboratories (BNL, FNAL, and LBNL) are currently engaged in the development of superconducting magnets for the LHC Interaction Regions (IR) beyond the current design. As a first step towards the development of long Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnets, a 3.6 m long structure, based on the LBNL Subscale Common-Coil Magnet design, will be fabricated, assembled, and tested with aluminum-plate 'dummy coils'. The structure features an aluminum shell pre-tensioned over iron yokes using pressurized bladders and locking keys (bladder and key technology). Pre-load homogeneity and mechanical responses are monitored with pressure sensitive films and strain gauges mounted on the aluminum shell and the dummy coils. The details of the design and fabrication are presented and discussed, and the expected mechanical behavior is analyzed with finite element models.

  6. Lattice truss structures from expanded metal sheet Gregory W. Kooistra *, Haydn N.G. Wadley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    % utilization of the sheet material. Aluminium alloy lattices with a relative density of 5.7% were fabricated and bonded to aluminium alloy facesheets using a brazing tech- nique. They have been tested in through several exam- ples of such structures. When made from aluminium alloys, lightweight sandwich structures

  7. Synthesis, Structure, and Properties of Refractory Hard-Metal Borides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lech, Andrew Thomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance super-alloys 11 for aerospace, or new metal-other high- strength alloys 26 of the aerospace and medical

  8. Supramolecular structures and metal-organic frameworks based on metal dipyrrin building blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halper, Sara R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assembly of supramolecular materials. [19-21] Specifically,to the metal. Supramolecular materials have an advantageproperties of supramolecular materials can be tuned by

  9. Fabrication of nanofibrous A- or B-sites substituted LaCoO{sub 3} perovskites with macroscopic structures and their catalytic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Qiang, E-mail: qiangwu@shiep.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhao, Li [College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Wu, Meixia [Department of Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China); Yao, Weifeng; Qi, Meixue [College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Shi, Xiaoyan [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing 100084 (China); Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Fabrication of nanofibrous La{sub 1?x}Ce{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.2) and LaMn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.2, 0.5, 0.8) perovskite-type oxides with macroscopic structures can be successfully achieved by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as templates. Furthermore, their application for the combustion of carbon black (CB), which is a model of particulate matter exhausted from diesel engines, was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Nanofibrous perovskites with macroscopic shapes were successfully obtained. • CNFs template method used here is facile, effective and reproducible. • This method might be applicable to other novel material fabrication. • The obtained materials show superior catalytic activity in soot combustion. - Abstract: Fabrication of nanofibrous La{sub 1?x}Ce{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.2) and LaMn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.2, 0.5, 0.8) perovskite-type oxides with macroscopic structures can be successfully achieved by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as templates. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), coupled with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the template effect and formation of the perovskite-type oxides on the macroscopic substrate. It turned out that this facile method can ensure the desired single-phase perovskite-type oxides formation by controlling the corresponding metal ratio during the preparation procedure. In addition, the immobilized nanofibrous La{sub 1?x}Ce{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (x = 0.05) and LaMn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.5) perovskite-type oxides can greatly decrease the combustion temperature of nanosized carbon black particles, which has the high potential application prospects in the treatment of diesel soot particles.

  10. Metal-insulator-semiconductor structures on p-type GaAs with low interface state density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhi

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor structures on p-type GaAs with low interface state density Zhi Chen properties of in situ deposited Si3N4 /Si/p-GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor structures have been offered by a low gate leakage technology in GaAs, such as metal insulator structures, func- tional Ga

  11. Structural Signature of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses H. L. Peng,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Structural Signature of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses H. L. Peng,1,2 M. Z. Li,2,* and W the degree of local fivefold symmetry (LFFS) as the structural indicator to predict plastic deformation of local structures and find that the plastic events prefer to be initiated in regions with a lower degree

  12. Nonlinear Structure of the Diffusing Gas-Metal Interface in a Thermonuclear Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molvig, Kim

    This Letter describes the theoretical structure of the plasma diffusion layer that develops from an initially sharp gas-metal interface. The layer dynamics under isothermal and isobaric conditions is considered so that ...

  13. Fabrication of superconducting metal-oxide textiles by heating impregnated polymeric material in a weakly oxidizing atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van den Sype, J.S.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for producing crystalline fibers, textiles or shapes comprised of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x] where x varies from about 0 to about 0.4, said process comprising: (a) impregnating a preformed organic polymeric material with three metal compounds to provide metal elements in said material in substantially the atomic ratio occurring in said YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x]; (b) heating said impregnated material in a weakly oxidizing atmosphere containing from about 0.05% to about 2% oxygen by volume to a temperature sufficiently high to at least partially pyrolize and oxidize said organic material and at least partially oxidize said metal compounds substantially without ignition of said organic material and without formation of a molten phase or reaching a decomposition temperature of said YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x]; and (c) cooling the resulting material in at least a moderately oxidizing atmosphere to room temperature so as to obtain said fibers, textiles or shapes.

  14. Composition, Reactivity, and Regulations of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholten, Johannes

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research proposal seeks to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages known as bacterial nanowires. This project targets bacterial nanowires produced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project will investigate the role of these structures in the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors, as well as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor that forms nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction.

  15. Metal Cooling in Simulations of Cosmic Structure Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britton D. Smith; Steinn Sigurdsson; Tom Abel

    2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of metals to any gas can significantly alter its evolution by increasing the rate of radiative cooling. In star-forming environments, enhanced cooling can potentially lead to fragmentation and the formation of low-mass stars, where metal-free gas-clouds have been shown not to fragment. Adding metal cooling to numerical simulations has traditionally required a choice between speed and accuracy. We introduce a method that uses the sophisticated chemical network of the photoionization software, Cloudy, to include radiative cooling from a complete set of metals up to atomic number 30 (Zn) that can be used with large-scale three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Our method is valid over an extremely large temperature range (10 K 10^-4 Zsun, regions of density and temperature exist where gas is both thermally unstable and has a cooling time less than its dynamical time. We identify these doubly unstable regions as the most inducive to fragmentation. At high redshifts, the CMB inhibits efficient cooling at low temperatures and, thus, reduces the size of the doubly unstable regions, making fragmentation more difficult.

  16. Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through pulsed-laser standing-waves under off-resonant condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through pulsed 1998 We show that it is feasible to produce one- and two-dimensional nano-structure arrays by passing the reduced dimensions are of the order of nanometers (10 9 m . In particular, nano

  17. Buffer architecture for biaxially textured structures and method of fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norton, David P.; Park, Chan; Goyal, Amit

    2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to an article with an improved buffer layer architecture comprising a substrate having a metal surface, and an epitaxial buffer layer on the surface of the substrate. The epitaxial buffer layer comprises at least one of the group consisting of ZrO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, and compounds having at least one of Ca and a rare earth element stabilizing cubic phases of ZrO.sub.2 and/or HfO.sub.2. The article can also include a superconducting layer deposited on the epitaxial buffer layer. The article can also include an epitaxial capping layer between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer. A method for preparing an epitaxial article comprises providing a substrate with a metal surface, depositing on the metal surface an epitaxial buffer layer comprising at least one material selected from the group consisting of ZrO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, and compounds having at least one of Ca and a rare earth element stabilizing cubic phases of at least one of ZrO.sub.2 and HfO.sub.2. The epitaxial layer depositing step occurs in a vacuum with a background pressure of no more than 1.times.10.sup.-5 Torr. The method can further comprise depositing a superconducting layer on the epitaxial layer, and depositing an epitaxial capping layer between the epitaxial buffer layer and the superconducting layer.

  18. Antiguided array diode lasers fabricated with modulated cap thin p-clad structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O, J.S.; Zory, P.S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Schwartz, B.D.; Setzko, R.S. [Raytheon Optical Systems, Danbury, CT (United States)] [Raytheon Optical Systems, Danbury, CT (United States); Emanuel, M.A.; Sperry, V.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antiguided array lasers were fabricated in thin p-clad, InGaAs-GaAs single quantum-well material. The required lateral refractive index variation was achieved by precisely modulating the thickness of the GaAs cap layer using a novel pulsed anodization/etching technique. Edge-emitting arrays having 20 lasers on 7-{micro}m centers with 5-{micro}m-wide gain regions were characterized. At 1.2 times the pulsed current threshold (I{sub th}), the central lobe of the lateral far field of the arrays contained about 75% of the beam power and was about twice the diffraction limit (FWHM = 0.8{degree}). At 10 {times} I{sub th}, the central lobe contained about 60% of the beam power and was about 1.6 {degree} wide.

  19. Structure-function relationships in dendrimer-encapsulated metal nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Orla Mary

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis, characterization and structure-function relationships of mono- and bimetallic dendrimerencapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) are described. Control over the factors influencing the structure of bimetallic DENs has been attained for Pd...

  20. Please cite this article in press as: Bourne, G.R., et al., Closed channel fabrication using micromolding of metallic glass. J. Mater. Process. Tech. (2009), doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2008.12.003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Wallace

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Gainesville, FL 32611, USA b Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida in molding, forming and casting of metallic glass alloys in a recent review (Schroers, 2005). The atomic structure of these alloys differentiates them from typical metals. While ordinary metals have a crystalline

  1. Metal-sensing layer-semiconductor and metal-sensing layer-metal heterostructure gas sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.; Li, Zheng; Fonash, S.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely sensitive gas sensors can be fabricated using heterostructures of the form metal-sensing layer-semiconductor or metal-sensing layer-metal. These structures are heterostructure diodes which have the barrier controlling transport at least partially located in the sensing layer. In the presence of the gas species to be detected, the electrical properties of the sensing layer evolve, resulting in a modification of the barrier to electric current transport and, hence, resulting in detection due to changes in the current-voltage characteristics of the device. This type of sensor structure is demonstrated using the Pd/Ti-O/sub x/Ti heterostructure hydrogen detector.

  2. Dendritic metal nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

  3. Design, fabrication and testing of a 15-kW gas-fired liquid-metal evaporator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development and testing of a compact heat- pipe heat exchanger that is designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases and the liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine where energy is transferred to the engine's helium working fluid. Recent tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15-kW{sub t} of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760{degrees}C. Four of these prototype units will eventually be used to power a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this paper.

  4. Design, fabrication and testing of a 15-kW gas-fired liquid-metal evaporator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development and testing of a compact heat- pipe heat exchanger that is designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases and the liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine where energy is transferred to the engine`s helium working fluid. Recent tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15-kW{sub t} of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760{degrees}C. Four of these prototype units will eventually be used to power a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this paper.

  5. Fabrication of spatial transient-density structures as high-field plasma photonic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /plasma density structures with such a scheme is an essential step in the development of plasma photonic devices by a subse- quent long heater pulse, the plasma density is greatly re- duced as a result of hydrodynamic

  6. Synthesis, Structure, and Metalation of Two New Highly Porous Zirconium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF and PhotonSeparationsRelevant toMetal-Organic

  7. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, M.K.

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  8. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi-Kyung Han

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  9. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng, E-mail: guw8@pitt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O{sub 2} adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N{sub 4} chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O{sub 2} adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O{sub 2} on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d{sub z{sup 2}}, d{sub xy}, d{sub xz}, and d{sub yz}) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O{sub 2} adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  10. Crystal structures of the CusA efflux pump suggest methionine-mediated metal transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Feng; Su, Chih-Chia; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Boyken, Scott E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Yu, Edward W. (Cornell); (Iowa State)

    2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently use tripartite efflux complexes in the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family to expel various toxic compounds from the cell. The efflux system CusCBA is responsible for extruding biocidal Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. No previous structural information was available for the heavy-metal efflux (HME) subfamily of the RND efflux pumps. Here we describe the crystal structures of the inner-membrane transporter CusA in the absence and presence of bound Cu(I) or Ag(I). These CusA structures provide new structural information about the HME subfamily of RND efflux pumps. The structures suggest that the metal-binding sites, formed by a three-methionine cluster, are located within the cleft region of the periplasmic domain. This cleft is closed in the apo-CusA form but open in the CusA-Cu(I) and CusA-Ag(I) structures, which directly suggests a plausible pathway for ion export. Binding of Cu(I) and Ag(I) triggers significant conformational changes in both the periplasmic and transmembrane domains. The crystal structure indicates that CusA has, in addition to the three-methionine metal-binding site, four methionine pairs - three located in the transmembrane region and one in the periplasmic domain. Genetic analysis and transport assays suggest that CusA is capable of actively picking up metal ions from the cytosol, using these methionine pairs or clusters to bind and export metal ions. These structures suggest a stepwise shuttle mechanism for transport between these sites.

  11. Fabricating metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate by applying low-temperature layer transfer of a single-crystalline silicon layer by meniscus force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakaike, Kohei; Akazawa, Muneki; Nakamura, Shogo [Department of Semiconductor Electronics and Integration Science, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)] [Department of Semiconductor Electronics and Integration Science, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Higashi, Seiichiro [Department of Semiconductor Electronics and Integration Science, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan) [Department of Semiconductor Electronics and Integration Science, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Research Institute for Nanodevice and Bio Systems, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-4-2, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-temperature local-layer technique for transferring a single-crystalline silicon (c-Si) film by using a meniscus force was proposed, and an n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) was fabricated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. It was demonstrated that it is possible to transfer and form c-Si films in the required shape at the required position on PET substrates at extremely low temperatures by utilizing a meniscus force. The proposed technique for layer transfer was applied for fabricating high-performance c-Si MOSFETs on a PET substrate. The fabricated MOSFET showed a high on/off ratio of more than 10{sup 8} and a high field-effect mobility of 609 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}.

  12. Electronic Structure and Properties of Transition Metal-Benzene Ravindra Pandey, Bijan K. Rao,*, Purusottam Jena, and Miguel Alvarez Blanco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Electronic Structure and Properties of Transition Metal-Benzene Complexes Ravindra Pandey, Bijan Kd transition metal atoms (M) interacting with benzene molecules (Bz) is carried out using density. The variation of the metal-benzene distances, dissociation energies, ionization potentials, electron affinities

  13. Experimental Response of Buildings Designed with Metallic Structural Fuses. II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    at the University at Buffalo, which consists of a three-story frame designed with buckling-restrained braces BRBs in a net reduction on the response of the structural sys- tem in terms of lateral displacements, compared to response of the system without dampers. Accelerations and lateral forces are ei- ther increased or reduced

  14. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bailey, Jeffrey L. (Clinton, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  15. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, J.W.; Burchell, T.D.; Bailey, J.L.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50 C for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400 C for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650 C under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400 C to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc. 12 figs.

  16. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bailey, Jeffrey L. (Clinton, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphite at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  17. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, J.W.; Burchell, T.D.; Bailey, J.L.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50 C for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2,000 psi at 400 C for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650 C under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2,400 C to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc. 12 figs.

  18. Spinel-structured metal oxide on a substrate and method of making same by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, Scott A.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a spinel-structured metal oxide on a substrate by molecular beam epitaxy, comprising the step of supplying activated oxygen, a first metal atom flux, and at least one other metal atom flux to the surface of the substrate, wherein the metal atom fluxes are individually controlled at the substrate so as to grow the spinel-structured metal oxide on the substrate and the metal oxide is substantially in a thermodynamically stable state during the growth of the metal oxide. A particular embodiment of the present invention encompasses a method of making a spinel-structured binary ferrite, including Co ferrite, without the need of a post-growth anneal to obtain the desired equilibrium state.

  19. Structures and Reactivity of Transition-Metal Compounds Featuring Metal-Ligand Multiple Bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhenggang

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    isomers of product 2a-f. .................................................................. 89 Figure 34. The rearrangement between 2_iso6 and 2_iso3. ............................................. 92 Figure 35. The solvated ?G (kcal/mol) diagram... iso3 and iso6 for 2a-f (kcal/mol). ................ 91 Table 17. Results of energies differencesa between 2c_iso6 and 2c_iso3. ...................... 92 xv Table 18. Selected structural parameters of 2a from computations and experiments. (Bond...

  20. Anthraquinone with Tailored Structure for Nonaqueous Metal-Organic Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonaqueous, hybrid metal-organic redox flow battery based on tailored anthraquinone structure is demonstrated to have an energy efficiency of {approx}82% and a specific discharge energy density similar to aqueous redox flow batteries, which is due to the significantly improved solubility of anthraquinone in supporting electrolytes.

  1. Hybrid Car-Parrinello/Molecular Mechanics Modelling of Transition Metal Complexes: Structure, Dynamics and Reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    Hybrid Car-Parrinello/Molecular Mechanics Modelling of Transition Metal Complexes: Structure). We have recently developed a QM/MM extension of a Car-Parrinello scheme [5]. These hybrid Car functional theory embedded in a classical force field description. The power of such a combined Car

  2. Structure-property relationships in gas-phase protonated and metalated peptide ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slaton, James Garrett

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . The fragmentation chemistry and structure selection of the first group of peptides, those that contain a proline residue, indicate that the presence of high proton and high metal ion affinity residues at the N-terminal position of the peptide direct...

  3. Electronic structure of rare-earth metals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseC SupportsElectronic structure of rare-earth

  4. Semiconductor quantum dots with light-hole exciton ground state: fabrication and fine structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Huo; B. J. Witek; S. Kumar; R. Singh; E. Zallo; R. Grifone; D. Kriegner; R. Trotta; N. Akopian; J. Stangl; V. Zwiller; G. Bester; A. Rastelli; O. G. Schmidt

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum dots (QDs) can act as convenient hosts of two-level quantum szstems, such as single electron spins, hole spins or excitons (bound electron-hole pairs). Due to quantum confinement, the ground state of a single hole confined in a QD usually has dominant heavy-hole (HH) character. For this reason light-hole (LH) states have been largely neglected, despite the fact that may enable the realilzation of coherent photon-to-spin converters or allow for faster spin manipulation compared to HH states. In this work, we use tensile strains larger than 0.3% to switch the ground state of excitons confined in high quality GaAs/AlGaAs QDs from the conventional HH- to LH-type. The LH-exciton fine structure is characterized by two in-plane-polarized lines and, ~400 micro-eV above them, by an additional line with pronounced out-of-plane oscillator strength, consistent with theoretical predictions based on atomistic empirical pseudopotential calculations and a simple mesoscopic model.

  5. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal-Cysteine Complexes From X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, B.O.; Jalilehvand, F.; Szilagyi, R.K.

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structures of Hg{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, Cr{sup III}, and Mo{sup V} complexes with cysteine were investigated by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and density functional theory. The covalency in the metal-sulfur bond was determined by analyzing the intensities of the electric-dipole allowed pre-edge features appearing in the XANES spectra below the ionization threshold. Because of the well-defined structures of the selected cysteine complexes, the current work provides a reference set for further sulfur K-edge XAS studies of bioinorganic active sites with transition metal-sulfur bonds from cysteine residues as well as more complex coordination compounds with thiolate ligands.

  6. Two-zone heterogeneous structure within shear bands of a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yang; Yao, Kefu; Liu, Xue [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Mo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear bands, the main plastic strain carrier in metallic glasses, are severely deformed regions often considered as disordered and featureless. Here we report the observations of a sandwich-like heterogeneous structure inside shear bands in Pd{sub 40.5}Ni{sub 40.5}P{sub 19} metallic glass sample after plastic deformation by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results suggest a two-step plastic deformation mechanism with corresponding microstructure evolution at atomic scale, which may intimately connected to the stability of the shear band propagation and the overall plastic deformability.

  7. First-principles studies of phase stability and the structural and dynamical properties of metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, M.Y.

    1991-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We decided to investigate first the interaction of hydrogen with the 4d transition-metal series, with the first element being hcp Y. Because of the recent development of soft pseudopotentials, we chose to use the plane wave basis set to carry out the calculation. Since problems had been associated with the slow convergence in transition metals, we first tested the computational methods by studying the structural properties of Y; results were encouraging. We started the calculation of YH[sub x] with hydrogen occupying different interstitial sites.

  8. Synthesis and structural, magnetic, thermal, and transport properties of several transition metal oxides and aresnides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Supriyo

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxide compounds containing the transition metal vanadium (V) have attracted a lot of attention in the field of condensed matter physics owing to their exhibition of interesting properties including metal-insulator transitons, structural transitions, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic orderings, and heavy fermion behavior. Binary vanadium oxides V{sub n}O{sub 2n-1} where 2 {le} n {le} 9 have triclinic structures and exhibit metal-insulator and antiferromagnetic transitions. The only exception is V{sub 7}O{sub 13} which remains metallic down to 4 K. The ternary vanadium oxide LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4} has the normal spinel structure, is metallic, does not undergo magnetic ordering and exhibits heavy fermion behavior below 10 K. CaV{sub 2}O{sub 4} has an orthorhombic structure with the vanadium spins forming zigzag chains and has been suggested to be a model system to study the gapless chiral phase. These provide great motivation for further investigation of some known vanadium compounds as well as to explore new vanadium compounds in search of new physics. This thesis consists, in part, of experimental studies involving sample preparation and magnetic, transport, thermal, and x-ray measurements on some strongly correlated eletron systems containing the transition metal vanadium. The compounds studied are LiV{sub 2}O{sub 4}, YV{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and YbV{sub 4}O{sub 8}. The recent discovery of superconductivity in RFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (R = La, Ce, Pr, Gd, Tb, Dy, Sm, and Nd), and AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (A = Ba, Sr, Ca, and Eu) doped with K, Na, or Cs at the A site with relatively high T{sub c} has sparked tremendous activities in the condensed matter physics community and a renewed interest in the area of superconductivity as occurred following the discovery of the layered cuprate high T{sub c} superconductors in 1986. To discover more superconductors with hopefully higher T{sub c}'s, it is extremely important to investigate compounds having crystal structures related to the compounds showing high T{sub c} superconductivity. Along with the vanadium oxide compounds described before, this thesis describes our investigations of magnetic, structural, thermal and transport properties of EuPd{sub 2}Sb{sub 2} single crystals which have a crystal structure closely related to the AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compounds and also a study of the reaction kinetics of the formation of LaFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}.

  9. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuckerman, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is anarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  10. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1985-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping lase pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  11. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1985-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  12. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration. 6 figs.

  13. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuckerman, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is anarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of the source grating for visibility improvement of neutron phase imaging with gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongyul [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kye Hong; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Taejoo [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chi Won [Nano Fusion Technology Division, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fabrication of gratings including metal deposition processes for highly neutron absorbing lines is a critical issue to achieve a good visibility of the grating-based phase imaging system. The source grating for a neutron Talbot-Lau interferometer is an array of Gadolinium (Gd) structures that are generally made by sputtering, photo-lithography, and chemical wet etching. However, it is very challenging to fabricate a Gd structure with sufficient neutron attenuation of approximately more than 20 {mu}m using a conventional metal deposition method because of the slow Gd deposition rate, film stress, high material cost, and so on. In this article, we fabricated the source gratings for neutron Talbot-Lau interferometers by filling the silicon structure with Gadox particles. The new fabrication method allowed us a very stable and efficient way to achieve a much higher Gadox filled structure than a Gd film structure, and is even more suitable for thermal polychromatic neutrons, which are more difficult to stop than cold neutrons. The newly fabricated source gratings were tested at the polychromatic thermal neutron grating interferometer system of HANARO at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the visibilities and images from the neutron phase imaging system with the new source gratings were compared with those fabricated by a Gd deposition method.

  15. Colloid Science of Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in 2D and 3D Structures. Challenges of Nucleation, Growth, Composition, Particle Shape, Size Control and their Influence on Activity and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent breakthroughs in synthesis in nanosciences have achieved control of size and shapes of nanoparticles that are relevant for catalyst design. In this article, we review the advance of synthesis of nanoparticles, fabrication of two and three dimensional model catalyst system, characterization, and studies of activity and selectivity. The ability to synthesize monodispersed platinum and rhodium nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm range permitted us to study the influence of composition, structure, and dynamic properties of monodispersed metal nanoparticle on chemical reactivity and selectivity. We review the importance of size and shape of nanoparticles to determine the reaction selectivity in multi-path reactions. The influence of metal-support interaction has been studied by probing the hot electron flows through the metal-oxide interface in catalytic nanodiodes. Novel designs of nanoparticle catalytic systems are discussed.

  16. Structure of multilayered Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} nanocomposite coatings fabricated by differential pumping co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States)] [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States); Nose, Masateru [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan)] [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan); Onishi, Ichiro [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)] [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A Cr(Al)N/38 vol. % SiO{sub x} hard coating was prepared on a (001) Si substrate at 250 °C in a differential pumping co-sputtering system, which has two chambers for radio frequency (RF) sputtering and a substrate holder rotating on the chambers. The composite coating was grown by alternate sputter-depositions from CrAl and SiO{sub 2} targets with flows of N{sub 2}+Ar and Ar at RF powers of 200 and 75 W, respectively, on transition layers grown on the substrate. Analytical electron microscopy reveled that the Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} coating had a multilayered structure of Cr(Al)N crystal layers ?1.6 nm thick and two-dimensionally dispersed amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}) particles with sizes of ?1 nm or less. The a-SiO{sub x} particles were enclosed with the Cr(Al)N layers. The coating had a low indentation hardness of ?25 GPa at room temperature, due to a high oxide fraction of 38 vol. % and a low substrate rotational speed of 1 rpm. Faster rotation and lower oxide fraction would make a-SiO{sub x} particles smaller, resulting in the formation of Cr(Al)N crystal including the very fine a-SiO{sub x} particles with small number density. They would work as obstacles for the lattice deformation of the Cr(Al)N crystals. We have fabricated a superhard coating of Cr(Al)N/17 vol. % SiO{sub x} with a hardness of 46 GPa prepared at 12 rpm.

  17. Diverse and tunable electronic structures of single-layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides for photocatalytic water splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); College of Electrical and Information Engineering, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Li, Xi-Bo; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min, E-mail: ppeng@hnu.edu.cn, E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Lau, Woon-Ming [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China) [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing Technology R and D Center, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Peng, Ping, E-mail: ppeng@hnu.edu.cn, E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The family of bulk metal phosphorus trichalcogenides (APX{sub 3}, A = M{sup II}, M{sub 0.5}{sup I}M{sub 0.5}{sup III}; X = S, Se; M{sup I}, M{sup II}, and M{sup III} represent Group-I, Group-II, and Group-III metals, respectively) has attracted great attentions because such materials not only own magnetic and ferroelectric properties, but also exhibit excellent properties in hydrogen storage and lithium battery because of the layered structures. Many layered materials have been exfoliated into two-dimensional (2D) materials, and they show distinct electronic properties compared with their bulks. Here we present a systematical study of single-layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides by density functional theory calculations. The results show that the single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides have very low formation energies, which indicates that the exfoliation of single layer APX{sub 3} should not be difficult. The family of single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides exhibits a large range of band gaps from 1.77 to 3.94 eV, and the electronic structures are greatly affected by the metal or the chalcogenide atoms. The calculated band edges of metal phosphorus trichalcogenides further reveal that single-layer ZnPSe{sub 3}, CdPSe{sub 3}, Ag{sub 0.5}Sc{sub 0.5}PSe{sub 3}, and Ag{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}PX{sub 3} (X = S and Se) have both suitable band gaps for visible-light driving and sufficient over-potentials for water splitting. More fascinatingly, single-layer Ag{sub 0.5}Sc{sub 0.5}PSe{sub 3} is a direct band gap semiconductor, and the calculated optical absorption further convinces that such materials own outstanding properties for light absorption. Such results demonstrate that the single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides own high stability, versatile electronic properties, and high optical absorption, thus such materials have great chances to be high efficient photocatalysts for water-splitting.

  18. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters and Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasubramanian, K

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Our research in this area since October 2007 has resulted in seven completed publications and more papers of the completed work are in progress. Our work during this period principally focused on actinide complexes with secondary emphasis on spectroscopic properties and electronic structure of metal complexes. As the publications are available online with all of the details of the results, tables and figures, we are providing here only a brief summary of major highlights, in each of the categories.

  19. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Satish V. (San Ramon, CA); Christensen, Richard M. (Danville, CA); Toland, Richard H. (West Chester, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  20. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

    1980-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  1. A Failure and Structural Analysis of Block Copolymer Electrolytes for Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Gregory Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries By Gregory Michaelfor Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries by Gregory Michaelin rechargeable lithium metal batteries. The block copolymer

  2. Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates:Fatigue of Wind Blade Laminates: Effects of Resin and Fabric University MCARE 2012 #12;Outline · Overview of MSU Fatigue Program on Wind Blade MaterialsWind Blade Wind Blade Component Materials Acknowledgements: Sandia National Laboratories/DOE (Joshua Paquette

  3. TITANIA SILICATE / FUSED QUARTZ GLASSBLOWING FOR 3-D FABRICATION OF LOW INTERNAL LOSS WINEGLASS MICRO-STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, William C

    TITANIA SILICATE / FUSED QUARTZ GLASSBLOWING FOR 3-D FABRICATION OF LOW INTERNAL LOSS WINEGLASS and ultra low expansion titania silicate glass (ULE TSG). The approach consists of a high temperature (at with low CTE, such as fused quartz (0.5 ppm/°C) or ultra low expansion titania silicate glass (0.03 ppm

  4. Nonlinear resonance of superconductor/normal metal structures to microwaves E. Kandelaki,1 A. F. Volkov,1,2 K. B. Efetov,1 and V. T. Petrashov3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Nonlinear resonance of superconductor/normal metal structures to microwaves E. Kandelaki,1 A. F.024502 PACS number s : 74.45. c, 74.50. r, 85.25.Dq, 03.67.Lx I. INTRODUCTION Superconductor/normal metal S conductance G=dj/dV of a normal metal wire in a superconductor/ normal metal heterostructure with a cross

  5. Peculiarities of formation of phase composition, porous structure, and catalytic properties of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials fabricated by sol–gel synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papynov, Evgeniy Konstantinovich, E-mail: Papynov@mail.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Natural Sciences, Suhanova, 8, Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation); Mayorov, Vitaliy Yurevich, E-mail: 024205@inbox.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Palamarchuk, Marina Sergeevna, E-mail: 02.06.1984@mail.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Avramenko, Valentin Aleksandrovich, E-mail: avramenko1@yandex.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Natural Sciences, Suhanova, 8, Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of template sol–gel synthesis of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials using ‘core–shell’ latex particles as colloid templates is described. The chemical composition and structural characteristics of the synthesized macroporous oxide systems have been investigated. The peculiarities of formation of material phase composition and macroporous structure under different template thermal destruction conditions have been revealed. An optimal method of a targeted synthesis of the crystalline tungsten(VI) oxide having a defect-free macroporous structure (average pore size 160 nm) and efficient catalytic properties under organic liquid phase oxidation conditions has been suggested. The prospects of the fabricated material application as catalysts of hydrothermal oxidation of radionuclide organic complexes at radioactive waste decontamination have been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Macroporous tungsten oxides were fabricated via sol–gel process. • The correlation between synthesis conditions and composition was determined. • Influence of synthesis conditions on porous structure has been explained. • The effects of template thermodestruction have been set up. • High potential of such materials for catalysis applications has been shown.

  6. Thin films versus 2D sheets in layered structures: graphene and 2D metallic sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo E. Sernelius

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study an interface between two media separated by a strictly 2D sheet. We show how the amplitude reflection coefficient can be modeled by that for an interface where the 2D sheet has been replaced by a film of small but finite thickness. We give the relationship between the 3D dielectric function of the thin film and the 2D dielectric function of the sheet. We choose graphene and a 2D metallic sheet as illustrative examples. This approach turns out to be very useful when treating graphene or graphene like sheets in non-planar structures

  7. Lithographic fabrication of nanoapertures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of silicon-based lithographically defined nanoapertures and processes for their fabrication using conventional silicon microprocessing technology have been invented. The new ability to create and control such structures should significantly extend our ability to design and implement chemically selective devices and processes.

  8. Vibrational fine structure in the valence ionizations of transition-metal hexacarbonyls: new experimental indication of metal-to-carbonyl. pi. bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, J.L.; Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1982-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observations of metal-carbon vibrational structure in photoionization bands are reported. Attention is focused on the predominantly metal d ionizations of M(CO)/sub 6/ (M = Cr, Mo, and W), and the methods for obtaining high resolution and very high signal-to-noise He I ionization data are detailed. The /sup 2/T/sub 2g/ ionization band of Cr(CO)/sub 6/ and the spin-orbit split /sup 2/E'' and /sup 2/U' bands of W(CO)/sub 6/ show distinct vibrational progressions which correspond to the totally symmetric (a/sub 1g/) metal-carbon stretching mode in the positive ion states. The metal-carbon stretching frequencies are found to be significantly less in the positive ion states than in the ground states, indicating a reduction of metal-carbon bond order upon the loss of a t/sub 2g/ electron. Evaluation of the vibrational progressions shows that the metal-carbon bond length increases on the order of 0.10 A upon t/sub 2g/ ionization in the case of W(CO)/sub 6/ and about 0.14 A in the case of Cr(CO)/sub 6/. In addition, the beginning of a short progression in the a/sub 1g/ carbon-oxygen stretching mode is observed in the Mo(CO)/sub 6/ spectrum and is clearly seen in the W(CO)/sub 6/ spectrum. All of these observations show that removal of an electron from the predominantly metal t/sub 2g/ orbitals, which are strictly ..pi.. symmetry with respect to the carbonyls, substantially weakens the metal-to-carbonyl bond. 9 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Structural studies of the metal-rich region in the ternary Ta-Nb-S system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Xiaoqiang.

    1991-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Six new solid solution type compounds have been prepared using high temperature techniques and characterized by means of single crystal x-ray techniques during a study of the metal-rich region of the ternary Ta-Nb-S system. The structures of Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 11-x}S{sub 4} are reminiscent of niobium-rich sulfides, rather than of tantalum-rich sulfides. The coordinations of sulfur are capped trigonal prismatic while the metal coordinations are capped distorted cubic prismatic for Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 11-x}S{sub 4}, and capped distorted cubic prismatic and pentagonal prismatic for Nb{sub 12-x}Ta{sub x}S{sub 4}. The structures of Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 5-x}S{sub 2} contain homoatomic layers sequenced S-M3-M2-M1-M2-M3-S (M is mixed Nb, Ta) generating six-layer sheets, respectively. Weak S-S interactions at 3.26 and 3.19{Angstrom} between sheets contrast with the M-M binding within and between the sheets in these two novel layered compounds. The former are presumably responsible for the observed graphitic slippage of the samples. Nb{sub 21-x}Ta{sub x}S{sub 8} and Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 2-x}S are isostructural with Nb{sub 21}S{sub 8} and Ta{sub 2}S, respectively. Extended Hueckel band calculations were carried out for two layered compounds, Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 5-x}S{sub 2} (x {approx} 1.72) and Nb{sub x}ta{sub 2-x}S (x {approx} 0.95). Based upon band calculations metallic properties can be expected for these two layered compounds. The relative preference of the metal sites for the two metal elements (Ta, Nb) in two layered compounds is explained by the results of the band calculations. 17 figs., 31 tabs., 80 refs.

  10. Innovative forming and fabrication technologies : new opportunities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, B.; Hryn, J.; Energy Systems; Kingston Process Metallurgy, Inc.

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of light metal alloys and advanced materials (polymer, composites, etc.) have brought the possibility of achieving important energy reductions into the full life cycle of these materials, especially in transportation applications. 1 These materials have gained acceptance in the aerospace industry but use of light metal alloys needs to gain wider acceptance in other commercial transportation areas. Among the main reasons for the relatively low use of these materials are the lack of manufacturability, insufficient mechanical properties, and increased material costs due to processing inefficiencies. Considering the enormous potential energy savings associated with the use of light metal alloys and advanced materials in transportation, there is a need to identify R&D opportunities in the fields of materials fabrication and forming aimed at developing materials with high specific mechanical properties combined with energy efficient processes and good manufacturability. This report presents a literature review of the most recent developments in the areas of fabrication and metal forming focusing principally on aluminum alloys. In the first section of the document, the different sheet manufacturing technologies including direct chill (DC) casting and rolling, spray forming, spray rolling, thin slab, and strip casting are reviewed. The second section of the document presents recent research on advanced forming processes. The various forming processes reviewed are: superplastic forming, electromagnetic forming, age forming, warm forming, hydroforming, and incremental forming. Optimization of conventional forming processes is also discussed. Potentially interesting light metal alloys for high structural efficiency including aluminum-scandium, aluminum-lithium, magnesium, titanium, and amorphous metal alloys are also reviewed. This section concludes with a discussion on alloy development for manufacturability. The third section of the document reviews the latest developments in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Emerging curing processes are presented along with a discussion on the possible developments in biocomposite materials. The fourth section presents recent developments in the fabrication of bulk nanomaterials and nanoparticles reinforced materials. Advanced joining technologies are presented in the fifth section. Future research is proposed in the last section.

  11. Structure of Cu64.5Zr35.5 Metallic glass by reverse Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Xikui W. [Ames Laboratory; Huang, Li [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory; Ding, Z. J. [University of Science and Technology of China

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Reverse Monte Carlo simulations (RMC) have been widely used to generate three dimensional (3D) atomistic models for glass systems. To examine the reliability of the method for metallic glass, we use RMC to predict the atomic configurations of a “known” structure from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and then compare the structure obtained from the RMC with the target structure from MD. We show that when the structure factors and partial pair correlation functions from the MD simulations are used as inputs for RMC simulations, the 3D atomistic structure of the glass obtained from the RMC gives the short- and medium-range order in good agreement with those from the target structure by the MD simulation. These results suggest that 3D atomistic structure model of the metallic glass alloys can be reasonably well reproduced by RMC method with a proper choice of input constraints.

  12. Effect of electron collecting metal oxide layer in normal and inverted structure polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, A.; Liu, X.; Sun, Y. C.; Djuriši?, A. B. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, P. R. (China); Ng, A. M. C. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, P. R. China and Nanostructure Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, Division of Physical Sciences, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen (China); Chan, W. K. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, P. R. (China)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a systematic study of the effect of electron collecting metal oxide layer on the performance of P3HT: PCBM solar cells. Zinc oxide (ZnO) or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) buffer layers were prepared by either e-beam evaporation or solution processing method. We also compared the photovoltaic performance of inserting the buffer layer between indium tin oxide (ITO) and the polymer layer for the inverted structure (ITO/ ZnO or TiO{sub 2}/P3HT:PCBM/V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Au) as well as inserting the buffers layers between the polymer and the aluminum electrode for the conventional structure (ITO/V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/P3HT:PCBM/ZnO or TiO{sub 2}/Al). The results are shown in detail.

  13. Simple formula for the interspaces of periodic grating structures self-organized on metal surfaces by femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashida, Masaki; Ikuta, Yoshinobu; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-organized grating structures formed on Mo and Ti metal surfaces irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses at wavelengths of 800 and 400 nm are investigated by electron microscopy. We observe the formation of the self-organized grating structures on the metals irradiated with 400-nm laser pulses at low laser fluence in narrow fluence ranges. The interspaces of the grating structure depend on the wavelength and fluence of the laser. We find that the dependence of the grating interspaces on laser fluence can be explained by a simple formula for induction of a surface-plasma wave through the parametric decay of laser light.

  14. Direct fabrication of nanopores in a metal foil using focused ion beam with in situ measurements of the penetrating ion beam current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagoshi, Kotaro; Honda, Junki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki; Takahagi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A through hole with a diameter less than 100 nm was fabricated in an Ag foil using only a focused ion beam (FIB) system and in situ measurements of the penetrating ion beam. During the drilling of the foil by a FIB of Ga{sup +} ions, the transmitted part of the beam was measured with an electrode mounted on the back face of the foil. When the beam current penetrating through the nanopore reached a certain value, irradiation was stopped and the area of the created aperture was measured with a scanning electron microscope. The resulting area was correlated with the current of the penetrating ion beam. This suggests that we can fabricate a nanopore of the desired size by controlling the ion beam via penetrating ion beam measurements. The smallest aperture thus created was circular with diameter of 30 nm.

  15. Crystal Structures of Apo and Metal-Bound Forms of the UreE Protein from Helicobacter pylori: Role of Multiple Metal Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Rong; Munger, Christine; Asinas, Abdalin; Benoit, Stephane L.; Miller, Erica; Matte, Allan; Maier, Robert J.; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (Georgia); (Biotech Res.)

    2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structure of the urease maturation protein UreE from Helicobacter pylori has been determined in its apo form at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, bound to Cu{sup 2+} at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, and bound to Ni{sup 2+} at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. Apo UreE forms dimers, while the metal-bound enzymes are arranged as tetramers that consist of a dimer of dimers associated around the metal ion through coordination by His102 residues from each subunit of the tetramer. Comparison of independent subunits from different crystal forms indicates changes in the relative arrangement of the N- and C-terminal domains in response to metal binding. The improved ability of engineered versions of UreE containing hexahistidine sequences at either the N-terminal or C-terminal end to provide Ni{sup 2+} for the final metal sink (urease) is eliminated in the H102A version. Therefore, the ability of the improved Ni{sup 2+}-binding versions to deliver more nickel is likely an effect of an increased local concentration of metal ions that can rapidly replenish transferred ions bound to His102.

  16. Microdisk fabrication by emulsion evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Susanna Wing Man

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , such as asphaltenes in heavy oil industry, clay particles in agriculture, and red blood cells in biology, are of great interest in a variety of industries and scientific areas. However, to fabricate monodisperse microdisks, uniform in structure or composition...

  17. Study of construction methodology and structural behaviour of fabric-formed form-efficient reinforced concrete beam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of this research is in advancing conventional structures and their methods of construction by exploring new technology. The formwork construction of the modern concrete structure involves the use of rigid materials ...

  18. Atomic and Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Ceramic/Metal Interfaces. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidman, D. N.

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials containing ceramic and metal phases play a significant role in modern materials technology.

  19. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  20. Hydrolysis of Naptalam and Structurally Related Amides: Inhibition by Dissolved Metal Ions and Metal (Hydr)Oxide Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ching-Hua

    . INTRODUCTION Several important classes of agrochemicals possess amide and anilide functional groups. Naptalam). Agrochemicals often possess functional groups in the vicinity of amide and anilide linkages; participation and anilide agrochemicals. Granados et al. (1995) reported no significant effects of dissolved divalent metal

  1. Nano-structure multilayer technology fabrication of high energy density capacitors for the power electronic building book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W.; Johnson, G.W.; Wagner, A.V.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercially available capacitors do not meet the specifications of the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB) concept. We have applied our propriety nanostructure multilayer materials technology to the fabrication of high density capacitors designed to remove this impediment to PEBB progress. Our nanostructure multilayer capacitors will also be enabling technology in many industrial and military applications. Examples include transient suppression (snubber capacitors), resonant circuits, and DC filtering in PEBB modules. Additionally, weapon applications require compact energy storage for detonators and pulsed-power systems. Commercial applications run the gamut from computers to lighting to communications. Steady progress over the last five years has brought us to the threshold of commercial manufacturability. We have demonstrated a working dielectric energy density of > 11 J/cm3 in 20 nF devices designed for 1 kV operation.

  2. The influence of transition metal solutes on dislocation core structure and values of Peierls stress and barrier in tungsten.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several transition metals were examined to evaluate their potential for improving the ductility of tungsten. We investigate the dislocation core structure, Peierls stress and barrier of $1/2\\langle111\\rangle$ screw dislocations in binary tungsten-transition metal alloys (W$_{1-x}$TM$_{x}$) based on first principles electronic structure calculations. The periodic quadrupole approach was applied to model the structure of $1/2\\langle111\\rangle$ dislocation. The alloying with transition metals was modeled using the virtual crystal approximation. In order to verify the applicability of this approach, the equilibrium lattice parameter and elastic constants were calculated for tungsten alloyed with the set of transition metals. Reasonable agreement was obtained between results using the virtual crystal approximation and those using both a conventional super-cell approach and existing experimental data. Increasing the concentration of a transition metal from the VIIIA group leads to reduction of the $C^\\prime$ elastic constant and increase of elastic anisotropy A=$C_{44}/C^\\prime$. It was demonstrated that alloying W with a group VIIIA transition metal changes the structure of the dislocation core from symmetric to asymmetric, similar to results obtained for W$_{1-x}$Re$_{x}$ alloys in the earlier work of Romaner {\\it et al} (Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 195503 (2010)). Following the core symmetry change, the values of the Peierls stress and barrier are reduced. This combination of two effects could lead to increased ductility in a tungsten-based alloy\\comments. Our results demonstrate that similar effects could be achieved with any of the transition metals from the VIIIA group.

  3. Tailoring plasmon resonances in the deep-ultraviolet by size-tunable fabrication of aluminum nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taguchi, Atsushi [Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Saito, Yuika; Watanabe, Koichi; Yijian, Song [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kawata, Satoshi [Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized surface plasmon resonances were controlled at deep-ultraviolet (DUV) wavelengths by fabricating aluminum (Al) nanostructures in a size-controllable manner. Plasmon resonances were obtained at wavelengths from near-UV down to 270 nm (4.6 eV) depending on the fabricated structure size. Such precise size control was realized by the nanosphere lithography technique combined with additional microwave heating to shrink the spaces in a close-packed monolayer of colloidal nanosphere masks. By adjusting the microwave heating time, the sizes of the Al nanostructures could be controlled from 80 nm to 50 nm without the need to use nanosphere beads of different sizes. With the outstanding controllability and versatility of the presented fabrication technique, the fabricated Al nanostructure is promising for use as a DUV plasmonic substrate, a light-harvesting platform for mediating strong light-matter interactions between UV photons and molecules placed near the metal nanostructure.

  4. Correlation between medium-range order structure and glass-forming ability for Al-based metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, N. C. [College of Material and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yan, M. [Queensland Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacturing (AMPAM), School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Zuo, L. [College of Material and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, J. Q., E-mail: jqwang@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To clarify the correlation of medium-range order (MRO) structure with glass forming ability (GFA) of Al-based metallic glasses, Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 14-a}Y{sub a} (a?=?2?9 at.?%) metallic glasses were analyzed by x-ray diffraction in detail and further verified by synchrotron high-energy x-ray diffraction. The prepeak that reflects the MRO structural evolution was found to be much sensitive to alloy composition. We have proposed an icosahedral supercluster MRO structure model in Al-TM (transition metal)-RE (rare earth metal) system, which consists of 12 RE(TM)-centered clusters on the vertex of icosahedral supercluster, one RE(TM)-centered clusters in the center, and TM(RE) atoms located at RE(TM)-centered cluster tetrahedral interstices in the icosahedral supercluster. It was indicated that the MRO structural stability mainly depends on the interaction of efficient dense packing and electrochemical potential equalization principle. The Al{sub 86}Ni{sub 9}Y(La){sub 5} alloys present good GFA due to the combination of the two structural factors.

  5. Post magnetic field annealing effect on magnetic and structural properties of Co{sub 80}Pt{sub 20} nanowires and nanotubes fabricated by electrochemical method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, S. S. [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Javed, K.; Shi, D. W.; Tao, L. L.; Jiang, J.; Han, X. F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhai, G. J. [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly ordered Co{sub 80}Pt{sub 20} nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) have been synthesized by low cost DC electrochemical deposition method with constant stirring during the fabrication process in anodic aluminum oxide nano-templates with average pore diameter of about 200?nm. The structural and magnetic properties of nanostructures have been investigated before and after simple and magnetic field annealing. Magnetic field of 1 T has been applied during annealing process in the direction perpendicular to NWs and NTs axis. X-Ray Diffraction analysis shows face centered cubic (fcc) as the dominant phase for Co{sub 80}Pt{sub 20} NWs and post annealing led to better crystallinity with retained fcc phase. Furthermore, magnetic properties, including saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), squareness ratio (M{sub r}/M{sub s}), and coercivity (H{sub c}), have been investigated as a function of annealing temperature by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer.

  6. Computational Studies of the Electronic Structures and Mechanisms of Late Transition Metal Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitts, Amanda

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Late transition metal species are heavily studied because of their diverse applications in industrial, synthetic, and biological processes. Transition metals can alter the thermodynamic aspects of a reaction by creating ...

  7. Electrical excitation of colloidally synthesized quantum dots in metal oxide structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Vanessa Claire

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops methods for integrating colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs) and metal oxides in optoelectronic devices, presents three distinct light emitting devices (LEDs) with metal oxides surrounding a QD ...

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Travelli, A.

    1985-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Travelli, Armando (Hinsdale, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  10. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lithium-Based Metal?Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Debasis; Borkowski, Lauren A.; Kim, Sun Jin; Parise, John B.; (IST-Korea); (SBU)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two lithium-based metal-organic frameworks, Li{sub 2}(C{sub 14}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}) [Li{sub 2}(4,4'-BPDC) [1]; ULMOF-2, UL = ultralight; BPDC = biphenyldicarboxylate]; space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 12.758(2) {angstrom}, b = 5.142(4) {angstrom}, c = 8.00(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 97.23{sup o}, V = 520.6(14) {angstrom}{sup 3} and Li{sub 2}(C{sub 14}H{sub 8}O{sub 6}S) [Li{sub 2}(4,4'-SDB) [2]; ULMOF-3, UL = ultralight; SDB = sulfonyldibenzoate], space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 5.5480(11) {angstrom}, b = 23.450(5) {angstrom}, c = 10.320(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 96.47(3){sup o}, V = 1334.1(5) {angstrom}3, were synthesized. Compounds 1 and 2 were synthesized by solvothermal methods and were characterized using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Structure 1 consists of layers of two-dimensional antifluorite related LiO motif connected by BPDC linkers, whereas structure 2 is constructed by a combination of tetrameric lithium polyhedral clusters connected by the sulfonyldibenzoate linker. The frameworks are stable up to 575 and 500 C, respectively, under N{sub 2} atmosphere.

  11. Graphitic carbon nitride materials: variation of structure and morphology and their use as metal-free catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    properties of carbon nitrides, they show unexpected catalytic activity for a variety of reactions, such as for the activation of benzene, trimerization reactions, and also the activation of carbon dioxide. Model calculationsGraphitic carbon nitride materials: variation of structure and morphology and their use as metal

  12. Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Jihui (Lakeshore, CA); Shi, Xun (Troy, MI); Bai, Shengqiang (Shanghai, CN); Zhang, Wenqing (Shanghai, CN); Chen, Lidong (Shanghai, CN); Yang, Jiong (Shanghai, CN)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

  13. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, suppliment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979,page C5-14 Two-dimensionally-modulated, magnetic structure of neodymium metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -dimensionally-modulated, magnetic structure of neodymium metal B. Lebech Physics Department, Risra National Laboratory, DK-4000, is linear combinations of the terms where the parameters p,, p,, p, and 0 must be deter- mined://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jphyscol:1979503 #12;TWO-DIMENSIONALLY-MODULATED, MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF NEODYMIUM METAL C5

  14. Method of forming a thin unbacked metal foil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1983-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to metal foils and methods of making the same. More particularly, this invention pertains to the fabrication of very thin, unbacked metal foils.

  15. Divalent metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Gretchen Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

  16. Ceramic package fabrication for YMP nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfinger, K.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop alternate materials/design concepts to metal barriers for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project. There is some potential that site conditions may prove to be too aggressive for successful employment of the metal alloys under current consideration or that performance assessment models will predict metal container degradation rates that are inconsistent with the goal of substantially complete containment included in the NRC regulations. In the event that the anticipated lifetimes of metal containers are considered inadequate, alternate materials (i.e. ceramics or ceramic/metal composites) will be chosen due to superior corrosion resistance. This document was prepared using information taken from the open literature, conversations and correspondence with vendors, news releases and data presented at conferences to determine what form such a package might take. This discussion presents some ceramic material selection criteria, alternatives for the materials which might be used and alternatives for potential fabrication routes. This includes {open_quotes}stand alone{close_quotes} ceramic components and ceramic coatings/linings for metallic structures. A list of companies providing verbal or written information concerning the production of ceramic or ceramic lined waste containers appears at the end of this discussion.

  17. THE PULTRUSION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF FABRIC-CEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    THE PULTRUSION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF FABRIC-CEMENT COMPOSITES Alva Peled Structural Engineering, Arizona State University, USA #12;Advantages of Fabrics in Cement Composites 0 300 600 900 0 2 4 6 8 Deflection, mm FlexuralLoad,N Fabrics Continuous Fibers Cement Matrix #12;Fabrics

  18. Metals 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  19. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

  20. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  1. Development of epitaxial AlxSc1-xN for artificially structured metal/semiconductor superlattice metamaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sands, Timothy D.; Stach, Eric A.; Saha, Bivas; Saber, Sammy; Naik, Gururaj V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kvam, Eric P.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial nitride rocksalt metal/semiconductor superlattices are emerging as a novel class of artificially structured materials that have generated significant interest in recent years for their potential application in plasmonic and thermoelectric devices. Though most nitride metals are rocksalt, nitride semiconductors in general have hexagonal crystal structure. We report rocksalt aluminum scandium nitride (Al,Sc)N alloys as the semiconducting component in epitaxial rocksalt metal/semiconductor superlattices. The AlxSc1?xN alloys when deposited directly on MgO substrates are stabilized in a homogeneous rocksalt (single) phase when x?more »has been extended to x?xSc1?xN alloys show moderate direct bandgap bowing with a bowing parameter, B?=?1.41?±?0.19?eV. The direct bandgap of metastable rocksalt AlN is extrapolated to be 4.70?±?0.20?eV. The tunable lattice parameter, bandgap, dielectric permittivity, and electronic properties of rocksalt AlxSc1?xN alloys enable high quality epitaxial rocksalt metal/AlxSc1?xN superlattices with a wide range of accessible metamaterials properties.« less

  2. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production of Quantum Well Type Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Type Structures...

  3. PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Growth and structure of supported metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Peter J F

    hydrogenation in the fine chemicals industry to the control of vehicle emissions. Yet many basic questions aboutManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd 98 Harris Supported metal catalyst particles metal catalysts, which play an essential role in oil refining, in the che

  4. Copper-silver-titanium filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 atomic percent copper, 15 to 50 atomic percent silver and 10 to 45 atomic percent titanium. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  5. Copper-silver-titanium-tin filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another at about 800.degree. C. is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 at. % copper, 40 to 50 at. % silver, 1 to 15 at. % titanium, and 2 to 8 at. % tin. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  6. Methods for fabricating a micro heat barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for fabricating a highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  7. Covering Walls With Fabrics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TDOC . Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1227 WALLS with ;FABRICS Texas Agricultural Extension Service . The Texas A&M University System Daniel C. Pfannstiel, Director, College Station, Texas Covering Walls with Fabrics* When tastefully applied, fabrics... it is applied, fabric-covered walls improve the sound-absorbing acoustical properties of a room. Also, fabrics can be used for covering walls of either textured gypsum board or wood paneling. Home decorating magazines are good sources for ideas about fabric...

  8. Modification of Thermal Emission via Metallic Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, David J.; Stein, Andreas; George, Steven M.

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals are materials that are periodically structured on an optical length scale. It was previously demonstrated that the glow, or thermal emission, of tungsten photonic crystals that have a specific structure - known as the 'woodpile structure' - could be modified to reduce the amount of infrared radiation from the material. This ability has implications for improving the efficiency of thermal emission sources and for thermophotovoltaic devices. The study of this effect had been limited because the fabrication of metallic woodpile structures had previously required a complex fabrication process. In this project we pursued several approaches to simplify the fabrication of metallic photonic crystals that are useful for modification of thermal emission. First, we used the self-assembly of micrometer-scale spheres into colloidal crystals known as synthetic opals. These opals can then be infiltrated with a metal and the spheres removed to obtain a structure, known as an inverse opal, in which a three-dimensional array of bubbles is embedded in a film. Second, we used direct laser writing, in which the focus of an infrared laser is moved through a thin film of photoresist to form lines by multiphoton polymerization. Proper layering of such lines can lead to a scaffold with the woodpile structure, which can be coated with a refractory metal. Third, we explored a completely new approach to modified thermal emission - thin metal foils that contain a simple periodic surface pattern, as shown in Fig. 1. When such a foil is heated, surface plasmons are excited that propagate along the metal interface. If these waves strike the pattern, they can be converted into thermal emission with specific properties.

  9. Liquid Phase 3D Printing for Quickly Manufacturing Metal Objects with Low Melting Point Alloy Ink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional 3D printings are generally time-consuming and printable metal inks are rather limited. From an alternative way, we proposed a liquid phase 3D printing for quickly making metal objects. Through introducing metal alloys whose melting point is slightly above room temperature as printing inks, several representative structures spanning from one, two and three dimension to more complex patterns were demonstrated to be quickly fabricated. Compared with the air cooling in a conventional 3D printing, the liquid-phase-manufacturing offers a much higher cooling rate and thus significantly improves the speed in fabricating metal objects. This unique strategy also efficiently prevents the liquid metal inks from air oxidation which is hard to avoid otherwise in an ordinary 3D printing. Several key physical factors (like properties of the cooling fluid, injection speed and needle diameter, types and properties of the printing ink, etc.) were disclosed which would evidently affect the printing quality. In addit...

  10. Fuel Fabrication Facility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

  11. Electrochemical fabrication of capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Azzam N. (Fairfax Sta., VA); Melendres, Carlos A. (Lemont, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A film of nickel oxide is anodically deposited on a graphite sheet held in osition on an electrochemical cell during application of a positive electrode voltage to the graphite sheet while exposed to an electrolytic nickel oxide solution within a volumetrically variable chamber of the cell. An angularly orientated x-ray beam is admitted into the cell for transmission through the deposited nickel oxide film in order to obtain structural information while the film is subject to electrochemical and in-situ x-ray spectroscopy from which optimum film thickness, may be determined by comparative analysis for capacitor fabrication purposes.

  12. Electrochemical fabrication of capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, A.N.; Melendres, C.A.

    1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A film of nickel oxide is anodically deposited on a graphite sheet held in position on an electrochemical cell during application of a positive electrode voltage to the graphite sheet while exposed to an electrolytic nickel oxide solution within a volumetrically variable chamber of the cell. An angularly orientated x-ray beam is admitted into the cell for transmission through the deposited nickel oxide film in order to obtain structural information while the film is subject to electrochemical and in-situ x-ray spectroscopy from which optimum film thickness, may be determined by comparative analysis for capacitor fabrication purposes.

  13. Structure and Function of Metal- and Nitrate-reducing Microbial Communities in the FRC Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Kerkhof, Lee; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kostk, Joel E.

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this study is to evaluate structure-function relationships of sedimentary microbial communities likely to regulate U(VI) reduction and immobilization in the subsurface of Area 2 at the Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, TN. Microcosm experiments were conducted under near in situ conditions with FRC subsurface materials cocontaminated with high levels of U(VI) and nitrate. The activity, abundance, and community composition of microorganisms was determined in microcosm samples, stimulated with ethanol or glucose, and compared to those from sediment cores and unamended controls. Activity was assessed by monitoring terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs; nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and iron reduction) as well as electron donor utilization. Microbial functional groups, nitrate- and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, were enumerated during the nitrate- and metal-reduction phases of the incubation and in sediment core samples using a most probable number (MPN) serial dilution assay. U(VI) and Fe(III) were reduced concurrently in the glucose but not the ethanol treatments. In ethanol-amended microcosms, U(VI) was reduced during a 4-day lag phase between nitrate- and Fe(III)-reduction phases. Biostimulation resulted in 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, whereas populations of nitrate-reducers were enhanced by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. One to 2 orders of magnitude more Fe(III)-reducers were observed in ethanol- as compared to glucose-amended treatments in parallel with enhanced U(VI) removal in ethanol treatments. Cultivatable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the ethanol treatments were dominated by Geobacter sp. while those cultured on glucose were dominated by fermentative organisms, i.e., Tolumonas sp. Currently, carbon substrate utilization is being examined through HPLC analysis of microcosm porewaters. In addition, changes in the overall microbial community composition are being assessed using cultivation-independent techniques, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing of structural and functional genes. Our results indicate that the microbially-catalyzed mechanism of U(VI) reduction is electron donor dependent and that more effective U(VI) removal is achieved in parallel with an enrichment of Geobacter sp. upon treatment with ethanol.

  14. Intrazeolite metal carbonyl topotaxy. A comprehensive structural and spectroscopic study of intrazeolite group VI metal hexacarbonyls and subcarbonyls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oezkar, S.; Ozin, G.A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Moller, K.; Bein, T. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

    1990-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses attention on the intrazeolite anchoring, thermal decarbonylation, ligand exchange, and addition chemistry of M(CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y, where M = Cr, Mo, W; M{prime} = H, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs. The key points to emerge from this study include the following. (1) M(CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y samples have the hexacarbonylmetal(0) molecule associated with two {alpha}-cage extraframework cations (or Broensted protons), via the oxygen end of two trans bonded carbonyls with a saturation loading of 2M(CO){sub 6}/{alpha}-cage. (2) M(CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y samples have the hexacarbonylmetal(0) guest confined to the internal surface of the zeolite with a homogeneous distribution throughout the zeolite crystals. (3) A Mo and Rb EXAFS structure analysis of 8{l brace}Mo(CO){sub 6}{r brace}-Rb{sub 56}Y shows that the {alpha}-cage encapsulated Mo(CO){sub 6} guest maintains its structural integrity, with some evidence for anchoring via extraframework Rb+ cations. (4) A rapid {sup 13}CO intrazeolite ligand exchange occurs for M({sup 12}CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y to yield M({sup 12}CO){sub m}({sup 13}CO){sub 6-m}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y, the extent of which depends on the {sup 13}CO intrazeolite ligand exchange occurs for M({sup 12}CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y to yield M({sup 12}CO){sub m}({sup 13}CO){sub 6-m}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y, the extent of which depends on the {sup 13}CO loading. (5) M(CO){sub 3}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y can be cleanly generated via the mild vacuum thermal decarbonylation of M(CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y, the tricarbonyl stoichiometry of which is unequivocally established from its observed ad calculated diagnostic M({sup 12}CO){sub n}({sup 13}CO){sub 3-n}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y vibrational isotope pattern and from EXAFS structural data.

  15. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects by pulsed laser heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuckerman, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  16. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  17. Interplay between electronic structure and catalytic activity in transition metal oxide model system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suntivich, Jin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of many energy storage and conversion technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells, rechargeable metal-air batteries, and hydrogen production from water splitting, is limited by the slow kinetics of the oxygen ...

  18. A Failure and Structural Analysis of Block Copolymer Electrolytes for Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Gregory Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    grid storage. The lithium-ion battery is the most advancedtoday [1, 2]. A lithium-ion battery is comprised of adendrite formation in lithium metal battery systems [12, 14,

  19. Electronic structure and conductivity of nanocomposite metal (Au,Ag,Cu,Mo)-containing amorphous carbon films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endrino, Jose L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dual-cathode arc deposition (PDC-FCVA) source containingand metal cathodes [2]. The PDC-FCVA system in combinationCu,Mo) incorporation in a-C by PDC-FCVA. The modification of

  20. Polymorphous computing fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolinski, Christophe Czeslaw (Los Alamos, NM); Gokhale, Maya B. (Los Alamos, NM); McCabe, Kevin Peter (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabric-based computing systems and methods are disclosed. A fabric-based computing system can include a polymorphous computing fabric that can be customized on a per application basis and a host processor in communication with said polymorphous computing fabric. The polymorphous computing fabric includes a cellular architecture that can be highly parameterized to enable a customized synthesis of fabric instances for a variety of enhanced application performances thereof. A global memory concept can also be included that provides the host processor random access to all variables and instructions associated with the polymorphous computing fabric.

  1. Probing the structural dependency of photoinduced properties of colloidal quantum dots using metal-oxide photo-active substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patty, Kira; Campbell, Quinn; Hamilton, Nathan; West, Robert G. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Sadeghi, Seyed M., E-mail: seyed.sadeghi@uah.edu [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Nano and Micro Device Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Mao, Chuanbin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We used photoactive substrates consisting of about 1 nm coating of a metal oxide on glass substrates to investigate the impact of the structures of colloidal quantum dots on their photophysical and photochemical properties. We showed during irradiation these substrates can interact uniquely with such quantum dots, inducing distinct forms of photo-induced processes when they have different cores, shells, or ligands. In particular, our results showed that for certain types of core-shell quantum dot structures an ultrathin layer of a metal oxide can reduce suppression of quantum efficiency of the quantum dots happening when they undergo extensive photo-oxidation. This suggests the possibility of shrinking the sizes of quantum dots without significant enhancement of their non-radiative decay rates. We show that such quantum dots are not influenced significantly by Coulomb blockade or photoionization, while those without a shell can undergo a large amount of photo-induced fluorescence enhancement via such blockade when they are in touch with the metal oxide.

  2. Ab initio study of the structure and dynamics of solvated highly charged metal ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogatko, Stuart A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of the Structure and Dynamics of Solvated Highly27 Chapter 3 Structure and Dynamics of the High Spin Fe 3+66 Chapter 4 Structure and Dynamics of the Hydrated Ca 2+

  3. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo-mechanical analyzer (TMA). Results showed that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value decreases with the addition of spinel and silicide particles. Thermo-cycling tests showed that molybdenum alloy with 6% wt of spinel (MgAl2O4) developed microcracks which were caused by thermal expansion mismatch between the spinel particles and molybdenum matrix, as well as the processing conditions. Detailed post-mortem studies of microstructures and segregation of impurities to the oxide dispersion/Mo interfaces were conducted using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  4. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  5. Apparatus and method for fabricating a microbattery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Kravitz, Stanley H. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Edgewood, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for fabricating a microbattery that uses silicon as the structural component, packaging component, and semiconductor to reduce the weight, size, and cost of thin film battery technology is described. When combined with advanced semiconductor packaging techniques, such a silicon-based microbattery enables the fabrication of autonomous, highly functional, integrated microsystems having broad applicability.

  6. Are the Effects of Structure Formation Seen in the Central Metallicity of Galaxy Clusters?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkholy, Tamer Y; Canizares, Claude R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of 46 nearby clusters observed with Chandra is analyzed to produce radial density, temperature, entropy and metallicity profiles, as well as other morphological measurements. The entropy profiles are computed to larger radial extents than in previous Chandra cluster sample analyses. We find that the iron mass fraction measured in the inner 0.15 R500 shows a larger dispersion across the sample of low-mass clusters, than it does for the sample of high-mass clusters. We interpret this finding as the result of the mixing of more haloes in large clusters than in small clusters, which leads to an averaging of the metal content in the large clusters, and thus less dispersion of metallicity for high-mass clusters. This interpretation lends support to the idea that the low-entropy, metal-rich gas of merging haloes reaches clusters' centers, which explains observations of Core-Collapse Supernova products metallicity peaks, and which is seen in hydrodynamical simulations. The gas in these merging haloes would h...

  7. Femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy of solvated transition metal complexes: Deciphering the interplay of electronic and structural dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Kim, Tae Kyu; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first implementation of femtosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy as an ultrafast direct probe of the excited-state valence orbitals in solution-phase molecules. This method is applied to photoinduced spin crossover of [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+, where the ultrafast spinstate conversion of the metal ion, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excitation, is directly measured using the intrinsic spin-state selectivity of the soft X-ray L-edge transitions. Our results provide important experimental data concerning the mechanism of ultrafast spin-state conversion and subsequent electronic and structural dynamics, highlighting the potential of this technique to study ultrafast phenomena in the solution phase.

  8. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Synthetic, Structural and Mechanistic Investigations of Olefin Polymerization Catalyzed by Early Transition Metal Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bercaw, John E. [California Institute of Technology

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop new catalysts and provide understanding of ligand effects on catalyst composition in order to guide development of superior catalyst systems for polymerization of olefins. Our group is designing and synthesizing new “LX2”,“pincer” type ligands and complexing early transition metals to afford precatalysts. In a collaboration with Hans Brintzinger from the University of Konstanz, we are also examining the structures of the components of catalyst systems obtained from reaction of zirconocene dichlorides with aluminum alkyls and aluminum hydrides. Such systems are currently used commercially to produce polyolefins, but the nature of the active and dormant species as well as the mechanisms of their interconversions are not understood. New information on catalyst design and performance may lead to new types of polymers and/or new chemical transformations between hydrocarbons and transition metal centers, ultimately contributing to the development of catalytic reactions for the production of fuels, commodity and polymeric materials.

  9. Neutron generators with size scalability, ease of fabrication and multiple ion source functionalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron generator is provided with a flat, rectilinear geometry and surface mounted metallizations. This construction provides scalability and ease of fabrication, and permits multiple ion source functionalities.

  10. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, D L [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  11. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  12. Structure and interactions of the C-terminal metal binding domain of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, S.; Hong, D.; Desai, N.K.; H.Sazinsky, M.; Argüello, J.M.; Rosenzweig, A.C. (NWU)

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cu(+)-ATPase CopA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus belongs to the P(1B) family of the P-type ATPases. These integral membrane proteins couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to heavy metal ion translocation across membranes. A defining feature of P(1B-1)-type ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains at the N-terminus (N-MBDs). The N-MBDs exhibit a conserved ferredoxin-like fold, similar to that of soluble copper chaperones, and bind metal ions via a conserved CXXC motif. The N-MBDs enable Cu(+) regulation of turnover rates apparently through Cu-sensitive interactions with catalytic domains. A. fulgidus CopA is unusual in that it contains both an N-terminal MBD and a C-terminal MBD (C-MBD). The functional role of the unique C-MBD has not been established. Here, we report the crystal structure of the apo, oxidized C-MBD to 2.0 A resolution. In the structure, two C-MBD monomers form a domain-swapped dimer, which has not been observed previously for similar domains. In addition, the interaction of the C-MBD with the other cytoplasmic domains of CopA, the ATP binding domain (ATPBD) and actuator domain (A-domain), has been investigated. Interestingly, the C-MBD interacts specifically with both of these domains, independent of the presence of Cu(+) or nucleotides. These data reinforce the uniqueness of the C-MBD and suggest a distinct structural role for the C-MBD in CopA transport.

  13. Boron Sheet Adsorbed on Metal Surfaces: Structures and Electronic L. Z. Zhang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    scientists have developed a lot of methods to prepare graphene, such as mechanical exfoliation, chemical with a large area and high quality,5-10 implying that metal-substrate-supported graphene is easier to prepare benefits the preparation of two- dimensional materials, such as graphene and an h-BN monolayer

  14. Accelerated Articles Fabrication of Metallic Microstructures Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    or meshes and can also be used in microfluidic, mi- croanalytical, and microelectromechanical systems systems,3 microsen- sor,4 and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).5,6 The fab- rication process involves

  15. Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy 1.DepartmentofDEPARTMENT2 DOEFabricated

  16. MECS 2006 - Fabricated Metals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1| DepartmentCement

  17. Synthesis, Structure Determination, and Hydrogen Sorption Studies of New Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Triazole and Naphthalenedicarboxylic Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park,H.; Britten, J.; Mueller, U.; Lee, J.; Li, J.; Parise, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new metal-organic framework compounds were synthesized under solvothermal conditions using Zn{sup 2+} ion, 1,2,4-triazole (TRZ), and 1,4- and 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acids (NDC): Zn{sub 4}(TRZ){sub 4}(1,4-NDC){sub 2}-2DMF-2H{sub 2}O (1) and Zn{sub 4}(TRZ){sub 4}(2,6-NDC){sub 2}-2DMF-4H{sub 2}O (2). Their crystal structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structure 1 crystallizes in the P2{sub 1}/n space group with a = 13.609(2) {angstrom}, b = 27.181(5){angstrom}, c = 13.617(3) {angstrom}, {beta} = 92.46(1){sup o}, V = 5032.4(16) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Structure 2 crystallizes in orthorhombic Pna2{sub 2} space group with a = 30.978(6) {angstrom}, b = 12.620(3) {angstrom}, c = 13.339(3) {angstrom}, V = 5215(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Both structures are analogues of the previously reported Zn{sub 4}(TRZ){sub 4}(1,4-BDC){sub 2}-16H{sub 2}O where the layers of Zn-triazole moieties are pillared by aromatic dicarboxylates to create 3-D open frameworks. Nitrogen sorption studies revealed that these structures have Brunaer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of 362.1-584.1 m{sup 2}/g. Hydrogen sorption experiments showed they can store 0.84-1.09 wt % H{sub 2} at 77 K and 1 atm. Although they do not contain large pores or surface areas, they possess the hydrogen sorption capacities comparable to those of highly porous metal-organic frameworks.

  18. Fabrication of Surface Plasmon Resonators by Nanoskiving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    . The diamond knife cuts cleanly through microplates 35 µm in diameter and 100 nm thick without bending); the single-crystalline gold nanowires fabricated here have much lower radiative loss than polycrystalline to act as surface plasmon resonators, a characteristic that polycrystalline metal nanowires do

  19. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  20. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  1. Interface structure and mechanics between graphene and metal substrates: a first-principles This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Markus J.

    -based nanoelectronics and nanocomposites. The availability of structural and energetic data of graphene­metal interfaces. already been observed in this hybrid system, in particular at graphene­metal interfaces [1, 4, 5

  2. Contextualizing urban mobile fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Michael Chia-Liang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is focus on the urban fabric issues. To be more specific, I will focus on the "Mobile Fabrics" within the larger Asian urban context. Instead of working with a specific geographical site; I will focus on the ...

  3. Structure formation upon reactive direct current magnetron sputtering of transition metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngaruiya, J.M.; Kappertz, O.; Mohamed, S.H.; Wuttig, M. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen, Germany and Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Box 62000 Nairobi (Kenya); I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative study of reactive direct current magnetron sputtering for different transition metal oxides reveals crystalline films at room temperature for group 4 and amorphous films for groups 5 and 6. This observation cannot be explained by the known growth laws and is attributed to the impact of energetic particles, originating from the oxidized target, on the growing film. This scenario is supported by measured target characteristics, the evolution of deposition stress of the films, and the observed backsputtering.

  4. Tidal Downsizing Model. III. Planets from sub-Earths to Brown Dwarfs: structure and metallicity preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present improved population synthesis calculations in the context of the Tidal Downsizing (TD) hypothesis for planet formation. Our models provide natural explanations and/or quantitative match to exoplanet observations in the following categories: (i) most abundant planets being super-Earths; (ii) cores more massive than $\\sim 5-15 M_\\oplus$ are enveloped by massive metal-rich atmospheres; (iii) the frequency of occurrence of close-in gas giant planets correlates strongly with metallicity of the host star; (iv) no such correlation is found for sub-Neptune planets; (v) presence of massive cores in giant planets; (vi) the composition of gas giant planets is over-abundant in metals compared to their host stars; (vii) this over-abundance decreases with planet's mass, as observed; (viii) a deep valley in the planet mass function between masses of $\\sim 10-20 M_\\oplus$ and $\\sim 100 M_\\oplus$. We provide a number of observational predictions distinguishing the model from Core Accretion: (a) composition of the m...

  5. Metal-Pyrrolide Complexes in Three-fold Symmetry: Synthesis, Structure, Reactivity and Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, William Hill

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure, Reactivity and Magnetism by William Hill Harman AStructure, Reactivity and Magnetism by William Hill Harmanlost time. Dave taught me magnetism and what it takes to win

  6. Structural evolution across the insulator-metal transition in oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-? studied using neutron total scattering and Rietveld analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, I.-K.; Lee, Seunghun; Jeong, Se-Young; Won, C. J.; Hur, N.; Llobet, A.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-? exhibits an insulator-metal transition with increasing ?. We performed neutron total scattering measurements to study structural evolution across an insulator-metal transition in BaTiO3-?. Despite its significant impact on resistivity, slight oxygen reduction (?=0.09) caused only a small disturbance on the local doublet splitting of Ti-O bond. This finding implies that local polarization is well preserved under marginal electric conduction. In the highly oxygen-deficient metallic state (?=0.25), however, doublet splitting of the Ti-O bond became smeared. The smearing of the local Ti-O doublet is complemented with long-range structural analysis and demonstrates that the metallic conduction in the highly oxygen-reducedmore »BaTiO3-? is due to the appearance of nonferroelectric cubic lattice.« less

  7. Structural evolution across the insulator-metal transition in oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-? studied using neutron total scattering and Rietveld analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, I.-K.; Lee, Seunghun; Jeong, Se-Young; Won, C. J.; Hur, N.; Llobet, A.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-deficient BaTiO3-? exhibits an insulator-metal transition with increasing ?. We performed neutron total scattering measurements to study structural evolution across an insulator-metal transition in BaTiO3-?. Despite its significant impact on resistivity, slight oxygen reduction (?=0.09) caused only a small disturbance on the local doublet splitting of Ti-O bond. This finding implies that local polarization is well preserved under marginal electric conduction. In the highly oxygen-deficient metallic state (?=0.25), however, doublet splitting of the Ti-O bond became smeared. The smearing of the local Ti-O doublet is complemented with long-range structural analysis and demonstrates that the metallic conduction in the highly oxygen-reduced BaTiO3-? is due to the appearance of nonferroelectric cubic lattice.

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the local structure of heavy metal ions incorporated into electrodeposited nickel oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasubramanian, M.; Melendres, C.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Mansour, A.N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.] [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of heavy metal ions into simulated corrosion films has been investigated using spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The films were formed by electrodeposition of the appropriate oxide (hydroxide) onto a graphite substrate. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to determine the structure and composition of the host oxide film, as well as the local structure of the impurity ion. Results on the incorporation of Ce and Sr into surface films of Ni(OH){sub 2} and NiOOH are reported. Cathodically deposited Ni(OH){sub 2} was found to be mainly in the alpha form while anodically prepared NiOOH showed the presence of Ni{sup +2} and Ni{sup +4}. Cerium incorporated into Ni(OH){sub 2} exists as mixed Ce{sup +3} and Ce{sup +4} phases; a Ce{sup +4} species was found when Ce was codeposited with NiOOH. The structure of the Ce{sup +4} phase in anodic films appears similar to a Ce(OH){sub 4} standard. However, XAS, X-ray diffraction, and laser Raman measurements indicate that the latter chemical formulation is probably incorrect and that the material is really a disordered form of hydrous cerium oxide. The local structure of this material is similar to CeO{sub 2} but has much higher structural disorder. The significance of this finding on the question of the structure of Ce-based corrosion inhibitors in aluminum oxide films is pointed out. Moreover, the authors found it possible to form pure Ce oxide (hydroxide) films on graphite by both cathodic and anodic electrodeposition; their structures have also been elucidated. Strontium incorporated into nickel oxide films consists of Sr{sup +2} which is coordinated to oxygen atoms and is likely to exist as small domains of coprecipitated material.

  9. Nondestructive characterization of a TiN metal gate: Chemical and structural properties by means of standing-wave hard x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fadley, Charles

    Nondestructive characterization of a TiN metal gate: Chemical and structural properties by means (HXPS, HAXPES) is applied to a thick (100 A° ) film of a metal gate TiN grown on top of a Si/MoSi2 of TiN, as well as the buried interface between TiN and the native oxide on top of the mirror

  10. Local field enhancement on metallic periodic surface structures produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kudryashov, Sergei I; Ligachev, A E; Makarov, Sergei V; Mel'nik, N N; Rudenko, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Khmelnitskii, R A [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodic surface structures on aluminium are produced by femtosecond laser pulses for efficient excitation of surface electromagnetic waves using a strong objective (NA = 0.5). The local electromagnetic field enhancement on the structures is measured using the technique of surface-enhanced Raman scattering from pyridine molecules. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  11. Lithographically defined microporous carbon structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Polsky, Ronen; Brozik, Susan M.; Wheeler, David R.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A lithographic method is used to fabricate porous carbon structures that can provide electrochemical electrodes having high surface area with uniform and controllable dimensions, providing enormous flexibility to tailor the electrodes toward specific applications. Metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of the porous carbon electrodes exhibit ultra small dimensions with uniform size distribution. The resulting electrodes are rugged, electrically conductive and show excellent electrochemical behavior.

  12. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  13. SIDEROPHILIN METAL COORDINATION. 1. COMPLEXATION OF THORIUM BY TRANSFERRIN: STRUCTURE-FUNCTION IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Wesley R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. COMPLEXATION OF THORIUM BY TRANSFERRIN: STRUCTURE-DIFFERENCE UV TITRATION RV FOR THORIUM-TRANSFERRIN FROM pH 8spectra- scopic data on the thorium complex of ethylene~bis

  14. Hydrothermal syntheses, structures and magnetic properties of two transition metal coordination polymers with a square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Song

    ; Square grid structure; 1,4-Naphthalenedicarb- oxylic acid 1. Introduction In recent years, great.1. Measurements Elemental analyses were performed with an Elemen- tar Vario EL analyzer. The IR spectrum

  15. Associations between iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticle growth and metal adsorption/structural incorporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, C.S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zn and ZnEDTA sorption at the goethite (alpha-FeOOH)/waterretention mechanisms on goethite .1. Surface structure.complexation of Hg2+ on goethite: Mechanism from EXAFS

  16. Generation and Applications of Structure Envelopes for Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakovenko, Andrey A.

    2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    years of research in the field MOFs were found to have several advantages in contrast to inorganic and organic porous solids. First, by differentiating Figure 2. Crystal structure of MOF-5, view in (100) crystallographic plane.25 4 the length...

  17. Emission intensity in the visible and IR spectral ranges from Si-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with erbium (Er) and europium (Eu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezdrogina, M. M., E-mail: margaret.m@mail.ioffe.ru; Kostina, L. S.; Beliakova, E. I.; Kuzmin, R. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photo- and electroluminescence spectra of silicon-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with rare-earth metals are studied. It is shown that emission in the visible and IR spectral ranges can be obtained from n-Si:Er/p-Si and n-Si:Eu/p-Si structures fabricated by the method suggested in the study. The results obtained make this method promising for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  18. Update on US High Density Fuel Fabrication Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.R. Clark; G.A. Moore; J.F. Jue; B.H. Park; N.P. Hallinan; D.M. Wachs; D.E. Burkes

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second generation uranium molybdenum fuel has shown excellent in-reactor irradiation performance. This metallic fuel type is capable of being fabricated at much higher loadings than any presently used research reactor fuel. Due to the broad range of fuel types this alloy system encompasses—fuel powder to monolithic foil and binary fuel systems to multiple element additions—significant amounts of research and development have been conducted on the fabrication of these fuels. This paper presents an update of the US RERTR effort to develop fabrication techniques and the fabrication methods used for the RERTR-9A miniplate test.

  19. Process development for the fabrication of light emitting vacuum field emission triodes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Roger T.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Legg has extended the diode structure by designing a vacuum triode. This work deals with development of a process for fabricating the triode structure using current microelectronic processing techniques. Subsequently, triodes are fabricated for testing...

  20. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge?transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  1. Deterministic, Nanoscale Fabrication of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr., R M; Shirk, M; Gilmer, G; Rubenchik, A

    2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Neither LLNL nor any other organization has the capability to perform deterministic fabrication of mm-sized objects with arbitrary, {micro}m-sized, 3-dimensional features with 20-nm-scale accuracy and smoothness. This is particularly true for materials such as high explosives and low-density aerogels. For deterministic fabrication of high energy-density physics (HEDP) targets, it will be necessary both to fabricate features in a wide variety of materials as well as to understand and simulate the fabrication process. We continue to investigate, both in experiment and in modeling, the ablation/surface-modification processes that occur with the use of laser pulses that are near the ablation threshold fluence. During the first two years, we studied ablation of metals, and we used sub-ps laser pulses, because pulses shorter than the electron-phonon relaxation time offered the most precise control of the energy that can be deposited into a metal surface. The use of sub-ps laser pulses also allowed a decoupling of the energy-deposition process from the ensuing movement/ablation of the atoms from the solid, which simplified the modeling. We investigated the ablation of material from copper, gold, and nickel substrates. We combined the power of the 1-D hydrocode ''HYADES'' with the state-of-the-art, 3-D molecular dynamics simulations ''MDCASK'' in our studies. For FY04, we have stretched ourselves to investigate laser ablation of carbon, including chemically-assisted processes. We undertook this research, because the energy deposition that is required to perform direct sublimation of carbon is much higher than that to stimulate the reaction 2C + O{sub 2} => 2CO. Thus, extremely fragile carbon aerogels might survive the chemically-assisted process more readily than ablation via direct laser sublimation. We had planned to start by studying vitreous carbon and move onto carbon aerogels. We were able to obtain flat, high-quality vitreous carbon, which was easy to work on, experimentally and relatively easy to model. We were provided with bulk samples of carbon aerogel by Dr. Joe Satcher, but the shop that would have prepared mounted samples for us was overwhelmed by programmatic assignments. We are pursuing aligned carbon nanotubes, provided to us by colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, as an alternative to aerogels. Dr. Gilmer started modeling the laser/thermally accelerated reactions of carbon with H{sub 2}, rather than O{sub 2}, due to limited information on equation of state for CO. We have extended our molecular dynamics models of ablation to include carbon in the form of graphite, vitreous carbon, and aerogels. The computer code has features that allow control of temperature, absorption of shock waves, and for the ejection of material from the computational cell. We form vitreous carbon atomic configurations by melting graphite in a microcanonical cell at a temperature of about 5000K. Quenching the molten carbon at a controlled rate of cooling yields material with a structure close to that of the vitreous carbon produced in the laboratory. To represent the aerogel, we have a computer code that connects ''graphite'' rods to randomly placed points in the 3-D computational cell. Ablation simulations yield results for vitreous carbon similar to our previous results with copper, usually involving the transient melting of the material above the threshold energy density. However, some fracturing in the solid regions occurs in this case, but was never observed in copper. These simulations are continuing, together with studies of the reaction of hydrogen with vitreous graphite at high temperatures. These reactions are qualitatively similar to that of oxygen with the carbon atoms at the surface, and the simulations should provide insight into the applicability of the use of chemical reactions to shape the surfaces of aerogels.

  2. Generation and Applications of Structure Envelopes for Metal-Organic Frameworks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakovenko, Andrey A.

    2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? overlapped generated for MOF-5 overlapped with its structural model. .................................... 116 Figure 44 Final Pawley whole pattern decomposition plots for (a) Cu2TPTC-OEt, (b) Cu2TPTC-O nPr and (c) Cu2TPTC-O nHex samples.... ................................................................ 121 Figure 45 Difference envelope density ?? plots generated for (a) Cu2TPTC-OEt, (b) Cu2TPTC-O nPr and (c) Cu2TPTC-O nHex samples overlapped with NOTT-106 structural model (without methyl groups on the central phenyl ring of (L7)4- ligand...

  3. Synthesis-Structure-Performance Correlation for Polyaniline-Me-C Non-Precious Metal Cathode Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Gang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Johnston, Christina [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mack, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Artyushkova, Kateryna [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Ferrandon, Magali [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Nelson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lezama-pacheco, Juan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Conradson, Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Myers, Deborah [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present the systematic preparation of active and durable non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) based on the heat treatment of polyaniline/metal/carbon precursors. Variation of the synthesis steps, heat-treatment temperature, metal loading, and the metal type in the synthesis leads to markedly different catalyst activity, speciation, and morphology. Microscopy studies demonstrate notable differences in the carbon structure as a function of these variables. Balancing the need to increase the catalyst's degree of graphitization through heat treatment versus the excessive loss of surface area that occurs at higher temperatures is a key to preparing an active catalyst. XPS and XAFS spectra are consistent with the presence of Me-N{sub x} structures in both the Co and Fe versions of the catalyst, which are often proposed to be active sites. The average speciation and coordination environment of nitrogen and metal, however, depends greatly on the choice of Co or Fe. Taken together, the data indicate that better control of the metal-catalyzed transformations of the polymer into new graphitized carbon forms in the heat-treatment step will allow for even further improvement of this class of catalysts.

  4. Multipole Representation of the Fermi Operator with Application to the Electronic Structure Analysis of Metallic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jianfeng

    Multipole Representation of the Fermi Operator with Application to the Electronic Structure, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 We propose a multipole representation of the Fermi-Dirac function temperature Green's functions in many-body physics [13]. It is natural to consider a multipole representation

  5. Structure and magnetism of transition-metal implanted dilute magnetic semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Lino; Temst, K; Araújo, JP; Wahl, U

    The discovery of a dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) in which ferromagnetism is carrier-mediated and persists above room temperature is a critical step towards the development of semiconductor-based spintronics. Among the many types of DMS materials which have been investigated, the current research interest can be narrowed down to two main classes of materials: (1) narrow-gap III-V semiconductors, mostly GaAs and InAs, doped with Mn; (2) wide-gap oxides and nitrides doped with 3d transition metals, mostly Mn- and Co-doped ZnO and Mn-doped GaN. With a number of interesting functionalities deriving from the carrier-mediated ferromagnetism and demonstrated in various proof-of-concept devices, Mn-doped GaAs has become, among DMS materials, one of the best candidates for technological application. However, despite major developments over the last 15 years, the maximum Curie temperature (185 K) remains well below room temperature. On the other hand, wide-gap DMS materials appear to exhibit ferromagnetic behavior...

  6. Micro structural studies of PVA doped with metal oxide nanocomposites films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N. B. Rithin [Dept. of Physics, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India); Crasta, Vincent, E-mail: vcrasta@yahoo.com; Viju, F. [Dept. of Physics, St. Joseph Engineering College, Vamanjoor, Mangalore-575028, Karnataka (India); Praveen, B. M. [Dept. of Chemistry, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India); Shreeprakash, B. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured PVA polymer composites are of rapidly growing interest because of their sized-coupled properties. The present article deals with both ZnO and WO{sub 3} embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix using a solvent casting method. These films were characterized using FTIR, XRD, and SEM techniques. The FTIR spectra of the doped PVA shows shift in the bands, which can be understood on the basis of intra/inter molecular hydrogen bonding with the adjacent OH group of PVA. The phase homogeneity and morphology of the polymer composites have been analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The crystal structure and crystallinity of polymer nanocomposites were studied by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD). Thus due to the interaction of dopant and complex formation, the structural repositioning takes place and crystallinity of the nanocomposites decreases.

  7. Structure of a Putative Metal-Chelate Type ABC Transporter: An

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer Solar Cells

  8. Heteroepitaxial Self Assembling Noble Metal Nanoparticles in Monocrystalline Silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Michael S.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Embedding metal nanoparticles in crystalline silicon possesses numerous possible applications to fabricate optoelectronic switches, increase efficiency of radiation detectors, decrease the thickness of monocrystalline silicon solar panels...

  9. Soft-Lithographical Fabrication of Three-dimensional Photonic Crystals in the Optical Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jae-Hwang Lee

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes several projects to realize low-cost and high-quality three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication using non-photolithographic techniques for layer-by-layer photonic crystals. Low-cost, efficient 3D microfabrication is a demanding technique not only for 3D photonic crystals but also for all other scientific areas, since it may create new functionalities beyond the limit of planar structures. However, a novel 3D microfabrication technique for photonic crystals implies the development of a complete set of sub-techniques for basic layer-by-layer stacking, inter-layer alignment, and material conversion. One of the conventional soft lithographic techniques, called microtransfer molding ({mu}TM), was developed by the Whitesides group in 1996. Although {mu}TM technique potentially has a number of advantages to overcome the limit of conventional photolithographic techniques in building up 3D microstructures, it has not been studied intensively after its demonstration. This is mainly because of technical challenges in the nature of layer-by-layer fabrication, such as the demand of very high yield in fabrication. After two years of study on conventional {mu}TM, We have developed an advanced microtransfer molding technique, called two-polymer microtransfer molding (2P-{mu}TM) that shows an extremely high yield in layer-by-layer microfabrication sufficient to produce highly layered microstructures. The use of two different photo-curable prepolymers, a filler and an adhesive, allows for fabrication of layered microstructures without thin films between layers. The capabilities of 2P-{mu}TM are demonstrated by the fabrication of a wide-area 12-layer microstructure with high structural fidelity. Second, we also had to develop an alignment technique. We studied the 1st-order diffracted moire fringes of transparent multilayered structures comprised of irregularly deformed periodic patterns. By a comparison study of the diffracted moire fringe pattern and detailed microscopy of the structure, we show that the diffracted moire fringe can be used as a nondestructive tool to analyze the alignment of multilayered structures. We demonstrate the alignment method for the case of layer-by-layer microstructures using soft lithography. The alignment method yields high contrast of fringes even when the materials being aligned have very weak contrasts. The imaging method of diffracted moire fringes is a versatile visual tool for the microfabrication of transparent deformable microstructures in layer-by-layer fashion. Third, we developed several methods to convert a polymer template to dielectric or metallic structures, for instance, metallic infiltration using electrodeposition, metallic coating using sputter deposition, dielectric infiltration using titania nano-slurry, and dielectric coating using atomic layer deposition of Titania. By several different developed techniques, high quality photonic crystals have been successfully fabricated; however, I will focus on a line of techniques to reach metallic photonic crystals in this dissertation since they are completely characterized at this moment. In addition to the attempts for photonic crystal fabrication, our non-photolithographic technique is applied for other photonic applications such as small optical waveguides whose diameter is comparable to the wavelength of guided light. Although, as guiding medium, polymers have tremendous potential because of their enormous variation in optical, chemical and mechanical properties, their application for optical waveguides is limited in conventional photolithography. By 2P-{mu}TM, we achieve low cost, high yield, high fidelity, and tailorable fabrication of small waveguides. Embedded semiconductor quantum-dots and grating couplers are used for efficient internal and external light source, respectively.

  10. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive dionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m.sup.2 /gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon compositives with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to be high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced.

  11. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication is described for conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive deionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m{sup 2}/gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon composites with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced. 1 fig.

  12. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  13. An experimental investigation of the energy-attenuation capabilities of various-shaped compliable metal structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding, Lynn Blackmore

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 APPENDIX B . . ~ 39 LIST Of PLATES Plate Page Compliable Structures -Shapes D, E. F. H, and I after Pre-Test Bending 17 2. Static Loading of Test Unit Using Shape A. . . . . . . . . . . 17 3 ~ Originally Designed Drop Carriage 18 4... Facility. . . 12 Load-Stroke Plot of Static Loading of Shapes A and B (Al 2024-T3) 20 9. Load-Stroke Plot of Static Loading F (Al 2024-T3) of Shapes C and 21 10. Load-Stroke Plot of Static Loading and G (Al 2024-T3) of Shapes D, E, 22 Load...

  14. Method for fabricating laminated uranium composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, L.R.

    1983-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a process for fabricating laminated composites of uranium or uranium alloys and at least one other metal or alloy. The laminated composites are fabricated by forming a casting of the molten uranium with the other metal or alloy which is selectively positioned in the casting and then hot-rolling the casting into a laminated plate in or around which the casting components are metallurgically bonded to one another to form the composite. The process of the present invention provides strong metallurgical bonds between the laminate components primarily since the bond disrupting surface oxides on the uranium or uranium alloy float to the surface of the casting to effectively remove the oxides from the bonding surfaces of the components.

  15. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Productionof Quantum-Well-Type Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum-Well-Type Structures and...

  16. Method and apparatus for fabricating superconducting wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for fabricating a superconducting wire comprising the steps of: in a first means, sputter depositing on a base wire a partial superconduction layer consisting of at least some, but not all, of the elements of an HTS material; and in a second means, reacting said partial superconduction layer with the other element or elements, including at least one metallic element, of the HTS material so that a complete superconduction layer is formed on said base wire.

  17. All-Metallic Vertical Transistors Based on Stacked Dirac Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yangyang

    It is an ongoing pursuit to use metal as a channel material in a field effect transistor. All metallic transistor can be fabricated from pristine semimetallic Dirac materials (such as graphene, silicene, and germanene), ...

  18. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  19. Controlling the Colour of Metals: Intaglio and Bas-Relief Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jianfa; Papasimakis, Nikitas; Chen, Yifang; MacDonald, Kevin F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fabrication of indented ('intaglio') or raised ('bas-relief') sub-wavelength metamaterial patterns on a metal surface provides a mechanism for changing and controlling the colour of the metal without employing any form of chemical surface modification, thin-film coating or diffraction effects. We show that a broad range of colours can be achieved by varying the structural parameters of metamaterial designs to tune absorption resonances. This novel approach to the 'structural colouring' of pure metals offers great versatility and scalability for both aesthetic (e.g. jewellery design) and functional (e.g. sensors, optical modulators) applications. We focus here on visible colour but the concept can equally be applied to the engineering of metallic spectral response in other electromagnetic domains.

  20. New polymorphous computing fabric.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolinski, C. (Christophe); Gokhale, M. (Maya); McCabe, K. P. (Kevin P.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a new polymorphous computing Fabric well suited to DSP and Image Processing and describes its implementation on a Configurable System on a Chip (CSOC). The architecture is highly parameterized and enables customization of the synthesized Fabric to achieve high performance for a specific class of application. For this reason it can be considered to be a generic model for hardware accelerator synthesis from a high level specification. Another important innovation is the Fabric uses a global memory concept, which gives the host processor random access to all the variables and instructions on the Fabric. The Fabric supports different computing models including MIMD, SPMD and systolic flow and permits dynamic reconfiguration. We present a specific implementation of a bank of FIR filters on a Fabric composed of 52 cells on the Altera Excalibur ARM running at 33 MHz. The theoretical performance of this Fabric is 1.8 GMACh. For the FIR application we obtain 1.6 GMAC/s real performance. Some automatic tools have been developed like the tool to provide a host access utility and assembler.

  1. Final Technical Report on DE-SC00002460 [Bimetallic or trimetallic materials with structural metal centers based on Mn, Fe or V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeuchi, Esther Sans [Stony Brook University; Takeuchi, Kenneth James [Stony Brook University; Marschilok, Amy Catherine [Stony Brook University

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bimetallic or trimetallic materials with structural metal centers based on Mn, Fe or V were investigated under this project. These metal centers are the focus of this research as they have high earth abundance and have each shown success as cathode materials in lithium batteries. Silver ion, Ag{sup +}, was initially selected as the displacement material as reduction of this center should result in increased conductivity as Ag{sup 0} metal particles are formed in-situ upon electrochemical reduction. The in-situ formation of metal nanoparticles upon electrochemical reduction has been previously noted, and more recently, we have investigated the resulting increase in conductivity. Layered materials as well as materials with tunnel or channel type structures were selected. Layered materials are of interest as they can provide 2-dimensional ion mobility. Tunnel or channel structures are also of interest as they provide a rigid framework that should remain stable over many discharge/charge cycles. We describe some examples of materials we have synthesized that demonstrate promising electrochemistry.

  2. First-principles studies of phase stability and the structural and dynamical properties of metal hydrides. Annual technical progress report, September 15, 1990--May 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, M.Y.

    1991-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We decided to investigate first the interaction of hydrogen with the 4d transition-metal series, with the first element being hcp Y. Because of the recent development of soft pseudopotentials, we chose to use the plane wave basis set to carry out the calculation. Since problems had been associated with the slow convergence in transition metals, we first tested the computational methods by studying the structural properties of Y; results were encouraging. We started the calculation of YH{sub x} with hydrogen occupying different interstitial sites.

  3. An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel E. Kostka

    2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This project represented a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee (UT), and Florida State University (FSU). ORNL served as the lead in-stitution with Dr. A.V. Palumbo responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliver-ables. In situ uranium bioremediation is focused on biostimulating indigenous microorganisms through a combination of pH neutralization and the addition of large amounts of electron donor. Successful biostimulation of U(VI) reduction has been demonstrated in the field and in the laboratory. However, little data is available on the dynamics of microbial populations capable of U(VI) reduction, and the differences in the microbial community dynamics between proposed electron donors have not been explored. In order to elucidate the potential mechanisms of U(VI) reduction for optimization of bioremediation strategies, structure-function relationships of microbial populations were investigated in microcosms of subsurface materials cocontaminated with radionuclides and nitrate from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  4. Selecting the suitable dopants: electronic structures of transition metal and rare earth doped thermoelectric sodium cobaltate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assadi, M H N; Yu, A B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineered Na0.75CoO2 is considered a prime candidate to achieve high efficiency thermoelectric systems to regenerate electricity from waste heat. In this work, three elements with outmost electronic configurations, (1) an open d shell (Ni), (2) a closed d shell (Zn), and (3) an half fill f shell (Eu) with a maximum unpaired electrons, were selected to outline the dopants' effects on electronic and crystallographic structures of Na0.75CoO2. Systematic ab initio density functional calculations showed that the formation energy of these dopants was found to be lowest when residing on sodium layer and ranked as -1.1 eV, 0.44 eV and 3.44 eV for Eu, Ni and Zn respectively. Furthermore Ni was also found to be stable when substituting Co ion. As these results show great harmony with existing experimental data, they provide new insights into the fundamental principle of dopant selection for manipulating the physical properties in the development of high performance sodium cobaltate based thermoelectric materials.

  5. Biologically inspired digital fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Sarah (Sarah J.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objects and systems in nature are models for the practice of sustainable design and fabrication. From trees to bones, natural systems are characterized by the constant interplay of creation, environmental response, and ...

  6. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  7. STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS OF HYDROGEN WITH BULK AMORPHOUS MICROSTRUCTURES IN METALLIC SYSTEMS UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLINITY ON PERMEATION AND EMBRITTLEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Elise; Korinko, Paul; Adams, Thad

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated with Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.

  8. Multilayer insulation blanket, fabricating apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Boroski, William N. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multilayer insulation blanket for insulating cryogenic structures operating at very low temperatures is disclosed. An apparatus and method for fabricating the improved blanket are also disclosed. In the improved blanket, each successive layer of insulating material is greater in length and width than the preceding layer so as to accommodate thermal contraction of the layers closest to the cryogenic structure. The fabricating apparatus has a rotatable cylindrical mandrel having an outer surface of fixed radius that is substantially arcuate, preferably convex, in cross-section. The method of fabricating the improved blanket comprises (a) winding a continuous sheet of thermally reflective material around the circumference of the mandrel to form multiple layers, (b) binding the layers along two lines substantially parallel to the edges of the circumference of the mandrel, (c) cutting the layers along a line parallel to the axle of the mandrel, and (d) removing the bound layers from the mandrel.

  9. Method of fabricating a multilayer insulation blanket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Boroski, William N. (Aurora, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multilayer insulation blanket for insulating cryogenic structures operating at very low temperatures is disclosed. An apparatus and method for fabricating the improved blanket are also disclosed. In the improved blanket, each successive layer of insulating material is greater in length and width than the preceding layer so as to accommodate thermal contraction of the layers closest to the cryogenic structure. The fabricating apparatus has a rotatable cylindrical mandrel having an outer surface of fixed radius that is substantially arcuate, preferably convex, in cross-section. The method of fabricating the improved blanket comprises (a) winding a continuous sheet of thermally reflective material around the circumference of the mandrel to form multiple layers, (b) binding the layers along two lines substantially parallel to the edges of the circumference of the mandrel, (c) cutting the layers along a line parallel to the axle of the mandrel, and (d) removing the bound layers from the mandrel.

  10. Low trap states in in situ SiN{sub x}/AlN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor structures grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xing; Ma, Jun; Jiang, Huaxing; Liu, Chao; Lau, Kei May, E-mail: eekmlau@ust.hk [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the use of SiN{sub x} grown in situ by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition as the gate dielectric for AlN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures. Two kinds of trap states with different time constants were identified and characterized. In particular, the SiN{sub x}/AlN interface exhibits remarkably low trap state densities in the range of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2}eV{sup ?1}. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that the in situ SiN{sub x} layer can provide excellent passivation without causing chemical degradation to the AlN surface. These results imply the great potential of in situ SiN{sub x} as an effective gate dielectric for AlN/GaN MIS devices.

  11. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O? bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H?O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH boundmore »structures have the highest calculated activity to date.« less

  12. Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels and Zhaoning Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels Han Caoa) and Zhaoning Yu Nanostructure wafers . The nanofluidic channels were further narrowed and sealed by techniques that are based- tremely small nanofluidic structures need to be fabricated and used as matrices for the manipulation

  13. Facile creation of bio-inspired superhydrophobic Ce-based metallic glass surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Kesong; Li Zhou [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang Weihua [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang Lei [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A bio-inspired synthesis strategy was conducted to fabricate superhydrophobic Ce-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) surfaces with self-cleaning properties. Micro-nanoscale hierarchical structures were first constructed on BMG surfaces and then modified with the low surface energy coating. Surface structures, surface chemical compositions, and wettability were characterized by combining scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements. Research indicated that both surface multiscale structures and the low surface free energy coating result in the final formation of superhydrophobicity.

  14. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobson, Craig P. (El Cerrito, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  15. Liquid Phase 3D Printing for Quickly Manufacturing Metal Objects with Low Melting Point Alloy Ink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Wang; Jing Liu

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional 3D printings are generally time-consuming and printable metal inks are rather limited. From an alternative way, we proposed a liquid phase 3D printing for quickly making metal objects. Through introducing metal alloys whose melting point is slightly above room temperature as printing inks, several representative structures spanning from one, two and three dimension to more complex patterns were demonstrated to be quickly fabricated. Compared with the air cooling in a conventional 3D printing, the liquid-phase-manufacturing offers a much higher cooling rate and thus significantly improves the speed in fabricating metal objects. This unique strategy also efficiently prevents the liquid metal inks from air oxidation which is hard to avoid otherwise in an ordinary 3D printing. Several key physical factors (like properties of the cooling fluid, injection speed and needle diameter, types and properties of the printing ink, etc.) were disclosed which would evidently affect the printing quality. In addition, a basic route to make future liquid phase 3D printer incorporated with both syringe pump and needle arrays was also suggested. The liquid phase 3D printing method, which owns potential values not available in a conventional modality, opens an efficient way for quickly making metal objects in the coming time.

  16. Pendant Functional Groups in Metal-Organic Frameworks - Effects on Crystal Structure, Stability, and Gas Sorption Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makal, Trevor Arnold

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this research concerns the synthesis and characterization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) grafted with pendant alkyl substituents to enhance stability and gas sorption properties for use in clean-energy related technologies...

  17. Acta Cryst. (1994). D50, 749-756 High-Resolution Structures of Single-Metal-Substituted Concanavalin A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Metal-Substituted Concanavalin A: the Co,Ca-Protein at 1.6 ,~ and the Ni,Ca-Protein at 2.0 By C. EMMERICH,J. R. HELLIWELL,* M

  18. Clustering Dynamics of the Metal-Benzene Sandwich Complex: The Role of Microscopic Structure of the Solute In the Bis(6-benzene)chromium Arn Clusters (n ) 1-15)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    Clustering Dynamics of the Metal-Benzene Sandwich Complex: The Role of Microscopic Structure of the Solute In the Bis(6-benzene)chromium ·Arn Clusters (n ) 1-15) Kyo-Won Choi, Sunyoung Choi, Doo-Sik AhnVised Manuscript ReceiVed: June 25, 2008 Ar clustering dynamics around the metal-benzene sandwich complex, bis(6

  19. Thin film lithium-based batteries and electrochromic devices fabricated with nanocomposite electrode materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillaspie, Dane T; Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, John Roland

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin-film lithium-based batteries and electrochromic devices (10) are fabricated with positive electrodes (12) comprising a nanocomposite material composed of lithiated metal oxide nanoparticles (40) dispersed in a matrix composed of lithium tungsten oxide.

  20. Fabrication process for openable microfluidic devices and externally actuated microfluidic switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartas Ayala, Marco Aurelio

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document I discuss the fabrication of metallic, aluminum and aluminum oxide, 3D micro channels, made with standard milling technology, along with two channel closing methods for openable devices: half cured-glued ...

  1. Method of producing catalytic materials for fabricating nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of fabricating nano-catalysts are described. In some embodiments the nano-catalyst is formed from a powder-based substrate material and is some embodiments the nano-catalyst is formed from a solid-based substrate material. In some embodiments the substrate material may include metal, ceramic, or silicon or another metalloid. The nano-catalysts typically have metal nanoparticles disposed adjacent the surface of the substrate material. The methods typically include functionalizing the surface of the substrate material with a chelating agent, such as a chemical having dissociated carboxyl functional groups (--COO), that provides an enhanced affinity for metal ions. The functionalized substrate surface may then be exposed to a chemical solution that contains metal ions. The metal ions are then bound to the substrate material and may then be reduced, such as by a stream of gas that includes hydrogen, to form metal nanoparticles adjacent the surface of the substrate.

  2. In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies of foreign metal ions in nickel hydrous oxide electrodes in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sunghyun; Tryk, D.A.; Scherson, D. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)); Antonio, M.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Carr, R. (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States))

    1994-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of the structural and electronic properties of hydrous oxide films of composite (9:1) Ni/Co and (9:1) Ni/Fe, prepared by electrodeposition, have been examined in alkaline electrolytes using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). An analysis of the X-ray absorption near the edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for the Co and Fe K-edges of these composite hydrous oxides revealed that, regardless of the oxidation state of nickel sites in the films, the guest metal ions are present as Co[sup 3+] and Fe[sup 3+] and that the cobalt-oxygen distance d(Co-O) = 1.9 [+-] 0.02 [angstrom] and d(Fe-O) = 1.92 [+-] 0.02 [angstrom]. The latter values are in excellent agreement with d(Me-O) (Me = Co or Fe) in CoOOH and [beta]- and [gamma]-FeOOH, respectively, determined by conventional X-ray diffraction. Two clearly defined Me-Ni first coordination shells could be observed in the Fourier transforms (FT) of the K-edge EXAFS of the guest metal recorded at a potential at which both Ni[sup 2+] and Ni[sup 3+] sites are expected to be present. 28 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Structural and electrical characterizations of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As/InP structures for infrared photodetector applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asar, Tar?k, E-mail: trkasar@gazi.edu.tr; Özçelik, Süleyman [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Gazi University, Ankara 06500 (Turkey); Photonics Application and Research Center, Gazi University, Ankara 06500 (Turkey); Özbay, Ekmel [Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Physics, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Three InGaAs/InP structures for photodetector applications were grown with different indium compositions by MBE technique. The structural properties of the samples have been obtained by means of high resolution X-ray diffraction and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. Three InGaAs/InP metal-semiconductor-metal devices were fabricated at room temperature. The experimental forward and reverse bias current–voltage characteristics of the devices such as ideality factor, barrier height, and saturation current were evaluated considering the structural properties of the grown structures. The carrier recombination lifetime and diffusion length in the devices were also calculated using carrier density and mobility data obtained with Hall effect measurement at room temperature. It was determined that all room temperature fabricated devices improved the Schottky barrier height. Especially, the device fabricated on the lower mismatched structure exhibited barrier height enhancement from 0.2?eV, which is the conventional barrier height to 0.642?eV. In addition, the obtained results show that the room temperature fabricated devices on InGaAs/InP structures can be convenient for infrared photodetector applications.

  4. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO{sub 2} layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M. [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)] [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F. [IBS, Rue G Imbert Prolongée, ZI Peynier-Rousset, 13790 Peynier (France)] [IBS, Rue G Imbert Prolongée, ZI Peynier-Rousset, 13790 Peynier (France); Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E. [NCSRD, Terma Patriarchou Gregoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)] [NCSRD, Terma Patriarchou Gregoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A. [ICube, 23 Rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)] [ICube, 23 Rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO{sub 2} films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories.

  5. THROUGH THICKNESS LASER JOINING OF CONTINUOUS GLASS FIBER FABRIC REINFORCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    THROUGH THICKNESS LASER JOINING OF CONTINUOUS GLASS FIBER FABRIC REINFORCEMENT Paper Number 405 Huade Tan, Gen Satoh, Y. Lawrence Yao Manufacturing Research Laboratory Department of Mechanical and propagation is a major failure mode in structural composite applications. Manufacturing induced fiber

  6. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

  7. Electrospun and oxidized cellulose materials for environmental remediation of heavy metals in groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Dong [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Halada, Gary P. [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Spalding, Brian Patrick [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter focuses on the use of modified cellulosic materials in the field of environmental remediation. Two different chemical methods were involved in fabricating oxidized cellulose (OC), which has shown promise as a metal ion chelator in environmental applications. Electrospinning was utilized to introduce a more porous structure into an oxidized cellulose matrix. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to study both the formation of OC and its surface complexation with metal ions. IR and Raman spectroscopic data demonstrate the formation of characteristic carboxylic groups in the structure of the final products and the successful formation of OC-metal complexes. Subsequent field tests at the Field Research Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory confirmed the value of OC for sorption of both U and Th ions.

  8. Strengthening porous metal skeletons by metal deposition from a nanoparticle dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crane, Nathan B., 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accuracy of solid freeform fabrication processes such as three-dimensional printing (3DP) and selective laser sintering (SLS) must be improved for them to achieve wide application in direct production of metal parts. ...

  9. Covalency in Metal-Oxygen Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen K-edge Spectroscopy and Electronic Structure Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minasian, Stefan G.; Keith, Jason M.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Bradley, Joseph A.; Daly, Scott R.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Martin, Richard L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Seidler, Gerald T.; Shuh, David K.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Wagner, Gregory L.; Weng, Tsu-Chein; Yang, Ping

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancing theories of how metal oxygen bonding influences metal oxo properties can expose new avenues for innovation in materials science, catalysis, and biochemistry. Historically, spectroscopic analyses of the transition metal peroxyanions, MO4x-, have formed the basis for new M O bonding theories. Herein, relative changes in M O orbital mixing in MO42- (M = Cr, Mo, W) and MO41- (M = Mn, Tc, Re) are evaluated for the first time by non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray absorption spectroscopy using fluorescence and transmission (via a scanning transmission X-ray microscope), and linear-response density functional theory. The results suggest that moving from Group 6 to Group 7 or down the triads increases M O e () mixing. Meanwhile, t2 mixing ( + ) remains relatively constant within the same Group. These unexpected changes in frontier orbital energy and composition are evaluated in terms of periodic trends in d orbital energy and radial extension.

  10. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  11. Synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=rare-earth metal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Tobash, Paul H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of rare-earth metal-magnesium-germanides RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) has been synthesized by reactions of the corresponding elements at high temperature. Their structures have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction and belong to the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} structure type (space group P4/mbm (No. 127), Z=2; Pearson symbol tP10). Temperature dependent DC magnetization measurements indicate Curie-Weiss paramagnetism in the high-temperature regime for all members of the family, excluding Y{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, Sm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, and Lu{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}. At cryogenic temperatures (ca. 60 K and below), most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases enter into an antiferromagnetic ground-state, except for Er{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Tm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, which do not undergo magnetic ordering down to 5 K. The structural variations as a function of the decreasing size of the rare-earth metals, following the lanthanide contraction, and the changes in the magnetic properties across the series are discussed as well. - Graphical Abstract: The structure of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) can be best viewed as 2-dimensional slabs of Mg and Ge atoms (anionic sub-lattice), and layers of rare-earth metal atoms (cationic sub-lattice) between them. Within this description, one should consider the Ge-Ge dumbbells (formally Ge{sup 6-}{sub 2}), interconnected with square-planar Mg atom as forming flat [MgGe{sub 2}] layers (z=0), stacked along the c-axis with the layers at z=1/2, made of rare-earth metal cations (formally RE{sup 3+}). Highlights: > RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) are new ternary germanides. > Their structures can be recognized as a 1:1 intergrowth of CsCl- and AlB{sub 2}-like slabs. > Ge atoms are covalently bound into Ge{sub 2} dumbbells. > Most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases are antiferromagnetically ordered at cryogenic temperatures.

  12. Fabrication of Molecular Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Katherine

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focuses on the synthesis and attachment of metal nanoparticles to Au and GaAs surfaces using a combination of chemical self-assembly and scanned probe lithography. In this project self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols...

  13. Design and Evaluation of Scalable Switching Fabrics for High-Performance Routers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzeng, Nian-Feng

    high scalability and low costs. The considered switching fabrics are based on a multistage structure. The buffered switching fabrics under our consideration are scalable and of low costs, ideally suitable's for packets to move from their arrival LC's toward their destined LC's. Switching fabrics naturally affect

  14. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 085425 (2012) Influence of water on the electronic structure of metal-supported graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -supported graphene: Insights from van der Waals density functional theory Xiao Li ( ),1 Ji Feng ( ),1,* Enge Wang-supported graphene through van der Waals density functional theory calculations. Our results show a systematic increase in the adsorption energy of water on graphene in the presence of underlying metal substrates

  15. Metal dependent structure, dynamics, and function in RNA measured by site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Nak-Kyoon

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................................................................... 43 III SEPARATE METAL REQUIREMENTS FOR LOOP INTERACTION AND CATALYSIS IN EXTENDED HAMMERHEAD RIBOZYME ................................................... 44 Summary... macroscopic disordering (MOMD) model .................................. 62 3-8 Mg2+-dependent folding of the extended HHRz ........................................ 63 3-9 Mg -dependent catalysis in extended HHRz with spin label at U2+ 1...

  16. TECHNOLOGICAL IMPROVEMENTS OF A METAL OXIDE GAS MULTI-SENSOR BASED ON A MICRO-HOTPLATE STRUCTURE AND INKJET DEPOSI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CO-100ppm, NO2-0.2ppm, NH3- 5ppm and C2H4O-2ppm). Keywords: Gas Sensors, Metal Oxides (MOX), Micro on the fact that the current/voltage characteristic of MOX films exhibits a non-linear behavior [7]. More presented here aims at presenting and characterizing an optimized MOX multi-sensor struc- ture developed

  17. The Mn effect on magnetic structure of FeMn-B amorphous metals , D.M.C. Nicholson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widom, Michael

    magnetization and high permeability, which make them a good candidate for magnetic core materials in transformers and electrical motors. Lately, high Mn content, Fe-based bulk amorphous metals have been movement during the quenching process is determined by molecular dynamics simulation using the Vienna Ab

  18. Method of making patterned helical metallic ribbon for continuous edge winding applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liebermann, H.H.; Frischmann, P.G.; Rosenberry, G.M. Jr.

    1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic ribbon having cutout patterns therein is fabricated in continuous helical form by directing a melt stream or jet onto a rapidly moving patterned substrate surface. 10 figs.

  19. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

    2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

  20. Materials for freeform fabrication of GHz tunable dielectric photonic crystals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niehaus, Michael Keith; Lewis, Jennifer A. (University of Illinois, Urbana, IL); Smay, James Earl; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Cesarano, Joseph, III (,; ); Carroll, James F.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals are of interest for GHz transmission applications, including rapid switching, GHz filters, and phased-array technology. 3D fabrication by Robocasting enables moldless printing of high solid loading slurries into structures such as the ''woodpile'' structures used to fabricate dielectric photonic band gap crystals. In this work, tunable dielectric materials were developed and printed into woodpile structures via solid freeform fabrication (SFF) toward demonstration of tunable photonic crystals. Barium strontium titanate ceramics possess interesting electrical properties including high permittivity, low loss, and high tunability. This paper discusses the processing route and dielectric characterization of (BaxSr1-XTiO3):MgO ceramic composites, toward fabrication of tunable dielectric photonic band gap crystals.

  1. Assembly of biological building blocks for nano- and micro-fabrication of materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Chung-Yi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies were performed to fabricate various material structures using genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. This virus template showed superior controls of material syntheses from nanoscale to microscale. ...

  2. The large-scale structure of the halo of the Andromeda Galaxy Part I: global stellar density, morphology and metallicity properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibata, Rodrigo A; McConnachie, Alan W; Martin, Nicolas F; Irwin, Michael J; Ferguson, Annette M N; Babul, Arif; Bernard, Edouard J; Chapman, Scott C; Collins, Michelle; Fardal, Mark; Mackey, A D; Navarro, Julio; Penarrubia, Jorge; Rich, R Michael; Tanvir, Nial; Widro, Lawrence

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the large-scale structure of the halo of the Andromeda galaxy, based on the Pan-Andromeda Archeological Survey (PAndAS), currently the most complete map of resolved stellar populations in any galactic halo. Despite copious substructure, the global halo populations follow closely power law profiles that become steeper with increasing metallicity. We divide the sample into stream-like populations and a smooth halo component. Fitting a three-dimensional halo model reveals that the most metal-poor populations ([Fe/H]-0.6). The space density of the smooth metal-poor component has a global power-law slope of -3.08+/-0.07, and a non-parametric fit shows that the slope remains nearly constant from 30kpc to 300kpc. The total stellar mass in the halo at distances beyond 2 degrees is 1.1x10^10 Solar masses, while that of the smooth component is 3x10^9 Solar masses. Extrapolating into the inner galaxy, the total stellar mass of the smooth halo is plausibly 8x10^9 Solar masses. We detect a substa...

  3. Adsorption geometry, conformation, and electronic structure of 2H-octaethylporphyrin on Ag(111) and Fe metalation in ultra high vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borghetti, Patrizia; Sangaletti, Luigi [I-LAMP and Department of Mathematics and Physics, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Brescia (Italy); Santo, Giovanni Di; Castellarin-Cudia, Carla; Goldoni, Andrea [ST-INSTM micro- and nano-carbon lab., Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s.14 Km. 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Fanetti, Mattia [ST-INSTM micro- and nano-carbon lab., Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s.14 Km. 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14 km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Magnano, Elena; Bondino, Federica [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14 km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the growing interest in the ferromagnetic properties of Fe-octaethylporphyrins (Fe-OEP) for applications in spintronics, methods to produce stable Fe-porphyrins with no Cl atoms are highly demanded. Here, we demonstrate the formation of Fe-OEP layers on Ag(111) single crystal by the ultra high vacuum in situ metalation of the free-base 2H-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethylporphyrin (2H-OEP) molecules. The metalation proceeds exactly as in the case of 2H-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (2H-TPP) on the same substrate. An extensive surface characterization by means of X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, valence band photoemission, and NEXAFS with synchrotron radiation light provides information on molecular conformation and electronic structure in the monolayer and multilayer cases. We demonstrate that the presence of the ethyl groups affects the tilt of the adsorbed molecules, the conformation of the macrocycle, and the polarization screening in multilayers, but has only a minor effect in the metalation process with respect to 2H-TPP.

  4. Development of a portable scratch test device for probing strength, ductility and structural distress in metal materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palkovic, Steven D. (Steven David)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practicing civil, mechanical, aerospace, petroleum and structural engineers are often faced with the complexity of evaluating the quality and integrity of new or existing structures. Recent academic research has demonstrated ...

  5. Optical Response of Oriented and Highly Anisotropic Subwavelength Metallic Nanostructure Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Danny J.; Mendoza, Albert; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we describe the optical transmission response of novel coatings with subwavelength metallic structures based on a quasi-open ring resonator design fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering. This offers a relatively simple approach to the fabrication of dense arrays of optically responsive subwavelength structures over large areas with an oriented two-dimensional array of parallel Au nanoshells. The cross-section of the individual lines is “L” shaped with an approximately 95 nm width, 75 nm height, and pitch of 140 nm to yield a resonant optical response in the visible/near infrared spectrum. Along the long axis of the shells, the geometry is wire-like and quasi-infinite in length compared to the cross-section. This highly anisotropic structure has a strongly polarization-dependent optical response. The coatings are characterized via optical transmission measurements as a function of wavelength, polarization, and angle are presented along with complementary numerical modeling results predicting the resonance shift with corresponding changes in fabrication parameters.

  6. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes Based Nanoelectrode Arrays: Fabrication, Evaluation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arrays: Fabrication, Evaluation and Application in Voltammetric Analysis. Carbon Nanotubes Based Nanoelectrode Arrays: Fabrication, Evaluation and Application in...

  8. Modeling electrodeposition for LIGA microdevice fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffiths, S.K.; Nilson, R.H.; Bradshaw, R.W. [and others

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand and to help optimize the electroforming portion of the LIGA process, we have developed one and two-dimensional numerical models describing electrode-position of metal into high aspect-ratio molds. The one-dimensional model addresses dissociation, diffusion, electromigration, and deposition of multiple ion species. The two-dimensional model is limited to a single species, but includes transport induced by forced flow of electrolyte outside the mold and by buoyancy associated with metal ion depletion within the mold. To guide model development and to validate these models, we have also conducted a series of laboratory experiments using a sulfamate bath to deposit nickel in cylindrical molds having aspect ratios up to twenty-five. The experimental results indicate that current densities well in excess of the diffusion-limited currents may still yield metal deposits of acceptable morphology. However, the numerical models demonstrate that such large ion fluxes cannot be sustained by convection within the mold resulting from flow across the mold top. Instead, calculations suggest that the observed enhancement of transport probably results from natural convection within the molds, and that buoyancy-driven flows may be critical to metal ion transport even in micron-scale features having very large aspect ratios. Taking advantage of this enhanced ion transport may allow order-of-magnitude reductions in electroforming times for LIGA microdevice fabrication. 42 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Technique to prepare metallic multi-point field emission sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuyama, F.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is proposed which enables one to fabricate multi-point field emission sources of bakeable structure. The technique is based on the cathodic growth of metallic needle crystal from metal carbonyl vapors and has so far been confirmed to provide emission sources of W, Mo, and Mo/sub 2/C. The field emission sources prepared by this technique are highly resistive to thermal treatment and actually yield field ions possessing satisfactory intensities when used as the ion sources of a field ion mass spectrometer. It is believed that the application of these field emission sources is not restricted to mass spectrometry but can be extended to other ion and electron optical systems. The technique may thus open new areas in field emission technology.

  10. CVD of refractory amorphous metal alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tenhover, M. [The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States). Technology Div.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a novel process is described for the fabrication of multi-metallic amorphous metal alloy coatings using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Of special interest in this work are amorphous metal alloys containing Mo and/or Cr which have high crystallization temperatures and readily available low decomposition temperature metal-bearing precursors. The conditions for amorphous alloy formation via CVD are described as well as the chemical properties of these materials. High temperature, aqueous corrosion tests have shown these materials (especially those containing Cr) are among the most corrosion resistant metal alloys known.

  11. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  12. A New Structural Form in the SAM/Metal-Dependent O;#8209;Methyltransferase Family: MycE from the Mycinamicin Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akey, David L.; Li, Shengying; Konwerski, Jamie R.; Confer, Laura A.; Bernard, Steffen M.; Anzai, Yojiro; Kato, Fumio; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L. (Michigan); (Toho)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O-linked methylation of sugar substituents is a common modification in the biosynthesis of many natural products and is catalyzed by multiple families of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM or AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases (MTs). Mycinamicins, potent antibiotics from Micromonospora griseorubida, can be methylated at two positions on a 6-deoxyallose substituent. The first methylation is catalyzed by MycE, a SAM- and metal-dependent MT. Crystal structures were determined for MycE bound to the product S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (AdoHcy) and magnesium, both with and without the natural substrate mycinamicin VI. This represents the first structure of a natural product sugar MT in complex with its natural substrate. MycE is a tetramer of a two-domain polypeptide, comprising a C-terminal catalytic MT domain and an N-terminal auxiliary domain, which is important for quaternary assembly and for substrate binding. The symmetric MycE tetramer has a novel MT organization in which each of the four active sites is formed at the junction of three monomers within the tetramer. The active-site structure supports a mechanism in which a conserved histidine acts as a general base, and the metal ion helps to position the methyl acceptor and to stabilize a hydroxylate intermediate. A conserved tyrosine is suggested to support activity through interactions with the transferred methyl group from the SAM methyl donor. The structure of the free enzyme reveals a dramatic order-disorder transition in the active site relative to the S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine complexes, suggesting a mechanism for product/substrate exchange through concerted movement of five loops and the polypeptide C-terminus.

  13. Intraocular lens fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salazar, Mike A. (Albuquerque, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention describes a method for fabricating an intraocular lens made rom clear Teflon.TM., Mylar.TM., or other thermoplastic material having a thickness of about 0.025 millimeters. These plastic materials are thermoformable and biocompatable with the human eye. The two shaped lenses are bonded together with a variety of procedures which may include thermosetting and solvent based adhesives, laser and impulse welding, and ultrasonic bonding. The fill tube, which is used to inject a refractive filling material is formed with the lens so as not to damage the lens shape. A hypodermic tube may be included inside the fill tube.

  14. Intraocular lens fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salazar, M.A.; Foreman, L.R.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention describes a method for fabricating an intraocular lens made from clear Teflon{trademark}, Mylar{trademark}, or other thermoplastic material having a thickness of about 0.025 millimeters. These plastic materials are thermoformable and biocompatable with the human eye. The two shaped lenses are bonded together with a variety of procedures which may include thermosetting and solvent based adhesives, laser and impulse welding, and ultrasonic bonding. The fill tube, which is used to inject a refractive filling material is formed with the lens so as not to damage the lens shape. A hypodermic tube may be included inside the fill tube. 13 figs.

  15. Mask fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Gregory F. (Oakland, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating masks and reticles useful for projection lithography systems. An absorber layer is conventionally patterned using a pattern and etch process. Following the step of patterning, the entire surface of the remaining top patterning photoresist layer as well as that portion of an underlying protective photoresist layer where absorber material has been etched away is exposed to UV radiation. The UV-exposed regions of the protective photoresist layer and the top patterning photoresist layer are then removed by solution development, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plasma etch and strip and chances for damaging the surface of the substrate or coatings.

  16. Metal aminoboranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH2BH3)n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  17. aircraft fuselage structures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stabilizer. All structural components are fabricated from oven-cured laminated carbon composite materials using uniaxial and biaxial prepreg fabric. In the current effort, the...

  18. Distinct superconducting states in the pressure-induced metallic structures of the nominal semimetal Bi[subscript 4]Te[subscript 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffries, J.R.; Sharma, A.L. Lima; Sharma, P.A.; Spataru, C.D.; McCall, S.K.; Sugar, J.D.; Weir, S.T.; Vohra, Y.K. (Sandia); (LLNL); (UAB)

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The end members, Bi and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, of the infinitely adaptive (Bi{sub 2})m(Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub n} series of compounds have not only been revealed to be topological insulators under the appropriate conditions, but have also been shown to be superconductors under pressure, suggesting the potential for bulk superconductor-topological-insulator interfaces and associated quantum computing applications. Herein, we report the pressure-dependent evolution of the structure and electrical transport of the nominal semimetal Bi4Te{sub 3}, a member of the (Bi{sub 2})m(Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub n} series. Under pressure, Bi4Te{sub 3} undergoes several structural phase transformations, ultimately yielding a metallic body-centered-cubic structure exhibiting superconductivity with a maximum T{sub c} = 8.4 K at 16.2 GPa. The occurrence of structure-dependent superconductivity in Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} is remarkably similar to the end members of the (Bi{sub 2})m(Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub n} series, intimating a convergence to high-pressure universal behavior that may expose the subtle variations that lead to the topological insulating and superconducting states in these systems.

  19. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic is described which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers. 3 figures.

  20. Series connected OLED structure and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin; Balch, Ernest Wayne; Duggal, Anil Raj; Heller, Christian Maria; Guida, Renato; Nealon, William Francis; Faircloth, Tami Janene

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A light emitting device comprises a plurality of organic light emitting diode (OLED) modules. The OLED modules are arranged into a series group where the individual OLED modules are electrically connected in series. The device is configured to be coupled to a power supply. A display is also provided. The display includes a plurality of OLED modules arranged to depict a shape selected from the group consisting of at least one letter, at least one number, at least one image, and a combination thereof.

  1. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Kucera, Eugenia H. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers.

  2. AFIP-6 Fabrication Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Moore; M. Craig Marshall

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AFIP-6 (ATR Full-size plate In center flux trap Position) experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Two qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP-6 experiment; to be irradiated in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts, including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  3. AFIP-2 Fabrication Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn Moore

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full-size Plate In Center Flux Trap Position (AFIP)-2 experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Two qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP 2 experiment to be irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory ATR. This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts, including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  4. AFIP-4 Fabrication Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Moore

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AFIP-4 (ATR Full –size-plate In center flux trap Position) experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Twelve qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP-4 experiment; to be irradiated in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts; including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  5. Synthesis of bulk metallic glass foam by powder extrusion with a fugitive second phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Min Ha; Sordelet, Daniel J. [Materials and Engineering Physics Program, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk metallic glass foams with 12 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length having a density of 4.62 g/cm{sup 3} (approximately 58.3% of theoretical) were fabricated by extruding a powder mixture comprised of 60 vol % Ni{sub 59}Zr{sub 20}Ti{sub 16}Si{sub 2}Sn{sub 3} metallic glass blended with 40 vol % brass followed by dissolution of the fugitive brass in an aqueous HNO{sub 3} solution. The final structure consists of continuously connected, high aspect ratio metallic glass struts surrounded by {approx}40 vol % of homogeneously distributed ellipsoid-shaped pores having nominal diameters between 10 and 50 {mu}m.

  6. Method for producing fabrication material for constructing micrometer-scaled machines, fabrication material for micrometer-scaled machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, F.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing fabrication material for use in the construction of nanometer-scaled machines is provided whereby similar protein molecules are isolated and manipulated at predetermined residue positions so as to facilitate noncovalent interaction, but without compromising the folding configuration or native structure of the original protein biomodules. A fabrication material is also provided consisting of biomodules systematically constructed and arranged at specific solution parameters.

  7. Temperature dependent junction capacitance-voltage characteristics of Ni embedded TiN/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si metal–insulator–semiconductor structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, J.; Nath, T. K., E-mail: tnath@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Chattopadhyay, S. [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Amity Institute of Nano Technology, Amity University, Sector-125, Noida, Uttar Pradesh 201313 (India)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the junction capacitance–voltage characteristics of highly textured/epitaxial Ni nanoparticle embedded in TiN matrix (TiN(Ni)) metal-insulator-semiconductor TiN(Ni)/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (100) heterojunction in the temperature range of 10–300?K. This heterojunction behaves as metal-semiconductor junction with unavoidable leakage through native oxide SiO{sub 2} layer. The clockwise hysteresis loop has been observed in the capacitance-voltage characteristics measured at various frequencies mainly due to presence of trap centers at the TiN(Ni)/SiO{sub 2} interface and these are temperature dependent. The spin-dependent trap charge effect at the interface influences the quadratic nature of the capacitance with magnetic field. The junction magnetocapacitance (JMC) is observed to be dependent on both temperature and frequency. The highest JMC of this heterojunction has been observed at 200?K at higher frequencies (100?kHz–1?MHz). It is found that there is not much effect of band structure modification under magnetic field causing the JMC.

  8. Assessing electronic structure approaches for gas-ligand interactions in metal-organic frameworks: The CO{sub 2}-benzene complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, Jonathon [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neaton, Jeffrey B., E-mail: jbneaton@lbl.gov [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption of gas molecules in metal-organic frameworks is governed by many factors, the most dominant of which are the interaction of the gas with open metal sites, and the interaction of the gas with the ligands. Herein, we examine the latter class of interaction in the context of CO{sub 2} binding to benzene. We begin by clarifying the geometry of the CO{sub 2}–benzene complex. We then generate a benchmark binding curve using a coupled-cluster approach with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] at the complete basis set (CBS) limit. Against this ?CCSD(T)/CBS standard, we evaluate a plethora of electronic structure approximations: Hartree-Fock, second-order Mřller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the resolution-of-the-identity approximation, attenuated MP2, and a number of density functionals with and without different empirical and nonempirical van der Waals corrections. We find that finite-basis MP2 significantly overbinds the complex. On the other hand, even the simplest empirical correction to standard density functionals is sufficient to bring the binding energies to well within 1 kJ/mol of the benchmark, corresponding to an error of less than 10%; PBE-D in particular performs well. Methods that explicitly include nonlocal correlation kernels, such as VV10, vdW-DF2, and ?B97X-V, perform with similar accuracy for this system, as do ?B97X and M06-L.

  9. "Fractal Growth Modeling of Electrochemical Deposition in Solid Freeform Fabrication," J. G. Zhou, Z. He and J. Guo, Proceedings of the Tenth Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, Austin, Texas, August, 1999.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jack

    "Fractal Growth Modeling of Electrochemical Deposition in Solid Freeform Fabrication," J. G. Zhou, August, 1999. FRACTAL GROWTH MODELING OF ELECTROCHEMICAL DEPOSITION IN SOLID FREEFORM FABRICATION Jack G deposition among metal particles during ECLD-SFF is a fractal growth process. The fractal dimension

  10. Reactive binders for metal parts produced by Three Dimensional Printing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Helen Jean

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three Dimensional Printing (3DP) is a solid free form fabrication process which enables the construction of parts directly from computer-aided design (CAD) models. In the current process, metal parts are produced by printing ...

  11. Near room temperature lithographically processed metal-oxide transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Hui, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully lithographic process at near-room-temperature was developed for the purpose of fabricating transistors based on metal-oxide channel materials. The combination of indium tin oxide (ITO) as the source/drain electrodes, ...

  12. A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Ping

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (R{sub s} = 10 ohms/square ({Omega}#2;/?)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2{Omega}#2;/?. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

  13. One-Step Fabrication of High-Performance All-SWNT Field-Effect Transistors by Patterned Growth Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    transfer characteristics, fabricated by modifying our SAM-based patterning technique [4]. With an improved pattering technique of SAM film, metal catalysts are dip-coated in SAM removed area. By ACCVD technique). Fig. 1. (a) SEM images of the fabricated all-SWNT FET. The electrode-shape films consisted

  14. Synthesis, Structure Elucidation, and Redox Properties of [superscript 99]Tc Complexes of Lacunary Wells-Dawson Polyoxometalates: Insights into Molecular [superscript 99]Tc-Metal Oxide Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Howell, Robertha C.; Mbomekalle, Israel M.; Lukens, Jr., Wayne W.; Bian, Fang; Mausolf, Edward; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Francesconi, Lynn C. (UNLV); (City U/NY)

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotope {sup 99}Tc ({beta}{sub max}, 293.7; half-life, 2.1 x 10{sup 5} years) is an abundant product of uranium-235 fission in nuclear reactors and is present throughout the radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Understanding and controlling the extensive redox chemistry of {sup 99}Tc is important in identifying tunable strategies to separate {sup 99}Tc from spent fuel and from waste tanks and, once separated, to identify and develop an appropriately stable waste form for {sup 99}Tc. Polyoxometalates (POMs), nanometer-sized models for metal oxide solid-state materials, are used in this study to provide a molecular level understanding of the speciation and redox chemistry of incorporated {sup 99}Tc. In this study, {sup 99}Tc complexes of the ({alpha}{sub 2}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}){sup 10-} and ({alpha}{sub 1}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}){sup 10-} isomers were prepared. Ethylene glycol was used as a 'transfer ligand' to minimize the formation of TcO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O. The solution structures, formulations, and purity of TcVO({alpha}{sub 1}/{alpha}{sub 2}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}){sup 7-} were determined by multinuclear NMR. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the complexes is in agreement with the formulation and structures determined from {sup 31}P and {sup 183}W NMR. Preliminary electrochemistry results are consistent with the EXAFS results, showing a facile reduction of the TcVO({alpha}{sub 1}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}){sup 7-} species compared to the TcVO({alpha}{sub 2}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}){sup 7-} analog. The {alpha}{sub 1} defect is unique in that a basic oxygen atom is positioned toward the {alpha}{sub 1} site, and the Tc{sup V}O center appears to form a dative metal-metal bond with a framework W site. These attributes may lead to the assistance of protonation events that facilitate reduction. Electrochemistry comparison shows that the ReV analogs are about 200 mV more difficult to reduce in accordance with periodic trends.

  15. Synthesis, structure elucidation and redox properties of 99Tc complexes of lacunary Wells Dawson polyoxometalates: insights into molecular 99Tc - metal oxide interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Howell, Robertha C.; Mbomekalle, Israel M.; Lukens Jr, Wayne W.; Bian, Fang; Mausolf, Edward; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotope 99Tc (beta max: 250 keV, half-life: 2 x 105 year) is an abundant product of uranium-235 fission in nuclear reactors and is present throughout the radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford and Savannah River. Understanding and controlling the extensive redox chemistry of 99Tc is important to identify tunable strategies to separate 99Tc from spent fuel and from waste tanks and once separated, to identify and develop an appropriately stable waste-form for 99Tc. Polyoxometalates (POMs), nanometer sized models for metal oxide solid-state materials, are used in this study to provide a molecular level understanding of the speciation and redox chemistry of incorporated 99Tc. In this study, 99Tc complexes of the (alpha 2-P2W17O61)10- and (alpha 1-P2W17O61)10- isomers were prepared. Ethylene glycol was used as a"transfer ligand" to minimize the formation of TcO2 cdot xH2O. The solution structures, formulations, and purity of TcVO(alpha 1/alpha 2-P2W17O61)7- were determined by multinuclear NMR. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the complexes are in agreement with the formulation and structures determined from 31P and 183W NMR. Preliminary electrochemistry results are consistent with the EXAFS results, showing a facile reduction of the TcVO(alpha 1-P2W17O61)7- species compared to the TcVO(alpha 2-P2W17O61)7- analog. The alpha1- defect is unique in that a basic oxygen atom is positioned toward the alpha1- site and the TcVO center appears to form a dative metal-metal bond with a framework W site. These attributes may lead to the assistance of protonation events that facilitate reduction. Electrochemistry comparison shows that the ReV analogs are about 200 mV more difficult to reduce in accordance with periodic trends.

  16. Fabrication methods for low impedance lithium polymer electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chern, T.S.; MacFadden, K.O.; Johnson, S.L.

    1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for fabricating an electrolyte-electrode composite suitable for high energy alkali metal battery that includes mixing composite electrode materials with excess liquid, such as ethylene carbonate or propylene carbonate, to produce an initial formulation, and forming a shaped electrode therefrom. The excess liquid is then removed from the electrode to compact the electrode composite which can be further compacted by compression. The resulting electrode exhibits at least a 75% lower resistance.

  17. Fabrication methods for low impedance lithium polymer electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chern, Terry Song-Hsing (Midlothian, VA); MacFadden, Kenneth Orville (Highland, MD); Johnson, Steven Lloyd (Arbutus, MD)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating an electrolyte-electrode composite suitable for high energy alkali metal battery that includes mixing composite electrode materials with excess liquid, such as ethylene carbonate or propylene carbonate, to produce an initial formulation, and forming a shaped electrode therefrom. The excess liquid is then removed from the electrode to compact the electrode composite which can be further compacted by compression. The resulting electrode exhibits at least a 75% lower resistance.

  18. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  19. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arman, Bedri [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cagin, Tahir [TEXAS A& M UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  20. Metal inks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  1. Heteroepitaxial VO{sub 2} thin films on GaN: Structure and metal-insulator transition characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou You; Ramanathan, Shriram [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic integration of correlated oxide and nitride semiconductors may open up new opportunities in solid-state electronics and opto-electronics that combine desirable functional properties of both classes of materials. Here, we report on epitaxial growth and phase transition-related electrical properties of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) thin films on GaN epitaxial layers on c-sapphire. The epitaxial relation is determined to be (010){sub vo{sub 2}} parallel (0001){sub GaN} parallel (0001){sub A1{sub 2O{sub 3}}} and [100]{sub vo{sub 2}} parallel [1210]{sub GaN} parallel [0110]{sub A1{sub 2O{sub 3}}} from x-ray diffraction. VO{sub 2} heteroepitaxial growth and lattice mismatch are analyzed by comparing the GaN basal plane (0001) with the almost close packed corrugated oxygen plane in vanadium dioxide and an experimental stereographic projection describing the orientation relationship is established. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests a slightly oxygen rich composition at the surface, while Raman scattering measurements suggests that the quality of GaN layer is not significantly degraded by the high-temperature deposition of VO{sub 2}. Electrical characterization of VO{sub 2} films on GaN indicates that the resistance changes by about four orders of magnitude upon heating, similar to epitaxial VO{sub 2} films grown directly on c-sapphire. It is shown that the metal-insulator transition could also be voltage-triggered at room temperature and the transition threshold voltage scaling variation with temperature is analyzed in the framework of a current-driven Joule heating model. The ability to synthesize high quality correlated oxide films on GaN with sharp phase transition could enable new directions in semiconductor-photonic integrated devices.

  2. A New Use for a Familiar Fold: the X-Ray Crystal Structure of GTP-Bound GTP Cyclohydrolase III From Methanocaldococcus Jannaschii Reveals a Two Metal Ion Catalytic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, S.D.; Roberts, S.A.; Zegeer, A.M.; Montfort, W.R.; Bandarian, V.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH) III from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, which catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 2-amino-5-formylamino-6-ribosylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5'-phosphate (FAPy), has been shown to require Mg{sup 2+} for catalytic activity and is activated by monovalent cations such as K{sup +} and ammonium [Graham, D. E., Xu, H., and White, R. H. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 15074-15084]. The reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by a GCH II ortholog (SCO 6655) from Streptomyces coelicolor; however, SCO 6655, like other GCH II proteins, is a zinc-containing protein. The structure of GCH III complexed with GTP solved at 2 {angstrom} resolution clearly shows that GCH III adopts a distinct fold that is closely related to the palm domains of phosphodiesterases, such as DNA polymerase I. GCH III is a tetramer of identical subunits; each monomer is composed of an N- and a C-terminal domain that adopt nearly superimposible structures, suggesting that the protein has arisen by gene duplication. Three metal ions were located in the active site, two of which occupy positions that are analogous to those occupied by divalent metal ions in the structures of a number of palm domain containing proteins, such as DNA polymerase I. Two conserved Asp residues that coordinate the metal ions, which are also found in palm domain containing proteins, are observed in GCH III. Site-directed variants (Asp{yields}Asn) of these residues in GCH III are less active than wild-type. The third metal ion, most likely a potassium ion, is involved in substrate recognition through coordination of O6 of GTP. The arrangement of the metal ions in the active site suggests that GCH III utilizes two metal ion catalysis. The structure of GCH III extends the repertoire of possible reactions with a palm fold to include cyclohydrolase chemistry.

  3. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate materials such as Type 321 and Type 347 austenitic stainless steels, Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for core support structure construction, and Alloy 718 for Threaded Structural Fasteners were among the recommended materials for inclusion in the Code Case. This Task 4 Report identifies the need to address design life beyond 3 x 105 hours, especially in consideration of 60-year design life. A proposed update to the latest Code Case N-201 revision (i.e., Code Case N-201-5) including the items resolved in this report is included as Appendix A.

  4. Enforcement Letter, Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Development & Fabrication Complex - April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex - April 13, 2010 April 13, 2010 Issued to...

  5. Magnesium substitutions in rare-earth metal germanides with the Gd5Si4 type. Synthesis, structure determination and magnetic properties of RE5-xMgxGe4 (RE=Gd-Tm, Lu and Y)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrao, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobash, P H [UNIV. OF DE; Bobev, S [UNIV. OF DE

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of magnesium-substituted rare-earth metal germanides with a general formula RE{sub 5-x}Mg{sub x}Ge{sub 4} (x {approx} 1.0-2.3; RE =Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) have been synthesized by high-temperature reactions and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. These compounds crystallize with the common Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4} type in the orthorhombic space group Pnma (No. 62; Z =4; Pearson's code oP36) and do not appear to undergo temperature-induced crystallographic phase transitions down to 120 K. Replacing rare-earth metal atoms with Mg, up to nearly 45 % at., reduces the valence electron count and is clearly expressed in the subtle changes of the Ge-Ge and metal-metal bonding. Magnetization measurements as a function of the temperature and the applied field reveal complex magnetic structures at cryogenic temperatures, and Curie-Weiss paramagnetic behavior at higher temperatures. The observed local moment magnetism is consistent with RE+ ground states in all cases. In the magnetically ordered phases, the magnetization cannot reach saturation in fields up to 50 kOe. The structural trends across the series and the variations of hte magnetic properties as a function of the Mg content are also discussed. KEYWORDS: Rare-earth intermetallics, germanides, crystal structure,Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4} type.

  6. Epsilon Metal Waste Form for Immobilization of Noble Metals from Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Rohatgi, Aashish; Zumhoff, Mac R.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epsilon metal (?-metal), an alloy of Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc, is being developed as a waste form to treat and immobilize the undissolved solids and dissolved noble metals from aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel. Epsilon metal is an attractive waste form for several reasons: increased durability relative to borosilicate glass, it can be fabricated without additives (100% waste loading), and in addition it also benefits borosilicate glass waste loading by eliminating noble metals from the glass and thus the processing problems related there insolubility in glass. This work focused on the processing aspects of the epsilon metal waste form development. Epsilon metal is comprised of refractory metals resulting in high reaction temperatures to form the alloy, expected to be 1500 - 2000°C making it a non-trivial phase to fabricate by traditional methods. Three commercially available advanced technologies were identified: spark-plasma sintering, microwave sintering, and hot isostatic pressing, and investigated as potential methods to fabricate this waste form. Results of these investigations are reported and compared in terms of bulk density, phase assemblage (X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis), and microstructure (scanning electron microscopy).

  7. Solid freeform fabrication using chemically reactive suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morisette, Sherry L. (Belmont, MA); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Jennifer A. (Urbana, IL); Dimos, Duane B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of processing parameters and suspension chemorheology on the deposition behavior of SFF components derived from polymeric-based gelcasting suspensions combines the advantages associated with SFF fabrication, including the ability to spatially tailor composition and structure as well as reduced tooling costs, with the improved handling strength afforded by the use of gel based formulations. As-cast free-formed Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 components exhibited uniform particle packing and had minimal macro-defects (e.g., slumping or stair casing) and no discernable micro-defects (e.g., bubbles or cracking).

  8. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  9. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J S; Haslam, J; Lian, T; Day, S; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peters, W; Bayles, R; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E; Ajdelsztajn, A; Grave, O; Aprigliano, L; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, B

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative thermal phase stability, microstructure, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, and corrosion resistance. Some alloy additions are known to promote glass formation and to lower the critical cooling rate [F. Guo, S. J. Poon, Applied Physics Letters, 83 (13) 2575-2577, 2003]. Other elements are known to enhance the corrosion resistance of conventional stainless steels and nickel-based alloys [A. I. Asphahani, Materials Performance, Vol. 19, No. 12, pp. 33-43, 1980] and have been found to provide similar benefits to iron-based amorphous metals. Many of these materials can be cast as relatively thick ingots, or applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. A wide variety of thermal spray processes have been developed by industry, and can be used to apply these new materials as coatings. Any of these can be used for the deposition of the formulations discussed here, with varying degrees of residual porosity and crystalline structure. Thick protective coatings have now been made that are fully dense and completely amorphous in the as-sprayed condition. An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Project will be given, with particular emphasis on the corrosion resistance of several different types of iron-based amorphous metals in various environments of interest. The salt fog test has been used to compare the performance of various wrought alloys, melt-spun ribbons, arc-melted drop-cast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings for their susceptibility to corrosion in marine environments. Electrochemical tests have also been performed in seawater. Spontaneous breakdown of the passive film and localized corrosion require that the open-circuit corrosion potential exceed the critical potential. The resistance to localized corrosion is seawater has been quantified through measurement of the open-circuit corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), the breakdown potential (E{sub crit}) and the repassivation potential (E{sub rp}). The greater the difference between the open-circuit corrosion potential and the repassivation potential ({Delta}E), the more resistant a material is to modes of localized corrosion such as pitting and crevice corrosion. Cyclic polarization (CP) was used as a means of measuring the critical potential (E{sub crit}) relative to the open-circuit corrosion potential (E{sub corr}). Linear polarization (LP) has been used to determine the corrosion current (i{sub corr}) and the corresponding corrosion rate. Other aspects of the materials will also be discussed, as well as potential applications.

  10. Reasonable computing for architectural fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villalon, Rachelle B. (Rachelle Bentajado)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of digital fabrication tools in the architecture industry serve a particular group of individuals whose familiarity of the tools are by trade skill. Machines lack the understanding of people in its ability to ...

  11. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of porous metal emitters for electrospray applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legge, Robert S., Jr

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrospray thrusters provide small, precise thrust with high power efficiencies and variable specific impulses from less than 1000s to over 4000s. The miniaturization and clustering of many emitters together is essential ...

  13. Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

    Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department...

  14. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM); Trowbridge, Frank R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.

  15. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN) [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  16. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  17. Reconfigurable liquid metal based terahertz metamaterials via selective erasure and refilling to the unit cell level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jinqi; Liu, Shuchang; Nahata, Ajay, E-mail: ajay.nahata@utah.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Guruswamy, Sivaraman [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a technique for selectively erasing and refilling unit cells of terahertz (THz) metamaterials. The structures are formed by injecting eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn), a liquid metal at room temperature, into microchannels within a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold fabricated using conventional soft lithography techniques. The thin oxide layer that forms on the surface of EGaIn can be locally dissolved via exposure to hydrochloric acid (HCl) introduced at the surface of the gas permeable PDMS mold. In the absence of the oxide skin, the liquid metal retracts to a position where a stable new oxide layer can be formed, effectively erasing the liquid metal structure in the presence of HCl. After erasing selected structures, EGaIn can be re-injected into microchannels to yield the initial structure. In the case of small unit cells, we show that mechanical pressure can be used to effectively erase individual elements. We use THz time-domain spectroscopy to characterize the distinct transmission properties for each of these different structures.

  18. Advances in LIGA-Based Post-Mold Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, T.R.

    1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The establishment of a process to allow planarization of deep x-ray lithography based microfabncated metal components via diamond lapping has enabled examination of three additional microfabrication issues. The areas of improvement that are discussed include materials, microassembly and packaging, and multilevel fabrication. New materials work has centered on magnetic materials including precision micromagnets and surface treatments of electrodeposited materials. Assembly and packaging has been aided by deep silicon etch processing and the use of conventional precision milling equipment combined with press-tit assembly. Diffhsion bonding is shown to be a particularly important approach to achieving multilevel metal mechanisms and furthermore shows promise for achieving batch assembled and packaged high aspect-ratio metal micromechanics,

  19. Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cardenas, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veauthier, Jackie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

  20. Geometries, Electronic Structures, And Spectral Properties Of Some Metal Free Phthalonitrile Derivatives For Enhancement Of The Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anbarasan, P. M. [Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem-636 011, Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New technologies for direct solar energy conversion have gained more attention in the last few years. In particular, Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are promising in terms of efficiency and low cost [1,2]. Benefited from systematic device engineering and continuous material innovation, a state of the art DSC with a ruthenium sensitizer has achieved a validated efficiency of 11.1%[3] measured under the air mass 1.5 global (AM1.5G) conditions.The optimized geometries of the 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are shown in Fig. 1(a). The frontier molecular orbitals (MO) energies of the dyes 3, 4 Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Nitrophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are shown in Fig. 1(b). The HOMO-LUMO gap of the dye 3, 4 Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile in vacuum is 5.96 eV, 5.54 eV, 5.57 eV, 5.76 eV respectively. The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities, and hyperpolarizabilities of dyes 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile were studied by using density functional theory with hybrid functional B3LYP, and the UV-Vis spectra were investigated by using TDDFT methods. The NBO results suggest that 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are all (D-pi-A) systems. The calculated isotropic polarizability of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is. 85.76, 112.72, 26.63 and 115.13 a.u., respectively. The calculated polarizability anisotropy invariant of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is 74.451, 83.533, 62.653 and 88.526 a.u., respectively. The hyperpolarizabilities of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is 0.80628, 5.60646, 7.7979 and 1.86216 (in a.u.), respectively. The frequencies of strongest IR absorption for 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are 1614 cm{sup -1}, 290 cm{sup -1}, 387 cm{sup -1} and 846 cm{sup -1} and the frequencies of strongest Raman activity for 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are 2345 cm{sup -1}, 2338 cm{sup -1},2329 cm{sup -1}, 2337cm{sup -1}, respectively. The electronic absorption spectral features in visible and near-UV region were assigned based on the qualitative agreement to TDDFT calculations. The absorptions are all ascribed to {pi}{yields}{pi}* transition. The three excited states with the lowest excited energies of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are photoinduced electron transfer processes that contributes sensitization of photo-to-current conversion processes. The interfacial electron transfer between semiconductor TiO{sub 2} electrode and dye sensitizer 3, 4- Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is electron injection process from excited dyes as donor to the semiconductor conduction band. Based on the comparative analysis of geometries, electronic structures, and spectrum properties between 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile the role of amide and methyl groups in phthalonitrile is as follows: it enlarged the distance between electron donor group and semiconductor surface, and decreased the timescale of the electron injection rate, resulted in giving lower conversion efficiency. This indicates that the choice of the appropriate conjugate bridge in dye sensitizer is very important to enhance the performance of DSSC.

  1. Sacrificial template method of fabricating a nanotube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); He, Rongrui (Berkeley, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yi-Ying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of fabricating uniform nanotubes are described in which nanotubes were synthesized as sheaths over nanowire templates, such as using a chemical vapor deposition process. For example, single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are utilized as templates over which gallium nitride (GaN) is epitaxially grown. The ZnO templates are then removed, such as by thermal reduction and evaporation. The completed single-crystalline GaN nanotubes preferably have inner diameters ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, and wall thicknesses between 5 and 50 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the resultant nanotubes are single-crystalline with a wurtzite structure, and are oriented along the <001> direction. The present invention exemplifies single-crystalline nanotubes of materials with a non-layered crystal structure. Similar "epitaxial-casting" approaches could be used to produce arrays and single-crystalline nanotubes of other solid materials and semiconductors. Furthermore, the fabrication of multi-sheath nanotubes are described as well as nanotubes having multiple longitudinal segments.

  2. Analysis of AlN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor structure by using capacitance-frequency-temperature mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Hong-An; Kudo, Masahiro; Suzuki, Toshi-kazu [Center for Nano Materials and Technology, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    AlN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is analyzed by using capacitance-frequency-temperature (C-f-T) mapping. Applying sputtering-deposited AlN, we attained AlN/AlGaN/GaN MIS heterostructure field-effect transistors with much suppressed gate leakage currents, but exhibiting frequency dispersion in C-V characteristics owing to high-density AlN/AlGaN interface states. In order to investigate the interface states deteriorating the device performance, we measured temperature-dependent frequency dispersion in the C-V characteristics. As a result, we obtained C-f-T mapping, whose analysis gives the activation energies of electron trapping, namely the interface state energy levels, for a wide range of the gate biases. This analysis method is auxiliary to the conventional conductance method, serving as a valuable tool for characterization of wide-bandgap devices with deep interface states. From the analysis, we can directly evaluate the gate-control efficiency of the devices.

  3. IMPROVED V II log(gf) VALUES, HYPERFINE STRUCTURE CONSTANTS, AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.; Den Hartog, E. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sneden, C. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Cowan, J. J., E-mail: mpwood@wisc.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: cowan@nhn.ou.edu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New experimental absolute atomic transition probabilities are reported for 203 lines of V II. Branching fractions are measured from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer and an echelle spectrometer. The branching fractions are normalized with radiative lifetime measurements to determine the new transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found between this work and previously reported V II transition probabilities. Two spectrometers, independent radiometric calibration methods, and independent data analysis routines enable a reduction in systematic uncertainties, in particular those due to optical depth errors. In addition, new hyperfine structure constants are measured for selected levels by least squares fitting line profiles in the FTS spectra. The new V II data are applied to high resolution visible and UV spectra of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 to determine new, more accurate V abundances. Lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential are used to search for non-LTE effects. Very good agreement is found between our new solar photospheric V abundance, log ?(V) = 3.95 from 15 V II lines, and the solar-system meteoritic value. In HD 84937, we derive [V/H] = –2.08 from 68 lines, leading to a value of [V/Fe] = 0.24.

  4. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  5. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  6. Controlling self-assembly within nanospace for peptide nanoparticle fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chau, Ying

    ,5 Moreover, short peptide building blocks can be designed to enable a bottom-up construction of smart provide natural building blocks for the fabrication of well-ordered structures and advanced materials.4 simultaneously be obtained from the same building blocks.9 Different nanostructure morphologies are desired

  7. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) designs, analyzes, and fabricates pressure vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    vessels using: n ASME B&PV Code, Section VIII, Division 1 n ASME B&PV Code, Section VIII, Division 2 n ASME B&PV Code, Section VIII, Division 3 n ASME Pressure Vessels for Human Occupancy n American Bureau for the Design, Fabrication, and Erection of Structural Steel for Buildings" n Fabrication n ASME B&PV Code

  8. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Li, Wenguang (Elgin, IL); Bailey, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Gao, Yuan (Brewer, ME)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  9. Hyperbolic Metamaterial Feasible for Fabrication with Direct Laser Writing Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xu; Güney, Durdu Ö

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulated emission depletion microscopy inspired direct laser writing (STED-DLW) processes can offer diffraction-unlimited fabrication of 3D-structures, not possible with traditional electron-beam or optical lithography. We propose a hyperbolic metamaterial for fabrication with STED-DLW. First, we design meandering wire structures with three different magnetic dipoles which can be excited under different incidences of light. Then, based on effective parameters corresponding to normal incidence and lateral incidence, we find that the hyperbolic dispersion relation for five-layer structure appears between 15THz to 20THz. Finally, we investigate the influence of imaginary parts of the effective parameters on the metamaterial dispersion. The proposed metamaterial structure has also potential for three-dimensionally isotropic permeability despite geometric anisotropy.

  10. Conduction properties of metal/organic monolayer/semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; Bishop, A.; Gim, Y.; Shi, X.B.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Jia, Q.X. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have fabricated and characterized rectifying devices made of metal/organic monolayer/semiconductor heterostructures. The devices consist of an organic barrier layer sandwiched between an aluminum (Al) metal contact and a {ital p}-type Si semiconductor. The barrier materials were chosen from three types of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with different electronic properties: (1) wide-band gap poly(diallydimethyl ammonium) chloride (PDDA), (2) narrow-band gap PDDA/NiPc (nickel phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate), and (3) donor type PDDA/PPP (poly {ital p}-quaterphenylene-disulfonic-dicarboxylic acid). From current{endash}voltage (I{endash}V) measurements at room temperature, we have found the turn-on voltage of the devices can be tuned by varying the structure, hence electronic properties, of the organic monolayers, and that there exists a power-law dependence of {ital I} on V, I{proportional_to}V{sup {alpha}}, with the exponent {alpha}=2.2 for PDDA, 2.7 for PDDA/NiPc, and 1.44 for PDDA/PPP as the barrier layer, respectively. Our results imply that the transport properties are controlled by both the electronic properties of the SAMs and those of the metal and semiconductor, as indicated by the power-law dependence of the I{endash}V characteristics. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Understanding and Tailoring the Mechanical Properties of LIGA Fabricated Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Lavan, D.A.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    LIGA fabricated materials and components exhibit several processing issues affecting their metallurgical and mechanical properties, potentially limiting their usefulness for MEMS applications. For example, LIGA processing by metal electrodeposition is very sensitive to deposition conditions which causes significant processing lot variations of mechanical and metallurgical properties. Furthermore, the process produces a material with a highly textured lenticular rnicrostructural morphology suggesting an anisotropic material response. Understanding and controlling out-of-plane anisotropy is desirable for LIGA components designed for out-of-plane flexures. Previous work by the current authors focused on results from a miniature servo-hydraulic mechanical test frame constructed for characterizing LIGA materials. Those results demonstrated microstructural and mechanical properties dependencies with plating bath current density in LIGA fabricated nickel (LIGA Ni). This presentation builds on that work and fosters a methodology for controlling the properties of LIGA fabricated materials through processing. New results include measurement of mechanical properties of LIGA fabricated copper (LIGA Cu), out-of-plane and localized mechanical property measurements using compression testing and nanoindentation of LIGA Ni and LIGA Cu.

  12. Fabrication of Pd/Pd-Alloy Films by Surfactant Induced Electroless Plating for Hydrogen Separation from Advanced Coal Gasification Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilias, Shamsuddin; Kumar, Dhananjay

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag composite membranes on microporous stainless steel substrate (MPSS) were fabricated by a novel electroless plating (EP) process. In the conventional Pd-EP process, the oxidation-reduction reactions between Pd-complex and hydrazine result in an evolution of NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} gas bubbles. When adhered to the substrate surface and in the pores, these gas bubbles hinder uniform Pd-film deposition which results in dendrite growth leading to poor film formation. This problem was addressed by introducing cationic surfactant in the electroless plating process known as surfactant induced electroless plating (SIEP). The unique features of this innovation provide control of Pd-deposition rate, and Pd-grain size distribution. The surfactant molecules play an important role in the EP process by tailoring grain size and the process of agglomeration by removing tiny gas bubbles through adsorption at the gas-liquid interface. As a result surfactant can tailor a nanocrystalline Pd, Cu and Ag deposition in the film resulting in reduced membrane film thickness. Also, it produces a uniform, agglomerated film structure. The Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag membranes on MPSS support were fabricated by sequential deposition using SIEP method. The pre- and post-annealing characterizations of these membranes (Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag on MPSS substrate) were carried out by SEM, EDX, XRD, and AFM studies. The SEM images show significant improvement of the membrane surface morphology, in terms of metal grain structures and grain agglomeration compared to the membranes fabricated by conventional EP process. The SEM images and helium gas-tightness studies indicate that dense and thinner films of Pd, Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag membranes can be produced with shorter deposition time using surfactant. H{sub 2} Flux through the membranes fabricated by SIEP shows large improvement compared to those by CEP with comparable permselectivity. Pd-MPSS composite membrane was subjected to test for long term performance and thermal cycling (573 - 723 - 573 K) at 15 psi pressure drop for 1200 hours. Pd membranes showed excellent hydrogen permeability and thermal stability during the operational period. Under thermal cycling (573 K - 873 K - 573 K), Pd-Cu-MPSS membrane was stable and retained hydrogen permeation characteristics for over three months of operation. From this limited study, we conclude that SIEP is viable method for fabrication of defect-free, robust Pd-alloy membranes for high-temperature H{sub 2}-separation applications.

  13. Epsilon Metal Summary Report FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Epsilon-metal ({var_epsilon}-metal) phase was selected in FY 2009 as a potential waste form to for immobilizing the noble metals found in the undissolved solids + aqueous stream, and the soluble Tc from ion-exchange process, each resulting from proposed aqueous reprocessing. {var_epsilon}-metal phase is observed in used nuclear fuel and the natural reactors of Oklobono in Gabon, where the long-term corrosion behavior was demonstrated. This makes {var_epsilon}-metal a very attractive waste form. Last fiscal year, {var_epsilon}-metal was successfully fabricated by combining the five-metals, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd and Re (surrogate for Tc), into pellets followed by consolidation with an arc melter. The arc melter produced fully dense samples with the epsilon structure. However, some chemistry differences were observed in the microstructure that resulted in regions rich in Re and Mo, and others rich in Pd, while Ru and Rh remained fairly constant throughout. This year, thermal stability (air), and corrosion testing of the samples fabricated by arc melting were the main focus for experimental work. Thermal stability was measured with a differential scanning calorimeter - thermogravimetric analyzer, by both ramp heating as well as step heating. There is clear evidence during the ramp heating experiment of an exothermic event + a weight loss peak both beginning at {approx}700 C. Step heating showed an oxidation event at {approx}690 C with minimal weight gain that occurs just before the weight loss event at 700 C. The conclusion being that the e-metal begins to oxidize and then become volatile. These findings are useful for considering the effects of voloxidation process. Three different pellets were subjected to electrochemical testing to study the corrosion behavior of the epsilon-metal phase in various conditions, namely acidic, basic, saline, and inert. Test was done according to an interim procedure developed for the alloy metal waste form. First an open circuit potential was measured, followed by linear polarization sweeps. The linear polarization sweep range was the Tafel equation was fit to the linear polarization sweep data to determine the corrosion rate of each pellet in each test solution. The average calculated corrosion rates of the three pellets according to solution conditions were: -1.91 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH), -1.48 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.01 M NaCl), -8.77 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), -2.09 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaCl), and -1.54 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.01 M NaCl). Three single-pass flow through (SPFT) test were conducted at a flow rate of 10 ml/day, at 90 C, and pH of 2.5, 7.0, and 9.0 for up to 322 days. Results of the tests indicate that dissolution rates were 5 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup 2} d{sup -1} at pH 9.0, 1.2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 7.0, and 2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 2.5. The sample used for the pH 7.0 SPFT test contains extra Re compared to samples used for the other two SPFT test, which came from a single pellet. The corrosion data measured this year indicate that the {var_epsilon}-metal phase is chemically durable. The two chemically different phases, but structurally the same, behave differently during dissolution according to the microstructure changes observed in both the electrochemical and in SPFT test. Characterization of the test specimens after testing suggests that the dissolution is complex and involves oxidative dissolution followed by precipitation of both oxide and metallic phases. These data suggest that the dissolution in the electrochemical and SPFT tests is different; a process that needs further investigation.

  14. Lateral electrodeposition of compositionally modulated metal layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hearne, Sean J

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making a laterally modulated metallic structure that is compositionally modulated in the lateral direction with respect to a substrate.

  15. Three-dimensional nanostructures fabricated by stacking pre-patterned monocrystalline silicon nanomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucetola, Corey Patrick

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers the viability of nanomembrane handling and stacking approaches to enable the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nano-structured materials. Sequentially stacking previously-patterned membranes to ...

  16. Fabrication of a High-Brightness Blue-Light-Emitting Diode Using a ZnO-Nanowire Array Grown on p-GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Fabrication of a High-Brightness Blue-Light-Emitting Diode Using a ZnO-Nanowire Array Grown on p-GaN of metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), gallium nitride (GaN) has become the most important GaN nanowires (NWs) have also been fabricated, and nanoLEDs are an active field of research.[5

  17. Targets and processes for fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, Thomas (Dresden, DE); Malekos, Steven (Reno, NV); Korgan, Grant (Reno, NV); Adams, Jesse (Reno, NV); Sentoku, Yasuhiko (Reno, NV); Le Galloudec, Nathalie (Reno, NV); Fuchs, Julien (Paris, FR)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides targets including a metal layer and defining a hollow inner surface. The hollow inner surface has an internal apex. The distance between at least two opposing points of the internal apex is less than about 15 .mu.m. In particular examples, the distance is less than about 1 .mu.m. Particular implementations of the targets are free standing. The targets have a number of disclosed shaped, including cones, pyramids, hemispheres, and capped structures. The present disclosure also provides arrays of such targets. Also provided are methods of forming targets, such as the disclosed targets, using lithographic techniques, such as photolithographic techniques. In particular examples, a target mold is formed from a silicon wafer and then one or more sides of the mold are coated with a target material, such as one or more metals.

  18. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  19. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  20. Digital fabrication in the architectural design process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seely, Jennifer C. K., 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital fabrication is affecting the architectural design process due to the increasingly important role it has in the fabrication of architectural models. Many design professionals, professors, and students have experienced ...

  1. 4.212 Design Fabrication, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sass, Lawrence

    Design Fabrication is an introductory course in the field of advanced computing, prototyping and building fabrication. The class is focused on the relationship between design, various forms of computer modeling both explicit ...

  2. Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions and minerals. Bacterial wall structure and implications for interaction with metal ions and minerals....

  3. Microoptical system and fabrication method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Microoptical systems with clear aperture of about one millimeter or less are fabricated from a layer of photoresist using a lithographic process to define the optical elements. A deep X-ray source is typically used to expose the photoresist. Exposure and development of the photoresist layer can produce planar, cylindrical, and radially symmetric micro-scale optical elements, comprising lenses, mirrors, apertures, diffractive elements, and prisms, monolithically formed on a common substrate with the mutual optical alignment required to provide the desired system functionality. Optical alignment can be controlled to better than one micron accuracy. Appropriate combinations of structure and materials enable optical designs that include corrections for chromatic and other optical aberrations. The developed photoresist can be used as the basis for a molding operation to produce microoptical systems made of a range of optical materials. Finally, very complex microoptical systems can be made with as few as three lithographic exposures.

  4. Microoptical System And Fabrication Method Therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microoptical systems with clear aperture of about one millimeter or less are fabricated from a layer of photoresist using a lithographic process to define the optical elements. A deep X-ray source is typically used to expose the photoresist. Exposure and development of the photoresist layer can produce planar, cylindrical, and radially symmetric micro-scale optical elements, comprising lenses, mirrors, apertures, diffractive elements, and prisms, monolithically formed on a common substrate with the mutual optical alignment required to provide the desired system functionality. Optical alignment can be controlled to better than one micron accuracy. Appropriate combinations of structure and materials enable optical designs that include corrections for chromatic and other optical aberrations. The developed photoresist can be used as the basis for a molding operation to produce microoptical systems made of a range of optical materials. Finally, very complex microoptical systems can be made with as few as three lithographic exposures.

  5. Surface half-metallicity of CrS thin films and perfect spin filtering and spin diode effects of CrS/ZnSe heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, G. Y., E-mail: guoying-gao@mail.hust.edu.cn; Yao, K. L., E-mail: klyao@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Physics and Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, ferromagnetic zinc-blende Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}S thin films (above x?=?0.5) were fabricated experimentally on ZnSe substrate, which confirmed the previous theoretical prediction of half-metallic ferromagnetism in zinc-blende CrS. Here, we theoretically reveal that both Cr- and S-terminated (001) surfaces of the CrS thin films retain the half-metallicity. The CrS/ZnSe(001) heterogeneous junction exhibits excellent spin filtering and spin diode effects, which are explained by the calculated band structure and transmission spectra. The perfect spin transport properties indicate the potential applications of half-metallic CrS in spintronic devices. All computational results are obtained by using the density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green's function.

  6. Near-Net Shape Fabrication Using Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David M. Bowden; Dr. William H. Peter

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of titanium in commercial aircraft production has risen steadily over the last half century. The aerospace industry currently accounts for 58% of the domestic titanium market. The Kroll process, which has been used for over 50 years to produce titanium metal from its mineral form, consumes large quantities of energy. And, methods used to convert the titanium sponge output of the Kroll process into useful mill products also require significant energy resources. These traditional approaches result in product forms that are very expensive, have long lead times of up to a year or more, and require costly operations to fabricate finished parts. Given the increasing role of titanium in commercial aircraft, new titanium technologies are needed to create a more sustainable manufacturing strategy that consumes less energy, requires less material, and significantly reduces material and fabrication costs. A number of emerging processes are under development which could lead to a breakthrough in extraction technology. Several of these processes produce titanium alloy powder as a product. The availability of low-cost titanium powders may in turn enable a more efficient approach to the manufacture of titanium components using powder metallurgical processing. The objective of this project was to define energy-efficient strategies for manufacturing large-scale titanium structures using these low-cost powders as the starting material. Strategies include approaches to powder consolidation to achieve fully dense mill products, and joining technologies such as friction and laser welding to combine those mill products into near net shape (NNS) preforms for machining. The near net shape approach reduces material and machining requirements providing for improved affordability of titanium structures. Energy and cost modeling was used to define those approaches that offer the largest energy savings together with the economic benefits needed to drive implementation. Technical feasibility studies were performed to identify the most viable approaches to NNS preform fabrication using basic powder metallurgy mill product forms as the building blocks and advanced joining techniques including fusion and solid state joining to assemble these building blocks into efficient machining performs.

  7. Fabrication technology for ODS Alloy MA957

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ML Hamilton; DS Gelles; RJ Lobsinger; MM Paxton; WF Brown

    2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful fabrication schedule has been developed at Carpenter Technology Corporation for the production of MA957 fuel and blanket cladding. Difficulties with gun drilling, plug drawing and recrystallization were overcome to produce a pilot lot of tubing. This report documents the fabrication efforts of two qualified vendors and the support studies performed at WHC to develop the fabrication-schedule.

  8. Reference Alloy Waste Form Fabrication and Initiation of Reducing Atmosphere and Reductive Additives Study on Alloy Waste Form Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.M. Frank; T.P. O'Holleran; P.A. Hahn

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the fabrication of two reference alloy waste forms, RAW-1(Re) and RAW-(Tc) using an optimized loading and heating method. The composition of the alloy materials was based on a generalized formulation to process various proposed feed streams resulting from the processing of used fuel. Waste elements are introduced into molten steel during alloy fabrication and, upon solidification, become incorporated into durable iron-based intermetallic phases of the alloy waste form. The first alloy ingot contained surrogate (non-radioactive), transition-metal fission products with rhenium acting as a surrogate for technetium. The second alloy ingot contained the same components as the first ingot, but included radioactive Tc-99 instead of rhenium. Understanding technetium behavior in the waste form is of particular importance due the longevity of Tc-99 and its mobility in the biosphere in the oxide form. RAW-1(Re) and RAW-1(Tc) are currently being used as test specimens in the comprehensive testing program investigating the corrosion and radionuclide release mechanisms of the representative alloy waste form. Also described in this report is the experimental plan to study the effects of reducing atmospheres and reducing additives to the alloy material during fabrication in an attempt to maximize the oxide content of waste streams that can be accommodated in the alloy waste form. Activities described in the experimental plan will be performed in FY12. The first aspect of the experimental plan is to study oxide formation on the alloy by introducing O2 impurities in the melt cover gas or from added oxide impurities in the feed materials. Reducing atmospheres will then be introduced to the melt cover gas in an attempt to minimize oxide formation during alloy fabrication. The second phase of the experimental plan is to investigate melting parameters associated with alloy fabrication to allow the separation of slag and alloy components of the melt.

  9. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menchhofer, Paul A. (Clinton, TN); Montgomery, Frederick C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  10. Transition metal gettering studies and simulation for the optimization of silicon photovoltaic device processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Aimée Louise, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use what is known about transition metal (TM) defect thermodynamic driving forces and kinetic responses to make predictive simulation of gettering during solar cell fabrication possible. We have developed a simulator ...

  11. A Low Temperature Fully Lithographic Process For Metal–Oxide Field-Effect Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sodini, Charles G.

    We report a low temperature ( ~ 100à °C) lithographic method for fabricating hybrid metal oxide/organic field-effect transistors (FETs) that combine a zinc-indium-oxide (ZIO) semiconductor channel and organic, parylene, ...

  12. Magnetically driven three-dimensional manipulation and inductive heating of magnetic-dispersion containing metal alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calabro, Joshua D.

    Fundamental to the development of three-dimensional microelectronic fabrication is a material that enables vertical geometries. Here we show low-melting-point metal alloys containing iron dispersions that can be remotely ...

  13. Highly reproducible and reliable metal/graphene contact by ultraviolet-ozone treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Hacker, Christina A.; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, A. R.; Richter, Curt A.; Gundlach, David J., E-mail: david.gundlach@nist.gov, E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Liang, Yiran; Tian, Boyuan; Liang, Xuelei, E-mail: david.gundlach@nist.gov, E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn; Peng, Lianmao [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Resist residue from the device fabrication process is a significant source of contamination at the metal/graphene contact interface. Ultraviolet Ozone (UVO) treatment is proven here, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman measurement, to be an effective way of cleaning the metal/graphene interface. Electrical measurements of devices that were fabricated by using UVO treatment of the metal/graphene contact region show that stable and reproducible low resistance metal/graphene contacts are obtained and the electrical properties of the graphene channel remain unaffected.

  14. Functional Metal Phosphonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Houston Phillipp

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................... 39 12 Zr6 prepared at 205 ?C with HF as a solubilizing agent ................................ 43 13 Layered structure of Zn(O3PC6H4CN)(H2O) and Mn(O3PC6H4CN)(H2O) viewed along the c-axis. The coordinating water molecules are between... acid groups form hydrogen-bonded pairs in in Zn(O3PC6H4CO2H)(H2O) and Mn(O3PC6H4CO2H)(H2O). ..................... 55 15 Inorganic layered structure common to divalent metal phosphonates. Octahedral metal ions are coordinated by five phosphonate...

  15. Method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal requires only two lithographic exposures and does not require mask repositioning between exposures. The mask and photoresist-coated substrate are spaced a fixed and constant distance apart using a spacer and the stack is clamped together. The stack is then tilted at a crystallographic symmetry angle (e.g., 45 degrees) relative to the X-ray beam and rotated about the surface normal until the mask is aligned with the X-ray beam. The stack is then rotated in plane by a small stitching angle and exposed to the X-ray beam to pattern the first half of the structure. The stack is then rotated by 180.degree. about the normal and a second exposure patterns the remaining half of the structure. The method can use commercially available DXRL scanner technology and LIGA processes to fabricate large-area, high-quality tilted logpile photonic crystals.

  16. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Menard, Etienne (Urbana, IL); Lee, Keon Jae (Savoy, IL); Khang, Dahl-Young (Urbana, IL); Sun, Yugang (Champaign, IL); Meitl, Matthew (Champaign, IL); Zhu, Zhengtao (Urbana, IL)

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  17. Method to fabricate high performance tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fanglin; Yang, Chenghao; Jin, Chao

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes forming an asymmetric porous ceramic tube by using a phase inversion process. The method further includes forming an asymmetric porous ceramic layer on a surface of the asymmetric porous ceramic tube by using a phase inversion process. The tube is co-sintered to form a structure having a first porous layer, a second porous layer, and a dense layer positioned therebetween.

  18. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  19. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  20. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC); Lee, Keon Jae (Daejeon, KR); Khang, Dahl-Young (Urbana, IL); Sun, Yugang (Champaign, IL); Meitl, Matthew (Raleigh, NC); Zhu, Zhengtao (Urbana, IL)

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  1. Atomized Spraying of Liquid Metal Droplets on Desired Substrate Surfaces as a Generalized Way for Ubiquitous Printed Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct electronics printing technique through atomized spraying for patterning room temperature liquid metal droplets on desired substrate surfaces is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. This method has generalized purpose and is highly flexible and capable of fabricating electronic components on any desired target objects, with either flat or rough surfaces, made of different materials, or different orientations from 1-D to 3-D geometrical configurations. With a pre-designed mask, the liquid metal ink can be directly deposited on the substrate to form various specific patterns which lead to the rapid prototyping of electronic devices. Further, extended printing strategies were also suggested to illustrate the adaptability of the method such that the natural porous structure can be adopted to offer an alternative way of making transparent conductive film with an optical transmittance of 47% and a sheet resistance of 5.167{\\Omega}/O. Different from the former direct writing technolog...

  2. Metal Hydrides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,DepartmentEnergyMetalMetal

  3. Surface Science Letters Deposition of metal clusters on single-layer graphene/Ru(0001): Factors that govern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Surface Science Letters Deposition of metal clusters on single-layer graphene/Ru(0001): Factors Keywords: Graphene Ru(0001) STM Metal nanoclusters Au film Fabrication of nanoclusters on a substrate of metal on graphene have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) based on different behaviors

  4. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

  5. Method for fabricating wrought components for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Larry D. (San Diego, CA); Johnson, Jr., William R. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and alloys for fabricating wrought components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are disclosed. These wrought, nickel-based alloys, which exhibit strength and excellent resistance to carburization at elevated temperatures, include aluminum and titanium in amounts and ratios to promote the growth of carburization resistant films while preserving the wrought character of the alloys. These alloys also include substantial amounts of molybdenum and/or tungsten as solid-solution strengtheners. Chromium may be included in concentrations less than 10% to assist in fabrication. Minor amounts of carbon and one or more carbide-forming metals also contribute to high-temperature strength.

  6. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang.

  7. WINCO Metal Recycle annual report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtold, T.E. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the first year progress of the WINCO Metal Recycle Program. Efforts were directed towards assessment of radioactive scrap metal inventories, economics and concepts for recycling, technology development, and transfer of technology to the private sector. Seven DOE laboratories worked together to develop a means for characterizing scrap metal. Radioactive scrap metal generation rates were established for several of these laboratories. Initial cost estimates indicate that recycle may be preferable over burial if sufficient decontamination factors can be achieved during melt refining. Radiation levels of resulting ingots must be minimized in order to keep fabrication costs low. Industry has much of the expertise and capability to execute the recycling of radioactive scrap metal. While no single company can sort, melt, refine, roll and fabricate, a combination of two to three can complete this operation. The one process which requires development is in melt refining for removal of radionuclides other than uranium. WINCO is developing this capability in conjunction with academia and industry. This work will continue into FY-94.

  8. Polymer micromold and fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ahre, P.E.; Dupuy, P.C.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A mold assembly is disclosed with micro-sized features in which the hollow portion thereof is fabricated from a sacrificial mandrel which is surface treated and then coated to form an outer shell. The sacrificial mandrel is then selectively etched away leaving the outer shell as the final product. The sacrificial mandrel is fabricated by a precision lathe, for example, so that when removed by etching the inner or hollow area has diameters as small as 10`s of micros ({micro}m). Varying the inside diameter contours of the mold can be accomplished with specified ramping slopes formed on the outer surface of the sacrificial mandrel, with the inside or hollow section being, for example, 275 {micro}m in length up to 150 {micro}m in diameter within a 6 mm outside diameter (o.d.) mold assembly. The mold assembly itself can serve as a micronozzle or microneedle, and plastic parts, such as microballoons for angioplasty, polymer microparts, and microactuators, etc., may be formed within the mold assembly. 6 figs.

  9. Polymer micromold and fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (1428 Whitecliff Way, Walnut Creek, CA 94596); Northrup, M. Allen (923 Creston Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Ahre, Paul E. (1299 Gonzaga Ct., Livermore, CA 94550); Dupuy, Peter C. (1736 Waldo Ct., Modesto, CA 95358)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mold assembly with micro-sized features in which the hollow portion thereof is fabricated from a sacrificial mandrel which is surface treated and then coated to form an outer shell. The sacrificial mandrel is then selectively etched away leaving the outer shell as the final product. The sacrificial mandrel is fabricated by a precision lathe, for example, so that when removed by etching the inner or hollow area has diameters as small as 10's of micros (.mu.m). Varying the inside diameter contours of the mold can be accomplished with specified ramping slopes formed on the outer surface of the sacrificial mandrel, with the inside or hollow section being, for example, 275 .mu.m in length up to 150 .mu.m in diameter within a 6 mm outside diameter (o.d.) mold assembly. The mold assembly itself can serve as a micronozzle or microneedle, and plastic parts, such as microballoons for angioplasty, polymer microparts, and microactuators, etc., may be formed within the mold assembly.

  10. Lattice-mismatched GaInP LED devices and methods of fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mascarenhas, Angelo; Steiner, Myles A; Bhusal, Lekhnath; Zhang, Yong

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method (100) of fabricating an LED or the active regions of an LED and an LED (200). The method includes growing, depositing or otherwise providing a bottom cladding layer (208) of a selected semiconductor alloy with an adjusted bandgap provided by intentionally disordering the structure of the cladding layer (208). A first active layer (202) may be grown above the bottom cladding layer (208) wherein the first active layer (202) is fabricated of the same semiconductor alloy, with however, a partially ordered structure. The first active layer (202) will also be fabricated to include a selected n or p type doping. The method further includes growing a second active layer (204) above the first active layer (202) where the second active layer (204) Is fabricated from the same semiconductor alloy.

  11. Fabrication of nanostructure by physical vapor deposition with glancing angle deposition technique and its applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horprathum, M., E-mail: mati.horprathum@nectec.or.th; Eiamchai, P., E-mail: mati.horprathum@nectec.or.th; Patthanasettakul, V.; Limwichean, S.; Nuntawong, N.; Chindaudom, P. [Optical Thin-Film Laboratory National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Pathumthani, 12120 (Thailand); Kaewkhao, J. [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Chananonnawathorn, C. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Thammasat University, Pathumthani, 12121 (Thailand)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanostructural thin film is one of the highly exploiting research areas particularly in applications in sensor, photocatalytic, and solar-cell technologies. In the past two decades, the integration of glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) technique to physical vapor deposition (PVD) process has gained significant attention for well-controlled multidimensional nanomorphologies because of fast, simple, cost-effective, and mass-production capability. The performance and functional properties of the coated thin films generally depend upon their nanostructural compositions, i.e., large aspect ratio, controllable porosity, and shape. Such structural platforms make the fabricated thin films very practical for several realistic applications. We therefore present morphological and nanostructural properties of various deposited materials, which included metals, i.e., silver (Ag), and oxide compounds, i.e., tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}), titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), and indium tin oxide (ITO). Different PVD techniques based on DC magnetron sputtering and electron-beam evaporation, both with the integrated GLAD component, were discussed. We further explore engineered nanostructures which enable controls of optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. These improvements led to several practical applications in surface-enhanced Raman, smart windows, gas sensors, self-cleaning materials and transparent conductive oxides (TCO)

  12. Update On Monolithic Fuel Fabrication Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. R Clark; J. M. Wight; G. C. Knighton; G. A. Moore; J. F. Jue

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Advancements have been made in the production of U-Mo foil including full sized foils. Progress has also been made in the friction stir welding and transient liquid phase bonding fabrication processes resulting in better bonding, more stable processes and the ability to fabricate larger fuel plates.

  13. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing. Quarterly report, September 13-December 12, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has undertaken to investigate, develop, and characterize laser-assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high-efficiency solar cells. Two basic techniques for metal deposition will be investigated, as follows: (1) photochemical decomposition of liquid or gas phase organometallic compounds utilizing either a focused, CW ultraviolet laser (System 1) or a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, such as that provided by a repetitively pulsed, defocused excimer laser (System 2), for pattern definition, and (2) thermal deposition of metals from organometallic solutions or vapors utilizing a focused, CW laser beam as a local heat source to draw the metallization pattern. The purpose of this contract is to investigate the various existing laser-assisted film deposition techniques in order to develop a new, cost-effective technology for solar cell metallization. The tasks that will be performed in the conduct of these investigations are detailed. In the first three months of this contract, a comprehensive literature search has been carried out on the various state-of-the-art laser-assisted techniques for metal deposition, including laser chemical vapor deposition and laser photolysis of organometallics, as well as laser-enhanced electroplating. A compact system for the experiments involving laser-assisted photolysis of gas-phase compounds has been designed and constructed. Initial experiments on laser-enhanced electro-plating have yielded very promising results, with linewidths as fine as 25 ..mu..m and plating speeds as high as 12 ..mu..m/sec being achieved.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: improved fiberglass fabric positioning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fabric positioning Sandia Participated in AMII to Support American-Made Wind-Turbine Blades On December 3, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Materials...

  15. Fabrication of Small Diesel Fuel Injector Orifices

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Micro-Orifice Fabrication - Nickel Vapor Deposition - Laser Micro-Drilling NVD - Weber Laser - Sparkle Publications & PatentsInventions Publications - Fenske, G.,...

  16. Fabrication and characterization of conducting polymer microwires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible microwires fabricated from conducting polymers have a wide range of potential applications, including smart textiles that incorporate sensing, actuation, and data processing. The development of garments that ...

  17. A High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal - The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J.; Haslam, J.; Day, D.; Lian, T.; Saw, C.; Hailey, P.; Choi, J.S.; Rebak, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Yang, N. [Sandia National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Bayles, R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, 20375 (United States); Aprigliano, L. [Consultant, Berlin, MD, 21811 (United States); Payer, J. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 44106 (United States); Perepezko, J.; Hildal, K. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States); Lavernia, E.; Ajdelsztajn, L. [University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Branagan, D. [The NanoSteel Company, Idaho Falls, ID, 83402 (United States); Beardsley, B. [Caterpillar, Peoria, IL, 61656 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of high-performance Ni-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal also makes it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications, as discussed in companion publications. Corrosion data for SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) is discussed here. (authors)

  18. Patterned Fabric Know - How (Plaids, Stripes, Checks, and Figured Designs).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anoymous,

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DC \\1\\245.7 '13 Fbiterned Fabric mow-Kbw Contents Design Principles and Patterned Fabrics Pattern Selection Fabric Construction Selecting and Preparing Fabric Kinds of Plaids and Stripes Pri nts Other Patterned Fabrics Combining..., Stripes, Checks and Figured Designs) Extension Clothing Specialists The Texas A&M University System Patterned fabrics provide an interesting di mension to anyone's wardrobe. In a garment or as an accent, patterned fabrics are colorful and ex citing...

  19. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

  20. Vibrational spectra and structure of {open_quotes}staircase{close_quotes} carbonyl {pi}-complexes of transition metals 2. Rotational isomerism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezernitskaya, M.G.; Lokshin, B.V.; Orlova, T.Yu.; Setkina, V.N.; Shilnikov, V.I. [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cesaro, S.N. [Institute of High Temperature Thermodynamics, Rome (Italy)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FTIR spectra have been studied for {open_quotes}staircase{close_quotes} cyclopentadienyl complexes containing two or three metal carbonyl fragments bound by the metal-carbon bond Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmMn(CO){sub 3} (1), Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmFe(CO){sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-Cpm(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmMn(CO){sub 3}, Cp(CO){sub 2}Mo-Cpm(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmMn(CO){sub 3}, Cp(CO){sub 3}W-Cpm(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmMn(CO){sub 3}, Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-Cpm(CO){sub 2}Fe-BmCr(CO){sub 3}, Cr(CO){sub 3}Bm-CpmFe(CO){sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, where Cp = {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}, Cpm = {eta}{sup 1}:{eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}, Bm = {eta}{sup 1}:{eta}{sup 6}-C{sub 6}H{sub 5}. Temperature-dependent FTIR spectra were measured in n-pentane solutions over a wide temperature range and in the low-temperature solid matrices of argon and nitrogen. Rotamers, formed due to rotation about the metal-carbon {sigma}-bond, were found in solutions and matrices. A molecular mechanics calculation of 1 proved the possibility of such rotation.

  1. Fabrication of a 1200 kg Ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy for the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vanadium chromium titanium alloys are attractive materials for fusion reactors because of their high temperature capability and their potential for low neutron active and rapid activation decay. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected in the U.S. as the current leading candidate vanadium alloy for future use in fusion reactor structural applications. General Atomics (GA), in conjunction with the Department of Energy`s (DOE) DIII-D Program, is carrying out a plan for the utilization of this vanadium alloy in the DIII-D tokamak. The plan will culminate in the fabrication, installation, and operation of a V-4Ti alloy structure in the DIII-D Radiative Divertor (RD) upgrade. The deployment of vanadium alloy will provide a meaningful step in the development and technology acceptance of this advanced material for future fusion power devices. Under a GA contract and material specification, an industrial scale 1200 kg heat (ingot) of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been produced and converted into product forms by Wah Chang of Albany, Oregon (WCA). To assure the proper control of minor and trace impurities which affect the mechanical and activation behavior of this vanadium alloy, selected lots of raw vanadium base metal were processed by aluminothermic reduction of high purity vanadium oxide, and were then electron beam melted into two high purity vanadium ingots. The ingots were then consolidated with high purity Cr and Ti, and double vacuum-arc melted to obtain a 1200 kg V-4Cr-4Ti alloy ingot. Several billets were extruded from the ingot, and were then fabricated into plate, sheet, and rod at WCA. Tubing was subsequently processed from plate material. The chemistry and fabrication procedures for the product forms were specified on the basis of experience and knowledge gained from DOE Fusion Materials Program studies on previous laboratory scale heats and a large scale ingot (500 kg)

  2. CONTAINER MATERIALS, FABRICATION AND ROBUSTNESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, K.; Louthan, M.; Rawls, G.; Sindelar, R.; Zapp, P.; Mcclard, J.

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-barrier 3013 container used to package plutonium-bearing materials is robust and thereby highly resistant to identified degradation modes that might cause failure. The only viable degradation mechanisms identified by a panel of technical experts were pressurization within and corrosion of the containers. Evaluations of the container materials and the fabrication processes and resulting residual stresses suggest that the multi-layered containers will mitigate the potential for degradation of the outer container and prevent the release of the container contents to the environment. Additionally, the ongoing surveillance programs and laboratory studies should detect any incipient degradation of containers in the 3013 storage inventory before an outer container is compromised.

  3. Fabrication of hollow core carbon spheres with hierarchical nanoarchitecture for ultrahigh electrical charge storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    .e., liquid crystal,30 polymer latices,31 or silica32­34 template with a hierarchical porous nano- structure nano- structure and hierarchical porosity of meso/macropores. Hollow core­mesoporous shell carbonFabrication of hollow core carbon spheres with hierarchical nanoarchitecture for ultrahigh

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanowires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Francis Randall

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    by bulk SMA structures. For bulk SMA structures, the frequency of actuation is typically less than 1 Hz. In general, the frequency of actuation exhibited by SMAs is lower than other multifunctional materials such as piezoelectrics (up to 1 MHz... (Au), Silver (Ag), and Copper (Cu) exhibit a crystal structure transformation [21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26]. The transformations observed in these systems are not typical of the bulk materials from which they are made. According to Liang et al. [21], a...

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compounds studied by x-ray and neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Min Gyu [Ames Laboratory

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of my dissertation is to understand the structural and magnetic properties of the newly discovered FeAs-based superconductors and the interconnection between superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, and structure. X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are powerful tools to directly observe the structure and magnetism in this system. I used both xray and neutron scattering techniques on di#11;erent transition substituted BaFe2As2 compounds in order to investigate the substitution dependence of structural and magnetic transitions and try to understand the connections between them.

  6. Method for fabricating ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Polzin, Bryant J. (Downers Grove, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Picciolo, John J. (Lockport, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing composite ceramic material is provided wherein a core ceramic structure is produced and simultaneously enveloped with a sleeve of similar material.

  7. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

  8. Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hyde, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

  9. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  10. ) L'w LLOAJO>' , Ris-R-516 One-Electron Theory of Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the structural phase transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth metals, and the local- ization transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth metals, and the localization of 3d, 4f, and 5f metals 46 5.2 The alkali metals at moderate compression 48 5.3 The alkaline earth metals 54 5

  11. Fabricating the Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D. [Advanced Methods and Materials, Inc., 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Road, Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Houts, Mike [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid core heatpipe nuclear reactor has the potential to be the most dependable concept for the nuclear space power system. The design of the conversion system employed permits multiple failure modes instead of the single failure mode of other concepts. Regardless of the material used for the reactor, either stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, Nb1Zr, Tantalum Alloys or MoRe Alloys, making the solid core by machining holes in a large diameter billet is not satisfactory. This is because the large diameter billet will have large grains that are detrimental to the performance of the reactor due to grain boundary diffusion. The ideal fabrication method for the solid core is by hot isostatic pressure diffusion bonding (HIPing). By this technique, wrought fine-grained tubes of the alloy chosen are assembled into the final shape with solid cusps and seal welded so that there is a vacuum in between all surfaces to be diffusion bonded. This welded structure is then HIPed for diffusion bonding. A solid core made of Type 321 stainless steel has been satisfactorily produced by Advanced Methods and Materials and is undergoing evaluation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Entry/exit control at fuel fabrication facilities using or possessing formula quantities of strategic special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents information on entry/exit control at fuel fabrication facilities using or possessing formula quantities of strategic special nuclear material. It describes NRC requirements and methods for conducting personnel, package, and vehicle searches at these facilities. Testing methods for determining the detection capability of firearms, explosives, and metal detectors are provided.

  13. Strained Ge channel p-type MOSFETs fabricated on Si1-xGex/Si virtual substrates Minjoo L. Lee, Christopher W. Leitz, Zhiyuan Cheng, Arthur J. Pitera, Gianni Taraschi, Dimitri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strained Ge channel p-type MOSFETs fabricated on Si1-xGex/Si virtual substrates Minjoo L. Lee of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 ABSTRACT We have fabricated strained Ge channel p-type metal oxideO2) and pure Ge. The effects of the Si cap thickness, the strain in the Ge channel, and the thickness

  14. Metal-Driven Hierarchical Self-Assembled One-Dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianbin

    helical inorganic materials. In preliminary attempts, helical silica and ZnS nanomaterials have been helical inorganic nanomaterials (i.e., SiO2 and ZnS) have been prepared based on metal to fabricate helical as- semblies from artificial molecules considering complicated organic synthesis

  15. Literature on fabrication of tungsten for application in pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edstrom, C.M.; Phillips, A.G.; Johnson, L.D.; Corle, R.R.

    1980-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The pyrochemical processing of nuclear fuels requires crucibles, stirrers, and transfer tubing that will withstand the temperature and the chemical attack from molten salts and metals used in the process. This report summarizes the literature that pertains to fabrication (joining, chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying, forming, and spinning) is the main theme. This report also summarizes a sampling of literature on molbdenum and the work previously performed at Argonne National Laboratory on other container materials used for pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels.

  16. The design and fabrication of two portal vein flow phantoms by different methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunker, Bryan E., E-mail: bryan.yunker@ucdenver.edu; Lanning, Craig J.; Shandas, Robin; Hunter, Kendall S. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado – Denver/Anschutz, 12700 East 19th Avenue, MS 8607, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado – Denver/Anschutz, 12700 East 19th Avenue, MS 8607, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Dodd, Gerald D., E-mail: gerald.dodd@ucdenver.edu; Chang, Samuel; Scherzinger, Ann L. [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop L954, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop L954, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Chen, S. James, E-mail: james.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Colorado 80045 and Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop B132, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Feng, Yusheng, E-mail: yusheng.feng@utsa.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas – San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, Mail Stop: AET 2.332, San Antonio, Texas 78249–0670 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas – San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, Mail Stop: AET 2.332, San Antonio, Texas 78249–0670 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study outlines the design and fabrication techniques for two portal vein flow phantoms. Methods: A materials study was performed as a precursor to this phantom fabrication effort and the desired material properties are restated for continuity. A three-dimensional portal vein pattern was created from the Visual Human database. The portal vein pattern was used to fabricate two flow phantoms by different methods with identical interior surface geometry using computer aided design software tools and rapid prototyping techniques. One portal flow phantom was fabricated within a solid block of clear silicone for use on a table with Ultrasound or within medical imaging systems such as MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT. The other portal flow phantom was fabricated as a thin walled tubular latex structure for use in water tanks with Ultrasound imaging. Both phantoms were evaluated for usability and durability. Results: Both phantoms were fabricated successfully and passed durability criteria for flow testing in the next project phase. Conclusions: The fabrication methods and materials employed for the study yielded durable portal vein phantoms.

  17. Electronic structures of transition metal to hydrogen bonds: oxidative addition of dihydrogen to a square planar rhodium complex and quantum mechanical prediction of the geometry of a metal hydride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpin, Carolyn F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and applications is dihydrogen or molecular hydrogen. Both the Heber process, in which nitrogen is converted to ammonia on an iron catalyst, and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, in which carbon monoxide is converted to hydrocarbons over iron and cobalt catalysts... systems containing hydride ligands. This work presents a computational method for examining the energetics and structures of two systems. The reaction RhC1(CO)(PHs)z + Hz ~ (H)zRhC1(CO)(PHs)z was examined to a~plain why the oxidation of RhCI(CO...

  18. Methods of fabricating cermet materials and methods of utilizing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of fabricating cermet materials and methods of utilizing the same such as in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The cermet material may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an aluminia phase. The mixture may be pressed to form a green compact body and then heated in a nitrogen-containing atmosphere so as to melt aluminum particles and form the cermet. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The cermet material may also be formed so as to pass an electrical current therethrough to heat the material during use.

  19. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  20. Design & Fabrication of a High-Voltage Photovoltaic Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felder, Jennifer; /North Carolina State U. /SLAC

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells are alternative energy sources that are important in sustainable power generation. Currently, applications of PV cells are limited by the low output voltage and somewhat low efficiency of such devices. In light of this fact, this project investigates the possibility of fabricating high-voltage PV cells on float-zone silicon wafers having output voltages ranging from 50 V to 2000 V. Three designs with different geometries of diffusion layers were simulated and compared in terms of metal coverage, recombination, built-in potential, and conduction current density. One design was then chosen and optimized to be implemented in the final device design. The results of the simulation serve as a feasibility test for the design concept and provide supportive evidence of the effectiveness of silicon PV cells as high-voltage power supplies.

  1. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

    1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  2. Microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and method for its fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and a method for its fabrication are disclosed. The heat exchanger is formed from a stack of thin metal sheets which are bonded together. The stack consists of alternating slotted and unslotted sheets. Each of the slotted sheets includes multiple parallel slots which form fluid flow channels when sandwiched between the unslotted sheets. Successive slotted sheets in the stack are rotated ninety degrees with respect to one another so as to form two sets of orthogonally extending fluid flow channels which are arranged in a crossflow configuration. The heat exchanger has a high surface to volume ratio, a small dead volume, a high heat transfer coefficient, and is suitable for use with fluids under high pressures. The heat exchanger has particular application in a Stirling engine that utilizes a liquid as the working substance.

  3. Microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and method for its fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and a method for its fabrication are disclosed. The heat exchanger is formed from a stack of thin metal sheets which are bonded together. The stack consists of alternating slotted and unslotted sheets. Each of the slotted sheets includes multiple parallel slots which form fluid flow channels when sandwiched between the unslotted sheets. Successive slotted sheets in the stack are rotated ninety degrees with respect to one another so as to form two sets of orthogonally extending fluid flow channels which are arranged in a crossflow configuration. The heat exchanger has a high surface to volume ratio, a small dead volume, a high heat transfer coefficient, and is suitable for use with fluids under high pressures. The heat exchanger has particular application in a Stirling engine that utilizes a liquid as the working substance. 9 figs.

  4. Microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and method for its fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and a method for its fabrication are disclosed. The heat exchanger is formed from a stack of thin metal sheets which are bonded together. The stack consists of alternating slotted and unslotted sheets. Each of the slotted sheets includes multiple parallel slots which form fluid flow channels when sandwiched between the unslotted sheets. Successive slotted sheets in the stack are rotated ninety degrees with respect to one another so as to form two sets of orthogonally extending fluid flow channels which are arranged in a crossflow configuration. The heat exchanger has a high surface to volume ratio, a small dead volume, a high heat transfer coefficient, and is suitable for use with fluids under high pressures. The heat exchanger has particular application in a Stirling engine that utilizes a liquid as the working substance.

  5. Fabrication of an optical component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nichols, Michael A. (Livermore, CA); Aikens, David M. (Pleasanton, CA); Camp, David W. (Oakland, CA); Thomas, Ian M. (Livermore, CA); Kiikka, Craig (Livermore, CA); Sheehan, Lynn M. (Livermore, CA); Kozlowski, Mark R. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming optical parts used in laser optical systems such as high energy lasers, high average power lasers, semiconductor capital equipment and medical devices. The optical parts will not damage during the operation of high power lasers in the ultra-violet light range. A blank is first ground using a fixed abrasive grinding method to remove the subsurface damage formed during the fabrication of the blank. The next step grinds and polishes the edges and forms bevels to reduce the amount of fused-glass contaminants in the subsequent steps. A loose abrasive grind removes the subsurface damage formed during the fixed abrasive or "blanchard" removal process. After repolishing the bevels and performing an optional fluoride etch, the surface of the blank is polished using a zirconia slurry. Any subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind will be removed during this zirconia polish. A post polish etch may be performed to remove any redeposited contaminants. Another method uses a ceria polishing step to remove the subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind. However, any residual ceria may interfere with the optical properties of the finished part. Therefore, the ceria and other contaminants are removed by performing either a zirconia polish after the ceria polish or a post ceria polish etch.

  6. Print preview for the fabrication of physical objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, David (David Alexander)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes a new class of design and fabrication interfaces for digitally created objects, which the author terms augmented fabrication machines. By enhancing traditional fabrication machines with rich new input ...

  7. Methods of fabricating applique circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimos, Duane B. (Albuquerque, NM); Garino, Terry J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Applique circuits suitable for advanced packaging applications are introduced. These structures are particularly suited for the simple integration of large amounts (many nanoFarads) of capacitance into conventional integrated circuit and multichip packaging technology. In operation, applique circuits are bonded to the integrated circuit or other appropriate structure at the point where the capacitance is required, thereby minimizing the effects of parasitic coupling. An immediate application is to problems of noise reduction and control in modern high-frequency circuitry.

  8. Composite Metal-hydrogen Electrodes for Metal-Hydrogen Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruckman, M W; Wiesmann, H; Strongin, M; Young, K; Fetcenko, M

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries. The anodes could be incorporated in thin film solid state Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding and fast hydrogen charging and Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with those of commercially available metal hydride materials discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films-and multiiayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 µm thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.

  9. Electrochemical/Pyrometallurgical Waste Stream Processing and Waste Form Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Frank; Hwan Seo Park; Yung Zun Cho; William Ebert; Brian Riley

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes treatment and waste form options being evaluated for waste streams resulting from the electrochemical/pyrometallurgical (pyro ) processing of used oxide nuclear fuel. The technologies that are described are South Korean (Republic of Korea – ROK) and United States of America (US) ‘centric’ in the approach to treating pyroprocessing wastes and are based on the decade long collaborations between US and ROK researchers. Some of the general and advanced technologies described in this report will be demonstrated during the Integrated Recycle Test (IRT) to be conducted as a part of the Joint Fuel Cycle Study (JFCS) collaboration between US Department of Energy (DOE) and ROK national laboratories. The JFCS means to specifically address and evaluated the technological, economic, and safe guard issues associated with the treatment of used nuclear fuel by pyroprocessing. The IRT will involve the processing of commercial, used oxide fuel to recover uranium and transuranics. The recovered transuranics will then be fabricated into metallic fuel and irradiated to transmutate, or burn the transuranic elements to shorter lived radionuclides. In addition, the various process streams will be evaluated and tested for fission product removal, electrolytic salt recycle, minimization of actinide loss to waste streams and waste form fabrication and characterization. This report specifically addresses the production and testing of those waste forms to demonstrate their compatibility with treatment options and suitability for disposal.

  10. Vibrational spectra and structure of {open_quotes}staircase{close_quotes} carbonyl {pi}-complexes of transition metals 1. Electronic effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezernitskaya, M.G.; Lokshin, B.V.; Orlova, T.Yu.; Setkina, V.N. [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cesaro, S.N. [Institute of High Temperature Thermodynamics, Rome (Italy)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FTIR spectra have been studied for {open_quotes}staircase{close_quotes} cyclopentadienyl complexes comprising two or three metal carbonyl fragments bound by the metal-carbon bond Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmMn(CO){sub 3}, Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmFe(CO){sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-Cpm(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmMn(CO){sub 3}, Cp(CO){sub 2}Mo-Cpm(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmMn(CO){sub 3}, Cp(CO){sub 3}W-Cpm(CO){sub 2}Fe-CpmMn(CO){sub 3}, Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe-Cpm(CO){sub 2}Fe-BmCr(CO){sub 3}, Cr(CO){sub 3}Bm-CpmFe(CO){sub 2}CH{sub 2}Ph, where Cp = {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}, Cpm = {eta}{sup 1}: {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}, Bm = {eta}{sup 1}:{eta}{sup 6}-C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, as well as mononuclear model complexes Cp(CO){sub 2}Fe(CH){sub 2}Ph, CpMn(CO){sub 3}, and ({eta}{sup 6}-C{sub 6}H{sub 6})Cr(CO){sub 3}. The spectra were interpreted on the basis of the local symmetry of each metal carbonyl center. The positions of vCOs are determined by the mutual electronic effect of each center. CpmM(CO){sub n} groups are strong electron acceptors and cause an increase in vCOs of adjacent M(CO){sub n} groups. Cp(CO){sub n}M groups, being electron donors, cause a decrease in the frequencies of neighboring groups. In trinuclear complexes, the frequencies of the central Fe(CO){sub 2} group are not changed much due to the compensation of donor and acceptor influences of two neighboring substituents.

  11. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  12. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  13. Magnetism in metal-organic capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, Jerry L.; Brechin, Euan K; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Inglis, Ross; Jones, Leigh F.; Mossine, Andrew; Paterson, Martin J.; Power, Nicholas P.; Teat, Simon J.

    2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel and cobalt seamed metal-organic capsules have been isolated and studied using structural, magnetic and computational approaches. Antiferromagnetic exchange in the Ni capsule results from coordination environments enforced by the capsule framework.

  14. UPDATE ON MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue; G. A. Moore; N. P. Hallinan; B. H. Park; D. E. Burkes

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Progress at INL has led to fabrication of hot isostatic pressed uranium-molybdenum bearing monolithic fuel plates. These miniplates are part of the RERTR-8 miniplate irradiation test. Further progress has also been made on friction stir weld processing which has been used to fabricate full size fuel plates which will be irradiated in the ATR and OSIRIS reactors.

  15. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  16. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  17. Electronic structure of the dioxygen to transition metal bond: generalized molecular orbital calculations on models of manganese, iron, and cobalt porphyrins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, James Edward

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are reported for FeP where P = porphinato(2-) ~ (NH2)4 , (NHCH2)4 , (N4C2H10) , (N4CBH6) and for Fe(02)PL where P = porphi nato(2-), (NH2)4 , (N4C2H6) and L = imidazole, NH3. The MO calculations indicate that (N4C2H6) is a better model for the porphyri n... ring in metal-dioxygen porphyrin complexes than the model (NH ) . This model was employed in generalized molecular orbital-confi guration interaction calculations of Fe(02)P(NH3), Co(02)P(NH3), and Mn(02)P where P = (N4C2H6) The ozone...

  18. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Lee, Chuck; Farmer, Joseph; Day, Dan; Wall, Mark; Saw, Cheng [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Boussoufi, Moe; Liu, Ben; Egbert, Harold [McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center, McClellan, CA, 95652 (United States); Branagan, Dan [Nanosteel Company, Idaho Falls, ID, 83402 (United States); D'Amato, Andy [Plasma Technology Incorporated, Torrance, CA, 90501 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, etc.). To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, Boral{sup TM}, Metamic{sup TM}, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion- Resistant Material (HPCRM){sup [1]} can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance for many naval applications raises the interest in applying the HPCRM to USDOE/OCRWM spent fuel management program. The fact that the HPCRM relies on the high content of boron to make the material amorphous - an essential property for corrosion resistance - and that the boron has to be homogeneously distributed in the HPCRM qualify the material to be a neutron poison. (authors)

  19. Blunt Trauma Performance of Fabric Systems Utilizing Natural Rubber Coated High Strength Fabrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, M. R.; Ahmad, W. Y. W.; Samsuri, A.; Salleh, J.; Abidin, M. H. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The blunt trauma performance of fabric systems against 9 mm bullets is reported. Three shots were fired at each fabric system with impact velocity of 367+-9 m/s and the depth of indentation on the modeling clay backing was measured. The results showed that 18-layer and 21-layer all-neat fabric systems failed the blunt trauma test. However, fabric systems with natural rubber (NR) latex coated fabric layers gave lower blunt trauma of between 25-32 mm indentation depths. Deformations on the neat fabrics upon impact were identified as broken yarns, yarn stretching and yarn pull-out. Deflections of the neat fabrics were more localised. For the NR latex coated fabric layers, no significant deformation can be observed except for peeled-off regions of the NR latex film at the back surface of the last layer. From the study, it can be said that the NR latex coated fabric layers were effective in reducing the blunt trauma of fabric systems.

  20. Characterization of candidate DOE sites for fabricating MOX fuel for lead assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdaway, R.F.; Miller, J.W.; Sease, J.D.; Moses, R.J.; O`Connor, D.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carrell, R.D. [Technical Resources International, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Jaeger, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, M.L.; Strasser, A.A. [Delta-21 Resources, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is directing the program to disposition US surplus weapons-usable plutonium. For the reactor option for disposition of this surplus plutonium, MD is seeking to contract with a consortium, which would include a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabricator and a commercial US reactor operator, to fabricate and burn MOX fuel in existing commercial nuclear reactors. This option would entail establishing a MOX fuel fabrication facility under the direction of the consortium on an existing DOE site. Because of the lead time required to establish a MOX fuel fabrication facility and the need to qualify the MOX fuel for use in a commercial reactor, MD is considering the early fabrication of lead assemblies (LAs) in existing DOE facilities under the technical direction of the consortium. The LA facility would be expected to produce a minimum of 1 metric ton heavy metal per year and must be operational by June 2003. DOE operations offices were asked to identify candidate sites and facilities to be evaluated for suitability to fabricate MOX fuel LAs. Savannah River Site, Argonne National Laboratory-West, Hanford, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were identified as final candidates to host the LA project. A Site Evaluation Team (SET) worked with each site to develop viable plans for the LA project. SET then characterized the suitability of each of the five plans for fabricating MOX LAs using 28 attributes and documented the characterization to aid DOE and the consortium in selecting the site for the LA project. SET concluded that each option has relative advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other options; however, each could meet the requirements of the LA project as outlined by MD and SET.

  1. Progress toward a MEMS fabricated 100 GHz oscillator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Lemp, Thomas; Weyn, Mark L.; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Rowley, James E. (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an LDRD effort which looked at the feasibility of building a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) fabricated 100 GHz micro vacuum tube. PIC Simulations proved to be a very useful tool in investigating various device designs. Scaling parameters were identified. This in turn allowed predictions of oscillator growth based on beam parameters, cavity geometry, and cavity loading. The electron beam source was identified as a critical element of the design. FEA's (Field Emission Arrays) were purchased to be built into the micro device. Laboratory testing of the FEA's was also performed which pointed out care and handling issues along with maximum current capabilities. Progress was made toward MEMS fabrication of the device. Techniques were developed and successfully employed to build up several of the subassemblies of the device. However, the lower wall fabrication proved to be difficult and a successful build was not completed. Alternative approaches to building this structure have been identified. Although these alternatives look like good solutions for building the device, it was not possible to complete a redesign and build during the timeframe of this effort.

  2. New route to the fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varshney, Deepak, E-mail: deepvar20@gmail.com; Morell, Gerardo [Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931, Puerto Rico (United States); Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PO Box 70377, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Palomino, Javier; Resto, Oscar [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PO Box 70377, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Gil, Jennifer [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Weiner, Brad R. [Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931, Puerto Rico (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films offer applications in various fields, but the existing synthetic approaches are cumbersome and destructive. A major breakthrough has been achieved by our group in the direction of a non-destructive, scalable, and economic process of NCD thin-film fabrication. Here, we report a cheap precursor for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond in the form of paraffin wax. We show that NCD thin films can be fabricated on a copper support by using simple, commonplace paraffin wax under reaction conditions of Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD). Surprisingly, even the presence of any catalyst or seeding that has been conventionally used in the state-of-the-art is not required. The structure of the obtained films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region confirm the presence of nanocrystalline diamond. The process is a significant step towards cost-effective and non-cumbersome fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond thin films for commercial production.

  3. X-ray Lenses Fabricated by LIGA Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazmov, Vladimir; Last, Arndt; Saile, Volker [Institut fuer Microstrukturtechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe University, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Jurgen [Institut fuer Microstrukturtechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Simon, Rolf [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DiMichiel, Marco [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, 38043, Grenoble (France)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray refractive optical lens systems have been successfully elaborated, designed, fabricated at the Institute for Microstructure Technology at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany) using LIGA technology in recent years. The lenses are structured in a SU-8 polymer. The capability of the LIGA technique to create an arbitrary profile of the focusing microstructures allow the fabrication of lenses with different curvature radius of parabolic geometry, minimized absorption and a large depth of focus. Also a set of planar lens systems on one substrate can be realized with 17 lenses providing identical focal distances for different X-ray energies from 2 to over 100 keV. Nickel lenses fabricated by electroforming using polymer templates can be applied for energies larger than 80 keV. The parabolic crossed lenses are used for 2D nano focusing of monochromatic beams. The quasi-parabolic crossed lenses with a submicron focus and a focus depth of the centimetre range can be used as an achromatic system. Mosaic truncated parabolic lenses with a focusing aperture up to 1 mm are made to increase the X-ray intensity in the focused spot.

  4. Covalency in Metal-Oxygen Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen K-edge Spectroscopy and Electronic Structure Theory . Covalency in Metal-Oxygen Multiple Bonds Evaluated Using Oxygen K-edge Spectroscopy...

  5. Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling Odessa fabricator builds rig specifically for geothermal drilling August 3, 2008 - 2:59pm Addthis For 35 years, MD...

  6. Carbon dioxide-assisted fabrication of highly uniform submicron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dioxide-assisted fabrication of highly uniform submicron-sized colloidal carbon spheres via hydrothermal carbonization Carbon dioxide-assisted fabrication of highly uniform...

  7. Plasma nonuniformities induced by dissimilar electrode metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnat, E.V.; Hebner, G.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1423 (United States)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonuniformities in both sheath electric field and plasma excitation were observed around dissimilar metals placed on a rf electrode. Spatial maps of the rf sheath electric field obtained by laser-induced fluorescence-dip (LIF-dip) spectroscopy show that the sheath structure was a function of the electrode metal. In addition to the electric-field measurements, LIF, optical emission, and Langmuir probe measurements show nonuniform excitation around the dissimilar metals. The degree and spatial extent of the discharge nonuniformities were dependent on discharge conditions and the history of the metal surfaces.

  8. Method for fabricating hafnia films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Michael Z [Knoxville, TN

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention comprises a method for fabricating hafnia film comprising the steps of providing a substrate having a surface that allows formation of a self-assembled monolayer thereon via covalent bonding; providing an aqueous solution that provides homogeneous hafnium ionic complexes and hafnium nanoclusters wherein the aqueous solution is capable of undergoing homogeneous precipitation under controlled conditions for a desired period of time at a controlled temperature and controlled solution acidity for desired nanocluster nucleation and growth kinetics, desired nanocluster size, desired growth rate of film thickness and desired film surface characteristics. The method further comprising forming the self-assembled monolayer on the surface of the substrate wherein the self-assembled monolayer comprises a plurality of hydrocarbon chains cross-linked together along the surface of the substrate, the hydrocarbon chains being uniformly spaced from one another and wherein each of the hydrocarbon chains having a functional anchoring group at a first end of the chain covalently bonded with the surface of the substrate and each of the hydrocarbon chains having a functional terminating group projected away from the surface wherein the functional terminating group provides a bonding site for the hafnium film to grow; and exposing the substrate to the aqueous solution for a desired period of time at a controlled temperature wherein the hafnium ionic complexes and the hafnium nanoclusters are deposited on the bonding site of the functional terminating group thereby forming the hafnia film wherein the hafnium bonded to the hydrocarbons and to one another provide a uniform ordered arrangement defined by the uniform arrangement of the hydrocarbons.

  9. Enhanced photoresponse of conformal TiO{sub 2}/Ag nanorod array-based Schottky photodiodes fabricated via successive glancing angle and atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800, Turkey and Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Cansizoglu, Hilal; Cansizoglu, Mehmet Fatih; Karabacak, Tansel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, Arkansas 72204 (United States); Okyay, Ali Kemal [National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the authors demonstrate a proof of concept nanostructured photodiode fabrication method via successive glancing angle deposition (GLAD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The fabricated metal-semiconductor nanorod (NR) arrays offer enhanced photoresponse compared to conventional planar thin-film counterparts. Silver (Ag) metallic NR arrays were deposited on Ag-film/Si templates by utilizing GLAD. Subsequently, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) was deposited conformally on Ag NRs via ALD. Scanning electron microscopy studies confirmed the successful formation of vertically aligned Ag NRs deposited via GLAD and conformal deposition of TiO{sub 2} on Ag NRs via ALD. Following the growth of TiO{sub 2} on Ag NRs, aluminum metallic top contacts were formed to complete the fabrication of NR-based Schottky photodiodes. Nanostructured devices exhibited a photo response enhancement factor of 1.49?×?10{sup 2} under a reverse bias of 3 V.

  10. Fabrication and testing of oxidized porous silicon field emitter strips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madduri, Vasanta Bhanu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fig. 1 Cross-section of Thin-film Field Emission Structure (After Spindt, et al. [7] ). Mo Silicon dioxide Silicon substrate Axis of rotation ~' Evaporant Aluminum release layer Mo SiO Si Evaporant Deposition for cone formation Etch off... release layer Fig. 2 Fabrication Procedure to Produce Mo Cones silicon substrates with 1-1, 5 pm of thermally grown oxide on them. Holes of 1. 5-2 ltm diameter are micro-machined in the oxide layer using electron beam lithography. Mo serves as an etch...

  11. Fabrication of porous silicon membranes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue, Wing Kong

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Porous silicon layer is formed by the local dissolution which is initiated by the surface layer and is promoted by the hindrance layers composed of the silicic acid. Local etching or local dissolution is the cause of forming porous structure... of pores were 25 to 45 A with a mean value of 38 A. Microstructure of porous silicon studied by Besle et al. showed two distinct 17 patterns: the structure pattern of porous silicon film on heavily doped silicon and that on slightly doped silicon [26...

  12. Parametric constructs : computational designs for digital fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araya Goldberg, Sergio

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores strategies for building design toolchains in order to design, develop and fabricate architectural forms. The hipothesys of this research is that by embedding ruled based procedures addressing generative, ...

  13. Design and Fabrication of Nanochannel Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Miao

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    /oval cross section efficiently and cost-effectively. 2.2 Background of Fabrication Technique: Basics of Electrospinning In 1934, Anton Formhals invented a spinning technology that produced synthetic fibers with the aid of an electric field.61...

  14. Pantry and Fabric Pests in the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.; Brown, Wizzie

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Pests such as Indian meal moths and various beetles and weevils can infest stored food. Dermestes beetles and clothes moths attack stored fabrics, hides and feathers. The first step in controlling these pests is learning to identify them and find...

  15. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; /SINTEF, Oslo; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; /SLAC; Da Via, C.; /Manchester U.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  16. Fabrication and properties of microporous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Jianzhong

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microporous silicon layers were fabricated by electrochemical etching of single crystalline silicon wafers in HF-ethanol solutions. The pore properties of porous silicon were examined by physical adsorption of nitrogen and the relationship between...

  17. Fabrication and properties of microporous silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Jianzhong

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microporous silicon layers were fabricated by electrochemical etching of single crystalline silicon wafers in HF-ethanol solutions. The pore properties of porous silicon were examined by physical adsorption of nitrogen and the relationship between...

  18. Raw fabric hardware implementation and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Albert (Albert G.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Raw architecture is scalable, improving performance not by pushing the limits of clock frequency, but by spreading computation across numerous simple, replicated tiles. The first Raw processors fabricated have 16 RISC ...

  19. Metal-phosphate binders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  20. Problems in interpretation of clay fabrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, S.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several models have been developed to explain the origins of different clay fabrics as seen with the scanning electron microscope, but some of these models may be oversimplified. One microfabric model suggests that bioturbation leads to a randomization of fabric; nonbioturbated fabrics should exhibit a preferred orientation (PO) of clay particles in the horizontal direction. However, in samples from the Los Angeles basin, California, it was discovered that bioturbated, hemipelagic mudstones had essentially the same clay fabric as nonbioturbated, turbiditic mudstones; both were highly random. The effect of bioturbation was also studied in anoxic-laminated, nonbioturbated muds which exhibited isolated burrows (Pico Formation, Rosario Group, California; Niobrara Formation, Colorado). The clay fabric inside and outside the burrows was similar; diagenesis appeared to be the controlling factor of these microfabrics. Another common conception is that PO of clays is developed during consolidation. The only PO seen in the samples from the Los Angeles basin is of silt-sized detrital micas and diagenetic chlorite. Much of the PO which has been measured in recent sediments may be due to the PO of silt-sized micas, not clays; and PO in shales may be due to diagenetic growth of phyllosilicates under uniaxial pressure. Another model states that pelagic settling of clays will lead to the development of PO. The nonbioturbated mudstones of the Pico Formation display random clay fabrics in both pelagic and turbiditic sediments. These results are not meant to disprove previous clay fabric studies but instead are intended as a warning against oversimplification of the origin and significance of clay fabrics.