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Sample records for faber fn forney

  1. Forney, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forney is a city in Kaufman County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 5th congressional district.12 References...

  2. Ch 19 Cumulative Impacts FN East Region

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 This page intentionally left blank Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Eastern United States VOLUME 15 - CHAPTER 19 April 2016 First Responder Network Authority Amanda Goebel Pereira, AICP NEPA Coordinator First Responder Network Authority U.S. Department of Commerce 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr. M/S 243 Reston, VA 20192 Cooperating Agencies Federal Communications Commission General Services Administration U.S. Department of

  3. Ch 22 Distribution List FN East Region

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 This page intentionally left blank Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Eastern United States VOLUME 15 - CHAPTER 22 April 2016 First Responder Network Authority Amanda Goebel Pereira, AICP NEPA Coordinator First Responder Network Authority U.S. Department of Commerce 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr. M/S 243 Reston, VA 20192 Cooperating Agencies Federal Communications Commission General Services Administration U.S. Department of

  4. Ch 5 DC FN East Region

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VOLUME 3 - CHAPTER 5 This page intentionally left blank Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Eastern United States April 2016 First Responder Network Authority Amanda Goebel Pereira, AICP NEPA Coordinator First Responder Network Authority U.S. Department of Commerce 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr. M/S 243 Reston, VA 20192 Cooperating Agencies Federal Communications Commission General Services Administration U.S. Department of

  5. Ch 22 Distribution List FN East Region

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Library-South Charleston, WV Morgantown Public Library-Morgantown, WV Clarksburg-Harrison Public Library-Clarksburg, WV Moomau-Grant County Public Library-Petersburg, WV ...

  6. Ch 19 Cumulative Impacts FN East Region

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    left blank Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Eastern United States VOLUME 15 - CHAPTER 19 April 2016 First ...

  7. Ch 20 Other Required Analyses FN East Region

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 This page intentionally left blank Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Eastern United States VOLUME 15 - CHAPTER 20 April 2016 First Responder Network Authority Amanda Goebel Pereira, AICP NEPA Coordinator First Responder Network Authority U.S. Department of Commerce 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr. M/S 243 Reston, VA 20192 Cooperating Agencies Federal Communications Commission General Services Administration U.S. Department of

  8. Ch 20 Other Required Analyses FN East Region

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    left blank Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Eastern United States VOLUME 15 - CHAPTER 20 April 2016 First ...

  9. 1,"W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",3675 2,"South Texas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Generation Company LLC",1865 6,"Sabine","Natural gas","Entergy Texas Inc.",1824.9 7,"Forney Energy Center","Natural gas","FPLE Forney LP",1760 8,"Limestone","Coal","NR...

  10. Current /sup 14/C measurements with the University of Washington FN tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, G.W.; Grootes, P.M.; Leach, D.D.; Schmidt, F.H.; Stuiver, M.

    1983-01-01

    The accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system shows a one-to-one relationship between sample /sup 14/C concentrations determined by AMS - and by ..beta..-counting. Measurements of unknown samples against a standard indicate that /sup 14/C concentration measurements to better than 2% can be made. For a 30-second data collection interval in a typical run of 100 intervals, the variability of the beam injected into the accelerator is ca 2%, that of the machine transmission is ca 4%, and counting statistics give 4.7% standard deviation for a sample of 80% of modern carbon.

  11. fn{EE49F893-CA64-40D2-9A32-E9DA8936271E}EIMS+Content&dbwisle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Errors and Omissions Process ID: PCS.062 Revision : 5 Revision Date: 04272012 Page: 1 of 2 Task Owner: * PA Project Associate * DS Design Supplier * SCR Sandia Contracting ...

  12. Next Generation Sequencing at the University of Chicago Genomics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The current presentation will highlight our capabilities in the area of ultra-high throughput sequencing analysis. Authors: Faber, Pieter 1 + Show Author Affiliations University ...

  13. fn{EE49F893-CA64-40D2-9A32-E9DA8936271E}EIMS+Content&dbwisle@srn.sandia.gov.vsd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Errors and Omissions Process ID: PCS.062 Revision #: 5 Revision Date: 04/27/2012 Page: 1 of 2 Task Owner: * PA Project Associate * DS Design Supplier * SCR Sandia Contracting Representative Process Owner: Senior Manager Customer Operations and Projects Printed Copies Of This Document are NOT Controlled Follow the Continual Improvement Process to Update this Process Manage Change FMS Design Error or Omission (DEO) PA Determines Associated Cost of NVA Error & Omission Cost Estimating NVA Cost

  14. ARM - Ingest Associated Status Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    common data format) datastream is generated: xxxmetFn.b1 xxxcmhFn.b1 aosingest Mentor: John Ogren, NOAA Lead Developer: Annette Koontz, PNNL Backup Developer: Brian Ermold, PNNL...

  15. 20F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1967RA24: 19F(n, ), E thermal; measured E; deduced Q. 1968SP01: 19F(n, ), E thermal; measured E, I; deduced Q. 20F...

  16. The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directory: Office of Sponsored Research Administration Name Title Office Email Phone Number Debra Covey Director II 311 TASF covey@ameslab.gov 515-294-1048 Craig Forney Associate 305 TASF ceforney@iastate.edu Fengrui Hu A303 Zaffarano frhu@iastate.edu 515-294-4745 Stacy Joiner Program Manager I 306 TASF joiner@ameslab.gov 515-294-5932 Elizabeth Pieper Program Coord I 311 TASF pieper@ameslab.gov 515-294-6486 Megan Pringnitz Office Assistant-X 305 TASF meganp@iastate.edu Elizabeth Rodgers Program

  17. Relation between the overpotentials and structures of graphite fluoride electrode in nonaqueous lithium cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, N.; Hagiwara, R.; Nakajima, T.

    1984-09-01

    A study was made of the relation between the cathode overpotentials and structures of two kinds of graphite fluorides, (CF)n and (C2F)n in a nonaqueous lithium battery. The overpotential of (CF)n electrode decreased with increasing interlayer spacing and decreasing thickness of the crystallite along the C axis. However, it was found that the overpotential of (C2F)n electrode primarily depended on the amount of the defects which would be present in the form of polynuclear aromatic carbon rings in (C2F)n. The defects in (C2F)n would give the short circuiting paths for the transfer of a lithium ion in diffusion layer. The higher discharge potential of (C2F)n than that of (CF)n was mainly attributed to the effect of the defects contained in (C2F)n. 17 references.

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Precision Measurement of the Neutron Twist-3 Matrix Element dn2: Probing Color Forces ... matrix element, fn2, the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were ...

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TOA Radiative Forcing F f(n) - f(N CCN 100) nN CCN 500 nN CCN 2500 ACI ln d ln N CCN McComiskey and Feingold, GRL, 2008 F (W m -2 ) ACI Quantifying Error in the...

  20. CEFRC_Egolfopoulos_Flames_Kinetics_Web.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laminar flame speed, ,cm/s Equivalence Ratio, ϕ Laminar flame speed, ,cm/s Equivalence Ratio, ϕ Methanol Ethanol n-Propanol n-Butanol n-Butanol sec-Butanol iso-Butanol tert-Butanol P.S. Veloo, Y.L Wang, F.N. Egolfopoulos, C.K. Westbrook, Combust. Flame 157 (2010) 1989-2004 P.S. Veloo, F.N. Egolfopoulos, "Flame Propagation of Butanol Isomers/Air Mixtures", Proc. Combust. Inst. (2010) doi:10.1016/j.proci.2010.06.163 P.S. Veloo, F.N. Egolfopoulos, "Studies of n-Propanol/Air,

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry program at the University of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, G.W.; Leach, D.D.; Grootes, P.M.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1984-04-10

    The University uses an FN-Tandem for /sup 14/C and /sup 10/Be measurements. Three main problems for accelerator-mass-spectrometry are normalization, stability, and sample preparation. The approach to these problems is discussed. (GHT)

  2. Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The mobile system is mounted in a small van with a portable power supply and transported ... Vegetation appeared to be the most important influence fn decreasing wind-borne ...

  3. The TLR4 agonist fibronectin extra domain A is cryptic, exposed by elastase-2; use in a fibrin matrix cancer vaccine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Julier, Ziad; Martino, Mikaël M.; de Titta, Alexandre; Jeanbart, Laura; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-02-24

    Fibronectin (FN) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein including numerous fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats with different functions. The alternatively spliced FN variant containing the extra domain A (FNIII EDA), located between FNIII 11 and FNIII 12, is expressed in sites of injury, chronic inflammation, and solid tumors. Although its function is not well understood, FNIII EDA is known to agonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, by producing various FN fragments containing FNIII EDA, we found that FNIII EDA's immunological activity depends upon its local intramolecular context within the FN chain. N-terminal extension of the isolated FNIII EDA with itsmore » neighboring FNIII repeats (FNIII 9-10-11) enhanced its activity in agonizing TLR4, while C-terminal extension with the native FNIII 12-13-14 heparin-binding domain abrogated it. We reveal that an elastase 2 cleavage site is present between FNIII EDA and FNIII 12. Activity of the C-terminally extended FNIII EDA could be restored after cleavage of the FNIII 12-13-14 domain by elastase 2. FN being naturally bound to the ECM, we immobilized FNIII EDA-containing FN fragments within a fibrin matrix model along with antigenic peptides. Such matrices were shown to stimulate cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses in two murine cancer models.« less

  4. Normal Force and Drag Force in Magnetorheological Finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2010-01-13

    The material removal in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is known to be controlled by shear stress, tau, which equals drag force, Fd, divided by spot area, As. However, it is unclear how the normal force, Fn, affects the material removal in MRF and how the measured ratio of drag force to normal force Fd/Fn, equivalent to coefficient of friction, is related to material removal. This work studies, for the first time for MRF, the normal force and the measured ratio Fd/Fn as a function of material mechanical properties. Experimental data were obtained by taking spots on a variety of materials including optical glasses and hard ceramics with a spot-taking machine (STM). Drag force and normal force were measured with a dual load cell. Drag force decreases linearly with increasing material hardness. In contrast, normal force increases with hardness for glasses, saturating at high hardness values for ceramics. Volumetric removal rate decreases with normal force across all materials. The measured ratio Fd/Fn shows a strong negative linear correlation with material hardness. Hard materials exhibit a low coefficient of friction. The volumetric removal rate increases with the measured ratio Fd/Fn which is also correlated with shear stress, indicating that the measured ratio Fd/Fn is a useful measure of material removal in MRF.

  5. Low Temperature Direct Use District Heating Geothermal Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    >

    Temperature: 79.0u00b0C, 174.0u00b0FnFlow: 4,000 gpm, 15,160 LminnAnnual Generation: 66.2 x109 Btuyrn

    ","title":"Boise City...

  6. CDM Sustainable Development Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fnNI3k2%2Be9hblXIZ7ZPrqk8cV Cost: Free Related Tools Simple Interactive Models for better air quality (SIM-air) Integrated MARKAL-EFOM System (TIMES) Asia-Pacific Integrated Model...

  7. A=20F (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are listed in Table 20.4 Resonances in 19F(n, )16N (in PDF or PS) (BO55A, MA55L: see graph in (HU58)). See also (WI37E, BO55D, GR55D, KO58A). 15. 19F(d, p)20F Qm 4.379 Q0 ...

  8. Structures of Adnectin/Protein Complexes Reveal an Expanded Binding Footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Bush, Alexander; Wei, Anzhi; Emanuel, Stuart L.; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Janjua, Ahsen; Cheng, Lin; Murdock, Melissa; Abramczyk, Bozena; Cohen, Daniel; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul; Davis, Jonathan H.; Dabritz, Michael; McLaughlin, Douglas C.; Russo, Katie A.; Chao, Ginger; Wright, Martin C.; Jenny, Victoria A.; Engle, Linda J.; Furfine, Eric; Sheriff, Steven

    2014-10-02

    Adnectins are targeted biologics derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ({sup 10}Fn3), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Target-specific binders are selected from libraries generated by diversifying the three {sup 10}Fn3 loops that are analogous to the complementarity determining regions of antibodies. The crystal structures of two Adnectins were determined, each in complex with its therapeutic target, EGFR or IL-23. Both Adnectins bind different epitopes than those bound by known monoclonal antibodies. Molecular modeling suggests that some of these epitopes might not be accessible to antibodies because of the size and concave shape of the antibody combining site. In addition to interactions from the Adnectin diversified loops, residues from the N terminus and/or the {beta} strands interact with the target proteins in both complexes. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis confirmed the calculated binding energies of these {beta} strand interactions, indicating that these nonloop residues can expand the available binding footprint.

  9. Microsoft Word - 25788WDC_DOE DD FS.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June 14, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A10FN003) SUBJECT: Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2010 Financial Statement Audit - Report No.: OAS-FS-11-07 TO: Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, EM-1 Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Planning and Budget, Office of Environmental Management, EM-60 The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants' audit of the United States Department of Energy's Uranium

  10. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will celebrate 50 years of highly successful collaborative research. Everyone who has been a part of TUNL's program - former and present students, post-doctoral researchers, faculty, staff, research collaborators, and other friends of the laboratory - is invited. Come and join us! What are we celebrating? In November 1965 the US Atomic Energy Commission announced a $2.5M award for purchase of a new High Voltage Engineering Model FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. This began a thriving

  11. Mr. Robert Tate Assistant Secretary Cyclops Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    E-23 Mr. Robert Tate Assistant Secretary Cyclops Corporation 650 Washington Road Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15228 Dear Mr. Tate: As you discussed with Gale Turf of my staff, the Cyclops Corporation, Titusville Plant fn Alfquippa, Pennsylvania, has been authorfzed for remedial action. This action will be conducted under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The Department will consult with the Cyclops Corporation before taking any action. I understand that

  12. Microsoft Word - Final Report Package Transmittal - FY 2010 FS Management Letter.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 20, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-322 (A10FN006) SUBJECT: Management Letter on the Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 2010 TO: Chief Financial Officer, CF-1 Attached is the subject letter prepared by KPMG LLP, our contract auditors. The letter contains 23 new findings (see letter, Exhibit A) and 4 repeat findings (see letter, Exhibit B) that were issued during the

  13. Microsoft Word - 271C2C7B.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 14, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A10FN003) SUBJECT: Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2010 Financial Statement Audit - Report No.: OAS-FS-11-07 TO: Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, EM-1 Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Planning and Budget, Office of Environmental Management, EM-60 The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants' audit of the United States Department of Energy's Uranium

  14. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2015-05-22

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  15. THE BLACK HOLE MASS-GALAXY LUMINOSITY RELATIONSHIP FOR SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salviander, S.; Shields, G. A.; Bonning, E. W. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between the mass of the central supermassive black hole, M {sub BH}, and the host galaxy luminosity, L {sub gal}, in a sample of quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We use composite quasar spectra binned by black hole mass and redshift to assess galaxy features that would otherwise be overwhelmed by noise in individual spectra. The black hole mass is calculated using the photoionization method, and the host galaxy luminosity is inferred from the depth of the Ca II H+K features in the composite spectra. We evaluate the evolution in the M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship by examining the redshift dependence of ? log M {sub BH}, the offset in M {sub BH} from the local M {sub BH}-L {sub gal} relationship. There is little systematic trend in ? log M {sub BH} out to z = 0.8. Using the width of the [O III] emission line as a proxy for the stellar velocity dispersion, ?{sub *}, we find agreement of our derived host luminosities with the locally observed Faber-Jackson relation. This supports the utility of the width of the [O III] line as a proxy for ?{sub *} in statistical studies.

  16. On the Development of a Miniature Neutron Generator for the Brachytherapy Treatment of Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman, L.

    2009-03-10

    Brachytherapy refers to application of an irradiation source within a tumor. {sup 252}Cf needles used in brachytherapy have been successfully applied to treatment of some of the most virulent cancers but it is doubtful that it will be widely used because of difficulty in dealing with unwanted dose (source cannot be turned off) and in adhering to stringent NRC regulations that have been exacerbated in our post 911 environment. We have been working on the development of a miniature neutron generator with the reaction target placed at the end of a needle (tube) for brachytherapy applications. Orifice geometries are most amenable, e.g. rectum and cervix, but interstitial use is possible with microsurgery. This paper dicusses the results of a 30 watt DD neutron generator SBU project that demonstrates that sufficient hydrogen isotope current can be delivered down a small diameter needle required for a DT neutron treatment device, and, will summarize the progress of building a commercial device pursued by the All Russian Institute for Automatics (VNIIA) supported by the DOE's Industrial Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP). It is known that most of the fast neutron (FN) beam cancer treatment facilities have been closed down. It appears that the major limitation in the use of FN beams has been damage to healthy tissue, which is relatively insensitive to photons, but this problem is alleviated by brachytherapy. Moreover, recent clinical results indicate that fast neutrons in the boost mode are most highly effective in treating large, hypoxic, and rapidly repopulating diseases. It appears that early boost application of FN may halt angiogenesis (development and repair of tumor vascular system) and shrink the tumor resulting in lower hypoxia. The boost brachytherapy application of a small, low cost neutron generator holds promise of significant contribution to the treatment of cancer.

  17. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tandem Schedule| Tandem Log Sheet| Tandem Training| Tandem SOP| RadSafe Logs| Tandem Accelerator Bay The main accelerator is a FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator that has a maximum terminal voltage of 10 MV. Negative ions can be injected into the tandem from three sources: (1) a direct extraction negative ion source provides pulsed or dc beams of unpolarized H- and D- ions, (2) an atomic beam polarized ion source provides dc beams of polarized H- and D- ions, and (3) a heavy-ion source provides

  18. SNS nEDM | Ultracold Neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory (pRad)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SNS nEDM An electric dipole moment (EDM) measures the separation of positive and negative charges within a system and is an extremely sensitive probe of physics beyond the standard model. A new neutron EDM (nEDM) experiment is being developed to be installed at the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with a goal sensitivity of δdn~5 x10-28 e-cm, an improvement of two orders of magnitude over the current limit set

  19. Microsoft Word - Transmittal Memo - FY 2007 Isotopes Final Report 4-7-2011_1.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    25.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: April 7, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A07FN003) SUBJECT: Department of Energy Isotope Program's Fiscal Year 2007 Financial Statement Audit - Audit Report No.: OAS-FS-11-06 TO: Director, Office of Science Director, Facilities and Project Management Division, Office of Nuclear Physics The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants' audit of the United States (U.S.) Department of

  20. A.12a (Pre-SAS 115) Letter to communicate significant deficiencies and/or material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting noted in an audit of financial statements of a nonpublic entity, excluding FDICIA engagements (Rev. 1/08)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    I325 8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 22,2009 REPLY TO A I T N OF: IG-322 (A09FN006) SUBJECT: Management Letter on the Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 2009 TO: Chief Financial Officer, CF- 1 Attached is the subject letter prepared by KPMG LLP, our contract auditors. The letter contains 21 new findings (see letter, Exhibit A) and 5 repeat findings (see letter, Exhibit B) that were

  1. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

  2. Technological advances in the University of Washington accelerator mass spectrometry system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, G.W.; Grootes, P.M.; Leach, D.D.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1983-01-01

    During the past year we have continued to work toward greater stability and flexibility in nearly all elements of our accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system, which is based upon an FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator, and have carried out measurements of /sup 14/C//sup 12/C and /sup 10/Be//sup 9/Be isotopic abundance ratios in natural samples. The principal recent developments and improvements in the accelerator system and in our sample preparation techniques for carbon beryllium are discussed, and the results of a study of /sup 10/Be cross-contamination of beryllium samples in the sputter ion source are presented.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry facility at the University of Washington: current status, and an application to the /sup 14/C profile of a tree ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, G.W.; Grootes, P.M.; Leach, D.D.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1984-01-01

    The University of Washington Model FN Tandem accelerator (1) is used for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) of /sup 10/Be and /sup 14/C. This paper describes our basic system, our methods for rare-isotope normalization, final ion detection, and sample preparation, and the general problem of adapting an existing accelerator to meet the stringent stability requirements of precision AMS measurements while retaining human and technical compatibility with other users and uses of the accelerator. Recent preliminary data obtained on /sup 14/C in thin sequential sections of a single Sitka spruce tree ring (1963) are presented.

  4. Tu3Og,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NV, 03 CP-36 April 17, 194' - Princeton University ~caz The specific heat of Tu3C3was determined accurately. The reaction of tuballoy with six ceramic materials at specified high temperatures is indicated. \ W-92 May 23, 1942 - New York University The specific heat and thermal conductivity of' tuballoy at room temperature are given. CP-92 Kay 23, 1942 - Princeton University Tu3Og, Thermal conductivity measurements of graphite, BeO, and Tu02 were made. CP-124 June 13, 1942 - Princet,Fn University

  5. Audit Report: OAS-L-08-16

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    IDOE F 1325 8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. August 18, 2008 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-08- 16 REPLY TO ATTN OF IG-34 (A08FN008) SUBJECT Report on "Agreed-lJpon Procedures for Federal Payroll" TO Director, Office of Human Capital Management, HC- I Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management and Budget Bulletin No. 07-04 (Bulletin), "Audit Requirements for Federal Financial

  6. Incorporating an advanced aerosol activation parameterization into WRF-CAM5: Model evaluation and parameterization intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kai; He, Jian; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fan, Jiwen; Nenes, Athanasios

    2015-07-22

    Aerosol activation into cloud droplets is an important process that governs aerosol indirect effects. The advanced treatment of aerosol activation by Fountoukis and Nenes (2005) and its recent updates, collectively called the FN series, have been incorporated into a newly developed regional coupled climate-air quality model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model with the physics package of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (WRF-CAM5) to simulate aerosol-cloud interactions in both resolved and convective clouds. The model is applied to East Asia for two full years of 2005 and 2010. A comprehensive model evaluation is performed for model predictions of meteorological, radiative, and cloud variables, chemical concentrations, and column mass abundances against satellite data and surface observations from air quality monitoring sites across East Asia. The model performs overall well for major meteorological variables including near-surface temperature, specific humidity, wind speed, precipitation, cloud fraction, precipitable water, downward shortwave and longwave radiation, and column mass abundances of CO, SO2, NO2, HCHO, and O3 in terms of both magnitudes and spatial distributions. Larger biases exist in the predictions of surface concentrations of CO and NOx at all sites and SO2, O3, PM2.5, and PM10 concentrations at some sites, aerosol optical depth, cloud condensation nuclei over ocean, cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), cloud liquid and ice water path, and cloud optical thickness. Compared with the default Abdul-Razzack Ghan (2000) parameterization, simulations with the FN series produce ~107113% higher CDNC, with half of the difference attributable to the higher aerosol activation fraction by the FN series and the remaining half due to feedbacks in subsequent cloud microphysical processes. With the higher CDNC, the FN series are more skillful in simulating cloud water path, cloud optical thickness, downward shortwave radiation, shortwave cloud forcing, and precipitation. The model evaluation identifies several areas of provements including emissions and their vertical allocation as well as model formulations such as aerosol formation, cloud droplet nucleation, and ice nucleation.

  7. Gammasphere Past, Present and Future: M.P. Carpenter Argonne National Laboratory ICW2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 8 3 Super Conducting Linac Development at Argonne Super Conducting Linac Development at Argonne 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 EN/FN Tandem Rm. Temp. Helix Superconducting Helix SC Booster Linac ATLAS Project Positive Ion Injector / ECR / Uranium-Upgrade ATLAS Energy Upgrade ANL RIA-SRF Development ANL SC Linac Operation The HELIX Age The HELIX Age * 1969 H. Klein et al (Frankfurt University) propose a heavy-ion linac using normal-conducting helical accelerating

  8. A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Linited states rjovernment Department of Eneryy memorandum DAE: E.115 ? 5 1994 A s 29 2 30 f'n ' y REPLvio W - 4 2 1 (Y. A. Williams. 427-1719) A'ITN OF S U W E t r Uranium Guidelines for the Schnoor Site, Springdale. Pennsylvania L . Price, OR TO This is in response to the request for approval of uranium guidelines for the Schnoor Site of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5. The site. located in western Pennsylvania. was used

  9. wxwe185.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    %53 - ?W=2W7 April 24,2000 STAk The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor system Encapsulated Fission Heat Source NERI Proposal 99-0154 Progress Report for period terminating March 31,2000 fn~u!! Comments and questions should be sent to =+< -gm Ehud Greenspan d Department of Nuclear Engineering University of California Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 Gehud@nuc.berkeley. edu Significant progress has been made since the beginniig of this project, in September 1999. Pm of the project findings are

  10. Structural, electrical and magnetic properties of (Bi{sub 0.9}RE{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.97}Co{sub 0.03})O{sub 3} (RE = Nd and Gd) thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Xu Tan, Guoqiang Liu, Wenlong; Ren, Huijun

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Nd–Co and Gd–Co codoped BiFeO{sub 3} thin films are synthesized by chemical solution deposition method. • Enhanced magnetic property is observed in BGFC thin film at room temperature. • The onset electric field of FN tunneling of the films is associated with band gaps. • Both ferromagnetism and diamagnetism coexist in the BNFC film. - Abstract: Rhombohedral (Bi{sub 0.9}RE{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.97}Co{sub 0.03})O{sub 3} (RE = Nd and Gd) thin films were deposited on FTO substrates by using a chemical solution deposition method. Raman scattering spectra reveal that the BiFeO{sub 3} lattices are able to incorporate Nd/Gd and Co ions with no effect on the basic rhombohedral structure. The chemical shift of Bi 4f, Fe 2p and O 1s core levels of the films is investigated by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The presence of defects in the films has been estimated through XPS study, which has a great effect on the dielectric dispersion and ferroelectric polarization. The intrinsic density of free electrons associated with band gap is the dominating factor which controls the FN tunneling conductance mechanism of the films. Both ferromagnetism and diamagnetism coexist in the BNFC film, while only ferromagnetism is observed in the BGFC film.

  11. Transverse single-spin asymmetry and cross section for π⁰ and η mesons at large Feynman x in p↑+p collisions at √s=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2012-09-05

    Measurements of the differential cross section and the transverse single-spin asymmetry, AN, vs xF for π⁰ and η mesons are reported for 0.4F↑+p collisions at √s=200 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The average transverse beam polarization was 56%. The cross section for π⁰, including the previously unmeasured region of xF>0.55, is consistent with a perturbative QCD prediction, and the η/π⁰ cross-section ratio agrees with existing midrapidity measurements. For 0.55FN for η is 0.210±0.056, and thatmore »for π⁰ is 0.081±0.016. The probability that these two asymmetries are equal is ~3%.« less

  12. IL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :; / 2. ' b-:-"y .",...4 * .-.a 2 IL !< :. 34 --' -, ' ' < I ,-. g Tvo"l r . . .-i- :- " .1-. . . . . NC0 /L ' J,, ' ;.' , -_I( + ? CENTRAL FILES c -&' { ' c;$y ;;j*' E ,J): ' i' Z, 1; p -^ r-raL-r.nuzT".Fn., , ,..-y - -' -ie .". iJ.&:~e!ct.;;' sf ' ;;i_is ,trip ' JG,' go f-Jj;~ey~ 2123 -:s<j .-&;.z ;y1y rrc&ed recr!p!~-,da.a .b ,&.j.,& .:*3;.. F-Y ' __ ,,,.x+; PC l;ealti: :.2,.i CCI ;et y. tirlr.&g t;1c oy-er at ion c.f sei;a~xl

  13. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    R i i e . Tennessee 37831 -8723 J u l y 18, 1995 Mr. Graham H i t c h e l l , Environmental Manager Ohio Envi r o n e n t a l Protection llgency Southwest O I s t r i c t O f f l c e 40 South H r i n Street Dayton, Ohio 45402 Dear Hr. M i t c h e l l : MUMD hSSESSHEKT FOR RESIDUAL COHTMINATION AT THE FORMER CISSOClATE AIRCRAFT SITE ( M S ) Enclosed i s a copy of the Hazard Assessment t h a t was performed f o r the Former Associate A i r c r a f t S i t e (MS) fn F a i r f i e l d , Ohio. In

  14. G-Plus Report to Judel Products: Spectral Analysis and Imaging of Colored Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H

    2005-06-20

    Redox state is one of the most important factors that affect color of glasses. Recently, optical properties and redox state of the glass melts have been studied at TNO by A.J. Faber [1]. Spectral measurements up to 4 {micro}m into the infrared region were taken. The focus of similar studies [2] was on the redox state of iron. In glassware production, the control of color is mainly dependent upon the experience of the operators. When the color varies due to changes in processing conditions, batching or furnace contamination, usually little can be done but to scrap the entire batch. This can result in significant down time and waste of energy to melt and refine the glass. For small glass companies, detecting out-of-specification color variation early in the melting process means savings on labor and energy costs. In larger color glass operations, early detection may provide means to correct or save the batch. Monitoring the redox state of the glass melt can be used to effectively control the quality of glass products. An in-line redox sensor has been tested in industrial environment [3]. Thermal emission spectroscopy is a non-contact, real-time sensing technique. The collection of a spectrum takes only a few seconds or less. This may allow on-line analysis of the glass melt or hot glass products. For a specific glass product, a series of spectra with different processing parameters could be collected and analyzed. The sensing system would be able to detect a deviation from the normal conditions and signal the operator a change has occurred. The primary goal of this GPLUS effort is to find a practical solution for color monitoring. In this project, we proposed to conduct initial experiments of spectral characterization of colored glasses from the designated glass industry members of the Society for Glass Science and Practices. The work plan contained three stages: (1) Obtain glass samples and use spectroscopy analysis at ORNL to measure basic spectral characteristics of various glass products; (2) collect emission spectra of the glasses using single-point spectrometers (UV to 2.5 microns) from glass melts; (3) Using a spectral imaging device (3-5 microns) at ORNL to obtain 2D hyper-spectra images to evaluate the emission of glass melts.

  15. Suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation by microRNA-29b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiya, Yumiko; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka ; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka; PhoenixBio Co. Ltd., Hiroshima ; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kawada, Norifumi; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during the activation of hepatic stellate cells in primary culture. {yields} Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs. {yields} It blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-b mRNAs essential for stellate cell activation. {yields} miR-29b overexpression led stellate cells to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their star-like morphology. {yields} miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in the regulation of cellular functions including proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. It has been previously shown that the miR-29 family is involved in regulating type I collagen expression by interacting with the 3'UTR of its mRNA. Here, we investigated the roles of miR-29b in the activation of mouse primary-cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a principal collagen-producing cell in the liver. Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during HSC activation in primary culture. Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs and additionally blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-{beta}, which are key genes involved in the activation of HSCs. Further, overexpression of miR-29b led HSCs to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their quiescent star-like cell morphology. Although phosphorylation of FAK, ERK, and Akt, and the mRNA expression of c-jun was unaffected, miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. These results suggested that miR-29b is involved in the activation of HSCs and could be a candidate molecule for suppressing their activation and consequent liver fibrosis.

  16. Intrinsic SiO{sub x}-based unipolar resistive switching memory. II. Thermal effects on charge transport and characterization of multilevel programing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yao-Feng Chen, Ying-Chen; Chen, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yanzhen; Xue, Fei; Zhou, Fei; Lee, Jack C.; Fowler, Burt

    2014-07-28

    Multilevel programing and charge transport characteristics of intrinsic SiO{sub x}-based resistive switching memory are investigated using TaN/SiO{sub x}/n{sup ++}Si (MIS) and TiW/SiO{sub x}/TiW (MIM) device structures. Current transport characteristics of high- and low-resistance states (HRS and LRS) are studied in both device structures during multilevel operation. Analysis of device thermal response demonstrates that the effective electron energy barrier is strongly dependent on the resistance of the programed state, with estimates of 0.1?eV in the LRS and 0.6?eV in the HRS. Linear data fitting and conductance analyses indicate Poole-Frenkel emission or hopping conductance in the low-voltage region, whereas Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) or trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) is indicated at moderate voltage. Characterizations using hopping transport lead to hopping distance estimates of ?1?nm in the LRS for both device structures. Relative permittivity values (?{sub r}) were extracted using the Poole-Frenkel formulism and estimates of local filament temperature, where ?{sub r} values were ?80 in the LRS and ?4 in the HRS, suggesting a strongly polarized medium in the LRS. The onset of F-N tunneling or TAT corresponds to an observed overshoot in the I-V response with an estimated threshold of 1.6??0.2?V, in good agreement with reported electro-luminescence results for LRS devices. Resistive switching is discussed in terms of electrochemical reactions between common SiO{sub 2} defects, and specific defect energy levels are assigned to the dominant transitions in the I-V response. The overshoot response in the LRS is consistent with TAT through either the E?' oxygen vacancy or the hydrogen bridge defect, both of which are reported to have an effective bandgap of 1.7?eV. The SET threshold at ?2.5?V is modeled as hydrogen release from the (Si-H){sub 2} defect to generate the hydrogen bridge, and the RESET transition is modeled as an electrochemical reaction that re-forms (SiH){sub 2}. The results provide further insights into charge transport and help identify potential switching mechanisms in SiO{sub x}-based unipolar resistive switching memory.

  17. BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT THE PRESENT EPOCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauer, Tod R.; Postman, Marc; Strauss, Michael A.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Chisari, Nora E.

    2014-12-20

    We have obtained photometry and spectroscopy of 433 z ? 0.08 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a full-sky survey of Abell clusters to construct a BCG sample suitable for probing deviations from the local Hubble flow. The BCG Hubble diagram over 0 < z < 0.08 is consistent to within 2% of the Hubble relation specified by a ? {sub m} = 0.3, ? = 0.7 cosmology. This sample allows us to explore the structural and photometric properties of BCGs at the present epoch, their location in their hosting galaxy clusters, and the effects of the cluster environment on their structure and evolution. We revisit the L{sub m} -? relation for BCGs, which uses ?, the log-slope of the BCG photometric curve of growth, to predict the metric luminosity in an aperture with 14.3kpc radius, L{sub m} , for use as a distance indicator. Residuals in the relation are 0.27mag rms. We measure central stellar velocity dispersions, ?, of the BCGs, finding the Faber-Jackson relation to flatten as the metric aperture grows to include an increasing fraction of the total BCG luminosity. A three-parameter ''metric plane'' relation using ? and ? together gives the best prediction of L{sub m} , with 0.21mag residuals. The distribution of projected spatial offsets, r{sub x} of BCGs from the X-ray-defined cluster center is a steep ? = 2.33 power law over 1 < r{sub x} < 10{sup 3}kpc. The median offset is ?10kpc, but ?15% of the BCGs have r{sub x} > 100kpc. The absolute cluster-dispersion normalized BCG peculiar velocity |?V {sub 1}|/? {sub c} follows an exponential distribution with scale length 0.39 0.03. Both L{sub m} and ? increase with ? {sub c}. The ? parameter is further moderated by both the spatial and velocity offset from the cluster center, with larger ? correlated with the proximity of the BCG to the cluster mean velocity or potential center. At the same time, position in the cluster has little effect on L{sub m} . Likewise, residuals from the metric plane show no correlation with either the spatial or velocity offset from the cluster center. The luminosity difference between the BCG and second-ranked galaxy, M2, increases as the peculiar velocity of the BCG within the cluster decreases. Further, when M2 is a close luminosity ''rival'' of the BCG, the galaxy that is closest to either the velocity or X-ray center of the cluster is most likely to have the larger ?. We conclude that the inner portions of the BCGs are formed outside the cluster, but interactions in the heart of the galaxy cluster grow and extend the envelopes of the BCGs.

  18. Studies of nuclear processes; Progress report, 1 September 1992--31 August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1993-09-01

    Results for the period 1 Sep 92 through 31 Aug 93 are presented in nearly a hundred brief papers, some of which present new but preliminary data. Activities reported may be grouped as follows: Fundamental symmetries in the nucleus (parity-mixing measurements, time reversal invariance measurements, signatures of quantum chaos in nuclei), Internucleon reactions (neutron -- proton interactions, the neutron -- neutron scattering length, reactions between deuterons and very light nuclei), Dynamics of very light nuclei (measurements of D states of very light nuclei by transfer reactions, nuclear reactions between very light nuclei, radiative capture reactions with polarized sources), The many-nucleon problem (nuclear astrophysics, high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation, the nuclear mean field: Dispersive relations and nucleon scattering, configuration mixing in {sup 56}Co and {sup 46}Sc using (d,{alpha}) reactions, radiative capture studies, high energy resolution resonance studies at 100--400 keV, nuclear data evaluation for A=3--20), Nuclear instruments and methods (FN tandem accelerator operation, KN accelerator operation and maintenance, atomic beam polarized ion source, development of techniques for determining the concentration of SF{sub 6} in the accelerator insulating gas mixture, production of beams and targets, detector systems, updating of TeX, Psprint, and associated programs on the VAX cluster), and Educational Activities.

  19. A comparative analysis of accident risks in fossil, hydro, and nuclear energy chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgherr, P.; Hirschberg, S.

    2008-07-01

    This study presents a comparative assessment of severe accident risks in the energy sector, based on the historical experience of fossil (coal, oil, natural gas, and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas)) and hydro chains contained in the comprehensive Energy-related Severe Accident Database (ENSAD), as well as Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the nuclear chain. Full energy chains were considered because accidents can take place at every stage of the chain. Comparative analyses for the years 1969-2000 included a total of 1870 severe ({>=} 5 fatalities) accidents, amounting to 81,258 fatalities. Although 79.1% of all accidents and 88.9% of associated fatalities occurred in less developed, non-OECD countries, industrialized OECD countries dominated insured losses (78.0%), reflecting their substantially higher insurance density and stricter safety regulations. Aggregated indicators and frequency-consequence (F-N) curves showed that energy-related accident risks in non-OECD countries are distinctly higher than in OECD countries. Hydropower in non-OECD countries and upstream stages within fossil energy chains are most accident-prone. Expected fatality rates are lowest for Western hydropower and nuclear power plants; however, the maximum credible consequences can be very large. Total economic damages due to severe accidents are substantial, but small when compared with natural disasters. Similarly, external costs associated with severe accidents are generally much smaller than monetized damages caused by air pollution.

  20. Precision Measurement of the Neutron Twist-3 Matrix Element dn2: Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posik, Matthew; Flay, David; Parno, Diana; Allada, Kalyan; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Chiranjib; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Franklin, Gregg; Friend, Megan; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Gomez, Javier; Guo, Lei; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, J; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jin, Ge; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lukhanin, Oleksandr; Mamyan, Vahe; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Moffit, Bryan; Muangma, Navaphon; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Oh, Yongseok; Peng, Jen-chieh; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Troth, Wolfgang; Wang, Diancheng; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2014-07-01

    Double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections were measured at large Bjorken x (0.25 lte x lte 0.90), in both the deep-inelastic and resonance regions, by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV from a transversely and longitudinally polarized 3He target. In this dedicated experiment, the spin structure function g2 on 3He was determined with precision at large x, and the neutron twist-three matrix element dn2 was measured at ?Q2? of 3.21 and 4.32 GeV2/c2, with an absolute precision of about 10?5. Our results are found to be in agreement with lattice QCD calculations and resolve the disagreement found with previous data at ?Q2?= 5 GeV2/c2. Combining dn2 and a newly extracted twist-four matrix element, fn2, the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were extracted and found to be of opposite sign and about 60 MeV/fm in magnitude.

  1. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

  2. ENO1 promotes tumor proliferation and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xinghua; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Li, Chunsun; Guo, Yan; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2015-07-15

    Enolases are glycolytic enzymes responsible for the ATP-generated conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In addition to the glycolytic function, Enolase 1 (ENO1) has been reported up-regulation in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression and biologic function of ENO1 in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs). Clinically, by western blot analysis we observed that ENO1 expression was apparently higher in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma than in the reactive lymphoid tissues. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining of 144 NHLs suggested that the expression of ENO1 was significantly lower in the indolent lymphomas compared with the progressive lymphomas. Further, we identified ENO1 as an independent prognostic factor, and it was significantly correlated with overall survival of NHL patients. In addition, we found that ENO1 could promote cell proliferation, regulate cell cycle associated gene and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in NHLs. Finally, we verified that ENO1 participated in the process of lymphoma cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Adhesion to FN or HS5 cells significantly protected OCI-Ly8 and Daudi cells from cytotoxicity compared with those cultured in suspension, and these effects were attenuated when transfected with ENO1-siRNA. Based on the study, we propose that inhibition of ENO1 expression may be a novel strategy for therapy for NHLs patients, and it may be a target for drug resistance. - Highlights: • ENO1 expression is reversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHLs. • ENO1 promotes the proliferation of NHL cells. • ENO1 regulates cell adhesion mediated drug resistance.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, February 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    2001-02-23

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended Corrective Action Alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 490 is located on the Nellis Air Force Range and the Tonopah Test Range and is approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (located southwest of Area 3); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area (located west of Main Lake); 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard (located north of the northwest corner of Area 3); and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area (located south of the Area 9 Compound on the TTR). A Corrective Action Investigation was performed in July and August 2000, and analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine contaminants of concern (COCs). There were no COCs identified in soil at the Gun Propellant Burn Area or the Station 44 Burn Area; therefore, there is no need for corrective actions at these two sites. Five soil samples at the Fire Training Area and seven at the Sandia Service Yard exceeded PALs for total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel. Upon the identification of COCs specific to CAU 490, Corrective Action Objectives were developed based on a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the TTR, with the following three CAAs under consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure In Place - No Further Action With Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred choice for CAU 490 was Alternative 3. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at this site.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  5. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope???????® and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope???????® were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought DSS and tested per ASTM A923 method B (Charpy impact test). Method A (sodium hydroxide etch test) was performed on one half of a fractured Charpy V-notch impact sample and Method C (ferric chloride corrosion weight loss test) was performed on another half. Test results for the three cast lots and one wrought lot indicate that ASTM A923 is relevant for detecting intermetallic phases in cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 round robin study, five laboratories conducted ASTM A923 Methods A & C on cast DSS material and the lab-to-lab reproducibility of the data was determined. Two groups of samples were sent to the participants. Group 1 samples were tested per ASTM A923 Method A, group 2 samples were tested by ASTM A923 Method C. Testing procedures for this round robin study were identical to those used in the ASTM A923 applicability study. Results from this round robin indicate that there is excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility of ASTM A923 with respect to cast DSS and that ASTM A923 could be expanded to cover both wrought and cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases, Ten heats of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) in the foundry solution annealed condition were tested per ASTM A923 Methods A, B, & C. Testing of these materials per ASTM A923 was used to determine if the foundry solution anneal procedures were adequate to completely eliminate any intermetallic phases, which may have precipitated during the casting and subsequent heat treatment processes. All heats showed no sign of intermetallic phase per Method A, passed minimum Charpy impact energy requirements per Method B (> 40 ft-lbs @ -40???????°C (-40???????°F)), and showed negligible weight loss per Method C (< 10 mdd). These results indicate that the solution annealing procedure used by foundri

  6. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope{reg_sign} and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope{reg_sign} were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought DSS and tested per ASTM A923 method B (Charpy impact test). Method A (sodium hydroxide etch test) was performed on one half of a fractured Charpy V-notch impact sample and Method C (ferric chloride corrosion weight loss test) was performed on another half. Test results for the three cast lots and one wrought lot indicate that ASTM A923 is relevant for detecting intermetallic phases in cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 round robin study, five laboratories conducted ASTM A923 Methods A & C on cast DSS material and the lab-to-lab reproducibility of the data was determined. Two groups of samples were sent to the participants. Group 1 samples were tested per ASTM A923 Method A, group 2 samples were tested by ASTM A923 Method C. Testing procedures for this round robin study were identical to those used in the ASTM A923 applicability study. Results from this round robin indicate that there is excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility of ASTM A923 with respect to cast DSS and that ASTM A923 could be expanded to cover both wrought and cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases, Ten heats of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) in the foundry solution annealed condition were tested per ASTM A923 Methods A, B, & C. Testing of these materials per ASTM A923 was used to determine if the foundry solution anneal procedures were adequate to completely eliminate any intermetallic phases, which may have precipitated during the casting and subsequent heat treatment processes. All heats showed no sign of intermetallic phase per Method A, passed minimum Charpy impact energy requirements per Method B (> 40 ft-lbs {at} -40 C (-40 F)), and showed negligible weight loss per Method C (< 10 mdd). These results indicate that the solution annealing procedure used by foundries is adequate to produce a product free from intermetallic phases.

  7. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room temperature or below. For many spectroscopic measurements, low temperatures have been achieved by co-condensing the actinide vapor in rare gas or inert molecule host matrices. Spectra recorded in matrices are usually considered to be minimally perturbed. Trapping the products from gas-phase reactions that occur when trace quantities of reactants are added to the inert host gas has resulted in the discovery of many new actinide species. Selected aspects of the matrix isolation data were discussed in chapter 17. In the present chapter we review the spectroscopic matrix data in terms of its relationship to gas-phase measurements, and update the description of the new reaction products found in matrices to reflect the developments that have occurred during the past two years. Spectra recorded in matrix environments are usually considered to be minimally perturbed, and this expectation is borne out for many closed shell actinide molecules. However, there is growing evidence that significant perturbations can occur for open shell molecules, resulting in geometric distortions and/or electronic state reordering. Studies of actinide reactions in the gas phase provide an opportunity to probe the relationship between electronic structure and reactivity. Much of this work has focused on the reactions of ionic species, as these may be selected and controlled using various forms of mass spectrometry. As an example of the type of insight derived from reaction studies, it has been established that the reaction barriers for An+ ions are determined by the promotion energies required to achieve the 5fn6d7s configuration. Gas-phase reaction studies also provide fundamental thermodynamic properties such as bond dissociation and ionization energies. In recent years, an increased number of gas-phase ion chemistry studies of bare (atomic) and ligated (molecular) actinide ions have appeared, in which relevant contributions to fundamental actinide chemistry have been made. These studies were initiated in the 1970's and carried out in an uninterrupted way over the course of the past three d