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Sample records for fa ult sawteeth

  1. Sawteeth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Fusion Science Fellowship Pro- gram. a Electronic mail: chapman@juno.physics.wisc.edu 1 R. G. Watt and R. A. Nebel, Phys. Fluids 26, 1168 1983. 2 R. J. Hayden and B....

  2. Development of magnetohydrodynamic modes during sawteeth in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas , Bariloche ; García-Martínez, P. L.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2013-07-15

    A dynamical analysis applied to a reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics model is shown to explain the chronology of the nonlinear destabilization of modes observed in tokamak sawteeth. A special emphasis is put on the nonlinear self-consistent perturbation of the axisymmetric m = n = 0 mode that manifests through the q-profile evolution. For the very low fusion-relevant resistivity values, the q-profile is shown to remain almost unchanged on the early nonlinear timescale within the central tokamak region, which supports a partial reconnection scenario. Within the resistive region, indications for a local flattening or even a local reversed-shear of the q-profile are given. The impact of this ingredient in the occurrence of the sawtooth crash is discussed.

  3. Off-axis sawteeth and double-tearing reconnection in reversed magnetic shear plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Z.; Park, W.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    1996-06-01

    Off-axis sawteeth are often observed in reversed magnetic shear plasmas when the minimum safety factor q is near or below 2. Fluctuations with m/n = 2/1 (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers) appear before and after the crashes. Detailed comparison has been made between the measured T{sub e} profile evolution during the crash and a nonlinear numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. The good agreement between the observation and simulation indicates that the off-axis sawteeth are due to a double-tearing magnetic reconnection process.

  4. FA Technology Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FA Technology Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FA Technology Ventures Name: FA Technology Ventures Address: 677 Broadway Place: Albany, New York Zip: 12207 Region:...

  5. FA Technology Ventures (Boston) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ventures (Boston) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FA Technology Ventures (Boston) Name: FA Technology Ventures (Boston) Address: 100 High Street, Suite 1105 Place: Boston,...

  6. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Wang, Feng [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  7. Zonal flow sawteeth and the time period between edge-localized transport bursts in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2007-01-15

    The time period between particle and energy transport bursts in simulations of tokamak edge turbulence is determined by the magnitude of the diamagnetic drift parameter {alpha}{sub d}{identical_to}{omega}{sub *}/{gamma}{sub 0}, where the diamagnetic drift frequency {omega}{sub *}={rho}{sub s}c{sub s}/L{sub 0}L{sub n} and the characteristic ballooning mode growth rate {gamma}{sub 0}=c{sub s}/(RL{sub n}/2){sup 1/2}. Here, R is the major radius of the torus, L{sub n} is the density gradient scale length, {rho}{sub s} is the ion gyroradius, and c{sub s} is the ion acoustic speed. The scale length L{sub 0} is given by L{sub 0}=2{pi}qR {nu}{sub ei}{rho}{sub s}/2{omega}{sub e}R){sup 1/2}(2R/L{sub n}){sup 1/4}, where q is the safety factor, {nu}{sub ei} is the electron-ion collision frequency, and {omega}{sub e} is the electron cyclotron frequency. When the diamagnetic drift frequency becomes larger than the ballooning mode growth rate ({alpha}{sub d}>1), then the transport in the tokamak edge is characterized by regularly recurring bursts of particles and energy with a single well-defined frequency. As {alpha}{sub d} increases above unity, the time period between the bursts becomes much longer. The temporal dependence of the energy in the zonal flow generated nonlinearly has the appearance of sawteeth.

  8. Feng Fa Science and Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Feng Fa Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Feng Fa Science and Technology Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Sector: Wind energy Product: A VCPE...

  9. FA 4: Crosscutting Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4: Crosscutting Research Focus Area 4 - Lograsso, Schwegler CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 4 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 4 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview CMI org chart for FA4 File: Read more about CMI org chart for FA4 CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) Critical Materials Institute

  10. MAN or FA from n-butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Cio, A.; Verde, L.

    1985-08-01

    Unsaturated polyester resins were first produced mostly from fumaric acid (FA) rather than from maleic anhydride (MAN). This is perfectly understandable if we consider that, using fumaric acid as raw material, polycondensates with a more homogeneous (less branched) structure are obtained, thus producing resins characterized by a more uniform and reproducible chemical and mechanical properties. Presently, for economical reasons, fumaric acid is used marginally as a MAN substitute in the production of polyester resins. These resins account for a major share (50%) of the overall MAN consumption in the U.S. and in Western Europe.

  11. Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 PDF icon Citrix_2FA_Authentication-September09 More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Microsoft Word - SMail_Secure_Web-Based_Email_v3 _2_.doc

  12. Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc More Documents & Publications Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token

  13. Performance evaluation of a low-temperature solar Rankine cycle system utilizing R245fa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.D.; Zhao, L.; Wang, J.L.; Zhang, W.Z.; Zhao, X.Z.; Wu, W.

    2010-03-15

    A low-temperature solar Rankine system utilizing R245fa as the working fluid is proposed and an experimental system is designed, constructed and tested. Both the evacuated solar collectors and the flat plate solar collectors are used in the experimental system; meanwhile, a rolling-piston R245fa expander is also mounted in the system. The new designed R245fa expander works stably in the experiment, with an average expansion power output of 1.73 kW and an average isentropic efficiency of 45.2%. The overall power generation efficiency estimated is 4.2%, when the evacuated solar collector is utilized in the system, and with the condition of flat plate solar collector, it is about 3.2%. The experimental results show that using R245fa as working fluid in the low-temperature solar power Rankine cycle system is feasible and the performance is acceptable. (author)

  14. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  16. Data:E8614377-f336-4354-9782-e7fa153c3873 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9782-e7fa153c3873 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  17. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  18. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore » large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.« less

  19. Data:Ae3cd3b5-369c-4ef5-a089-9be6f92e16fa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ef5-a089-9be6f92e16fa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  20. Data:9203c91f-7d51-486f-a398-add8a8014cd6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    f-a398-add8a8014cd6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  1. Data:873baff3-174f-491f-a4c4-7c1d016cc484 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    baff3-174f-491f-a4c4-7c1d016cc484 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1....

  2. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the master control elements of far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-11-25

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches tha tare strongly enriched in far-redlight (FRL; λ > 700nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRLphotoacclimation(FaRLiP).During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS)I, PSII,and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d.Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB,and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203.The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorbmore » FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, in appropriately synthesized Chl d in white light,and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response.« less

  3. Perspective and current status on fuel cycle system of fast reactor cycle Technology development (FaCT) project in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funasaka, Hideyuki; Itoh, Masanori

    2007-07-01

    FaCT Project taking over from Feasibility Study on Commercialized FR cycle system (FS) has been launched in 2006 by Japanese joint team with the participation of all parties concerned in Japan. Combination system of (the sodium-cooled reactor,) the advanced aqueous reprocessing system and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication (MOX fuel) is evaluated as the most promising fuel cycle system concept so that it has potential conformity to the design requirements, as well as a high level of technical feasibility as the final report of Phase II in FS. Current status and R and D prospects for this combination system of the advanced aqueous reprocessing system and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication (MOX fuel) system until around 2015 have been studied. Then, it is anticipated that in FR reprocessing commercial facility will start to operate around same time that in LWR reprocessing subsequent plant will be required to replace Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (provided that life time 40 years) around 2050. From the view point of the smooth transition from LWRs to FRs in approximately the year 2050 and beyond in Japan, some issues on fuel cycle have been also discussed. (authors)

  4. Data:B831a092-b2f7-4f35-957e-d1fa374af3a8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    f35-957e-d1fa374af3a8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  5. Experience in the commercial operation of the pilot asynchronized turbogenerator T3FA-110 at cogeneration plant-22 (TETs-22) of the Mosenergo Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinakov, V. E.; Chernyshev, E. V.; Kuzin, G. A.; Voronov, V. K.; Labunets, I. A.

    2006-01-15

    Results of commercial operation of a world pioneer asynchronized turbogenerator T3FA-110 with a capacity of 11 MW and full air cooling at a cogeneration plant are presented. The turbogenerator developed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Elektrosila Company differs from traditional synchronous generators by the presence on the rotor of two mutually orthogonal windings, a two-channel reverse thyristor excitation system, and a special control system. The special features of design and control allow such generators to operate in the modes of both production and high consumption of reactive power at normal static and dynamic stability. This widens the range of regulation of the voltage level in the connected electric network and makes it possible to bring parallel-connected synchronous generators to optimum operation conditions. The generator can work without excitation for a long time at 70% load. Commercial operation of the pilot T3FA-110 turbogenerator started in December 2003 at TETs-22 of the Mosenergo Company and has proved its full correspondence to the design engineering parameters. A program of wide use of such turbogenerators in the United Power System of Russia (RAO 'EES Rossii' Co.) has been developed.

  6. Data:Fa413ec1-68e5-4f5e-a367-f60cd2d56c38 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fa413ec1-68e5-4f5e-a367-f60cd2d56c38 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  7. FA 1: Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Diversifying Supply Focus Area 1 - Moyer, Herbst CMI pilot-scale separations test bed (image) File: Read more about CMI pilot-scale separations test bed (image) CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 1 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 1 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks

  8. FA 2: Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2: Developing Substitutes Focus Area 2 - Schwatrz, Sales U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file March 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file March 2016 U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file January 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file January 2016 Image Lisa Savagian, Oak Ridge Science Semester, Fall 2015 File: Author: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Publication Year:

  9. Microsoft Word - best-fa.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leading to failure. Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004 9 Solution and Implementation Many solutions were investigated and...

  10. FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3: Improving Reuse and Recycling Focus Area 3 - Peterson, Jones CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 3 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 3 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview Photo montage: recycling File: Read more about Photo montage: recycling CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) Critical Materials

  11. 2014-04-23 Michigan FA CVT Posting.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  12. Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature Laboratory Freezers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ultra-low temperature laboratory freezers (ULTs) are some of the most energy-intensive pieces of equipment in a scientific research laboratory, yet there are several barriers to user acceptance and adoption of high-efficiency ULTs. One significant barrier is a relative lack of information on ULT efficiency to help purchasers make informed decisions with respect to efficient products.

  13. Jefferson Lab, a forefront U.S. Department of Energy nuclear physics research fa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab, a forefront U.S. Department of Energy nuclear physics research facility, provides world- class, unique research capabilities and innovative technologies to serve an international scientific user community. Specifically, the laboratory's mission is to: * deliver discovery-caliber research by exploring the atomic nucleus and its fundamental constituents, including precise tests of their interactions; * apply advanced particle accelerator, detector and other technologies to develop new basic

  14. http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=9182fa

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and (B)(iii) of 49 U.S.C. 32904(b)(3), shall notify the Administrators of the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of its...

  15. Microsoft Word - FFLF Wind Project EA 11 Feb 2010 rev4 FINAL FA.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    37 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE'S PROPOSED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PENNSYLVANIA FOR FREY FARM LANDFILL WIND ENERGY PROJECT MANOR TOWNSHIP LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory February 2010 DOE/EA-1737 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE'S PROPOSED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PENNSYLVANIA FOR FREY FARM LANDFILL WIND ENERGY PROJECT MANOR TOWNSHIP LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory February

  16. https://empcs.nv.doe.gov/emis2/fa/pg/FFACO.Obligations_Commitments...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The NDEP will provide comments regarding issues on the CAU 98 CAIP and on the Nye County drilling program. Ongoing: Comments on the CAIP were received in a letter dated April 2,...

  17. Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OCIO Application Hosting Environment Instructions for Using RSA Token with Citrix Workplace Environment Instructions for Using Two- Factor RSA Tokens with Citrix Workplace Environment (CWE) Revision 1.13 December, 2009 Associate CIO for Operations (IM) United States Department of Energy DOE HQ OCIO Application Hosting Environment Instructions for Using RSA Token with Citrix Workplace Environment Using Your RSA Token with Citrix Note: If you access Citrix Workplace from within the DOE network

  18. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Areas FA 1: Diversifying Supply FA 2: Developing Substitutes FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling FA 4: Crosscutting Research

  19. Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    low temperature laboratory freezers (ULTs) are some of the most energy-intensive pieces of equipment in a scientific research laboratory, yet there are several barriers to user...

  20. d:\\

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measured perpendicular to the magnetic field (T ) is approximately equal to ... RFP with a thick conducting shell, rotating tearing modes, and regular sawteeth. ...

  1. Data:C2f657fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  2. Data:8777236b-9eb8-4857-bc99-0e5a03782fa7 | Open Energy Information

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  3. Data:07f78f8f-a33a-4414-add9-cd8d2c7ac364 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  4. Data:F4305257-a041-4f91-990d-7fa77582ebd6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  5. Observation of Spontaneous Neoclassical Tearing Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.D. Fredrickson

    2001-10-03

    We present data in this paper from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) which challenges the commonly held belief that extrinsic MHD events such as sawteeth or ELMs [edge localized modes] are required to provide the seed islands that trigger Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs). While sawteeth are reported to provide the trigger for most of the NTMs on DIII-D [at General Atomics in San Diego, California] and ASDEX-U [at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany], the majority of NTMs seen in TFTR occur in plasmas without sawteeth, that is which are above the beta threshold for sawtooth stabilization. Examples of NTMs appearing in the absence of any detectable extrinsic MHD activity will be shown. Conversely, large n=1 modes in plasmas above the NTM beta threshold generally do not trigger NTMs. An alternative mechanism for generating seed islands will be discussed.

  6. Data:0e5fa6ee-2c95-482a-a78a-fd06c670a3a6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  7. CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    lo&&-, : i e r : gtdlm FILLS March 12, 1956 ~'RII~~~~~I~~D~.,A~ICAW~~TMDRLBS, CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M .D. c. E. aahwun ObJcrativr oi THpt On !iUesd8y, Fabmerg 28,19!36, th@ lILQMetallurgMalD@p~rtJmnt beipn bzdquotting green ult-ll( blend on e 350 ton hydmulla prau 8t the Ura &i&nnrlug DivUiou of Ameria8n Steel muUdPae8, c&alMatl, Ohio. Approll'tely a,ooo pound8 of greeu ult ub briqumtte4 bw13ry 8 -rioa of mvea day,. Par the pwpou ofwalutlngexpo88mmmafpemmm8 linrelvmd

  8. Section 27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NF o N e ' f (N,$,Zb,h,8,u,<;) Session Papers 117 (1) (2) A Test of the Validity of Cumulus Cloud Parameterizations for Longwave Radiation Calculations D. Han and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Longwave radiative transfer under broken cloud conditions is often treated as a problem in cloud bulk geometry, especially for cumulus clouds, because individual clouds are nearly black. However, climate models ignore cloud geometry

  9. Locked modes and magnetic field errors in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Locked modes and magnetic field errors in the Madison Symmetric Torus A. F. Almagri, S. Assadi, S. C. Prager, J. S. Sarff, and D. W. Kerst Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53 706 (Received 15 June 1992; accepted 7 August 1992) In the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch [Fusion Technol. 19, 13 1 ( 1991)] magnetic oscillations become stationary (locked) in the lab frame as a result of a process involving interactions between the modes, sawteeth, and

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DelMoro, A. (1) Gandhi, P. (1) Hailey, C.J. (1) Harrison, F.A. (1) Koss, M. (1) Lansbury, ... ; Comastri, A. ; Bologna Observ. ; Harrison, F.A. ; Caltech ; Alexander, D.M. ; ...

  11. Method for selecting minimum width of leaf in multileaf adjustable collimator while inhibiting passage of particle beams of radiation through sawtooth joints between collimator leaves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludewigt, Bernhard (Berkeley, CA); Bercovitz, John (Hayward, CA); Nyman, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Chu, William (Lafayette, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for selecting the minimum width of individual leaves of a multileaf adjustable collimator having sawtooth top and bottom surfaces between adjacent leaves of a first stack of leaves and sawtooth end edges which are capable of intermeshing with the corresponding sawtooth end edges of leaves in a second stack of leaves of the collimator. The minimum width of individual leaves in the collimator, each having a sawtooth configuration in the surface facing another leaf in the same stack and a sawtooth end edge, is selected to comprise the sum of the penetration depth or range of the particular type of radiation comprising the beam in the particular material used for forming the leaf; plus the total path length across all the air gaps in the area of the joint at the edges between two leaves defined between lines drawn across the peaks of adjacent sawtooth edges; plus at least one half of the length or period of a single sawtooth. To accomplish this, in accordance with the method of the invention, the penetration depth of the particular type of radiation in the particular material to be used for the collimator leaf is first measured. Then the distance or gap between adjoining or abutting leaves is selected, and the ratio of this distance to the height of the sawteeth is selected. Finally the number of air gaps through which the radiation will pass between sawteeth is determined by selecting the number of sawteeth to be formed in the joint. The measurement and/or selection of these parameters will permit one to determine the minimum width of the leaf which is required to prevent passage of the beam through the sawtooth joint.

  12. Sawtooth Pacing by Real-Time Auxiliary Power Control in a Tokamak Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, T. P.; Felici, F.; Sauter, O.; Graves, J. P.

    2011-06-17

    In the standard scenario of tokamak plasma operation, sawtooth crashes are the main perturbations that can trigger performance-degrading, and potentially disruption-generating, neoclassical tearing modes. This Letter demonstrates sawtooth pacing by real-time control of the auxiliary power. It is shown that the sawtooth crash takes place in a reproducible manner shortly after the removal of that power, and this can be used to precisely prescribe, i.e., pace, the individual sawteeth. In combination with preemptive stabilization of the neoclassical tearing modes, sawtooth pacing provides a new sawtooth control paradigm for improved performance in burning plasmas.

  13. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  14. Development of a cross-polarization scattering system for the measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, T. L. Peebles, W. A.; Crocker, N. A.; Nguyen, X.

    2014-11-15

    The design and performance of a new cross-polarization scattering (CPS) system for the localized measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations is presented. CPS is a process whereby magnetic fluctuations scatter incident electromagnetic radiation into a perpendicular polarization which is subsequently detected. A new CPS design that incorporates a unique scattering geometry was laboratory tested, optimized, and installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Plasma tests of signal-to-noise, polarization purity, and frequency response indicate proper functioning of the system. CPS data show interesting features related to internal MHD perturbations known as sawteeth that are not observed on density fluctuations.

  15. Visiting Faculty Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions...

  16. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decoupling ude: & Control tion itoring Parts & FPG vironment op ility System boratories ha pplications. services" wi me custom ra aging, test, fa om microele Hard S tructured Ap...

  17. City of Clarksville, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    @CDELightband Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCDE-Lightband96953266253?refts Outage Hotline: 931-648-8151 Outage Map: www.outageentry.comCustomerFa References:...

  18. Sandia Energy » Wind News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Wake-Imaging System Successfully Deployed at Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility http:energy.sandia.govsandia-wake-imaging-system-successfully-deployed-at-scaled-wind-fa...

  19. Argent Energy UK Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motherwell, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: ML1 5FA Product: Motherwell-based waste-to-energy biodiesel producer that has an operational plant in Scotland. Coordinates:...

  20. PARC Seminar Series featuring Don Bryant | Photosynthetic Antenna...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Don Bryant PARC Seminar Series featuring Don Bryant "Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in...

  1. Microsoft Word - Bryant flyer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria" Dr. Donald Bryant Ernest C. Pollard Professor in...

  2. Pilot Project on Fibrous Debris ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water. Concerns have been raised about the potential for the debris to affect long term core cooling during the LOCA event. Nuclear fuel assemblies (FA) are equipped with...

  3. Waste Heat-to-Power Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Different working fluids - but, many ORC's use HFC-245fa Pressure ratiobuilt-in volume ratio mismatch - larger pressure ratio than practical scroll built-in volume ratio ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... U. ; Molendi, S. ; IASF, Milan ; Madejski, G. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ; Harrison, F. ... ; Comastri, A. ; Bologna Observ. ; Harrison, F.A. ; Caltech ; Alexander, D.M. ; ...

  5. CASL-8-2015-0199-000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... IT staff is available to support R&D: * Financial Management (budgeting, contracts, ... University (retired) Area: Transport Theory |FA: RTM * Finis Southworth, Areva ...

  6. M S

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    % "s .J' /:, * & 1 $&; i e' 3 ' M S , 4- Monthly Report / hw4~ 3. SuhumaP @&gstlo~ (5. S&umxr, C. Smnson) 3ik&wd.on of xllymaloy rod3 Qnd berylll~ ahapes ma conductf3d at Rew3x3 Brass and Copper co. 0.. i7-Lm .3 6, 194.6. One pure bwylUm L&" billet m m &r&d into a 1 l/8' * rod and one pure beryllium #' billet n-as extrLlc-!c?c into 1,53om disn. PC& Ro5ults V"mv3 good. Two pm0 bcrylliwn cp billets andc<me3C$U,7C$Be billet were csxtmded :nto

  7. Quantification of the degree of reaction of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Haha, M.; De Weerdt, K.; Lothenbach, B.

    2010-11-15

    The quantification of the fly ash (FA) in FA blended cements is an important parameter to understand the effect of the fly ash on the hydration of OPC and on the microstructural development. The FA reaction in two different blended OPC-FA systems was studied using a selective dissolution technique based on EDTA/NaOH, diluted NaOH solution, the portlandite content and by backscattered electron image analysis. The amount of FA determined by selective dissolution using EDTA/NaOH is found to be associated with a significant possible error as different assumptions lead to large differences in the estimate of FA reacted. In addition, at longer hydration times, the reaction of the FA is underestimated by this method due to the presence of non-dissolved hydrates and MgO rich particles. The dissolution of FA in diluted NaOH solution agreed during the first days well with the dissolution as observed by image analysis. At 28 days and longer, the formation of hydrates in the diluted solutions leads to an underestimation. Image analysis appears to give consistent results and to be most reliable technique studied.

  8. Simulations of alpha parameters in a TFTR DT supershot with high fusion power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Janos, A.C.

    1995-07-01

    A TFTR supershot with a plasma current of 2.5 MA, neutral beam heating power of 33.7 MW, and a peak DT fusion power of 7.5 MW is studied using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Simulations of alpha parameters such as the alpha heating, pressure, and distributions in energy and v{sub parallel}/v are given. The effects of toroidal ripple and mixing of the fast alpha particles during the sawteeth observed after the neutral beam injection phase are modeled. The distributions of alpha particles on the outer midplane are peaked near forward and backward v{sub parallel}/v. Ripple losses deplete the distributions in the vicinity of v{sub parallel}/v {approximately}{minus}0.4. Sawtooth mixing of fast alpha particles is computed to reduce their central density and broaden their width in energy.

  9. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore large volumes of data, and...

  10. Microsoft Word - MPW_Fact_Sheet_SAND2010-4820P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inte rvices integra afer resource circuits in low rogram prov production fa test and pac ened, 3.3 v, 0 ors, and diod tal and analo n Kit. managed and oper artment of Energy r...

  11. 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lee, G.T.; Sudhoff, F.A. 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS; GAS TURBINE...

  12. US Department of the Navy Driving Alternative Fuels Adoption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 years (anything beyond 1 year is challenging) - Offtakes before facility is producing fuel - Another major capital infusion FA-18E , Pacific Ocean USS Nimitz (CVN-68) THANK YOU...

  13. NRFE-07-28

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Company LLC All Rights Reserved To: Jess Gehin - AMA FA Lead Rose Montgomery - AMA Deputy Lead cc: Z. Karoutas (W) From: J. Yan (W) Date: April 16, 2013 Tel:...

  14. Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects File DOE F 4600.2 FA RepReqChklst FINAL 10-2014.docx More Documents & Publications 1 1 Federal ...

  15. A=9Be (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The angular correlation of ground-state -particles with those resulting from breakup of 5He indicate J 52- (RI56D), J 32- (FA57A), for the 9Be level mainly...

  16. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Systems Volume VIII System Shot Operations Manual S-AB-P-008 Shot Type 6-7 ESO Checklist (S-AB-P-173) Lithium Deuteride Targets Handling Procedure(Q-FA-P-121) OMEGA...

  17. Section 81

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B.A. Whitney, H.E. Revercomb, R.O. Knuteson, F.A. Best, and W.L. Smith University of ... 1989; Revercomb et al. 1995) and cloud (Smith et al. 1992; Collard et al. 1995) ...

  18. Light-induced electron transfer vs. energy transfer in molecular thin-film systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renschler, C. L.; Faulkner, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    Quenching of fluoranthene (FA) singlets by tetrabromo-o-benzoquinone (TBBQ) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was studied both in xylene solutions and in spin-cast polystyrene (PS) films. Emphasis was placed on time-resolved fluorescence transients resulting from pulsed excitation. Linear Stern-Volmer plots were obtained for quenching in solution and gave diffusion-controlled rate constants, of 1.45 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/ and 1.53 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/ for TBBQ and TMPD, respectively. TBBQ was found to quench FA singlets in PS over the studied concentration range 12 mM < (TBBQ) < 48 mM, but in its presence FA singlets decayed nonexponentially. The results were interpreted quantitatively in terms of pure Foerster's transfer from FA to TBBQ without diffusion of excitons. The critical transfer radius R/sub 0/ was experimentally determined to be 24.3 A, which is in good agreement with the theoretical value of 23 A calculated from spectral data. Quenching of FA singlets in PS films was found to be independent of FA concentration over a 300 mM to 1200 mM FA concentration range for a constant TBBQ concentration of 24.0 mM. TMPD was only slightly effective as a quencher of FA singlets in PS because it apparently behaves strictly as a contact quencher based on reversible charge transfer. The implications of these results for the design of systems intended to exploit light-induced electron transfer are discussed.

  19. Microsoft Word - SMail_Secure_Web-Based_Email_v3 _2_.doc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy SMail_Secure_Web-Based_Email_v3 _2_.doc Microsoft Word - SMail_Secure_Web-Based_Email_v3 _2_.doc PDF icon Instructions for Using Secure Email via Outlook Web Access More Documents & Publications Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

  20. Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Your RSA token is used to esbablish a connection to the Internet and connect to https://connect.doe.gov . PDF icon Using-TwoFactorRSA-Token w VPN.pdf More Documents & Publications Instructions for WebVPN Connectivity Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

  1. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h⁻¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stablemore » and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 μmol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H₂ generation from FA.« less

  2. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G.; León-Reina, L.; Aranda, M.A.G.; CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona ; Santacruz, I.

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  3. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h?¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stable and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 ?mol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H? generation from FA.

  4. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Brunner, D.; Ennever, P.; Garrett, M. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Ochoukov, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2014-02-12

    Impurity contamination and localized heat loads associated with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna operation are among the most challenging issues for ICRF utilization.. Another challenge is maintaining maximum coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. Here, we report on an experimental assessment of a field aligned (FA) antenna with respect to impurity contamination, impurity sources, RF enhanced heat flux and load tolerance. In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to and the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E? (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20–30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. Further we observe that the fraction of RF energy deposited upon the antenna is less than 0.4 % of the total injected RF energy in dipole phasing. The total deposited energy increases significantly when the FA antenna is operated in monopole phasing. The FA antenna also exhibits an unexpected load tolerance for ELMs and confinement transitions compared to the TA antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing. In monopole phasing, the FA antenna has the highest plasma potentials and poor heating efficiency despite calculations indicating low integrated E?. In mode conversion heating scenario, no core waves were detected in the plasma core indicating poor wave penetration. For monopole phasing, simulations suggest the antenna spectrum is peaked at very short wavelength and full wave simulations show the short wavelength has poor wave penetration to the plasma core.

  5. The q-profile effect on high-order harmonic q = 1 tearing mode generation during sawtooth crashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Zhengxiong; Wei Lai; Wang Xiaogang

    2012-06-15

    The effect of q-profiles on the excitation of high-order harmonic q=1 tearing modes during sawtooth crashes is investigated by a collisionless fluid model with the electron inertia term in Ohm's law. It is found that for a flat q-profile in the core region, the high-order harmonics, such as m/n=2/2 and/or m/n=3/3 modes, comparable to or stronger than the m/n=1/1 component, can be excited during tokamak sawteeth. The stronger the magnetic shear on the q=1 surface is, the more unstable the higher-m modes are. For smoothly monotonously increased q-profiles, a lower q value on the plasma edge tends to easily excite higher-m harmonics at the same level as the m = 1 mode simultaneously. The spatial characteristics of the eigenmodes in the cases with the typical q-profiles are also discussed. In addition, the basic feature of the magnetic island structures in the nonlinear evolution is numerically obtained, which is consistent qualitatively with the experimentally reconstructed phenomenon.

  6. STATIONARY HIGH-PERFORMANCE DISCHARGES IN THE DII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUCE,TC; WADE,MR; FERRON,JR; HYATT,AW; KELLMAN,AG; KINSEY,JE; LAHAYE,RJ; LASNIER,CJ; MURAKAMI,M; POLITZER,PA; SCOVILLE,JT

    2002-11-01

    A271 STATIONARY HIGH-PERFORMANCE DISCHARGES IN THE DII-D TOKAMAK. Discharges which can satisfy the high gain goals of burning plasma experiments have been demonstrated in the DIII-D tokamak under stationary conditions at relatively low plasma current (q{sub 95} > 4). A figure of merit for fusion gain ({beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2}) has been maintained at values corresponding to ! = 10 operation in a burning plasma for > 6 s or 36{tau}{sub E} and 2{tau}{sub R}. The key element is the relaxation of the current profile to a stationary state with q{sub min} > 1. In the absence of sawteeth and fishbones, stable operation has been achieved up to the estimated no-wall {beta} limit. Feedback control of the energy content and particle inventory allow reproducible, stationary operation. The particle inventory is controlled by gas fueling and active pumping; the wall plays only a small role in the particle balance. The reduced current lessens significantly the potential for structural damage in the event of a major disruption. In addition, the pulse length capability is greatly increased, which is essential for a technology testing phase of a burning plasma experiment where fluence (duty cycle) is important.

  7. The Role of Axisymmetric Reconnection Events in JET Discharges with Extreme Shear Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.C. Stratton; J.A. Breslau; R.V. Budny; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; H.R. Strauss; L.E. Zakharov; B. Alper; V. Drozdov; N.C. Hawkes; S. Reyes-Cortes; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Work Programme

    2001-12-03

    Injection of Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive into the current ramp-up phase of Joint European Torus (JET) discharges can produce extremely reversed q-profiles characterized by a core region of very small or zero current density (within Motional Stark Effect diagnostic measurement errors) and q(subscript min) > 1. T(subscript e)-profiles show sawtooth-like collapses and the presence of an internal transport barrier. Accurate equilibrium reconstructions of these discharges are obtained using the ESC code, which was recently extended to allow equilibrium reconstructions in which a free boundary solver determines the plasma boundary and a fixed boundary solver provides the magnetic geometry and current density profile. The core current density does not appear to go negative, although current diffusion calculations indicate that sufficient non-inductive current drive to cause this is present. This is explained by nonlinear resistive MHD simulations in toroidal geometry which predict that these discharges undergo n=0 reconnection events (axisymmetric sawteeth) that redistribute the current to hold the core current density near zero.

  8. The targeted heating and current drive applications for the ITER electron cyclotron system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, M.; Darbos, C.; Gandini, F.; Gassmann, T.; Loarte, A.; Omori, T.; Purohit, D.; Saibene, G.; Gagliardi, M.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Hanson, G.; Poli, E.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-02-15

    A 24?MW Electron Cyclotron (EC) system operating at 170?GHz and 3600?s pulse length is to be installed on ITER. The EC plant shall deliver 20?MW of this power to the plasma for Heating and Current Drive (H and CD) applications. The EC system is designed for plasma initiation, central heating, current drive, current profile tailoring, and Magneto-hydrodynamic control (in particular, sawteeth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode) in the flat-top phase of the plasma. A preliminary design review was performed in 2012, which identified a need for extended application of the EC system to the plasma ramp-up, flattop, and ramp down phases of ITER plasma pulse. The various functionalities are prioritized based on those applications, which can be uniquely addressed with the EC system in contrast to other H and CD systems. An initial attempt has been developed at prioritizing the allocated H and CD applications for the three scenarios envisioned: ELMy H-mode (15 MA), Hybrid (?12 MA), and Advanced (?9 MA) scenarios. This leads to the finalization of the design requirements for the EC sub-systems.

  9. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Collaboration: Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-15

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%–30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed reduced with the FA antenna configuration, the mechanism determining the SOL plasma potential in the presence of ICRF and its impact on impurity contamination and sources remains to be understood.

  10. User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token PDF icon VDI_WP_RSA_Remote_Guide_Final.pdf More Documents & Publications User Guide for Remote Access to VDI/Workplace Using PIV Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), longchain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart.

  12. Semi-Batch Deoxygenation of Canola- and Lard-Derived Fatty Acids to Diesel-Range Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, JP; Thapaliya, N; Kelly, MJ; Roberts, WL; Lamb, HH

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) derived via thermal hydrolysis of food-grade lard and canola oil were deoxygenated in the liquid phase using a commercially available 5 wt % Pd/C catalyst. Online quadrupole mass spectrometry and gas chromatography were used to monitor the effluent gases from the semi-batch stirred autoclave reactors. Stearic, oleic, and palmitic acids were employed as model compounds. A catalyst lifetime exceeding 2200 turnovers for oleic acid deoxygenation was demonstrated at 300 degrees C and 15 atm under 10% H-2. The initial decarboxylation rate of palmitic acid under 5% H-2 decreases sharply with increasing initial concentration; in contrast, the initial decarbonylation rate increases linearly, indicative of first-order kinetics. Scale-up of diesel-range hydrocarbon production was investigated by increasing the reactor vessel size, initial FA concentration, and FA/catalyst mass ratio. Lower CO2 selectivity and batch productivity were observed at the larger scales (600 and 5000 mL), primarily because of the higher initial FA concentration (67 wt %) employed. Because unsaturated FAs must be hydrogenated before deoxygenation can proceed at an appreciable rate, the additional batch time required for FA hydrogenation reduces the batch productivity for unsaturated feedstocks. Low-temperature hydrogenation of unsaturated feedstocks (using Pd/C or another less-expensive catalyst) prior to deoxygenation is recommended.

  13. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Soils Soil Series and Phase D Fa D LaB TrB D TrC VeC .Wm '" Vegetation Compartment 28 Community D Mixed PineHardwood D Upland Hardwod D Bottomland Hardwood Water D Sandhill...

  14. A=6Be (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    74AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Be) GENERAL: See also (66LA04) and Table 6.7 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (BA66T, BA68GG, FA68C, VA68P,...

  15. A=10C (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    74AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10C) GENERAL: See also (66LA04) and Table 10.24 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (FA68C, SA69K, SO69A, SA73S)....

  16. Problems with interface change | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ex.php?titleData:1c1ac6b9-5085-41f4-b478-2927d2fa41e7tab3.Energy http:en.openei.orgservicesrestutilityrates?versionlatest&formatjsonplain&detailfull&getpageData:1c1a...

  17. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95 Wa ste Sit es Re me dia ted 9 23 ,00 0 To ns of So il Re mo ved Fin al Re me dia tio n of 61 8-1 0 & 618 -11 Bu ria l Gr ou nd s Co mp let e 40 0 A re a Fa st Flu...

  18. Dr. Donald Bryant | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donald Bryant September 29, 2014 Dr. Donald Bryant "Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria." View Seminar Here Original Event info: September 22, 2014 - 11:00am Washington University, Brauer Hall Room 12

  19. A=7Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Li) GENERAL: See also (66LA04) and Table 7.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KO61L, CO65I, KU65D, VO65A, BA66T, HA66F, WI66E, BO67R, BO67V, CO67M, FA67A,...

  20. A=10Be (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (KO61L, FA68C, SA69K, BO70P, KA70H, KU73D, SA73S). Cluster and alpha-particle model: (KU73D). Special levels: (BO70P, FR70H, PE70F, SA73S)....

  1. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2010 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key Accomplishments ......................................................................................... 1 2.0 ANALYSIS OF FUNDS

  2. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    'a! , + : ; fa- . . . c2 ..- - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ( i i : ; i - 3 = -*..A - - I . ; > . . . . . . . . . . , ' ; ! . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . P i v ~ - R - 6 . ( . i % ' . * ,. : . . , . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . , , . . - _ ' . . I , - 3 . I 5 6 7 3 . : : i': . PuL 5 3 - 3 . . ,! . , - . - . . . . . I - . c . 1 .-.> -., ! ; < : : A . . . . . . . . I . . . . . . ..... ----&- ,.<.. . ........ I . - c ' . . . - COPY w n Investigation

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ER RI I W Wi in nt te er r S Su ur rf fa ac ce e G Gr re ee en nh ho ou us se e F Fl lu ux xe es s Greenhouse Gas Emission Band (cm -1 ) GL Flux (Wm 2 ) AERI Flux (Wm 2 ) CFC-11...

  4. BPA-2012-00330-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10512011 1004 Daniel C. APLC FA O8 998 8975 P.0011011 DANIEL C. MINUTILLO Professional Law Corporation rED BV BP 941 Blossom Hill Road, Suite 205 FOIL OtFCCE T 1 i i P.O. Box...

  5. Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects File DOE F 4600.2 FA RepReqChklst FINAL 10-2014.docx More Documents & Publications 1 1 Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for RD&D

  6. Two-Factor Authentication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Authentication Two-Factor Authentication computer-767784_960_720.jpg Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) (also known as 2-Step Verification) is a system that employs two methods to identify an individual. More secure than reusable passwords, when a token's random number is combined with a secret PIN, the resulting passcode provides positive identification, and more reliable user authentication.

  7. A=17O (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO69B, NO69G, PA69D, PI69, SA69, SC69F, SC69O, BA70A, HA70L, MC70Q, SU70A). Ground state: -1.89371 0.00009 nm (SH67N); Q 26.5 3.0 mb (LI64H). See also (FA59E,...

  8. A=17O (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagram for 17O) GENERAL: See also Table 17.2 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Theory: (BA56E, KA56C, KI56B, LE56E, SC56H, VI56, AM57B, AM57C, FA57, FE57C, PE57B, RA57B,...

  9. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipids and Metabolites in Tissues by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; yang, Pengxiang; Prieto, Mari; Laskin, Julia

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of tissue sections is a new frontier in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Here we report on fast 3D imaging of lipids and metabolites associated with mouse uterine decidual cells and embryo at the implantation site on day 6 of pregnancy. 2D imaging of 16-20 serial tissue sections deposited on the same glass slide was performed using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) – an ambient ionization technique that enables sensitive localized analysis of analytes on surfaces without special sample pre-treatment. In this proof-of-principle study, nano-DESI was coupled to a high-resolution Q-Exactive instrument operated at high repetition rate of >5 Hz with moderate mass resolution of 35,000 (m/?m at m/z 200), which enabled acquisition of the entire 3D image with a spatial resolution of ~150 ?m in less than 4.5 hours. The results demonstrate localization of acetylcholine in the primary decidual zone (PDZ) of the implantation site throughout the depth of the tissue examined, indicating an important role of this signaling molecule in decidualization. Choline and phosphocholine – metabolites associated with cell growth – are enhanced in the PDZ and abundant in other cellular regions of the implantation site. Very different 3D distributions were obtained for fatty acids (FA), oleic acid and linoleic acid (FA 18:1 and FA 18:2), differing only by one double bond. Localization of FA 18:2 in the PDZ indicates its important role in decidualization while FA 18:1 is distributed more evenly throughout the tissue. In contrast, several lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC) observed in this study show donut-like distributions with localization around the PDZ. Complementary distributions with minimal overlap were observed for LPC 18:0 and FA 18:2 while the 3D image of the potential precursor phosphatidylcholine (PC 36:2) showed a significant overlap with both LPC 18:0 and FA 18:2.

  10. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body s-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter k{sub F}a=0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter k{sub F}a: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=? with ?=1.34 from the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for k{sub F}a>? and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=?. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86F}a<1.56) for the ferromagnetic phase. At sufficiently large negative effective range, the ferromagnetic phase disappears. On the other hand, the appearance of positive-energy bound state resonantly enhances the two-body decay rate around k{sub F}a=? and may prevent the study of equilibrium phases and ferromagnetism of the upper branch Fermi gas. - Highlights: • Nonperturbative interaction energy is obtained within the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation approach. • Positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter. • The upper branch Fermi gas exhibits an energy maximum and reentrant ferromagnetic transition. • The ferromagnetic phase disappears for large and negative effective ranges.

  11. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A.; Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M.; Saleem, M.A.; Topham, P.S.

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub ?FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub ?FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub ?FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: • The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. • Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. • CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  12. DISCHARGE IMPROVEMENT THROUGH CONTROL OF NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODES BY LOCALIZED ECCD IN DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRATER,R; LAHAYE,RJ; LOHR,J; LUCE,TC; PETTY,CC; FERRON,JR; HUMPHREYS,DA; STRAIT,EJ; PERKINS,FW; HARVEY,RW

    2002-10-01

    A271 DISCHARGE IMPROVEMENT THROUGH CONTROL OF NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODES BY LOCALIZED ECCD IN DIII-D. Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are MHD modes which can limit the performance of high beta discharges in tokamaks, in some cases leading to a major disruption. The destabilizing effect which results in NTM growth is a helical decrease in the bootstrap current caused by a local reduction of the plasma pressure gradient by seed magnetic islands. The NTM is particularly well suited to control since the mode is linearly stable although nonlinearly unstable, so if the island amplitude can be decreased below a threshold size the mode will decay and vanish. One means of shrinking the island is the replacement of the missing bootstrap current by a localized current generated by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). This method has been applied to the m=3/n=2 neoclassical tearing mode in DIII-D, in H-mode plasmas with ongoing ELMs and sawteeth, both of which generate seed islands periodically. In the case of the 3/2 mode, full suppression was obtained robustly by applying about 1.5 MW of ECCD very near the rational surface of the mode. When the mode first appears in the plasma the stored energy decreases by 20%, but after the mode is stabilized by the ECCD the beta may be raised above the initial threshold pressure by 20% by additional neutral beam heating, thereby generating an improvement in the limiting beta of nearly a factor 2. An innovative automated search algorithm was implemented to find and retain the optimum location for the ECCD in the presence of the mode.

  13. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; Kim, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Sauter, O.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H.; Park, H.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different deposition position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (?N~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.

  14. Plasma rotation and NTM onset driven by central EC deposition in TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma CNR, Euratom Association, 20125 Milano (Italy); Sauter, O.; Canal, G.; Duval, B.; Federspiel, L.; Karpushov, A. N.; Kim, D.; Reimerders, H.; Rossel, J.; Testa, D.; Wagner, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Raju, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Collaboration: TCV Team

    2014-02-12

    The effects of the central electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) on the spontaneous plasma rotation and on the presence of Tearing Modes (TM), observed in the TCV tokamak[1], were recently investigated as an interplay between the toroidal velocity and NTM onset in absence of sawteeth, ELMs and error fields [2–3]. In a set of reproducible TCV discharges (I{sub p}? ?150 kA, B{sub t}? ?1.4 T, ne,{sub av?} 1.5 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}, T{sub e}? 3 keV and T{sub i}?0.25 keV, q{sub 95}?5.8) with both pure EC heating and current drive the cnt-Ip toroidal velocity was observed to be reduced with subsequent co-Ip appearance of 3/2 and 2/1 modes during the ramp up EC phases. The understanding of the capability of the on-axis EC power to modify the rotation profiles before and after the TM onset and of the sudden disappearance of 3/2 mode when 2/1 starts is the main purpose of this work. The velocity profile modifications are due to a direct effect of the EC absorbed power and also related to some variation of the perpendicular diffusion of the toroidal momentum and to magnetic braking effects of the kind of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) due to the NTM resonant field perturbations associated to the presence of TM. Numerical investigations are performed using a 1D toroidal momentum balance equation including contributions by external sources, as EC power, and NTV torques. Furthermore, the combined evolution of the 3/2 and 2/1 modes requires considering also coupling effects included in a generalized Rutherford equation for the modelling of the TM time growth.

  15. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; Kim, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Sauter, O.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; et al

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different depositionmore » position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (βN~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.« less

  16. Prediction of microalgae hydrothermal liquefaction products from feedstock biochemical composition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leow, Shijie; Witter, John R.; Vardon, Derek R.; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2015-05-11

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) uses water under elevated temperatures and pressures (200–350 °C, 5–20 MPa) to convert biomass into liquid “biocrude” oil. Despite extensive reports on factors influencing microalgae cell composition during cultivation and separate reports on HTL products linked to cell composition, the field still lacks a quantitative model to predict HTL conversion product yield and qualities from feedstock biochemical composition; the tailoring of microalgae feedstock for downstream conversion is a unique and critical aspect of microalgae biofuels that must be leveraged upon for optimization of the whole process. This study developed predictive relationships for HTL biocrude yield and othermore » conversion product characteristics based on HTL of Nannochloropsis oculata batches harvested with a wide range of compositions (23–59% dw lipids, 58–17% dw proteins, 12–22% dw carbohydrates) and a defatted batch (0% dw lipids, 75% dw proteins, 19% dw carbohydrates). HTL biocrude yield (33–68% dw) and carbon distribution (49–83%) increased in proportion to the fatty acid (FA) content. A component additivity model (predicting biocrude yield from lipid, protein, and carbohydrates) was more accurate predicting literature yields for diverse microalgae species than previous additivity models derived from model compounds. FA profiling of the biocrude product showed strong links to the initial feedstock FA profile of the lipid component, demonstrating that HTL acts as a water-based extraction process for FAs; the remainder non-FA structural components could be represented using the defatted batch. These findings were used to introduce a new FA-based model that predicts biocrude oil yields along with other critical parameters, and is capable of adjusting for the wide variations in HTL methodology and microalgae species through the defatted batch. Lastly, the FA model was linked to an upstream cultivation model (Phototrophic Process Model), providing for the first time an integrated modeling framework to overcome a critical barrier to microalgae-derived HTL biofuels and enable predictive analysis of the overall microalgal-to-biofuel process.« less

  17. Compact, flexible, frequency agile parametric wavelength converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Velsko, Stephan P. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Steven T. (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01

    This improved Frequency Agile Optical Parametric Oscillator provides near on-axis pumping of a single QPMC with a tilted periodically poled grating to overcome the necessity to find a particular crystal that will permit collinear birefringence in order to obtain a desired tuning range. A tilted grating design and the elongation of the transverse profile of the pump beam in the angle tuning plane of the FA-OPO reduces the rate of change of the overlap between the pumped volume in the crystal and the resonated and non-resonated wave mode volumes as the pump beam angle is changed. A folded mirror set relays the pivot point for beam steering from a beam deflector to the center of the FA-OPO crystal. This reduces the footprint of the device by as much as a factor of two over that obtained when using the refractive telescope design.

  18. Current status and perspective of advanced loop type fast reactor in fast reactor cycle technology development project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Hajime; Aoto, Kazumi; Morishita, Masaki

    2007-07-01

    After selecting the combination of the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) with oxide fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication as the most promising concept of FR cycle system, 'Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems' was finalized in 2006. Instead, a new project, Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT Project) was launched in Japan focusing on development of the selected concepts. This paper describes the current status and perspective of the advanced loop type SFR system in the FaCT Project, especially on the design requirements, current design as well as the related innovative technologies together with the development road-map. Some considerations on advantages of the advanced loop type design are also described. (authors)

  19. A=17F (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    71AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 17F) GENERAL: See also Table 17.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (WI57H, TA60L, BH62, TA62F, KU63I, LE65G, MA65J, DE66M, MA66BB, SO66A, EL67C, BI68A, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, EL69B, KU69G, MA69U, WA70A). Collective model: (FA59E, RA60B, AR62C, MA62J, MA62O, BA64AA, BI68A, MA68DD, MA69U). Electromagnetic transitions: (BA59M, FA59E, RA60B, BA64AA, GR65E, KA65F, MA66BB, KA67J, KH69, MA69U, EL70D, GO70D, SI70B). Special levels: (EV60A, WI61,

  20. A=7Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 7.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1967FA1A, 1968GO01, 1969TA1H, 1971CO28, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49). Cluster model: (1965NE1B, 1968HA1G, 1971NO02, 1972HI16, 1972KU12, 1972LE1L). Rotational and deformed models: (1965VO1A, 1966EL08). Special levels: (1966BA26, 1966EL08, 1967FA1A, 1969HA1G, 1969HA1F, 1971CO28, 1971NO02, 1972BB26, 1973AS02, 1973FE1J).

  1. A low-temperature processed environment-friendly full-organic carrier collection layer for polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Ai-Li; Li, Yan-Qing E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn Jiang, Xiao-Chen; Ma, Zhong-Sheng; Wang, Qian-Kun; Guo, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Dan-Dan E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn Lee, Shuit-Tong; Tang, Jian-Xin E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn

    2014-08-04

    We constructed a concept of the full-organic carrier collection layer (CCL) used for polymer solar cells. The CCL is composed of dipyrazino[2,3-f:2?,3?-h]quinoxaline-2,3,6,7,10,11-hexacarbonitrile as hole collection layer (HCL) and chlorine-free solvents (formic acid (FA)) processed 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) as electron collection layer, exhibiting good solubility, and environmental protection. The FA based device shows ideal power conversion efficiency (3.75%), which is higher than that of control device (3.6%). Besides, the HCL shows a different mechanism in hole extraction by functioning as a charge recombination zone for electrons injected from anode and holes extracted from the donor materials.

  2. CIPS Validation Data Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Dinh

    2012-03-01

    This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

  3. I.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -J- g / /' ,, ' ^ ' 2r.r ~~A~LUiiC3.Ci.L I.:dXJV,Wi!Y : r:. ..I' ,/' :,. : , qY.5 ;,' .. ! , IL,.5 q.Fj. . Y , x, I' hll : I. t. i. Qae _ ' . :.?, . y& at bIr&y I. "~+@y; .AL(;o,q, >-,?~;-j+,& 1b/L;4 +xritj: . cpr ; $: gs9 ji.i.y " xv *;, .J 2 ki S2Fd.y ' ., . _' fa' C3. hoz, cnc"vb ~&x4 -1, : _' .:' It *,-la3 t2zan,culahsd by hixlbqxd fhc c:jT?dpmtt * , ' It Fa umkn%t~d~ tos mch to hope. that t!io t&m v5.U ever cam r.+w.n the f&$ &&~~cYrg'; need

  4. Weldability and hot ductility of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, D.I.; Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); David, S.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The weldability of iron aluminide alloys is discussed. Although readily welded with electron beam (EB) and gas-tungsten arc (GTA) techniques, iron aluminides are sometimes susceptible to cracking during cooling when welded with the GTA welding process. Taken into account are the effects of microstructural instability (grain growth), weld heat input (cooling rate) and environment on the hot ductility of an iron aluminide alloy designated FA-129. 64 refs., 59 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles Dynamic model of organic Rankine cycle with R245fa working fluid and conservative component efficiencies predict power generation in excess of electrical accessory load demand under highway drive cycle PDF icon deer11_hussain.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Automotive Thermoelectric Generator Design Issues

  6. Tn-seq of Caulobacter crescentus under uranium stress reveals genes essential for detoxification and stress tolerance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yung, Mimi C.; Park, Dan M.; Overton, K. Wesley; Blow, Matthew J.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Smit, John R.; Murray, Sean R.; Ricci, Dante P.; Christen, Beat; Bowman, Grant R.; et al

    2015-07-20

    Ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. In order to gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFamore » and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. These results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus.« less

  7. Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Eleanor Lee Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory eslee@lbl.gov 510-486-4997 April 5, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: In order to reach BTO's aggressive 50% energy savings goal by 2030, innovative façade systems must minimize both lighting and HVAC energy end use consumption more optimally while addressing occupant comfort and amenity requirements. Impact of Project: An

  8. Meet CMI Researcher Eric Schwegler | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schwegler Eric Schwegler, FA4 Deputy CMI researcher Eric Schwegler is the leader for Focus Area 4, Crosscutting Research, and the Thrust Lead for Enabling Science. Previously he served as Deputy Lead for Focus Area 4. Eric received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 1998 from the University of Minnesota, following undergraduate degrees in computer science and chemistry from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. His thesis research was focused on the development of linear scaling

  9. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences Science Subject Feed Building a secondary containment system Broder, M.F. (1994) 144 /> Methods and opportunities in the recycling of rare earth based materials Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.; Jones, L.L. (1994) 134 /> Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. (1999) 128 /> Ammonia usage in vapor compression for refrigeration and

  10. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How we're different Diversity Programs in other organizations are not so different at first glance. However, closer scrutiny brings several differences to light. Some are primarily compliance-driven and seek only to meet predetermined goals for underrepresented groups such as women and minorities. Others are strong on façade; with eye-catching web pages, multiple committees, affinity groups, and various events, but not always with an obvious connection to accomplishing the organization's

  11. Surface runoff from full-scale coal combustion product pavements during accelerated loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.M.; Taerakul, P.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing coal combustion products (CCPs) was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under well-controlled conditions. An equivalent of 20 years of highway traffic loading was simulated at the OSU/OU Accelerated Pavement Load Facility (APLF). Three types of portland cement concrete driving surface layers were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (PC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). In general, the concentrations of minor and trace elements were higher in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates than in the leachates obtained from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure and ASTM leaching procedures. Importantly, none of the leachate concentrations exceeded the TCLP limits or primary drinking water standards. Surface runoff monitoring results showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, whereas there were little differences in release rates between PC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for Cr, elements were released as particulates (>0.45 {mu} m) rather than dissolved constituents. The incorporation of fly ash in the PC cement concrete pavements examined in this study resulted in little or no deleterious environmental impact from the leaching of inorganic elements over the lifetime of the pavement system.

  12. Monthly Performance Report October 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monthly Performance Report October 2009 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report October 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 1 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report October 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 1 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key Accomplishments

  13. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Monthly Performance Report February 2010 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report February 2010 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 5 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report February 2010 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 5 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key

  14. Microbial Reduction of Furfurals to Furan Alcohols by a Microbial Species -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Microbial Reduction of Furfurals to Furan Alcohols by a Microbial Species Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryAn ORNL researcher developed a method for producing furfuryl alcohol (FA) through bioprocessing using a thermophilic microorganism. This organism has been shown to be highly resistant to the toxic effects of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and can propagate in the presence of over 48 g/L (500

  15. C:\My Documents\FORMS\DOE F 4200.41.cdr

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    200.41 (10-03) (All Other Editions Are Obsolete) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY INDIVIDUAL PROCUREMENT ACTION REPORT SUPPLEMENT FOR PROCUREMENT AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 4. B&R NO. 5. DOLLARS 6. WORK FOR OTHERS FA See Handbook for the Preparation of the Individual Procurement Action Report Original - Contract File Goldenrod - ADP Entry Printed with soy ink on recycled paper ADD/CHANGE: 1. AWARD BIN 2. MOD NUMBER 3. KIND OF AWARD Change Delete Add

  16. Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector Introduction Building on previous work on an 11-ton packaged natural gas heat pump, this project will develop hardware and software for engine and system controls for a residential gas heat pump system that will provide space cooling, heating, and hot water. Various electric heat pump systems are used to provide heating and cooling for a wide range of buildings, from commercial fa- cilities to single family homes. The market for heat pumps is

  17. Window Daylighting Demo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Daylighting Demo: Accelerated Deployment of Daylighting and Shading Systems Stephen Selkowitz Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory seselkowitz@lbl.gov 510-486-5064 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Façade has large energy impacts. Cooling and lighting average ~ 40% of energy use in commercial buildings and often >50% in peak electric demand. * Many glazing/shading/daylighting options exist, but selecting the

  18. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Addthis 1 of 3 PPG Industries and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are partnering to develop a new class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and façade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG Industries 2 of 3 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group physicist Paul

  19. C:EFHFRONT.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    600/P-95/002Fa August 1997 VOLUME I - GENERAL FACTORS EXPOSURE FACTORS HANDBOOK Update to Exposure Factors Handbook EPA/600/8-89/043 - May 1989 Office of Research and Development National Center for Environmental Assessment U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Page Exposure Factors Handbook ii August 1997 DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial

  20. MEMORANDUM I TO: FILE DATE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MEMORANDUM I TO: FILE DATE -----_-_- FaOM: ~~,~hkcid!,~- ' ALTERNATE CITY: I\ptw)a.yk --~---_--___-~--~---______ STATE: I current: ------------_------_-~~~~~ if yes, date contacted ____ TYPE OF OPERATION -_---_---------__ 0 Research & Development 6 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilat Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies Sample $ rraductian & Analysis a Manufacturing I 0 University I (1 Research Organization 0 Government Sponao&ed Facility 0 Cither I

  1. Launch of fast reactor cycle technology development project in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagayama, Yutaka

    2007-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA launched a new Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development f (FaCT) Project in cooperation with the Japanese electric utilities. The FaCT project is based on the conclusion of the previous project, namely the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems (FS) which carried out in last seven years. In the FS, the combination of the sodium-cooled fast reactor with oxide fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication was selected as the main concept which should be developed principally because it was the most promising concept for commercialization. A conceptual design study of the main concept and research and development of innovative technologies adopted in the main concept are implemented toward an important milestone at 2015. The development targets, which were set up at the beginning stage of FS, were revised for the FaCT project based on the results of FS and change in Japanese society environment and in the world situation. International collaboration is promoted to pursue fast reactor cycle technology which deserves the global standard and its efficient development. (author)

  2. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in ?-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of ?-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at ?-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within ?-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of ? and ? phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  3. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    2009-08-05

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

  4. Sun light mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles as carrier for 6-mercaptopurine: Preparation, characterization and toxicity studies in zebrafish embryo model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Sathish Kumar, Muniram; Dinesh, Murugan Girija; Kannappan, Sudalyandi; Suguna, Lonchin

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? Gold nanoparticles prepared using eco-friendly method with good in vitro stability. ? Can be used as drug delivery system. ? Did not show any toxicity in zebrafish embryo. ? More toxic to cancer cells when compared to N-Au-Mp and Mp. -- Abstract: The objective of this study is to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles by sun light irradiation method. The prepared gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were modified using folic acid and then coupled with 6-mercaptopurine. These modified nanoparticles were used as a tool for targeted drug delivery to treat laryngeal cancer. In the present study, novel bionanocomposites containing nutrient agar coated gold nano particles (N-AuNPs) coupled with 6-mercaptopurine (drug) (N-AuNPs-Mp), folic acid (ligand) (N-AuNPs-Mp-Fa) and rhodamine (dye) (N-AuNPs-Rd), a fluorescent agent, were prepared and characterized by IR, UV, TEM, Particle size analysis and in vitro stability. The toxicity and fluorescence of N-Au was studied using zebrafish embryo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free Mp, N-Au-Mp and N-Au-Mp-Fa against HEp-2 cells was compared and found that the amount of Mp required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (IC{sub 50}) was much lower in N-Au-Mp-Fa than in free Mp and N-Au-Mp.

  5. A Combined Experimental and Computational Study on the Stability of Nanofluids Containing Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annapureddy, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-01-23

    Computational studies on nanofluids composed of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) were performed using molecular modeling techniques. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used to study adsorption behavior of 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane (R-245fa) in a MIL-101 MOF at various temperatures. To understand the stability of the nanofluid composed of MIL-101 particles, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to compute potentials of mean force between hypothetical MIL-101 fragments terminated with two different kinds of modulators in R-245fa and water. Our computed potentials of mean force results indicate that the MOF particles tend to disperse better in water than in R-245fa. The reasons for this observation were analyzed and discussed. Our results agree with experimental results indicating that the employed potential models and modeling approaches provide good description of molecular interactions and the reliabilities. Work performed by LXD was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Work performed by HVRA, SKN, RKM, and PBM was supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  6. MHD-induced Energetic Ion Loss during H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.S. Medley; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Andre; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; A.L. Roquemore; and the NSTX Team

    2004-03-15

    MHD-induced energetic ion loss in neutral-beam-heated H-mode [high-confinement mode] discharges in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] is discussed. A rich variety of energetic ion behavior resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity is observed in the NSTX using a horizontally scanning Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) whose sightline views across the three co-injected neutral beams. For example, onset of an n = 2 mode leads to relatively slow decay of the energetic ion population (E {approx} 10-100 keV) and consequently the neutron yield. The effect of reconnection events, sawteeth, and bounce fishbones differs from that observed for low-n, low-frequency, tearing-type MHD modes. In this case, prompt loss of the energetic ion population occurs on a time scale of less than or equal to 1 ms and a precipitous drop in the neutron yield occurs. This paper focuses on MHD-induced ion loss during H-mode operation in NSTX. After H-mode onset, the NPA charge-exchange spectrum usually exhibits a significant loss of energetic ions only for E > E(sub)b/2 where E(sub)b is the beam injection energy. The magnitude of the energetic ion loss was observed to decrease with increasing tangency radius, R(sub)tan, of the NPA sightline, increasing toroidal field, B(sub)T, and increasing neutral-beam injection energy, E(sub)b. TRANSP modeling suggests that MHD-induced ion loss is enhanced during H-mode operation due to an evolution of the q and beam deposition profiles that feeds both passing and trapped ions into the region of low-n MHD activity. ORBIT code analysis of particle interaction with a model magnetic perturbation supported the energy selectivity of the MHD-induced loss observed in the NPA measurements. Transport analysis with the TRANSP code using a fast-ion diffusion tool to emulate the observed MHD-induced energetic ion loss showed significant modifications of the neutral- beam heating as well as the power balance, thermal diffusivities, energy confinement times, and toroidal beta. A proper accounting of energetic ion loss is therefore important for accurate analysis of power balance and transport in plasmas exhibiting MHD-induced energetic ion loss.

  7. Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.

    2011-06-07

    The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

  8. Nuclear Data Sheets for A=77

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh B.; Nica N.; Singh,B.; Nica,N.

    2012-05-01

    The experimental nuclear spectroscopic data for known nuclides of mass number 77 (Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y) have been evaluated and presented together with adopted properties for levels and {gamma} rays. New high-spin data are available for {sup 77}Ga, {sup 77}Br and {sup 77}Kr. New precise single-particle transfer cross section data are available for {sup 77}Ge, {sup 77}As, {sup 77}Se and {sup 77}Br from eight different reactions (2009Ka06,2008Sc03); these data give information for occupancy of valence neutron orbitals in the ground states of target nuclides: {sup 76}Ge, {sup 76}Se and {sup 78}Se. No significant new data since the 1997 NDS for A = 77 (1997Fa12) have been reported for {sup 77}Rb and {sup 77}Sr. No data are yet available for excited states in {sup 77}Ni, {sup 77}Cu and {sup 77}Y. Level schemes from the radioactive decays of {sup 77}Ni to {sup 77}Cu and {sup 77}Y to {sup 77}Sr are unknown, while those for the decays of {sup 77}Cu to {sup 77}Zn and {sup 77}Ga to {sup 77}Ge are incomplete. Detailed gamma-ray data for {sup 77}Ge from thermal-neutron capture in {sup 76}Ge, together with extensive gamma-ray data from {sup 77}Ge decay to {sup 77}As have become available from 2012Me04. This work benefited from earlier evaluations (1997Fa12,1989Fa07,1980Si05,1973Ur02) of A = 77 nuclides, however, the data presented here supersede those in above evaluations.

  9. Differences in Brainstem Fiber Tract Response to Radiation: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Li, Yimei; Feng, Tianshu; Gajjar, Amar; Ogg, Robert J.; Hua, Chiaho

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation-induced changes in white matter tracts are uniform across the brainstem. Methods and Materials: We analyzed serial diffusion tensor imaging data, acquired before radiation therapy and over 48 to 72 months of follow-up, from 42 pediatric patients (age 6-20 years) with medulloblastoma. FSL software (FMRIB, Oxford, UK) was used to calculate fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial, radial, and mean diffusivities. For a consistent identification of volumes of interest (VOIs), the parametric maps of each patient were transformed to a standard brain space (MNI152), on which we identified VOIs including corticospinal tract (CST), medial lemniscus (ML), transverse pontine fiber (TPF), and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) at the level of pons. Temporal changes of DTI parameters in VOIs were compared using a linear mixed effect model. Results: Radiation-induced white matter injury was marked by a decline in FA after treatment. The decline was often accompanied by decreased axial diffusivity, increased radial diffusivity, or both. This implied axonal damage and demyelination. We observed that the magnitude of the changes was not always uniform across substructures of the brainstem. Specifically, the changes in DTI parameters for TPF were more pronounced than in other regions (P<.001 for FA) despite similarities in the distribution of dose. We did not find a significant difference among CST, ML, and MCP in these patients (P>.093 for all parameters). Conclusions: Changes in the structural integrity of white matter tracts, assessed by DTI, were not uniform across the brainstem after radiation therapy. These results support a role for tract-based assessment in radiation treatment planning and determination of brainstem tolerance.

  10. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  11. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  12. 12N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1949AL05: 12N; measured T1/2. 1958VE20: 12N; measured T1/2. 1959FA03: 12N; measured T1/2. 1962MA22: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962PO02: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FI05: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963GL04: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963PE10: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963WI05: 12N; measured not

  13. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington,

  14. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Comparison of High Spectral Resolution Infrared Cloud Boundary Algorithms using S-HIS and AERI Measurements Holz, R.E.(a), Antonelli, P.(a), Ackerman, S.(a), McGill, M.J.(a), Nagel, F.(a), Feltz, W.F.(a), and Turner, D.D.(b), Univeristy of Wisconsin, Madison (a), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud top pressure is an important parameter in determining the radiative impact of clouds on climate. In addition,

  15. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI Observations in the Arctic: Monthly-Average Radiance Spectra and Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Walden, V.P., Revercomb, H.E., Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Ciganovich, N., Dedecker, R.G., Dirkx, T., Garcia, R.K., Herbsleb, R., Howell, H.B., McRae, D., Short, J., and Tobin, D., Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/Space Science and Engineering Center/University of Wisconsin Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Atmospheric Emitted Radiance

  16. Microsoft Word - L3-RTM.PRT.P5.04.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P5.04 Bill Martin University of Michigan Completed: 9/30/2012 CASL-U-2012-0159-000 Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Bldg. 5700, Room F317, MS 6003 P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6003 Email: casl-info@ornl.gov Date: 10/9/2012 To: Bill Martin c: Tom Evans From: Tom Evans FA/ORNL Level 3 Milestone Deliverable - L3:RTM.PRT.P5.04 Milestone Due Date: 9/30/2012 Milestone Completion Date: 9/30/2012 Description of Milestone:

  17. I Unlimited Release UC-70

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unlimited Release UC-70 Proceedings of the Fifth Annual NEA-Seabed Working Group Meeting Bristol, England March 3 - 5, 1980 D. Richard Anderson, Editor *md by $wrdia W - I Labcratmks, A l b u q w - New Mmka '71@s - a d L - Cal&mla SrFSBDfm tfm Unitad S l w m D - 1 ird E W @ ~ : ya& CpFaJS Q & d - 7 - ~~&rS&emhw I B ~ D -a,J - . r , ~ : :>5:, ~ ~ 5 - r 1 - e . - - Q Sandia National Laboratories L - I . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by

  18. Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

    2011-05-17

    A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

  19. The NuSTAR View of Nearby Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei: The Cases

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of NGC 424, NGC 1320, and IC 2560 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The NuSTAR View of Nearby Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei: The Cases of NGC 424, NGC 1320, and IC 2560 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The NuSTAR View of Nearby Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei: The Cases of NGC 424, NGC 1320, and IC 2560 Authors: Balokovic, M. ; /Caltech ; Comastri, A. ; /Bologna Observ. ; Harrison, F.A. ; /Caltech ; Alexander, D.M. ;

  20. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 1\ ".~ -. , ;J Community _ Loblolly Pine _ Slash Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood ~ Upland Hard'MJod Bottomland Hand'MJod Mixed Swamp Forest I!!!!I Carolina Bay Wetland _Water 8 Bottomland Hand'MJod/Pine DForb/Grassland _ Other* Disturbed Area &:i Scrub/Shrub %~~~sBoundary :tfW'Roads o Utimy ROW Streams NPDES outfalls o Monitoring Wells * Wastesites CJ TES Plants (2) ~ Other Set*Asides .-. SRS Bays Areas D Hydric Soiis o Soils Soil Series and Phase D AnB D BaB D BaC D Ch I::!:I Fa D LaB _

  1. Compartment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 Road 8-3.1 a Community _Loblolly Pine I!!i!iILongleaf Pine DMixed Pine/Hardwood C]Carolina Bay Wetland _Water hW#IHydric Soils f I TES Plants (1) 1M. Roads /YI. Streams '1\1 Site Boundary 280 Soil Series and Phase D BaB oDoA LJ Fa o FuB o LaB o Rm .Wm o 280 Soils 560 Meters N A Figure 25-1. Plant cOllllllunities and soils associated with the Mona Bay and Woodward Bay Set- Aside Area. 25-5 Set-Aside 25: Mona Bay and Woodward

  2. Argonne Lea Computing F A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lea Computing F A r g o n n e L e a d e r s h i p C o m p u t i n g FA c i l i t y 2 0 1 3 S c i e n c e H i g H l i g H t S Argonne leadership computing Facility C O N T E N T S About ALCF ...............................................................................................................................2 MirA...............................................................................................................................................3 SCienCe DireCtor'S MeSSAge

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - ZEROES_Presentation.pptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HouZe GT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RACE TO ZERO STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION By Zeroes Decision Making Process - WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT, ROBUST, AND COST EFFECTIVE SOLUTION TO ACHIEVE NET ZERO? HouZe GT + Program - WHO ARE WE DESIGNING FOR? VISITING FAMILY AND FRIENDS EXPANDING FAMILY HouZe GT Location In The City/Surroundings - WHERE IN THE CITY DO WE WANT TO BE? HouZe GT Site - WHAT IS THE EXISTING SITUATION? N EXISTING FOOTPRINT two volumes - large façade area COMBINE VOLUMES bad outdoor

  4. CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMA.NRC.P5.01 CASL NRC Commissioner Technical Seminar Jess Gehin Oak Ridge National Laboratory December 22, 2012 CASL-U-2014-0076-000-a CASL-U-2012-0076-000-a 1 CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors NRC Commissioner Technical Seminar November 30, 2012 Doug Kothe (ORNL) CASL Director Doug Burns (INL) CASL Deputy Director Paul Turinsky (NCSU) CASL Chief Scientist Jess Gehin (ORNL) CASL AMA FA

  5. A I K E N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donates Collection for Education AIKEN, S.C. (May 12, 2014) - When Dr. Carol Jantzen was just one year old; her fa- ther gave her a mineral pick. Even though she was barely able to hold the tool, it sparked a lifelong interest in rocks, minerals and fos- sils. Jantzen is now a Materials Scientist and Geochemist at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and has donated her ex- tensive mineral collection to the Ruth Patrick Science Education Center at the University of South Carolina -

  6. ,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O'

  7. CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your

  8. TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    --____ R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal/Storage a Research Organization a Government 0 Other Sponsored i F[fa' tty ------__------__ I Prime 5 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order a Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit p CgNTRACTING PERIOD: L.&G , PX& & cx LFkoL ~~~~~~~~~----------_ __ _______ OWNERSH; P: AEC/MED AEC/MED GOVT GOVT

  9. MEPleRANDUM TO: FILE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MEPleRANDUM ( TO: FILE , , ------ --------iS"I;=~:ta,,,-;onFa;tedl/~~-r*z .-+a~* & 0 no; TYV= OF CP==ATION ---=-------aY----- 0 8:esearch & Develoyent B Facility Type Q Other information <i.e.,.ccst + fixed fee, unit price, Manufacturing University Research Organizatian I Government Sponsored iaci:i<y Other %&~!$-a---- : 0 F'rcduction scale testing 0 Filet Scale 0 Hench Scale Process 0 Thecrktical Studies 0 Sample 2 Anaiysis .B '.Ct-oduction 0 Disposai/Storage TYPE CIF

  10. NLU

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NLU w57 &d-m &$i$h?Ga&n6 &%zca4f%a4uhd 370 LEXINGTON AVENUE, NEW YORK 17, N. Y., ORegon 9-9170 April 13, 1959. Dr. Charles E. Croanpton Associate Technical Director National Lead Company of Ohio P. 0. Box 158, Mt. Healthy Station Cincwnatl 31, Ohio / c. ;/ "' .* 3 t- Dear Dr. Crompton: As you know; we have, for the past year and a half, been engaged in a project under contract to the Reactor De- velopment Division of the Atomic Energy Commission to investi- gate the removal

  11. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  12. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  13. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenfen Zhu; Masaki Takaoka; Kenji Shiota; Kazuyuki Oshita; Yoshinori Kitajima

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCl, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl{sub 2}, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCl, 37% as CaCl{sub 2}, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. 25 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Effect of landfill leachate organic acids on trace metal adsorption by kaolinite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroth, B.; Garrison, Sposito

    1997-02-01

    Hexanoic (hex) and fulvic acid (FA), representing early and later stages of landfill leachate evolution, were examined for influence on trace metal adsorption by a poorly crystallized kaolinite (KGa-2). Our experiments represented a model approach to examine possible reaction mechanisms in an environmentally important ternary metal-ligand-mineral surface system. Batch experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol kg(-1) NaClO4 at pH 3-8. Concentrations of metals (Cu, Cd, and Pb) and ligands were representative of those found typically in groundwater immediately downgradient of a landfill. The presence of FA resulted in enhancement of metal adsorption below pH 5, whereas the presence of hex produced no significant net change in metal uptake. Measured surface charge properties of KGa-2 were combined with binary and ternary system data in constructing a quantitative model of the system. The simple combination of binary system results was not effective in predicting the observed ternary system behavior. In both ternary systems, the addition of ternary surface complexes (TSCs) to the models resulted in a satisfactory fit to the data. Our work suggests the strong possibility that TSC involvement in surface reactions of natural adsorbents may be a useful concept.

  15. DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, T.; Chandler, G.; Daugherty, W.; Imrich, K.; Jankins, C.

    1996-09-12

    To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.

  16. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W.

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial 235U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, …, 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for 134Cs/137Cs 134Cs/154Eu, and 154Eu/137Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial 235U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the FA models serve as source materials for the pre- and postelectrorefining models to be reported in Parts 2 and 3.

  17. Enhanced air/fuel mixing for automotive Stirling engine turbulator-type combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riecke, G.T.; Stotts, R.E.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes a combustor for use in a Stirling engine and the like. It comprises: a combustor chamber; a fuel inlet couple to the chamber to inject fuel therein; a turbulator means disposed in the chambers downstream of the fuel inlet means for injecting combustion air into the chamber, the turbulator means being so positioned to cause a mixing of the combustion air and fuel injected in the chamber; diverter means for dividing the combustion air and creating a primary mixing zone downstream fa the primary mixing zone; and wherein the primary mixing zone comprises a fuel rich zone where combustion initiates and the secondary mixing zone has sufficient combustion air to complete combustion of the fuel.

  18. A=12C (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1968AJ02) and Table 12.8 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1967SV1A, 1968BA1L, 1968DR1B, 1968FA1B, 1968FU1B, 1968GO01, 1968GU1C, 1968HA11, 1968RO1G, 1969GU1E, 1969GU03, 1969IK1A, 1969LA26, 1969MO1F, 1969SA1A, 1969SV1A, 1969WA06, 1969WO05, 1970AR21, 1970BE26, 1970BO33, 1970BO1J, 1970CO1H, 1970DE1F, 1970DO1A, 1970EI06, 1970GI11, 1970GU11, 1970KH01, 1970KO04, 1970KR1D, 1970LO1C, 1970RE1G, 1970RU1A, 1970RY1A,

  19. A=14N (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 14N) GENERAL: See also Table 14.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (AD55, OT55A, EL56B, FR56B, BA57, GR57D, VI57, FA58, MA58C, MO58, SK58, WA59). 1. 9Be(6Li, n)14N Qm = 14.503 See (NO57A). 2. 10B(α, n)13N Qm = 1.065 Eb = 11.615 Resonances are reported at Eα = 1.51, 1.64, 2.16, 2.26, 2.95, 4.53, 4.85, and 5.36 MeV: see Table 14.6 (in PDF or PS) (SH53B, SH55C, BO56D, MA58G, GI59). Angular distributions have been measured at Eα = 1.51

  20. A=15O (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15O) GENERAL: See Table 15.18 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(TA60H, TA60L, CO63B, KU63I, AL64P, AM64, BR64Z, RI64B, CO65I, GI65D, GR65E, GU65A, HU65D, BO66J, EL66B, RI66G, SO66A, BO67B, EL67C, DE68K, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, SH68D, WO68D, ZH68, ZU68, DE69M, EL69B, GU69, SA69). General calculations and reviews:(EV64, FA67A, NE67B, BI68C). Electromagnetic transitions:(RO65O, PO66F, RO66C, WA66D, KU67J, PO67G, WA67I, BI68C,

  1. A=16F (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 16F) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 16.24 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. For reactions involving pions see (1983AS01, 1984AS05) and reaction 2. See also (1982BR08, 1983ANZQ, 1983AN25, 1983CO15, 1983KO2B, 1986YA1Q, 1986YA1F). For a comparison of analog states in 16O and 16F see (1982FA06, 1983KE06, 1984ST10). See also (1985AN28, 1985HA01). 1. (a) 14N(3He, n)16F Qm = -0.957 (b) 14N(3He, np)15O Qm = -0.421 Observed neutron groups from

  2. A=20F (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20F) GENERAL: See Table 20.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(BR59M, KU63F, MO64M, DE65B, DE65Q, CH66H, PI66A, BO67K, GU67, GU67A, AR68C, CO68L, GU68A, HA68H, HA68T, HO69U, AN70G, BA70DD, AR71L, JO71, WI71B). Other theoretical calculations:(ST67G, CE68A, DW68, SC69F, LE71I, TE71B). General experimental work:(FA70, AR71). Ground state: μ = +2.0935 ± 0.009 nm (GU67D; see also (TS63, FU69E). See also (KU63F, LI64H, ST64, SH67N,

  3. FY 2008 Annual Performance Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hyd rog en Tan k Res earc h, LLN L PH EN IX Ex pe rim en t, BN L Fu el Ce ll Re sea rch , AN L Ca rb on Se qu es tra tio n Re se ar ch , PN NL Hi gh Ex pl os iv es Ap pl ic at io ns Fa ci lit y, LL NL Com put er Sim ulat ion The ater , LAN L Al ga e Re se ar ch , NR EL Ad va nc ed Bio fue ls Re se arc h, LB NL T ra in in g Nuc lear Mat eria ls Sto rag e, SRS C o a l G a s if ic a ti o n R e s e a rc h , P N N L Cli ma te Mo de lin g, OR NL AnnuAl PerformAnce rePort fY 2008 Table of Contents

  4. Characteristics of the WWR-K test core and the LEU LTAS to be placed in the central experimental beryllium device.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arinkin, F.; Chakrov, P.; Chekushina, L.; Gizatulin,, Sh.; Koltochnik, S.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Kazakhstan Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

    2010-03-01

    In 2010 life test of three LEU (19.7%) lead test assemblies (LTA) is expected in the existing WWR-K reactor core with regular WWR-C-type fuel assemblies and a smaller core with a beryllium insert. Preliminary analysis of test safety is to be carried out. It implies reconstruction of the reactor core history for last three years, including burnup calculation for each regular fuel assembly (FA), as well as calculation of characteristics of the test core. For the planned configuration of the test core a number of characteristics have been calculated. The obtained data will be used as input for calculations on LTA test core steady-state thermal hydraulics and on transient analysis.

  5. NERSC Climate PIs Telecon!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Systems Update NERSC Systems Early 2015 2 x 10 Gb 1 x 100 Gb So#ware D efined N etworking Data---Intensive S ystems Carver, P DSF, J GI,KBASE,HEP 1 4x Q DR Vis & A naly3cs D ata T ransfer N odes Adv. A rch. Testbeds S cience G ateways Global Scratch 3.6 PB 5 x S FA12KE /project 5 PB DDN9900 & NexSAN /home 250 TB NetApp 5 460 50 P B s tored, 2 40 PB c apacity, 2 0 years o f community d ata HPSS 80 GB/s 50 GB/s 5 GB/s 12 GB/s 16 x Q DR I B 2.2 PB Local Scratch 70 G B/s Hopper: 1

  6. Jason Hick! Storage Systems Group! NERSC User Group Meeting!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group! ! NERSC User Group Meeting! February 6, 2014 Storage Systems: 2014 and beyond The compute and storage systems 2013 Produc(on C lusters Carver, P DSF, J GI,KBASE,HEP 1 4x Q DR Global Scratch 3.6 PB 5 x S FA12KE /project 5 PB DDN9900 & NexSAN /home 250 TB NetApp 5 460 50 P B s tored, 2 40 PB c apacity, 3 5 years o f community d ata HPSS 16 x Q DR I B 2.2 P B L ocal Scratch 70 GB/s 6.4 P B L ocal Scratch 140 GB/s 16 x F DR I B Ethernet & I B F abric Science F riendly S ecurity

  7. A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W.

    2010-05-15

    A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

  8. Interrelation of technologies for RW preparation and sites for final isolation of the wastes from pyrochemical processing of SNF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupalo, V.S.; Chistyakov, V.N.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.; Kormilitsyna, L.A.

    2013-07-01

    For the justification of engineering solutions and practical testing of the radiochemical component of the perspective nuclear power complex with on-site variant of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC), it is planned to establish a multi-functional research-development complex (MFCRC) for radiochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) from fast reactors. MFCRC is being established at the NIIAR site, it comprises technological process lines, where innovation pyro-electrochemical and hydrometallurgical technologies are realized, with an option for closing the inter-chain material flows for testing the combined radiochemically converted materials. The technological flowchart for processing at the MFCRC is subdivided into 3 segments: -) complex of the lead operations for dismantling the fuel elements (FE) and fuel assemblies (FA), -) pyrochemical extraction flowchart for processing SNF, and -) hydrometallurgical flowchart for processing SNF. The engineered solutions for the management and disposition of the radioactive wastes from MFCRC are reviewed.

  9. FROM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :s. B. ' Brown S"BJJ=T:WIDEKLY IUSWiT ,BDR WBMlC BHDIBG WlLBcB 28, 1951 L:' -F k-2.M0 _ firlt, )fa~rQf ti' + " ' ; /=jo A?T?i id' ! CP~) ~c~cd.: &JL& c"/ . ,Q.~~,~~~.- GJ I; ' " ;?%lT Scrap RecoverJT Kellex wae requested to expand their inveatigation.of poaeible 7-7 ;. I i * meam for recoverfng uran' itlm from low-grade wastes and reeiduee to . include all reeiduee containing above about 0.1% U. S-lee were .- collected from the IOOU and Hairt eitsr for this research

  10. Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :::, pL' /Z 1 ~etaIturgital Xalboratorp a* -9- g-/i c> ylr3' w - .yuc- bl# 7-L c/"v. tP cq \ 9hi 8 documen t? O?,?O! sta 0f-A Je 4 %muw pace? and-.-G?-. fi::ur-e;. Q&LOPifx3, Series.... ' d o,.L Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu. vzP-1014uMalg* budi&&ah uwmud y.::::: .:..... ,.>:. I C~.4SS~F!Ct4T@N CHANGED f %H=slwffn;lDc1 &4-e-- :: . IRKED TO EE UNCLASSIFIED UTHORITY: DOE-~PP DECLASSIFIED huthority PruD z?3OL7 BY hR-m ,I(ARqD& Il/lr/X'

  11. RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 , RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V : w ~?g+QZ FM USAEC NYK @5 TO USAEC LEMUMT Ill.. AEC WWC ; I _. _' FOR A TAMwsflO h@G NR tt0 PD Tti18~18~~10 APPROVE pf TWJNTY GRAM8 ENRICHED 1 '. , URANlUM TO 8YLyANI~q FOR W8E. IWTREPARIWG~F~VE U&AN,!UU SLUGS 7/.8 lF4j34 ' .' : ' . ~ , . LQ~JG m S/8 1%~ ~IAhiiilER pa THE-DIE WI& CW!. APOROX 300 DOLLARS Am " , SIX ~uN-~Y# WILL BE REQI!!REl! FW WJG FA~ICf' TlW PD ?eJJRCt+A= @ fmR woull] BE m OUT to 8YLVANIA AND WNT TO, V L PAf?SEGIAN Cy

  12. Toxicity Data to Determine Refrigerant Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calm, James M.

    2000-09-30

    This report reviews toxicity data, identifies sources for them, and presents resulting exposure limits for refrigerants for consideration by qualified parties in developing safety guides, standards, codes, and regulations. It outlines a method to calculate an acute toxicity exposure limit (ATEL) and from it a recommended refrigerant concentration limit (RCL) for emergency exposures. The report focuses on acute toxicity with particular attention to lethality, cardiac sensitization, anesthetic and central nervous system effects, and other escape-impairing effects. It addresses R-11, R-12, R-22, R-23, R-113, R-114, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-E134, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245ca, R-245fa, R-290, R-500, R-502, R-600a, R-717, and R-744. It summarizes additional data for R-14, R-115, R-170 (ethane), R-C318, R-600 (n-butane), and R-1270 (propylene) to enable calculation of limits for blends incorporating them. The report summarizes the data a nd related safety information, including classifications and flammability data. It also presents a series of tables with proposed ATEL and RCL concentrations-in dimensionless form and the latter also in both metric (SI) and inch-pound (IP) units of measure-for both the cited refrigerants and 66 zerotropic and azeotropic blends. They include common refrigerants, such as R-404A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-507A, as well as others in commercial or developmental status. Appendices provide profiles for the cited single-compound refrigerants and for R-500 and R-502 as well as narrative toxicity summaries for common refrigerants. The report includes an extensive set of references.

  13. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  14. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and ?H2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  15. Macro-to-microchannel transition in two-phase flow: Part 1 - Two-phase flow patterns and film thickness measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, C.L.; Thome, J.R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL-STI-IGM-LTCM, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    The classification of macroscale, mesoscale and microscale channels with respect to two-phase processes is still an open question. The main objective of this study focuses on investigating the macro-to-microscale transition during flow boiling in small scale channels of three different sizes with three different refrigerants over a range of saturation conditions to investigate the effects of channel confinement on two-phase flow patterns and liquid film stratification in a single circular horizontal channel (Part 2 covers the flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux). This paper presents the experimental two-phase flow pattern transition data together with a top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison for refrigerants R134a, R236fa and R245fa during flow boiling in small channels of 1.03, 2.20 and 3.04 mm diameter. Based on this work, an improved flow pattern map has been proposed by determining the flow patterns transitions existing under different conditions including the transition to macroscale slug/plug flow at a confinement number of Co {approx} 0.3-0.4. From the top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison results, it was observed that the gravity forces are fully suppressed and overcome by the surface tension and shear forces when the confinement number approaches 1, Co {approx} 1. Thus, as a new approximate rule, the lower threshold of macroscale flow is Co = 0.3-0.4 while the upper threshold of symmetric microscale flow is Co {approx} 1 with a transition (or mesoscale) region in-between. (author)

  16. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  17. The features of neutronic calculations for fast reactors with hybrid cores on the basis of BFS-62-3A critical assembly experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitenkova, E. F.; Novikov, N. V.; Blokhin, A. I.

    2012-07-01

    The different (U-Pu) fuel compositions are considered for next generation of sodium fast breeder reactors. The considerable discrepancies in axial and radial neutron spectra for hybrid reactor systems compared to the cores with UO{sub 2} fuel cause increasing uncertainty of generating the group nuclear constants in those reactor systems. The calculation results of BFS-62-3A critical assembly which is considered as full-scale model of BN-600 hybrid core with steel reflector specify quite different spectra in local areas. For those systems the MCNP 5 calculations demonstrate significant sensitivity of effective multiplication factor K{sub eff} and spectral indices to nuclear data libraries. For {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu the results of calculated radial fission rate distributions against the reconstructed ones are analyzed. Comparative analysis of spectral indices, neutron spectra and radial fission rate distributions are performed using the different versions of ENDF/B, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, JEFF-3.1.1 libraries and BROND-3 for Fe, Cr isotopes. For analyzing the fission rate sensitivity to the plutonium presence in the fuel {sup 239}Pu is substituted for {sup 235}U (enrichment 90%) in the FA areas containing the plutonium. For {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu radial fission rate distributions the explanation of pick values discrepancies is based on the group fission constants analyses and possible underestimation of some features at the experimental data recovery method (Westcott factors, temperature dependence). (authors)

  18. Point model equations for neutron correlation counting: Extension of Böhnel's equations to any order

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Favalli, Andrea; Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter

    2015-06-15

    Various methods of autocorrelation neutron analysis may be used to extract information about a measurement item containing spontaneously fissioning material. The two predominant approaches being the time correlation analysis (that make use of a coincidence gate) methods of multiplicity shift register logic and Feynman sampling. The common feature is that the correlated nature of the pulse train can be described by a vector of reduced factorial multiplet rates. We call these singlets, doublets, triplets etc. Within the point reactor model the multiplet rates may be related to the properties of the item, the parameters of the detector, and basic nuclearmore » data constants by a series of coupled algebraic equations – the so called point model equations. Solving, or inverting, the point model equations using experimental calibration model parameters is how assays of unknown items is performed. Currently only the first three multiplets are routinely used. In this work we develop the point model equations to higher order multiplets using the probability generating functions approach combined with the general derivative chain rule, the so called Faà di Bruno Formula. Explicit expression up to 5th order are provided, as well the general iterative formula to calculate any order. This study represents the first necessary step towards determining if higher order multiplets can add value to nondestructive measurement practice for nuclear materials control and accountancy.« less

  19. Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

  20. A=14C (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14C) GENERAL: See Table 14.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See (JA54A, EL56B, VI57, BA58E, OT59, SK59, TA60L, WA60, BA61D, FR61B, TA62F, BL63C, NA63A, SO63, VL63A, LI64I, LO64C, BA65T, KO65F, WA65D, ZA65B, BA66PP, BO66J, GU66D, MI66C, ZA66B, GR67M, HA67G, IN67A, KO67C, KO67S, EI68, FA68C, FR68C, NE68A, RO68C, AR69E, AT69, FR69B, SH69, SO69A, SO69D). 1. 14C(β-)14N Qm = 0.156 Recent values are 5745 ± 50 y (MA61B, HU64B), 5780 ± 65 y (WA61E),

  1. Weldability of Fe[sub 3]Al-type Aluminide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, S.A.; Zacharia, T. )

    1993-05-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the weldability of a series of Fe[sub 3]Al-type alloys. Autogenous welds were made on thin sheets of iron aluminide alloys using gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding processes at different travel speeds and power levels. The results indicate that although these alloys can be successfully welded using the EB welding process, some compositions may hot crack during GTA welding. Boron and zirconium additions have been found to promote hot cracking in these alloys. Among the alloys investigated, Fe[sub 3]Al modified with chromium, niobium and carbon (FA-129) showed the most promise for good weldability. Hot-cracking severity of this alloy was further investigated using the Sigmajig test. The minimum threshold stress of 25 ksi measured is within the material range of other aluminides and some commercial stainless steels. Also, some of these alloys exhibited a tendency for cold cracking. This is related to severe hydrogen embrittlement associated with this class of alloys.

  2. Weldability of polycrystalline aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasching, A.A.; Edwards, G.R.; David, S.A.

    1993-07-01

    Iron aluminide alloy FA-129 is susceptible to cold cracking during gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welding. Cracking occurs by brittle fracture in the fusion zone, which has been attributed to excessive grain growth during solidification, in concert with environmental embrittlement. Previous work has shown that iron aluminide can be susceptible to environmental embrittlement when tested in the presence of water vapor. The suggested mechanism is similar to that observed in aluminum alloys: the reaction of water molecules with freshly exposed aluminum atoms at the crack tip results in the formation of high activity atomic hydrogen, which diffuses into the metal and causes embrittlement. This phenomenon occurs only when the metal is stressed, and therefore, is a dynamic embrittlement phenomenon. The same effect was not seen in experiments conducted in the presence of hydrogen gas. To further investigate this embrittlement problem and its effect on welding, GTA welds were conducted in atmospheres of varying amounts of water vapor on base material of varying grain sizes. The varying base material grain sizes were chosen because fusion zone grain size depends, to an extent, on the grain size of the base material. For example, a fine-grained base material should produce a finer grained fusion zone that a coarse-grained base material would. The results of the investigation are presented within this paper.

  3. Identification of GPR65, a novel regulator of matrix metalloproteinases using high through-put screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Hongbo; Chen, Xiaohong; Huang, Junwei [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China); Deng, Weiwei [Functional Genomics Group, Chinese National Human Genome Center (CHGB) at Beijing (China)] [Functional Genomics Group, Chinese National Human Genome Center (CHGB) at Beijing (China); Zhong, Qi [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China); Yue, Changli [Department of Pathology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China)] [Department of Pathology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Wang, Pingzhang, E-mail: wangpzh@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health (China) [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health (China); Functional Genomics Group, Chinese National Human Genome Center (CHGB) at Beijing (China); Huang, Zhigang, E-mail: enthuangzhigang@sohu.com [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing (China)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •A novel mechanism of MMP3 regulation by proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors was defined. •GPR65 was identified to induce the MMP3 expression. •GPR65 mediated MMP induction under acidic conditions. •AP-1 binding site in MMP3 promoter was crucial for MMP3 induction. •GPR65 overexpression can accelerate the invision of A549 cells. -- Abstract: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are over-expressed in nearly all cancers. To study novel regulatory factors of MMP expression in head and neck cancer (HNC), we screened a total of 636 candidate genes encoding putative human transmembrane proteins using MMP promoter reporter in a dual luciferase assay system. Three genes GPR65, AXL and TNFRSF10B dramatically activated the induction of MMP3 expression. The induction of MMP expression by GPR65 was further confirmed in A549 and/or FaDu cells. GPR65 mediated MMP induction under acidic conditions. The AP-1 binding site in MMP3 promoter was crucial for MMP3 induction. Moreover, the A549 cells infected by recombinant adenovirus of GPR65 showed accelerated cell invasion. In conclusion, we validate that GPR65 is vital regulatory genes upstream of MMP3, and define a novel mechanism of MMP3 regulation by proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors.

  4. High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zia, Jalal; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

    2013-06-29

    A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

  5. Adiabatic two-phase frictional pressure drops in microchannels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revellin, Remi; Thome, John R. [EPFL, STI ISE LTCM, ME Gl 464, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Two-phase pressure drops were measured over a wide range of experimental test conditions in two sizes of microchannels (sight glass tubes 0.509 and 0.790 mm) for two refrigerants (R-134a and R-245fa). Similar to the classic Moody diagram in single-phase flow, three zones were distinguishable when plotting the variation of the two-phase friction factor versus the two-phase Reynolds number: a laminar regime for Re{sub TP} < 2000, a transition regime for 2000 {<=} Re{sub TP} < 8000 and a turbulent regime for Re{sub TP} {>=} 8000. The laminar zone yields a much sharper gradient than in single-phase flow. The transition regime is not predicted well by any of the prediction methods for two-phase frictional pressure drops available in the literature. This is not unexpected since only a few data are available for this region in the literature and most methods ignore this regime, jumping directly from laminar to turbulent flow at Re{sub TP} = 2000. The turbulent zone is best predicted by the Mueller-Steinhagen and Heck correlation. Also, a new homogeneous two-phase frictional pressure drop has been proposed here with a limited range of application. (author)

  6. Preparation of Cu and Fly Ash Composite by Powder Metallurgy Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chew, P. Y.; Lim, P. S.; Ng, M. C.; Zahi, S.; You, A. H.

    2011-03-30

    Cu and Fly Ash (FA) mixtures with different weight percentages were prepared. Pellets of the mixture powder were produced with the dimension of 17.7 mm in diameter and 10-15 mm in height. These different composites were compacted at a constant pressure of 280 MPa. One of the selected weight percentages was then compacted to form into pellet and sintered at different temperatures which were at 900, 950 and 1000 deg. C respectively for 2 hours. Density of green pellet was measured before sintered in furnace. After sintering, all the pellets with different temperatures were re-weighed and sintered density were calculated. The densification of the green and sintered pellets was required to be measured as one of the parameter in selection of the best material properties. Porosity of the pellet shall not be ignored in order to analyze the close-packed particles stacking in the pellet. SEM micrograph had been captured to observe the presence of pores and agglomeration of particles in the sample produced.

  7. SLUDGE PARTICLE SEPAPATION EFFICIENCIES DURING SETTLER TANK RETRIEVAL INTO SCS-CON-230

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DEARING JI; EPSTEIN M; PLYS MG

    2009-07-16

    The purpose of this document is to release, into the Hanford Document Control System, FA1/0991, Sludge Particle Separation Efficiencies for the Rectangular SCS-CON-230 Container, by M. Epstein and M. G. Plys, Fauske & Associates, LLC, June 2009. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) will retrieve sludge from the 105-K West Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Settler Tanks and transfer it to container SCS-CON-230 using the Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS). The sludge will enter the container through two distributors. The container will have a filtration system that is designed to minimize the overflow of sludge fines from the container to the basin. FAI/09-91 was performed to quantify the effect of the STRS on sludge distribution inside of and overflow out of SCS-CON-230. Selected results of the analysis and a system description are discussed. The principal result of the analysis is that the STRS filtration system reduces the overflow of sludge from SCS-CON-230 to the basin by roughly a factor of 10. Some turbidity can be expected in the center bay where the container is located. The exact amount of overflow and subsequent turbidity is dependent on the density of the sludge (which will vary with location in the Settler Tanks) and the thermal gradient between the SCS-CON-230 and the basin. Attachment A presents the full analytical results. These results are applicable specifically to SCS-CON-230 and the STRS filtration system's expected operating duty cycles.

  8. SYNCHEM feasibility report: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    Several Czech and US companies have entered into a development agreement for the purposes of determining the technical and economic feasibility and overall financeability of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) regional energy facility to be located adjacent to the Chemopetrol refinery in Litvinov, Czech Republic. The Project would use a feedstock comprised of coal supplied by Doly a upravny Komorany s.p. (DUK) coal mining company and mined from the Most/Litvinov area together with high sulfur residual oils from the Chemopetrol refinery. When gasified together with oxygen from an Air Products air separation plant, and based on an average yearly consumption of 2,100K metric tons per year of coal (as delivered) and 630K tonnes per year of oil, approximately 11 million normal cubic meters per day of syngas will be produced. At its current projected design capacity, when combusted in two General Electric advanced technology Frame 9FA gas turbines, the Project will produce approximately 690MW of electric power; 250 metric tons/hour of steam for process; and 135 thermal equivalent MW of district heat. The Feasibility Phase efforts described in this report indicate the real possibility for a successful and profitable IGCC Project for the Czech Republic. It is therefore incumbent upon all the Project Participants to review and evaluate the information contained herein such that a go/no-go decision can be reached by early next year.

  9. SunShot Initiative - Stimmel - November 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U N S H O T Shift C A R O L L . S T I M M E L , F O U N D E R M A N I F E S T M I N D , I N C . W W W. M A N I F E S T M I N D . C O M I N F O @ M A N I F E S T M I N D . C O M ( C ) 2 0 1 5 , A L L R I G H T S R E S E R V E D S O L A R E N E R G Y T H AT I S A F F O R D A B L E F O R A L L E N O U G H T R A N S F O R M H O W S O L A R I S G E N E R AT E D FA S T E R , E A S I E R , A N D A F F O R D A B L E T O C H O O S E S O L A R I N I T I AT I V E Reduce the total installed cost (or the

  10. C)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9 . Z 9 * i' ; :s ' C) ig j$ j9 v, :I 5m src z 2 0 7 v, 5 Z E isi 2 !s z l O W 00 is -. ' 1 Y !: , - " i - VI 5 P c x r: ij 2 :" - 7 - - - 4 = f - /j p6' 3 % 6 i "# eg ' P ze; Y !f ; at =$ FE= Z - *a 2 :* 3 !F a I/, 2 P a %s m b- 4 g Fa PA ' l 1. 4 /M ;t L $ ; 11 e T 2 LC-y , - . , , I I I I La I L 2 0 E, w-1 * -if! 122" $ F>: * 72s -I woiz g r> 6" .. r ^N xl- ia 2, m ii g gg 9' fS $3 5: 3 f -i 2 2 23 3 r? z z e4.u bi gB nii 2, wr 2% IZ "-I F-3 4m ' 5 0 r ?

  11. Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger

    2013-07-01

    Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle Plates to the Baffle Former Plates. The FaST is designed to remove the Baffle Former Plates from the Core Barrel. The VRS further volume reduces segmented components using multiple configurations of the 38i and horizontal reciprocating saws. After the successful removal and volume reduction of the Internals, the RV will be segmented using a 'First in the US' thermal cutting process through a co-operative effort with Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH using their experience at the Stade NPP and Karlsruhe in Germany. SNS mobilized in the fall of 2011 to commence execution of the project in order to complete the RVI segmentation, removal and packaging activities for the first unit (Unit 2) by end of the 2012/beginning 2013 and then mobilize to the second unit, Unit 1. Parallel to the completion of the segmentation of the reactor vessel internals at Unit 1, SNS will segment the Unit 2 pressure vessel and at completion move to Unit 1. (authors)

  12. Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

    2006-01-01

    Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program. Emissions measurements were obtained over a variety of operating conditions. A kinetics model is formulated to describe the emissions performance. The model is a tool for determining the conditions for low emission performance. The flow field was also modeled using CFD. A first prototype was developed for low emission performance on natural gas. The design utilized the tools anchored to the atmospheric prototype performance. The 1/6 scale combustor was designed for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. A second prototype was developed to evaluate changes in the design approach. The prototype was developed at a 1/10 scale for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. The performance of the first two prototypes gave a strong indication of the best design approach. Review of the emission results led to the development of a 3rd prototype to further reduce the combustor emissions. The original plan to produce a scaled-up prototype was pushed out beyond the scope of the current program. The 3rd prototype was designed at 1/10 scale and targeted further reductions in the full-speed full-load emissions.

  13. WABASH RIVER COAL GASIFICATION REPOWERING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-09-01

    The close of 1999 marked the completion of the Demonstration Period of the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project. This Final Report summarizes the engineering and construction phases and details the learning experiences from the first four years of commercial operation that made up the Demonstration Period under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-92MC29310. This 262 MWe project is a joint venture of Global Energy Inc. (Global acquired Destec Energy's gasification assets from Dynegy in 1999) and PSI Energy, a part of Cinergy Corp. The Joint Venture was formed to participate in the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program and to demonstrate coal gasification repowering of an existing generating unit impacted by the Clean Air Act Amendments. The participants jointly developed, separately designed, constructed, own, and are now operating an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant, using Global Energy's E-Gas{trademark} technology (E-Gas{trademark} is the name given to the former Destec technology developed by Dow, Destec, and Dynegy). The E-Gas{trademark} process is integrated with a new General Electric 7FA combustion turbine generator and a heat recovery steam generator in the repowering of a 1950's-vintage Westinghouse steam turbine generator using some pre-existing coal handling facilities, interconnections, and other auxiliaries. The gasification facility utilizes local high sulfur coals (up to 5.9% sulfur) and produces synthetic gas (syngas), sulfur and slag by-products. The Project has the distinction of being the largest single train coal gasification combined-cycle plant in the Western Hemisphere and is the cleanest coal-fired plant of any type in the world. The Project was the first of the CCT integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) projects to achieve commercial operation.

  14. Sex ratio of the offspring of Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in utero and lactationally in a three-generation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowlands, J.C. [Dow Chemical Company, Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, 1803 Building, Midland, MI 48674 (United States); Budinsky, R.A. [Dow Chemical Company, Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, 1803 Building, Midland, MI 48674 (United States)]. E-mail: RABudinsky@dow.com; Aylward, L.L. [Summit Toxicology, L.L.P., 6343 Carolyn Drive, Falls Church, VA 22044 (United States); Faqi, A.S. [MPI Research, Department of Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology, 54943 N. Main Street, Mattawan, MI 49071 (United States); Carney, E.W. [Dow Chemical Company, Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, 1803 Building, Midland, MI 48674 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Reports of a decreased male/female sex ratio in children born to males exposed to TCDD in Seveso, Italy, at a young age have sparked examinations of this endpoint in other populations exposed to TCDD or related compounds. Overall, the male/female sex ratio results reported in these studies, with slightly different age-exposed male populations, have shown mixed results. Experimental studies of the effects of in utero exposure to TCDD in laboratory animals have reported no effect on the f{sub 1} sex ratio and mixed results for the sex ratio of the f{sub 2} generation. In order to better understand the potential effects of TCDD on second generation sex ratio, we retrieved archived data from a comprehensive three-generation feeding study of TCDD in rats that was conducted and published in the 1970s, but which did not publish data on sex ratio of the offspring [Murray, F.J., Smith, F.A., Nitschke, K.D., Humiston, C.G., Kociba, R.J., Schwetz, B.A., 1979. Three-generation reproduction study of rats given 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in the diet. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 50, 241-252]. A re-examination of the original Murray et al. data found no statistically significant treatment-related changes in postnatal day 1 sex ratio in any generation of treated animals, consistent with one other relatively large study reporting on this endpoint. We discuss mechanistic data underlying a potential effect of TCDD on this endpoint. We conclude that the inconsistency in findings on sex ratio of the offspring of male rats exposed to TCDD in utero is likely due to random variation associated with a relatively small sample size, although differences between studies in strain of rat, dose regimen, and day of ascertainment of sex ratio cannot be ruled out.

  15. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 75

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru; Singh, Balraj

    2013-08-15

    The experimental nuclear spectroscopic data for known nuclides of mass number 75 (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr) have been evaluated and presented together with Adopted properties for levels and ? rays. New high-spin data are available for {sup 75}Ga, and {sup 75}Rb; and lifetime data for high-spin states in {sup 75}Br and {sup 75}Kr. For ?J =1, M1+E2 transitions in two rotational bands in {sup 75}Kr, several B(E2)(W.u.) values are anomalously high, deviating by 2–3 ? values from currently accepted RUL(E2) = 300. In the opinion of the evaluators, there is need to remeasure level lifetimes and multipole mixing ratios in {sup 75}Kr to resolve this serious discrepancy. New precise single-particle transfer cross section data are available for {sup 75}Ga, {sup 75}Ge, {sup 75}As and {sup 75}Se from several different reactions (2009Ka06,2008Sc03); these data give information for occupancy of valence neutron orbitals in the ground states of target nuclides: {sup 76}Ge, {sup 76}Se and {sup 78}Se. No significant new data since the 1999 NDS for A = 75 have been reported for {sup 75}As and {sup 75}Se. No data are yet available for excited states in {sup 75}Co, {sup 75}Ni and {sup 75}Sr. For {sup 75}Fe, only the isotopic identification is made with one observed event. The radioactive decay schemes of {sup 75}Co and {sup 75}Ni are unknown while those for {sup 75}Rb and {sup 75}Sr are incomplete. This work supersedes the data presented in the previous NDS evaluation of A = 75 published by 1999Fa05.

  16. Improved DC Gun Insulator Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, R.; Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Surles-Law, K. E.L.

    2010-05-23

    Many user fa­cil­i­ties such as syn­chrotron ra­di­a­tion light sources and free elec­tron lasers re­quire ac­cel­er­at­ing struc­tures that sup­port elec­tric fields of 10-100 MV/m, es­pe­cial­ly at the start of the ac­cel­er­a­tor chain where ce­ram­ic in­su­la­tors are used for very high gra­di­ent DC guns. These in­su­la­tors are dif­fi­cult to man­u­fac­ture, re­quire long com­mis­sion­ing times, and often ex­hib­it poor re­li­a­bil­i­ty. Two tech­ni­cal ap­proach­es to solv­ing this prob­lem will be in­ves­ti­gat­ed. First­ly, in­vert­ed ce­ram­ics offer so­lu­tions for re­duced gra­di­ents be­tween the elec­trodes and ground. An in­vert­ed de­sign will be pre­sent­ed for 350 kV, with max­i­mum gra­di­ents in the range of 5-10 MV/m. Sec­ond­ly, novel ce­ram­ic man­u­fac­tur­ing pro­cess­es will be stud­ied, in order to pro­tect triple junc­tion lo­ca­tions from emis­sion, by ap­ply­ing a coat­ing with a bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty. The pro­cess­es for cre­at­ing this coat­ing will be op­ti­mized to pro­vide pro­tec­tion as well as be used to coat a ce­ram­ic with an ap­pro­pri­ate gra­di­ent in bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty from the vac­u­um side to the air side of an HV stand­off ce­ram­ic cylin­der. Ex­am­ple in­su­la­tor de­signs are being com­put­er mod­elled, and in­su­la­tor sam­ples are being man­u­fac­tured and test­ed

  17. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun, Ji Hyun

    2011-11-30

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

  18. OPERATIONAL AND COMPOSITIONAL FACTORS THAT AFFECT THE PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF ARP/MCU SALTSTONE GROUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Edwards, T.; Pickenheim, B.

    2012-02-15

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives low level waste (LLW) salt solution from Tank 50H for treatment and disposal. Tank 50H receives transfers from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, and the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT). At the SPF, the LLW is mixed with premix (a cementitious mixture of portland cement (PC), blast furnace slag (BFS) and Class F fly ash (FA)) in a Readco mixer to produce fresh (uncured) saltstone that is transferred to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. The saltstone formulation (mix design) must produce a grout waste form that meets both placement and performance properties. In previous simulated saltstone studies, multiple compositional factors were identified that drive the performance properties of saltstone made from the projected ARP/MCU salt solution. This composition was selected as salt solution simulant since ARP/MCU is the primary influent into Tank 50H. The primary performance property investigated was hydraulic conductivity since it is a variable input property to the saltstone Performance Assessment (PA) transport model. In addition, the porosity, also referred to as void structure, is another variable that impacts the PA response. In addition, Young's modulus and cured density are other performance properties analyzed in this report; however they are indicators of the performance of saltstone and not direct inputs into the PA. The data from previous studies showed that the largest impact on the performance properties of saltstone was due to curing temperature, followed by aluminate concentration in the salt solution, water to premix ratio and premix composition. However, due to the scope of the previous studies, only a few mixes were cured and analyzed at higher temperatures. The samples cured at 60 C had an increased hydraulic conductivity of approximately 600 times that of the sample cured at room temperature. The hydration reactions initiated during the mixing of the premix and salt solution continue during the curing period in the vaults to produce the hardened waste form product. The heat generated from exothermic hydration reactions results in a temperature increase in the vaults that depends on the composition of the decontaminated salt solution being dispositioned, the grout formulation (mix design) and the pour frequency and volume. This heat generation is a contributing factor to the temperature increase in the vaults that leads to an increased cure temperature for the grout. This report will further investigate the impact of curing temperature on saltstone performance properties (hydraulic conductivity, Young's modulus, porosity, etc.) over a range of aluminate concentration, water to premix (w/p) ratio and weight percent fly ash in the premix processed at the SPF. The three curing temperatures selected for this study were chosen to provide data at fixed cure temperatures that represent measured temperatures in the SDF vaults. This does not represent the conditions in the vault where the temperature of the saltstone is continually changing with time. For example, it may take several days for the saltstone to reach 60 C at a given elevation. Previous results demonstrated that the rates at which a selected curing temperature is reached affect the performance properties. The approach taken in this task, a rapid increase to the curing temperature, may be conservative with respect to decreased performance. Nevertheless, the data will provide a basis from which to determine the impact of curing temperature on saltstone performance as a function of key variables. A statistical evaluation of the results for these mixes will be performed to provide the range, and associated uncertainties, of hydraulic conductivity and other properties over this factor space.

  19. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melton, Elaina M.; Center for Cardiovascular Sciences, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY ; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of FATP2 resulted in increases in all four classes of phospholipid, indicating little selectivity. In the case of C22:6, there were significant increases of this exogenous fatty acids being trafficking into PC and PI. Collectively, these data support the conclusion that FATP2 has a dual function in the pathways linking the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids. We discuss the differential roles of FATP2 and its role in both fatty acid transport and fatty acid activation in the context of lipid homeostasis.

  20. Optimized performance for neutron interrogation to detect SNM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaughter, D R; Asztalos, S J; Biltoft, P J; Church, J A; Descalle, M; Hall, J M; Luu, T C; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; Norman, E B; Petersen, D C; Pruet, J A; Prussin, S G

    2007-02-14

    A program of simulations and validating experiments was utilized to evaluate a concept for neutron interrogation of commercial cargo containers that would reliably detect special nuclear material (SNM). The goals were to develop an interrogation system capable of detecting a 5 kg solid sphere of high-enriched uranium (HEU) even when deeply embedded in commercial cargo. Performance goals included a minimum detection probability, P{sub d} {ge} 95%, a maximum occurrence of false positive indications, P{sub fA} {le} 0.001, and maximum scan duration of t {le} 1 min. The conditions necessary to meet these goals were demonstrated in experimental measurements even when the SNM is deeply buried in any commercial cargo, and are projected to be met successfully in the most challenging cases of steel or hydrocarbons at areal density {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. Optimal performance was obtained with a collimated ({Delta}{Theta} = {+-} 15{sup o}) neutron beam at energy E{sub n} = 7 MeV produced by the D(d,n) reaction with the deuteron energy E{sub d} = 4 MeV. Two fission product signatures are utilized to uniquely identify SNM, including delayed neutrons detected in a large array of polyethylene moderated 3He proportional counters and high energy {beta}-delayed fission product {gamma}-radiation detected in a large array of 61 x 61 x 25 cm{sup 3} plastic scintillators. The latter detectors are nearly blind to normal terrestrial background radiation by setting an energy threshold on the detection at E{sub min} {ge} 3 MeV. Detection goals were attained with a low beam current (I{sub d} = 15-65 {micro}A) source up to {rho}L = 75 g/cm{sup 2} utilizing long irradiations, T = 30 sec, and long counting times, t = 30-100 sec. Projecting to a higher beam current, I{sub d} {ge} 600 {micro}A and larger detector array the detection and false alarm goals would be attained even with intervening cargo overburden as large as {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. The latter cargo thickness corresponds to 8 ft of hydrogenous or metallic cargo at the highest density allowed by the weight limit of the container. Simulations support the efficacy of this technique in the most challenging cases and experimental measurements are shown validating these predictions. Signal and background levels have been assessed and utilized to predict error rates due to false positive and false negative results. The laboratory system demonstrates the ability to detect HEU in amounts as small as m {ge} 250 g buried in the middle of a maximum density cargo and to do so with error rates that meet the goals given above. Higher beam current allows reliable SNM detection in shorter irradiation and/or counting times and with more challenging cargo threat scenarios.

  1. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Co-production Plant Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Haynes; Justin Brumberg; Venkatraman Iyer; Jonathan Janssen; Ben Lacy; Matt Mosbacher; Craig Russell; Ertan Yilmaz; Williams York; Willy Ziminsky; Tim Lieuwen; Suresh Menon; Jerry Seitzman; Ashok Anand; Patrick May

    2008-12-31

    Future high-efficiency, low-emission generation plants that produce electric power, transportation fuels, and/or chemicals from fossil fuel feed stocks require a new class of fuel-flexible combustors. In this program, a validated combustor approach was developed which enables single-digit NO{sub x} operation for a future generation plants with low-Btu off gas and allows the flexibility of process-independent backup with natural gas. This combustion technology overcomes the limitations of current syngas gas turbine combustion systems, which are designed on a site-by-site basis, and enable improved future co-generation plant designs. In this capacity, the fuel-flexible combustor enhances the efficiency and productivity of future co-production plants. In task 2, a summary of market requested fuel gas compositions was created and the syngas fuel space was characterized. Additionally, a technology matrix and chemical kinetic models were used to evaluate various combustion technologies and to select two combustor concepts. In task 4 systems analysis of a co-production plant in conjunction with chemical kinetic analysis was performed to determine the desired combustor operating conditions for the burner concepts. Task 5 discusses the experimental evaluation of three syngas capable combustor designs. The hybrid combustor, Prototype-1 utilized a diffusion flame approach for syngas fuels with a lean premixed swirl concept for natural gas fuels for both syngas and natural gas fuels at FA+e gas turbine conditions. The hybrid nozzle was sized to accommodate syngas fuels ranging from {approx}100 to 280 btu/scf and with a diffusion tip geometry optimized for Early Entry Co-generation Plant (EECP) fuel compositions. The swozzle concept utilized existing GE DLN design methodologies to eliminate flow separation and enhance fuel-air mixing. With changing business priorities, a fully premixed natural gas & syngas nozzle, Protoytpe-1N, was also developed later in the program. It did not have the diluent requirements of Prototype-1 and was demonstrated at targeted gas turbine conditions. The TVC combustor, Prototype-2, premixes the syngas with air for low emission performance. The combustor was designed for operation with syngas and no additional diluents. The combustor was successfully operated at targeted gas turbine conditions. Another goal of the program was to advance the status of development tools for syngas systems. In Task 3 a syngas flame evaluation facility was developed. Fundamental data on syngas flame speeds and flame strain were obtained at pressure for a wide range of syngas fuels with preheated air. Several promising reduced order kinetic mechanisms were compared with the results from the evaluation facility. The mechanism with the best agreement was selected for application to syngas combustor modeling studies in Task 6. Prototype-1 was modeled using an advanced LES combustion code. The tools and combustor technology development culminate in a full-scale demonstration of the most promising technology in Task 8. The combustor was operated at engine conditions and evaluated against the various engine performance requirements.

  2. Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashok K. Anand

    2005-12-16

    This study identifies vital gas turbine (GT) parameters and quantifies their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. The project analytically evaluates GE advanced F class air cooled technology level gas turbine conceptual cycle designs and determines their influence on IGCC plant level performance including impact of Carbon capture. This report summarizes the work accomplished in each of the following six Tasks. Task 1.0--Overall IGCC Plant Level Requirements Identification: Plant level requirements were identified, and compared with DOE's IGCC Goal of achieving 50% Net HHV Efficiency and $1000/KW by the Year 2008, through use of a Six Sigma Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) Tool. This analysis resulted in 7 GT System Level Parameters as the most significant. Task 2.0--Requirements Prioritization/Flow-Down to GT Subsystem Level: GT requirements were identified, analyzed and prioritized relative to achieving plant level goals, and compared with the flow down of power island goals through use of a Six Sigma QFD Tool. This analysis resulted in 11 GT Cycle Design Parameters being selected as the most significant. Task 3.0--IGCC Conceptual System Analysis: A Baseline IGCC Plant configuration was chosen, and an IGCC simulation analysis model was constructed, validated against published performance data and then optimized by including air extraction heat recovery and GE steam turbine model. Baseline IGCC based on GE 207FA+e gas turbine combined cycle has net HHV efficiency of 40.5% and net output nominally of 526 Megawatts at NOx emission level of 15 ppmvd{at}15% corrected O2. 18 advanced F technology GT cycle design options were developed to provide performance targets with increased output and/or efficiency with low NOx emissions. Task 4.0--Gas Turbine Cycle Options vs. Requirements Evaluation: Influence coefficients on 4 key IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

  3. Secondary Waste Form Down Selection Data Package – Ceramicrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-08-31

    As part of high-level waste pretreatment and immobilized low activity waste processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility. Currently, four waste forms are being considered for stabilization and solidification of the liquid secondary wastes. These waste forms are Cast Stone, Ceramicrete, DuraLith, and Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer. The preferred alternative will be down selected from these four waste forms. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing data packages to support the down selection process. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilization and solidification of the liquid secondary wastes. The information included will be based on information available in the open literature and from data obtained from testing currently underway. This data package is for the Ceramicrete waste form. Ceramicrete is a relatively new engineering material developed at Argonne National Laboratory to treat radioactive and hazardous waste streams (e.g., Wagh 2004; Wagh et al. 1999a, 2003; Singh et al. 2000). This cement-like waste form can be used to treat solids, liquids, and sludges by chemical immobilization, microencapsulation, and/or macroencapsulation. The Ceramicrete technology is based on chemical reaction between phosphate anions and metal cations to form a strong, dense, durable, low porosity matrix that immobilizes hazardous and radioactive contaminants as insoluble phosphates and microencapsulates insoluble radioactive components and other constituents that do not form phosphates. Ceramicrete is a type of phosphate-bonded ceramic, which are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics. The Ceramicrete binder is formed through an acid-base reaction between calcined magnesium oxide (MgO; a base) and potassium hydrogen phosphate (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}; an acid) in aqueous solution. The reaction product sets at room temperature to form a highly crystalline material. During the reaction, the hazardous and radioactive contaminants also react with KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} to form highly insoluble phosphates. In this data package, physical property and waste acceptance data for Ceramicrete waste forms fabricated with wastes having compositions that were similar to those expected for secondary waste effluents, as well as secondary waste effluent simulants from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant were reviewed. With the exception of one secondary waste form formulation (25FA+25 W+1B.A. fabricated with the mixed simulant did not meet the compressive strength requirement), all the Ceramicrete waste forms that were reviewed met or exceeded Integrated Disposal Facility waste acceptance criteria.

  4. Scale-Up of Palladium Powder Production Process for Use in the Tritium Facility at Westinghouse, Savannah River, SC/Summary of FY99-FY01 Results for the Preparation of Palladium Using the Sandia/LANL Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Baldwin; Daniel S. Zamzow; R. Dennis Vigil; Jesse T. Pikturna

    2001-08-24

    Palladium used at Savannah River (SR) for process tritium storage is currently obtained from a commercial source. In order to understand the processes involved in preparing this material, SR is supporting investigations into the chemical reactions used to synthesize this material. The material specifications are shown in Table 1. An improved understanding of the chemical processes should help to guarantee a continued reliable source of Pd in the future. As part of this evaluation, a work-for-others contract between Westinghouse Savannah River Company and Ames Laboratory (AL) was initiated. During FY98, the process for producing Pd powder developed in 1986 by Dan Grove of Mound Applied Technologies, USDOE (the Mound muddy water process) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in morphology in the final product. During FY99 and FY00, the process for producing Pd powder that has been used previously at Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories (the Sandia/LANL process) was studied to understand the processing conditions that lead to changes in the morphology of the final Pd product. During FY01, scale-up of the process to batch sizes greater than 600 grams of Pd using a 20-gallon Pfaudler reactor was conducted by the Iowa State University (ISU) Chemical Engineering Department. This report summarizes the results of FY99-FY01 Pd processing work done at AL and ISU using the Sandia/LANL process. In the Sandia/LANL process, Pd is dissolved in a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids. A number of chemical processing steps are performed to yield an intermediate species, diamminedichloropalladium (Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, or DADC-Pd), which is isolated. In the final step of the process, the Pd(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} intermediate is subsequently redissolved, and Pd is precipitated by the addition of a reducing agent (RA) mixture of formic acid and sodium formate. It is at this point that the morphology of the Pd product is determined. During FY99 and FY00, a study of how the characteristics of the Pd are affected by changes in processing conditions including the RA/Pd molar ratio, Pd concentration, mole fraction of formic acid (mf-FA) in the RA solution, reaction temperature, and mixing was performed. These parameters all had significant effects on the resulting values of the tap density (TD), BET surface area (SA), and Microtrac particle size (PS) distribution for the Pd samples. These effects were statistically modeled and fit in order to determine ranges of predicted experimental conditions that resulted in material that meets the requirements for the Pd powder to be used at SR. Although not statistically modeled, the method and rate of addition of the RA and the method and duration of stirring were shown to be significant factors affecting the product morphology. Instead of producing an additional statistical fit and due to the likely changes anticipated during scale-up of this processing procedure, these latter conditions were incorporated into a reproducible practical method of synthesis. Palladium powder that met the SR specifications for TD, BET SA, and Microtrac PS was reliably produced at batch sizes ranging from 25-100 grams. In FY01, scale-up of the Sandia/LANL process was investigated by the ISU Chemical Engineering Department for the production of 600-gram batches of Pd. Palladium that meets the SR specifications for TD, BET SA, and Microtrac PS has been produced using the Pfaudler reactor, and additional processing batches will be done during the remainder of FY01 to investigate the range of conditions that can be used to produce Pd powder within specifications. Palladium product samples were analyzed at AL and SR to determine TD and at SR to determine BET SA, Microtrac PS distribution, and Pd nodule size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  5. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and viscoelastic behavior as functions of pH; shear rate; polymer concentration; salinity, including divalent ion effects; polymer molecular weight; and degree of hydrolysis. A comprehensive rheological model was developed for HPAM solution rheology in terms of: shear rate; pH; polymer concentration; and salinity, so that the spatial and temporal changes in viscosity during the polymer flow in the reservoir can be accurately modeled. A series of acid coreflood experiments were conducted to understand the geochemical reactions relevant for both the near-wellbore injection profile control and for conformance control applications. These experiments showed that the use hydrochloric acid as a pre-flush is not viable because of the high reaction rate with the rock. The use of citric acid as a pre-flush was found to be quite effective. This weak acid has a slow rate of reaction with the rock and can buffer the pH to below 3.5 for extended periods of time. With the citric acid pre-flush the polymer could be efficiently propagated through the core in a low pH environment i.e. at a low viscosity. The transport of various HPAM solutions was studied in sandstones, in terms of permeability reduction, mobility reduction, adsorption and inaccessible pore volume with different process variables: injection pH, polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight, salinity, degree of hydrolysis, and flow rate. Measurements of polymer effluent profiles and tracer tests show that the polymer retention increases at the lower pH. A new simulation capability to model the deep-penetrating mobility control or conformance control using pH-sensitive polymer was developed. The core flood acid injection experiments were history matched to estimate geochemical reaction rates. Preliminary scale-up simulations employing linear and radial geometry floods in 2-layer reservoir models were conducted. It is clearly shown that the injection rate of pH-sensitive polymer solutions can be significantly increased by injecting it at a pH below 3.5 (at a fixed bottom-hole pressure). This improvement in injectivity by a fa

  6. Final report : phase I investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-05

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of state-wide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently owned and occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]), described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the default target level (DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). (The DTL is defined in Section 4.) Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A phased approach is being employed by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the study can be used most effectively to guide subsequent aspects of the program. This report presents the technical findings of Phase I of Argonne's studies. The Phase I investigation was undertaken in accord with the final site-specific Phase I Work Plan for Savannah (Argonne 2007), as well as with the Master Work Plan (MWPK) for CCC/USDAArgonne operations in the state of Kansas (Argonne 2002), which the MoDNR reviewed and approved (with minor revisions) for temporary use in Missouri to facilitate the start-up of the CCC/USDA's activities at Savannah. (Argonne is developing a similar Master Work Plan for operations in Missouri that is based on the existing MWPK, with the approval of the MoDNR. The Missouri document has not been finalized, however, at this time.) The site-specific Savannah Work Plan (Argonne 2007; approved by the MoDNR [2007a]) (1) summarized the pre-existing knowledge base for the Savannah investigation site compiled by Argonne and (2) described the site-specific technical objectives and the intended scope of work developed for this phase of the investigation. Four primary technical objectives were identified for the Phase I studies, as follows: (1) Update the previous (MoDNR 2000a,b) inventory and status of private wells in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility, and sample the identified wells for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and geochemical constituents. (2) Investigate for possible evidence of a soil source of carbon tetrachloride contamination to groundwater beneath the former CCC/USDA fa

  7. Worksheet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","TRANSLINE_NO","TERMINAL_LOC_FROM","TERMINAL_LOC_TO","PERCENT_OWNED","LINE_LENGTH","LINE_TYPE","VOLTAGE_TYPE","VOLTAGE_OPERATING","VOLTAGE_DESIGN","CONDUCTOR_SIZE","CONDUCTOR_MAT_TYPE","CONDUCTOR_CONFIG","CIRCUIT_PERSTRUCT_PRES","CIRCUIT_PERSTRUCT_ULT","POLE_TOWER_TYPE","RATED_CAPACITY","LAND_LANDRIGHT_COSTS","POLE_TOWER_FIXTURE_COSTS","CONDUCTOR_DEVICE_COSTS","CONSTRUCTION_ETC_COSTS","TOTAL_LINE_COSTS","IN_SERVICE_DATE" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",1,"Northland","Magnesium Plant",100,4.11,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR Drake/ACSS Rail","Single",1,2,"Steel & Wood Poles",215,0,17500,8000,19500,45000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",2,"Grove","Met Center",100,3.1,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ASCR Drake","Double",1,1,"Steel Pole",430,0,30000,10000,35000,75000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",3,"Dessau","Daffin Gin",100,6.01,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ASCR Drake","Single",1,1,"Steel Pole",215,0,60000,15000,40000,115000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",4,"Burleson","AMD",100,2.2,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACR Drake","Double",2,2,"Steel Pole",430,0,75000,55000,120000,250000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",5,"Bergstrom","Kingsberry",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ASCR Drake/AAAC","Single",1,2,"Steel & Wood Poles",215,0,75000,35000,340000,450000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",6,"Mcneil","Magnesium Plant",100,3.24,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR Drake","Double",1,2,"Steel Pole & Steel Tower",430,0,380000,76000,644000,1100000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1015,"Austin City of",7,"Summit","Magnesium Plant",100,2.18,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR Drake","Double",1,2,"Steel Pole & Steel Tower",430,0,265000,125000,410000,800000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1307,"Basin Electric Power Coop",1,"Rapid City","New Underwood",65,18.55,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Single Pole, Steel",460,0,0,0,5300000,5300000,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,1586,"Bentonville City of",1,"AEP/SWEPCO","City Substation F",100,1,"OH","AC",161,161,477,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood and Steel Single Pole",199,18000,81522,28082,214516,342120,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,2172,"Brazos Electric Power Coop",1,"Coppell","Lewisville",100,7.03,"OH","AC",138,138,1033,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Concrete/Steel Single Pole",485,17577.55,2527717,537265.96,956475.39,4039035.9,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,2172,"Brazos Electric Power Coop",2,"Boyd","Newark",100,1.8,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",2,2,"Concrete/Steel Single Pole",215,133929.08,538282.3,131112.75,246577.6,1049901.73,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,2172,"Brazos Electric Power Coop",3,"Cedar Hill","Sardis",100,5.1,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Concrete Si ngle Ploe",215,24515.26,652910.22,246676.96,560582.43,1484684.87,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,5580,"East Kentucky Power Coop Inc",1,"Jamestown Tap","Jamestown Tap",100,0.47,"OH","AC",161,161,556.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Single Pole",292,43326,160508,68789,0,272623,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,5580,"East Kentucky Power Coop Inc",2,"Pulaski Co. Tap","Pulaski Co. Tap",100,5.88,"OH","AC",161,161,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood H-Frame Structure",367,494183,1092462,468198,0,2054843,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,7197,"Georgia Transmission Corp",1,"Shoal Creek","Spout Spring",100,10.83,"OH","AC",230,230,1351,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Concrete, Single Pole & Steel",602,1277945,1685271,444690,6047603,9455509,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,7197,"Georgia Transmission Corp",2,"Dresden","Yellowdirt",100,9.5,"OH","AC",230,230,795,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Concrete, Single Pole",866,870826,772876,375515,3649376,5668593,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,7197,"Georgia Transmission Corp",3,"East Moultrie","West Valdosta",100,38.46,"OH","AC",230,230,1622,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Concrete, Single Pole",596,1191168,2829632,1476802,10279078,15776680,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,7490,"Grand River Dam Authority",1,"Cowskin","Grove PSO",100,4.5,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single/Twisted",1,1,"Wood Pole",223,287671,135402,156769,880890,1460732,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",1,"BASTROP","AUSTIN",100,0.32,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,9155828,155817297,37044659,47228709,249246493,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",2,"BASTROP","AUSTROP",100,0.32,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",3,"BASTROP","AUSTROP",100,0.32,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",4,"BASTROP","AUSTROP",100,0.32,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",5,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",6,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",7,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",8,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",9,"CANYON","SAN MARCOS/LOCKHART",100,0.31,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",10,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",11,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",12,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",13,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",14,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",15,"CICO","HELOTES",100,4,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",16,"LOCKHART","DUMP HILL",100,1.6,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Concrete Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",17,"HILL POWER STATION","NUECES BAY",100,17.3,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",18,"NORTH OAK PARK","LON HILL",100,14.9,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Wood Pole",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",19,"STATE HIGHTWAY 80",,100,0.38,"OH","AC",138,138,211.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood H-Frame Structure",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",20,"STATE HIGHWAY 80",,100,0.38,"OH","AC",138,138,211.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood H-Frame Structure",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",21,"STERLING/MITCHELL LINE","TWINN BUTTES",100,135.08,"OH","AC",345,345,1590,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",22,"VERDE CREEK","KERRVILLE STADIUM",100,0.1,"OH","AC",138,138,336,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",23,"VERDE CREEK","KERRVILLE STADIUM",100,0.1,"OH","AC",138,138,336,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",24,"VERDE CREEK","KERRVILLE STADIUM",100,0.1,"OH","AC",138,138,336,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",25,"VERDE CREEK","KERRVILLE STADIUM",100,0.1,"OH","AC",138,138,336,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",26,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",27,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",28,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",29,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",30,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,11269,"Lower Colorado River Authority",31,"ZORN","MCCARTY LANE",100,4.2,"OH","AC",138,138,1433.6,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,15143,"Platte River Power Authority",1,"Rawhide","Timberline West",100,31.63,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ACSR","Single",2,2,"Steel/Tower & Pole",378,5553,1928767,2385430,251850,4571600,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,15159,"Plymouth City of",1,"Mullet River Sub","Sub # 1",100,0.8,"OH","AC",138,138,336.4,"ACSR","SINGLE",1,1,"Steel Double Pole",33,0,0,0,1492139,1492139,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,16534,"Sacramento Municipal Util Dist",1,"Natomas","Elverta",100,4.3,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"Aluminum","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",316,0,0,0,0,0,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,17543,"South Carolina Pub Serv Auth",1,"Rainey - Anderson (Duke) #1","Rainey - Anderson (Duke) #1",100,9.51,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ACSR","Double",2,2,"Steel / Tower",956,840152,1230361,1207282,22364,3300159,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,17543,"South Carolina Pub Serv Auth",2,"Rainey - Anderson (Duke) #2","Rainey - Anderson (Duke) #2",100,9.51,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ACSR","Double",2,2,"Steel / Tower",956,840152,1230361,1207282,22364,3300159,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",1,"West Ringgold","Center Point",100,7.94,"OH","AC",115,230,954,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,2086252,5658529,1502763,3053959,12301503,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",2,"NE Johnson City--Erwin 161kV T","Jonesborough 161 kV SS",100,0.28,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,11050,191917,894933,714987,1812887,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",3,"Elizabethton","Pandara-Shouns",100,15.12,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,282232,1797686,537733,2057572,4675223,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",4,"Sullivan","Blountville",100,0.63,"OH","AC",161,161,1590,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,547521,1134556,788061,1224067,3694205,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",5,"Pin Hook","Structure E 104A (NES)",100,1.74,"OH","DC",161,161,2034.5,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,179775,881877,641976,270782,1974410,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",6,"Dug Gap 115 kV SS","Center Point 230 kV SS",100,4.49,"OH","AC",115,230,954,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,3939251,3451555,545558,1026021,8962385,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",7,"Chickamauga-Ridgedale","Hawthorne 161 kV SS",100,2.82,"OH","AC",161,161,1590,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,87206,533582,342640,584799,1548227,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",8,"Ft. Loudoun-Elza 161 kV TL","Spallation Neutron Source 161",100,3.92,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,2972,639541,373150,469765,1485428,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",9,"Leake","Sebastapol SW STA 161 kV",100,0.77,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,36158,236368,103374,167311,543211,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",10,"Sebasatpol 161 kV Switching St","Five Point 161 kV Substation",100,0.13,"OH","AC",161,230,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,917304,1772761,931352,1477668,5099085,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",11,"Structure 170A","Structure 174",100,0.73,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,0,445863,79638,194574,720075,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",12,"Ramer-Hickory Valley 161 kV TL","Middleton 46 kV SS",100,6.81,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,566805,1162854,447607,787813,2965079,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",13,"Lowndes-Miller","Valley View",100,0.46,"OH","AC",500,500,954,"ASCR","Triple",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,688737,255237,341129,1285103,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",14,"Sweetwater 161 kV SS","Madisonville 161 kV SS",100,8.95,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,1066219,1474937,466681,797814,3805651,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",15,"East Point 500 kV SS","Hanceville 161 kV TL",100,11.25,"OH","AC",161,161,1351.5,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,1416513,1442382,606534,1427424,4892853,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",16,"W Cookeville-Crossville 161 kV","W. Crossville SS",100,4.37,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,267463,1112667,651963,964407,2996500,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",17,"East Shelbyville-Unionville","Deason 161 kV SS",100,5.09,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,1071199,931797,430714,320721,2754431,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",18,"Kentucky Hydro","Barkley Hydro",100,2,"OH","AC",161,161,2034.5,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,2845,406947,90111,155401,655304,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",19,"MEC Sw Station","Trinity Substation",100,2.9,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ACSS","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,0,604526,474640,608702,1687868,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",20,"Hickory Valley Selmer 161 kV T","North Selmer 161 kV SS",100,4.88,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,357578,632244,368993,899046,2257861,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",21,"Trinity","Morgan Energy Center",100,2.98,"OH","AC",161,161,1590,"ASCR","Single",2,2,"Steel Tower",,7155,647789,386671,513831,1555446,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",22,"MEC","Finley",100,0.61,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,9879,303540,156165,181613,651197,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",23,"Pickwick-South Jackson","Magic Valley",100,1.38,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Pole",,78377,284367,113237,237716,713697,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",24,"Wolf Creek-Choctaw 500 kV TL","Reliant French Camp Gener Plt",100,0.11,"OH","AC",500,500,954,"ASCR","Triple",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,863770,411493,891161,2166424,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",25,"Widows Creek Ft. Payne 161 kV","Flat Rock 161 kV SS",100,2.05,"OH","AC",161,161,397.5,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,130460,443384,182965,410228,1167037,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",26,"Volunteer-Cherokee HP 161 kV T","Oakland 161 kV SS",100,0.5,"OH","AC",161,161,1351,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,159020,71787,133784,364591,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",27,"Cordell-Hull-Carthage 161 kV","South Carthage 161 kV SS",100,1.68,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,209664,102390,256537,568591,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",1,"Arco","Sprectrum",100,5.89,"OH","AC",138,138,336.4,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",91,37547.56,399750.8,416067.16,0,853365.52,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",2,"Hazel Dell Jct","Hazel Dell",100,3.12,"OH","AC",138,138,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",158,72967.09,417464.37,285659.16,0,776090.62,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",3,"Red River","Tenaska Kiowa Sw",100,75.75,"OH","AC",345,345,795,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Combination Pole",158,0,0,0,47569327.23,47569327.23,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",4,"Washita Sw","Blue Canyon",100,23.96,"OH","AC",138,138,1590,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",239,0,0,0,5092171.22,5092171.22,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",5,"Limestone Jct","Limestone",100,0.5,"OH","AC",138,138,336.4,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"Wood Pole",91,25673.08,159253.08,77468.07,0,262394.23,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",6,"OGE Sunset Jct","Sunset Corner",100,0.15,"OH","AC",161,161,336.4,"ACSR","Singel",1,1,"Wood Pole",91,0,29315.87,35224.01,0,64539.88,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",1,"Shiprock","Four Corners",100,8.2,"OH","AC",345,345,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",2,"Coolidge","Sundance 1 and 2",100,9.8,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,2,2,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",3,"Structure 96/4","O/Banion 1",100,38,"OH","AC",230,230,,"ASCR",,2,2,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",4,"Mead","Market Place",100,12.9,"OH","AC",525,525,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",5,"Bears Ears","Craig",100,1,"OH","AC",345,345,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",6,"Glen Canyon Pumping Plant","Glen Canyon SW Yard",100,1,"OH","AC",345,345,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",7,"Baker","Bowman",22.96,53.96,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,1,1,"Wood H",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",8,"Basin Tap #2","Washburn",100,2.23,"OH","AC",230,230,795,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",9,"Craig","Rifle",100,96,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",10,"Garrison","Basin Tap #1",100,20.97,"OH","AC",230,230,795,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",11,"Everta","Roseville",100,13.3,"OH","AC",230,230,,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",12,"Griffith","McConnico",100,8,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",13,"McConnico","Peacock",100,29.4,"OH","AC",230,230,795,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",14,"Liberty","Buckeye",100,6.7,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ASCR",,2,2,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",15,"Liberty","Parker",100,118.7,"OH","AC",230,230,1272,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",16,"Liberty","Estrella",100,10.8,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,2,2,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",17,"Liberty","Lone Batte",100,38.2,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",18,"Lone Butte","Sundance",100,38.4,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",19,"New Waddell","West Wing",100,10.1,"OH","AC",230,230,954,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",20,"South Point","Topock #1",100,6.46,"OH","AC",230,230,1590,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0 2003,27000,"Western Area Power Admin",21,"South Point","Topock #2",100,6.34,"OH","AC",230,230,1590,"ASCR",,1,1,"Steel Lattice",,0,0,0,0,0