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Sample records for fa ult sawteeth

  1. Sawteeth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sawteeth and energy confinement in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch B. E. Chapman, a) A. F. Almagri, M. Cekic, D. J. Den Hartog, S. C. Prager, and J. S. Sarff University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 23 October 1995; accepted 6 December 1995͒ Most Madison Symmetric Torus ͑MST͒ ͓Fusion Technol. 19, 131 ͑1991͔͒ reversed-field pinch discharges exhibit sawtooth oscillations with a period of 2-5 ms,

  2. Development of magnetohydrodynamic modes during sawteeth in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientficas y Tcnicas , Bariloche ; Garca-Martnez, P. L.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2013-07-15

    A dynamical analysis applied to a reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics model is shown to explain the chronology of the nonlinear destabilization of modes observed in tokamak sawteeth. A special emphasis is put on the nonlinear self-consistent perturbation of the axisymmetric m = n = 0 mode that manifests through the q-profile evolution. For the very low fusion-relevant resistivity values, the q-profile is shown to remain almost unchanged on the early nonlinear timescale within the central tokamak region, which supports a partial reconnection scenario. Within the resistive region, indications for a local flattening or even a local reversed-shear of the q-profile are given. The impact of this ingredient in the occurrence of the sawtooth crash is discussed.

  3. Theory of discrete dynamo activity in laboratory plasmas: RFP sawteeth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegna, C.C.; Prager, S.C.; Gimblett, C.G.

    1996-12-31

    Reversed field pinch experiments (RFP) exhibit relaxation phenomena which sustain the magnetic configuration longer than electrical resistivity should allow. This effect is due to the NMD dynamo. An interesting feature of the dynamo is that the relaxations often occur in a discrete and nearly periodic sawtoothing fashion. Unlike the tokamak sawtooth where a single Fourier harmonic is believed to play a central role in the sawtooth dynamics, RFP sawteeth are characterized by a set of tearing instabilities which play the essential role in the MHD dynamo. A theoretical explanation of the discrete dynamo is presented which is based upon a description of the RFP dynamics as a low order dynamical system. The calculation accounts for the evolution of the equilibrium that is affected by applied electrical fields, diffusion processes and the MHD dynamo, as well as a dynamical description of the MHD dynamo which is determined from the behavior of the tearing instabilities and the properties of the equilibrium. The system can be reduced to two ordinary differential equations for the averaged current gradient, which measures the degree of plasma relaxation, and the dynamo amplitude. The dynamical system exhibit a predator-prey type periodic limit cycle, which is characterized by a slow current peaking phase followed by a rapid crash. The sawtooth amplitude and period are predicted to increase with Lundquist number and plasma current, features which are in qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  4. Off-axis sawteeth and double-tearing reconnection in reversed magnetic shear plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Z.; Park, W.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    1996-06-01

    Off-axis sawteeth are often observed in reversed magnetic shear plasmas when the minimum safety factor q is near or below 2. Fluctuations with m/n = 2/1 (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers) appear before and after the crashes. Detailed comparison has been made between the measured T{sub e} profile evolution during the crash and a nonlinear numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. The good agreement between the observation and simulation indicates that the off-axis sawteeth are due to a double-tearing magnetic reconnection process.

  5. FA Technology Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FA Technology Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FA Technology Ventures Name: FA Technology Ventures Address: 677 Broadway Place: Albany, New York Zip: 12207 Region:...

  6. FA Technology Ventures (Boston) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ventures (Boston) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FA Technology Ventures (Boston) Name: FA Technology Ventures (Boston) Address: 100 High Street, Suite 1105 Place: Boston,...

  7. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Wang, Feng [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  8. Zonal flow sawteeth and the time period between edge-localized transport bursts in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2007-01-15

    The time period between particle and energy transport bursts in simulations of tokamak edge turbulence is determined by the magnitude of the diamagnetic drift parameter {alpha}{sub d}{identical_to}{omega}{sub *}/{gamma}{sub 0}, where the diamagnetic drift frequency {omega}{sub *}={rho}{sub s}c{sub s}/L{sub 0}L{sub n} and the characteristic ballooning mode growth rate {gamma}{sub 0}=c{sub s}/(RL{sub n}/2){sup 1/2}. Here, R is the major radius of the torus, L{sub n} is the density gradient scale length, {rho}{sub s} is the ion gyroradius, and c{sub s} is the ion acoustic speed. The scale length L{sub 0} is given by L{sub 0}=2{pi}qR {nu}{sub ei}{rho}{sub s}/2{omega}{sub e}R){sup 1/2}(2R/L{sub n}){sup 1/4}, where q is the safety factor, {nu}{sub ei} is the electron-ion collision frequency, and {omega}{sub e} is the electron cyclotron frequency. When the diamagnetic drift frequency becomes larger than the ballooning mode growth rate ({alpha}{sub d}>1), then the transport in the tokamak edge is characterized by regularly recurring bursts of particles and energy with a single well-defined frequency. As {alpha}{sub d} increases above unity, the time period between the bursts becomes much longer. The temporal dependence of the energy in the zonal flow generated nonlinearly has the appearance of sawteeth.

  9. Feng Fa Science and Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Feng Fa Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Feng Fa Science and Technology Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Sector: Wind energy Product: A VCPE...

  10. FA 4: Crosscutting Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4: Crosscutting Research Focus Area 4 - Lograsso, Schwegler CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 4 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 4 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview CMI org chart for FA4 File: Read more about CMI org chart for FA4 CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) Critical Materials Institute

  11. MAN or FA from n-butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Cio, A.; Verde, L.

    1985-08-01

    Unsaturated polyester resins were first produced mostly from fumaric acid (FA) rather than from maleic anhydride (MAN). This is perfectly understandable if we consider that, using fumaric acid as raw material, polycondensates with a more homogeneous (less branched) structure are obtained, thus producing resins characterized by a more uniform and reproducible chemical and mechanical properties. Presently, for economical reasons, fumaric acid is used marginally as a MAN substitute in the production of polyester resins. These resins account for a major share (50%) of the overall MAN consumption in the U.S. and in Western Europe.

  12. Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc (453.3 KB) More Documents & Publications Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token

  13. Performance evaluation of a low-temperature solar Rankine cycle system utilizing R245fa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.D.; Zhao, L.; Wang, J.L.; Zhang, W.Z.; Zhao, X.Z.; Wu, W.

    2010-03-15

    A low-temperature solar Rankine system utilizing R245fa as the working fluid is proposed and an experimental system is designed, constructed and tested. Both the evacuated solar collectors and the flat plate solar collectors are used in the experimental system; meanwhile, a rolling-piston R245fa expander is also mounted in the system. The new designed R245fa expander works stably in the experiment, with an average expansion power output of 1.73 kW and an average isentropic efficiency of 45.2%. The overall power generation efficiency estimated is 4.2%, when the evacuated solar collector is utilized in the system, and with the condition of flat plate solar collector, it is about 3.2%. The experimental results show that using R245fa as working fluid in the low-temperature solar power Rankine cycle system is feasible and the performance is acceptable. (author)

  14. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  16. Data:E8614377-f336-4354-9782-e7fa153c3873 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9782-e7fa153c3873 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  17. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore » large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.« less

  18. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  19. Data:Ae3cd3b5-369c-4ef5-a089-9be6f92e16fa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ef5-a089-9be6f92e16fa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  20. Data:9203c91f-7d51-486f-a398-add8a8014cd6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    f-a398-add8a8014cd6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  1. Data:873baff3-174f-491f-a4c4-7c1d016cc484 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    baff3-174f-491f-a4c4-7c1d016cc484 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1....

  2. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the master control elements of far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-11-25

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches tha tare strongly enriched in far-redlight (FRL; λ > 700nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRLphotoacclimation(FaRLiP).During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS)I, PSII,and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d.Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB,and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203.The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorb FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, in appropriately synthesized Chl d in white light,and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response.

  3. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the master control elements of far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-11-25

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches tha tare strongly enriched in far-redlight (FRL; λ > 700nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRLphotoacclimation(FaRLiP).During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS)I, PSII,and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d.Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB,and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203.The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorbmore » FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, in appropriately synthesized Chl d in white light,and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response.« less

  4. Perspective and current status on fuel cycle system of fast reactor cycle Technology development (FaCT) project in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funasaka, Hideyuki; Itoh, Masanori

    2007-07-01

    FaCT Project taking over from Feasibility Study on Commercialized FR cycle system (FS) has been launched in 2006 by Japanese joint team with the participation of all parties concerned in Japan. Combination system of (the sodium-cooled reactor,) the advanced aqueous reprocessing system and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication (MOX fuel) is evaluated as the most promising fuel cycle system concept so that it has potential conformity to the design requirements, as well as a high level of technical feasibility as the final report of Phase II in FS. Current status and R and D prospects for this combination system of the advanced aqueous reprocessing system and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication (MOX fuel) system until around 2015 have been studied. Then, it is anticipated that in FR reprocessing commercial facility will start to operate around same time that in LWR reprocessing subsequent plant will be required to replace Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (provided that life time 40 years) around 2050. From the view point of the smooth transition from LWRs to FRs in approximately the year 2050 and beyond in Japan, some issues on fuel cycle have been also discussed. (authors)

  5. Data:B831a092-b2f7-4f35-957e-d1fa374af3a8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    f35-957e-d1fa374af3a8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  6. Experience in the commercial operation of the pilot asynchronized turbogenerator T3FA-110 at cogeneration plant-22 (TETs-22) of the Mosenergo Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinakov, V. E.; Chernyshev, E. V.; Kuzin, G. A.; Voronov, V. K.; Labunets, I. A.

    2006-01-15

    Results of commercial operation of a world pioneer asynchronized turbogenerator T3FA-110 with a capacity of 11 MW and full air cooling at a cogeneration plant are presented. The turbogenerator developed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Elektrosila Company differs from traditional synchronous generators by the presence on the rotor of two mutually orthogonal windings, a two-channel reverse thyristor excitation system, and a special control system. The special features of design and control allow such generators to operate in the modes of both production and high consumption of reactive power at normal static and dynamic stability. This widens the range of regulation of the voltage level in the connected electric network and makes it possible to bring parallel-connected synchronous generators to optimum operation conditions. The generator can work without excitation for a long time at 70% load. Commercial operation of the pilot T3FA-110 turbogenerator started in December 2003 at TETs-22 of the Mosenergo Company and has proved its full correspondence to the design engineering parameters. A program of wide use of such turbogenerators in the United Power System of Russia (RAO 'EES Rossii' Co.) has been developed.

  7. Data:Fa413ec1-68e5-4f5e-a367-f60cd2d56c38 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fa413ec1-68e5-4f5e-a367-f60cd2d56c38 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  8. Microsoft Word - best-fa.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leading to failure. Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004 9 Solution and Implementation Many solutions were investigated and...

  9. FA 1: Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Diversifying Supply Focus Area 1 - Moyer, Herbst CMI pilot-scale separations test bed (image) File: Read more about CMI pilot-scale separations test bed (image) CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 1 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 1 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks

  10. FA 2: Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2: Developing Substitutes Focus Area 2 - Schwatrz, Sales U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file August 29, 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file August 29, 2016 U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file August 8, 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file August 8, 2016 U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file June 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S.

  11. 2014-04-23 Michigan FA CVT Posting.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  12. FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Area 3 - Peterson, Jones Electronic Waste: DOD is Recovering Materials but Several ... Read more about Electronic Waste: DOD is Recovering Materials but Several Factors May ...

  13. Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature Laboratory Freezers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Ultra-low temperature laboratory freezers (ULTs) are some of the most energy-intensive pieces of equipment in a scientific research laboratory, yet there are several barriers to user acceptance and adoption of high-efficiency ULTs. One significant barrier is a relative lack of information on ULT efficiency to help purchasers make informed decisions with respect to efficient products.

  14. http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=9182fa

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AUTOMOBILE AVERAGE FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS Section Contents 531.1 Scope. 531.2 Purpose. 531.3 Applicability. 531.4 Definitions. 531.5 Fuel economy standards. ...

  15. https://empcs.nv.doe.gov/emis2/fa/pg/FFACO.Obligations_Commitments...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The NDEP will provide comments regarding issues on the CAU 98 CAIP and on the Nye County drilling program. Ongoing: Comments on the CAIP were received in a letter dated April 2,...

  16. RETRAN-02 comparison of natural circulation flow rates at Babcock and Wilcox 177-FA plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, N.T.

    1985-07-01

    A very important aspect of nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) model development is the process of comparing the computer model results against actual plant responses. Good comparisons will qualify the computer model for specific engineering analyses. Flow rates and decay heat power levels were obtained from planned and unplanned natural circulation events that occurred at Arkansas Nuclear One, Crystal River, Davis-Besse, and Oconee nuclear power plants. A oneloop RETRAN model of the Oconee NSSS is used to attain a spectrum of steady-state equilibrium conditions at different power levels of 25, 50, 75, and 100 MW. The benchmark comparisons are respectable. The comparisons also illustrate the ability of the Babcock and Wilcox raised-loop plant to induce a greater natural circulation flow rate.

  17. Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Workplace logon screen will prompt you only for your Windows User name and Password. ... see a prompt for your Windows User PASSWORD. There are various situations that cause ...

  18. Microsoft Word - FFLF Wind Project EA 11 Feb 2010 rev4 FINAL FA.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    37 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE'S PROPOSED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PENNSYLVANIA FOR FREY FARM LANDFILL WIND ENERGY PROJECT MANOR TOWNSHIP LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory February 2010 DOE/EA-1737 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE'S PROPOSED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PENNSYLVANIA FOR FREY FARM LANDFILL WIND ENERGY PROJECT MANOR TOWNSHIP LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory February

  19. Jefferson Lab, a forefront U.S. Department of Energy nuclear physics research fa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab, a forefront U.S. Department of Energy nuclear physics research facility, provides world- class, unique research capabilities and innovative technologies to serve an international scientific user community. Specifically, the laboratory's mission is to: * deliver discovery-caliber research by exploring the atomic nucleus and its fundamental constituents, including precise tests of their interactions; * apply advanced particle accelerator, detector and other technologies to develop new basic

  20. Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Citrix2FAAuthentication1232009.doc Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Microsoft Word - SMailSecureWeb-BasedEmailv3 ...

  1. Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    low temperature laboratory freezers (ULTs) are some of the most energy-intensive pieces of equipment in a scientific research laboratory, yet there are several barriers to user...

  2. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Areas FA 1: Diversifying Supply FA 2: Developing Substitutes FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling FA 4: Crosscutting Research

  3. Using PHP format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sawteeth, and the energy and particle confinement. Current is driven in the edge by electrostatic current sources. ... gradients in the normalized current density, (J"BB 2 ). ...

  4. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and Young's mod ant within the August 30, ble 1) require nal strength o m the ratio o fault plane (F ult from the nd generate of Rangely oi pore fluid ch dulus and Pois e model. ...

  5. Fluctuation and transport reduction in a reversed field pinch by inductive poloidal current drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarff, J.S.; Hokin, S.A.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    An auxilliay poloidal inductive electric field applied to a reversed field pinch plasma reduces the current density gradient, slows the growth of m=1 tearing fluctations, suppresses their associated sawteeth, and doubles the energy confinement time. Small sawteeth occur in the improved state but with m=0 precursors. By requiring a change of toroidal flux embedding the plasma, inductive poloidal current profile drive is transient, but the improvement encourages the program of RFP transport suppression using current profile control.

  6. Data:C2f657fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  7. Data:8777236b-9eb8-4857-bc99-0e5a03782fa7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  8. Data:07f78f8f-a33a-4414-add9-cd8d2c7ac364 | Open Energy Information

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  9. Data:F4305257-a041-4f91-990d-7fa77582ebd6 | Open Energy Information

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  10. Acquisition Letter AL 2011-05_FAL 2011-01 Congressional Notification of Pending Actions (Contract and FA) in excess of $1M

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AL 2011-05/FAL 2011-01 (AL/FAL) implements statutory and non-statutory Congressional notification of pending award of a contract action, announcement of selected applications for negotiation of financial assistance awards, or to award a financial assistance action in excess of $1 million. The AL/FAL implements Title I - General Provision Section 1101(a)(2) of Division B of Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011 from the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011 (Pub.L. 112-10). This statute is a continuation of Section 311 under the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010. The amendment to Head of Contracting Activity delegation to designate signature authority for these notices will be sent out separately.

  11. Observation of Spontaneous Neoclassical Tearing Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.D. Fredrickson

    2001-10-03

    We present data in this paper from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) which challenges the commonly held belief that extrinsic MHD events such as sawteeth or ELMs [edge localized modes] are required to provide the seed islands that trigger Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs). While sawteeth are reported to provide the trigger for most of the NTMs on DIII-D [at General Atomics in San Diego, California] and ASDEX-U [at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany], the majority of NTMs seen in TFTR occur in plasmas without sawteeth, that is which are above the beta threshold for sawtooth stabilization. Examples of NTMs appearing in the absence of any detectable extrinsic MHD activity will be shown. Conversely, large n=1 modes in plasmas above the NTM beta threshold generally do not trigger NTMs. An alternative mechanism for generating seed islands will be discussed.

  12. Data:0e5fa6ee-2c95-482a-a78a-fd06c670a3a6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  13. CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    lo&&-, : i e r : gtdlm FILLS March 12, 1956 ~'RII~~~~~I~~D~.,A~ICAW~~TMDRLBS, CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M .D. c. E. aahwun ObJcrativr oi THpt On !iUesd8y, Fabmerg 28,19!36, th@ lILQMetallurgMalD@p~rtJmnt beipn bzdquotting green ult-ll( blend on e 350 ton hydmulla prau 8t the Ura &i&nnrlug DivUiou of Ameria8n Steel muUdPae8, c&alMatl, Ohio. Approll'tely a,ooo pound8 of greeu ult ub briqumtte4 bw13ry 8 -rioa of mvea day,. Par the pwpou ofwalutlngexpo88mmmafpemmm8 linrelvmd

  14. Section 27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NF o N e ' f (N,$,Zb,h,8,u,<;) Session Papers 117 (1) (2) A Test of the Validity of Cumulus Cloud Parameterizations for Longwave Radiation Calculations D. Han and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Longwave radiative transfer under broken cloud conditions is often treated as a problem in cloud bulk geometry, especially for cumulus clouds, because individual clouds are nearly black. However, climate models ignore cloud geometry

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DelMoro, A. (1) Gandhi, P. (1) Hailey, C.J. (1) Harrison, F.A. (1) Koss, M. (1) Lansbury, ... ; Comastri, A. ; Bologna Observ. ; Harrison, F.A. ; Caltech ; Alexander, D.M. ; ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... DelMoro, A. (1) Gandhi, P. (1) Hailey, C.J. (1) Harrison, F.A. (1) Koss, M. (1) Lansbury, ... ; Comastri, A. ; Bologna Observ. ; Harrison, F.A. ; Caltech ; Alexander, D.M. ; ...

  17. Method for selecting minimum width of leaf in multileaf adjustable collimator while inhibiting passage of particle beams of radiation through sawtooth joints between collimator leaves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Bercovitz, John; Nyman, Mark; Chu, William

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for selecting the minimum width of individual leaves of a multileaf adjustable collimator having sawtooth top and bottom surfaces between adjacent leaves of a first stack of leaves and sawtooth end edges which are capable of intermeshing with the corresponding sawtooth end edges of leaves in a second stack of leaves of the collimator. The minimum width of individual leaves in the collimator, each having a sawtooth configuration in the surface facing another leaf in the same stack and a sawtooth end edge, is selected to comprise the sum of the penetration depth or range of the particular type of radiation comprising the beam in the particular material used for forming the leaf; plus the total path length across all the air gaps in the area of the joint at the edges between two leaves defined between lines drawn across the peaks of adjacent sawtooth edges; plus at least one half of the length or period of a single sawtooth. To accomplish this, in accordance with the method of the invention, the penetration depth of the particular type of radiation in the particular material to be used for the collimator leaf is first measured. Then the distance or gap between adjoining or abutting leaves is selected, and the ratio of this distance to the height of the sawteeth is selected. Finally the number of air gaps through which the radiation will pass between sawteeth is determined by selecting the number of sawteeth to be formed in the joint. The measurement and/or selection of these parameters will permit one to determine the minimum width of the leaf which is required to prevent passage of the beam through the sawtooth joint.

  18. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvn eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  19. Sawtooth Pacing by Real-Time Auxiliary Power Control in a Tokamak Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, T. P.; Felici, F.; Sauter, O.; Graves, J. P.

    2011-06-17

    In the standard scenario of tokamak plasma operation, sawtooth crashes are the main perturbations that can trigger performance-degrading, and potentially disruption-generating, neoclassical tearing modes. This Letter demonstrates sawtooth pacing by real-time control of the auxiliary power. It is shown that the sawtooth crash takes place in a reproducible manner shortly after the removal of that power, and this can be used to precisely prescribe, i.e., pace, the individual sawteeth. In combination with preemptive stabilization of the neoclassical tearing modes, sawtooth pacing provides a new sawtooth control paradigm for improved performance in burning plasmas.

  20. Development of a cross-polarization scattering system for the measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, T. L. Peebles, W. A.; Crocker, N. A.; Nguyen, X.

    2014-11-15

    The design and performance of a new cross-polarization scattering (CPS) system for the localized measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations is presented. CPS is a process whereby magnetic fluctuations scatter incident electromagnetic radiation into a perpendicular polarization which is subsequently detected. A new CPS design that incorporates a unique scattering geometry was laboratory tested, optimized, and installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Plasma tests of signal-to-noise, polarization purity, and frequency response indicate proper functioning of the system. CPS data show interesting features related to internal MHD perturbations known as sawteeth that are not observed on density fluctuations.

  1. Locked modes and magnetic field errors in MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Kerst, D.W.

    1992-06-01

    In the MST reversed field pinch magnetic oscillations become stationary (locked) in the lab frame as a result of a process involving interactions between the modes, sawteeth, and field errors. Several helical modes become phase locked to each other to form a rotating localized disturbance, the disturbance locks to an impulsive field error generated at a sawtooth crash, the error fields grow monotonically after locking (perhaps due to an unstable interaction between the modes and field error), and over the tens of milliseconds of growth confinement degrades and the discharge eventually terminates. Field error control has been partially successful in eliminating locking.

  2. Proteasome activity is important for replication recovery, CHK1 phosphorylation and prevention of G2 arrest after low-dose formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Green, Samantha E.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2015-07-15

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a human carcinogen with numerous sources of environmental and occupational exposures. This reactive aldehyde is also produced endogenously during metabolism of drugs and other processes. DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) are considered to be the main genotoxic lesions for FA. Accumulating evidence suggests that DPC repair in high eukaryotes involves proteolysis of crosslinked proteins. Here, we examined a role of the main cellular proteolytic machinery proteasomes in toxic responses of human lung cells to low FA doses. We found that transient inhibition of proteasome activity increased cytotoxicity and diminished clonogenic viability of FA-treated cells. Proteasome inactivation exacerbated suppressive effects of FA on DNA replication and increased the levels of the genotoxic stress marker γ-H2AX in normal human cells. A transient loss of proteasome activity in FA-exposed cells also caused delayed perturbations of cell cycle, which included G2 arrest and a depletion of S-phase populations at FA doses that had no effects in control cells. Proteasome activity diminished p53-Ser15 phosphorylation but was important for FA-induced CHK1 phosphorylation, which is a biochemical marker of DPC proteolysis in replicating cells. Unlike FA, proteasome inhibition had no effect on cell survival and CHK1 phosphorylation by the non-DPC replication stressor hydroxyurea. Overall, we obtained evidence for the importance of proteasomes in protection of human cells against biologically relevant doses of FA. Biochemically, our findings indicate the involvement of proteasomes in proteolytic repair of DPC, which removes replication blockage by these highly bulky lesions. - Highlights: • Proteasome inhibition enhances cytotoxicity of low-dose FA in human lung cells. • Active proteasomes diminish replication-inhibiting effects of FA. • Proteasome activity prevents delayed G2 arrest in FA-treated cells. • Proteasome inhibition exacerbates replication stress by FA in

  3. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decoupling ude: & Control tion itoring Parts & FPG vironment op ility System boratories ha pplications. services" wi me custom ra aging, test, fa om microele Hard S tructured Ap...

  4. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dept. of Chemical and Material Engineering; Hamad, F.A.; Abu-Arabi, M. University of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design and ...

  5. PARC Seminar Series featuring Don Bryant | Photosynthetic Antenna...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Don Bryant PARC Seminar Series featuring Don Bryant "Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in...

  6. Microsoft Word - Bryant flyer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria" Dr. Donald Bryant Ernest C. Pollard Professor in...

  7. Sandia Energy Wind News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Wake-Imaging System Successfully Deployed at Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility http:energy.sandia.govsandia-wake-imaging-system-successfully-deployed-at-scaled-wind-fa...

  8. Visiting Faculty Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions...

  9. City of Clarksville, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    @CDELightband Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCDE-Lightband96953266253?refts Outage Hotline: 931-648-8151 Outage Map: www.outageentry.comCustomerFa References:...

  10. Prepared in response to formal guidance and a request by Sam...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Computational Chief Scientist to oversee and drive cross-cutting computer and computational science assets; and experienced FA Leads and Deputies with responsibility for the ...

  11. Waste Heat-to-Power Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Different working fluids - but, many ORC's use HFC-245fa Pressure ratiobuilt-in volume ratio mismatch - larger pressure ratio than practical scroll built-in volume ratio ...

  12. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 25

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... asbestos- containing transite panels from the walls and roof, exposing the ... Both CPP-601 and 602 once formed the center of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing fa- cilities at ...

  13. Argent Energy UK Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motherwell, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: ML1 5FA Product: Motherwell-based waste-to-energy biodiesel producer that has an operational plant in Scotland. Coordinates:...

  14. Evaluation of the intrinsic and extrinsic fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, B.S.; Yao, Qizhou; Cooper, B.R.

    1996-08-01

    Comparative creep crack growth tests of FA-186 and FA-187 iron aluminides under either dry oxygen or air environment showed that both alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement. Test results also revealed that FA-187 is intrinsically a more brittle material than FA-186. Atomistic computational modeling is being undertaken to find the preferred geometries, structures and formation energies of iron vacancies and vacancy pairs (Fe-Fe) in FeAl and Fe{sub 3}Al. An indication of vacancy clustering in Fe{sub 3}Al, with consequences for dislocation behavior, may be important for understanding the role of dislocation assisted diffusion in the hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  15. Transport reduction by current profile control in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarff, J.S.; Almagri, A.F.; Cekic, M.

    1994-11-01

    An auxiliary poloidal inductive electric field applied to a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma reduces the current density gradient, slows the growth of m = 1 tearing fluctuations, suppresses their associated sawteeth, and doubles the energy confinement time. This experiment attacks the dominant RFP plasma loss mechanism of parallel streaming in a stochastic magnetic field. The auxiliary electric field flattens the current profile and reduces the magnetic fluctuation level. Since a toroidal flux change linking the plasma is required to generate the inductive poloidal electric field, the current drive is transient to avoid excessive perturbation of the equilibrium. To sustain and enhance the improved state, electrostatic and RF current drivers are being developed. A novel electrostatic current drive scheme uses a plasma source for electron injection, and the lower-hybrid wave is a good candidate for RF current drive.

  16. Non-axisymmetric equilibrium reconstruction of a current-carrying stellarator using external magnetic and soft x-ray inversion radius measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, X.; Maurer, D. A.; Knowlton, Stephen F.; ArchMiller, M. C.; Ennis, D. A.; Hanson, J. D.; Hartwell, G. J.; Hebert, J. D.; Herfindal, J. L.; Pandya, M. D.; Roberts, N. A.; Traverso, P. J.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2015-12-22

    Non-axisymmetric free-boundary equilibrium reconstructions of stellarator plasmas are performed for discharges in which the magnetic configuration is strongly modified by ohmically driven plasma current. These studies were performed on the compact toroidal hybrid device using the V3FIT reconstruction code with a set of 50 magnetic diagnostics external to the plasma. With the assumption of closed magnetic flux surfaces, the reconstructions using external magnetic measurements allow accurate estimates of the net toroidal flux within the last closed flux surface, the edge safety factor, and the plasma shape of these highly non-axisymmetric plasmas. Lastly, the inversion radius of standard saw-teeth is used to infer the current profile near the magnetic axis; with external magnetic diagnostics alone, the current density profile is imprecisely reconstructed.

  17. Synergy between fast-ion transport by core MHD and test blanket module fields in DIII-D experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Austin, M. E.; Collins, C. S.; Gray, T.; Grierson, B. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Lanctot, M.; Pace, D. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Mclean, A. G.

    2015-07-21

    We measured fast-ion transport caused by the combination of MHD and a mock-up test-blanket module (TBM) coil in the DIII-D tokamak. The primary diagnostic is an infrared camera that measures the heat flux on the tiles surrounding the coil. The combined effects of the TBM and four other potential sources of transport are studied: neoclassical tearing modes, Alfvén eigenmodes, sawteeth, and applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields for the control of edge localized modes. A definitive synergistic effect is observed at sawtooth crashes where, in the presence of the TBM, the localized heat flux at a burst increases from 0.36±0.27 tomore » 2.6±0.5 MW/m-2.« less

  18. Simulations of alpha parameters in a TFTR DT supershot with high fusion power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Janos, A.C.

    1995-07-01

    A TFTR supershot with a plasma current of 2.5 MA, neutral beam heating power of 33.7 MW, and a peak DT fusion power of 7.5 MW is studied using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Simulations of alpha parameters such as the alpha heating, pressure, and distributions in energy and v{sub parallel}/v are given. The effects of toroidal ripple and mixing of the fast alpha particles during the sawteeth observed after the neutral beam injection phase are modeled. The distributions of alpha particles on the outer midplane are peaked near forward and backward v{sub parallel}/v. Ripple losses deplete the distributions in the vicinity of v{sub parallel}/v {approximately}{minus}0.4. Sawtooth mixing of fast alpha particles is computed to reduce their central density and broaden their width in energy.

  19. Quantification of the degree of reaction of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Haha, M.; De Weerdt, K.; Lothenbach, B.

    2010-11-15

    The quantification of the fly ash (FA) in FA blended cements is an important parameter to understand the effect of the fly ash on the hydration of OPC and on the microstructural development. The FA reaction in two different blended OPC-FA systems was studied using a selective dissolution technique based on EDTA/NaOH, diluted NaOH solution, the portlandite content and by backscattered electron image analysis. The amount of FA determined by selective dissolution using EDTA/NaOH is found to be associated with a significant possible error as different assumptions lead to large differences in the estimate of FA reacted. In addition, at longer hydration times, the reaction of the FA is underestimated by this method due to the presence of non-dissolved hydrates and MgO rich particles. The dissolution of FA in diluted NaOH solution agreed during the first days well with the dissolution as observed by image analysis. At 28 days and longer, the formation of hydrates in the diluted solutions leads to an underestimation. Image analysis appears to give consistent results and to be most reliable technique studied.

  20. Function allocation for humans and automation in the context of team dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; John O'Hara; Jacques Hugo; Johanna Oxstrand

    2015-07-01

    Within Human Factors Engineering, a decision-making process called function allocation (FA) is used during the design life cycle of complex systems to distribute the system functions, often identified through a functional requirements analysis, to all human and automated machine agents (or teammates) involved in controlling the system. Most FA methods make allocation decisions primarily by comparing the capabilities of humans and automation, but then also by considering secondary factors such as cost, regulations, and the health and safety of workers. The primary analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of humans and machines, however, is almost always considered in terms of individual human or machine capabilities. Yet, FA is fundamentally about teamwork in that the goal of the FA decision-making process is to determine what are the optimal allocations of functions among agents. Given this framing of FA, and the increasing use of and sophistication of automation, there are two related social psychological issues that current FA methods need to address more thoroughly. First, many principles for effective human teamwork are not considered as central decision points or in the iterative hypothesis and testing phase in most FA methods, when it is clear that social factors have numerous positive and negative effects on individual and team capabilities. Second, social psychological factors affecting team performance and can be difficult to translate to automated agents, and most FA methods currently do not account for this effect. The implications for these issues are discussed.

  1. A=10C (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10C) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 10.24 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1968FA1B, 1969SA1A, 1969SO08, 1973SA30). Special reactions: (1967AU1B, 1969YI1A, 1971AR02). Pion reactions (See also reaction 3.): (1973AL1E, 1973CH20). Other topics: (1968FA02, 1968FA1B, 1969SO08, 1969SO1E, 1970FO1B, 1972AN05, 1972CA37). Ground-state properties: (1966KE16, 1968FA02, 1968FA1B, 1969GA1G, 1973SA30). 1. 10C(β+)10B Qm = 3.650 10C

  2. Cost savings deliverables and criteria for the OST technology decision process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, A.

    1997-04-01

    This document has been prepared to assist focus area (FA) technical and management teams in understanding the cost savings deliverables associated with a technology system during its research and development (R and D) phases. It discusses the usefulness of cost analysis in the decision-making process, and asserts that the level of confidence and data quality of a cost analysis is proportional to the maturity of the technology system`s development life cycle. Suggestions of specific investment criteria or cost savings metrics that a FA might levy on individual research projects are made but the final form of these elements should be stipulated by the FA management based on their rationale for a successful technology development project. Also, cost savings deliverables for a single FA will be more detailed than those for management of the Office of Science and Technology (OST). For example, OST management may want an analysis of the overall return on investment for each FA, while the FA program manager may want this analysis and the return on investment metrics for each technology research activity the FA supports.

  3. Effects of high temperature surface oxides on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing, heat treatment (750 {degrees}C in air, one hour) or simulated in-service-type oxidation (1000{degrees}C in air, 24 hours) on the room-temperature aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of iron aluminides. Materials evaluated included the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84, FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo, a FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385, and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy, FAPY. Tests were performed in a mild acid-chloride solution to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Cyclic-anodic-polarization tests were employed to evaluate resistances to localized aqueous corrosion. The high-temperature oxide surfaces consistently produced detrimental results relative to mechanically or chemically cleaned surfaces. Specifically, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the as-processed and 750{degrees} C surfaces, relative to the cleaned surfaces, for FA-84, FA-129, FAL-Mo, FA-385 and FAPY. Furthermore, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the 1000{degrees}C surfaces, relative to cleaned surfaces, for FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo.

  4. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of ... The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure ...

  5. 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lee, G.T.; Sudhoff, F.A. 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS; GAS TURBINE...

  6. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore large volumes of data, and...

  7. Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects File DOE F 4600.2 FA RepReqChklst FINAL 10-2014.docx More Documents & Publications 1 1 Federal ...

  8. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Systems Volume VIII System Shot Operations Manual S-AB-P-008 Shot Type 6-7 ESO Checklist (S-AB-P-173) Lithium Deuteride Targets Handling Procedure(Q-FA-P-121) OMEGA...

  9. NATIONAL .LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ((1 Radiation Dept. 3 Water Treatment Plant (Fa Water hsples Only) ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY SECTI ON >ATE RECEIVED: BY: - I IATE REPORTED: BY: 4-28-61 4ETHOD OF ANALYSIS: ...

  10. DOE/SC-ARM-0606

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Tobin,.DC,.H.Revercomb,.RO.Knuteson,.FA.Best,.WL.Smith,.NN.Ciganovich,.RG.Dedecker,.S.Dutc... .Minnis,.P,.L.Nguyen,.W.Smith,.R.Palikonda,.J.Ayers,.D.Doelling,.M.Norde...

  11. Microsoft Word - MPW_Fact_Sheet_SAND2010-4820P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inte rvices integra afer resource circuits in low rogram prov production fa test and pac ened, 3.3 v, 0 ors, and diod tal and analo n Kit. managed and oper artment of Energy r...

  12. US Department of the Navy Driving Alternative Fuels Adoption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 5 years (anything beyond 1 year is challenging) - Offtakes before facility is producing fuel - Another major capital infusion FA-18E , Pacific Ocean USS Nimitz (CVN-68) THANK YOU

  13. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.; Jones, L.L. (1994) 134 Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. (1999) 128 Ammonia usage in vapor compression for ...

  14. Section 81

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B.A. Whitney, H.E. Revercomb, R.O. Knuteson, F.A. Best, and W.L. Smith University of ... 1989; Revercomb et al. 1995) and cloud (Smith et al. 1992; Collard et al. 1995) ...

  15. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Discrepant Fractional Anisotropy Between the Frontal and Parietal Lobes After Whole-Brain Irradiation in Childhood Medulloblastoma Survivors: Reflection of Regional White Matter Radiosensitivity?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu Deqiang; Kwong, Dora; Chan, Godfrey; Leung, Lucullus; Khong, P.-L.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that fractional anisotropy (FA) is more severely reduced in white matter of the frontal lobe compared with the parietal lobe after receiving the same whole-brain irradiation dose in a cohort of childhood medulloblastoma survivors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two medulloblastoma survivors (15 male, mean [{+-} SD] age = 12.1 {+-} 4.6 years) and the same number of control subjects (15 male, aged 12.0 {+-} 4.2 years) were recruited for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using an automated tissue classification method and the Talairach Daemon atlas, FA values of frontal and parietal lobes receiving the same radiation dose, and the ratio between them were quantified and denoted as FFA, PFA, and FA{sub f/p}, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for significant differences of FFA, PFA, and FA{sub f/p} between medulloblastoma survivors and control subjects. Results: Frontal lobe and parietal lobe white matter FA were found to be significantly less in medulloblastoma survivors compared with control subjects (frontal p = 0.001, parietal p = 0.026). Moreover, these differences were found to be discrepant, with the frontal lobe having a significantly larger difference in FA compared with the parietal lobe. The FA{sub f/p} of control and medulloblastoma survivors was 1.110 and 1.082, respectively (p = 0.029). Conclusion: Discrepant FA changes after the same irradiation dose suggest radiosensitivity of the frontal lobe white matter compared with the parietal lobe. Special efforts to address the potentially vulnerable frontal lobe after treatment with whole-brain radiation may be needed so as to balance disease control and treatment-related morbidity.

  16. Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Your RSA token is used to esbablish a connection to the Internet and connect to https://connect.doe.gov . Using-TwoFactorRSA-Token w VPN.pdf (469 KB) More Documents & Publications Instructions for WebVPN Connectivity Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

  17. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... I c3tr9830.0cr JrL lm l m ROOM FLOOR TOP V I EI FAI-I FAI.2 F A2-2 FAI -3 F A2-3 FA I.4 FAI-5 FA2-5 FBI-3 FB2-3 FBI-4 FB I.5 FB2-5 FrcuRE 4-2 LocATtoNs oF POSr-REMEDIAL AcrloN ...

  18. Light-induced electron transfer vs. energy transfer in molecular thin-film systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renschler, C. L.; Faulkner, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    Quenching of fluoranthene (FA) singlets by tetrabromo-o-benzoquinone (TBBQ) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was studied both in xylene solutions and in spin-cast polystyrene (PS) films. Emphasis was placed on time-resolved fluorescence transients resulting from pulsed excitation. Linear Stern-Volmer plots were obtained for quenching in solution and gave diffusion-controlled rate constants, of 1.45 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/ and 1.53 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/ for TBBQ and TMPD, respectively. TBBQ was found to quench FA singlets in PS over the studied concentration range 12 mM < (TBBQ) < 48 mM, but in its presence FA singlets decayed nonexponentially. The results were interpreted quantitatively in terms of pure Foerster's transfer from FA to TBBQ without diffusion of excitons. The critical transfer radius R/sub 0/ was experimentally determined to be 24.3 A, which is in good agreement with the theoretical value of 23 A calculated from spectral data. Quenching of FA singlets in PS films was found to be independent of FA concentration over a 300 mM to 1200 mM FA concentration range for a constant TBBQ concentration of 24.0 mM. TMPD was only slightly effective as a quencher of FA singlets in PS because it apparently behaves strictly as a contact quencher based on reversible charge transfer. The implications of these results for the design of systems intended to exploit light-induced electron transfer are discussed.

  19. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h⁻¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stable and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 μmol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H₂ generation from FA.

  20. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h⁻¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stablemore » and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 μmol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H₂ generation from FA.« less

  1. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garca-Mat, M.; De la Torre, A.G.; Len-Reina, L.; Aranda, M.A.G.; CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona ; Santacruz, I.

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 2 and 72 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  2. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-09-19

    In this study, we investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body ss-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter kFa = 0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parametermore » kFa: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at kFa = α with α = 1.34 from the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for kFa > α and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at kFa = α. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86< kFa < 1.56) for the ferromagnetic phase. At sufficiently large negative effective range, the ferromagnetic phase disappears. On the other hand, the appearance of positive-energy bound state resonantly enhances the two-body decay rate around kFa = α and may prevent the study of equilibrium phases and ferromagnetism of the upper branch Fermi gas.« less

  3. The Role of Axisymmetric Reconnection Events in JET Discharges with Extreme Shear Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.C. Stratton; J.A. Breslau; R.V. Budny; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; H.R. Strauss; L.E. Zakharov; B. Alper; V. Drozdov; N.C. Hawkes; S. Reyes-Cortes; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Work Programme

    2001-12-03

    Injection of Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive into the current ramp-up phase of Joint European Torus (JET) discharges can produce extremely reversed q-profiles characterized by a core region of very small or zero current density (within Motional Stark Effect diagnostic measurement errors) and q(subscript min) > 1. T(subscript e)-profiles show sawtooth-like collapses and the presence of an internal transport barrier. Accurate equilibrium reconstructions of these discharges are obtained using the ESC code, which was recently extended to allow equilibrium reconstructions in which a free boundary solver determines the plasma boundary and a fixed boundary solver provides the magnetic geometry and current density profile. The core current density does not appear to go negative, although current diffusion calculations indicate that sufficient non-inductive current drive to cause this is present. This is explained by nonlinear resistive MHD simulations in toroidal geometry which predict that these discharges undergo n=0 reconnection events (axisymmetric sawteeth) that redistribute the current to hold the core current density near zero.

  4. Study of electron temperature profile evolution during L-H transition with measurement of electron cyclotron emission on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.; Hsieh, C.; Zhang, J.; Lohr, J.; Stockdale, R.E.; Bell, G.L.; Wilgen, J.B.; Luo, J.

    1995-06-01

    The L-H transition has been intensively investigated since it was discovered in the ASDEX tokamak in 1982. Considerable experimental evidence shows that the formation of the transport barrier at the plasma edge, during which the edge density and temperature gradients suddenly increase, is a common feature in the L-H transition discharge in all devices. Formation of the transport barrier is indicated by a sharp reduction in the D{alpha} radiation at the periphery of the plasma despite a simultaneous increase in the plasma density. A new heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer, which had been built for the ATF device at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been installed on DIII-D. The instrument features 32 channels with high temporal and spatial resolution and covers the outer half of DIII-D plasma at full magnetic field. Initial measurements with the instrument at the time of the L-H transition show that there is no T{sub e}, precursor to the transition and this is further supported by observations during dithering L-H transition where the transport barrier is immediately destroyed when the plasma briefly returns to the L-mode during process of the transition. Other applications of the new instrument have included T{sub e}, profile measurements during edge localized modes and during Ohmic and beam-heated sawteeth, which highlight the magnetic reconnection process. The instrument will be described and some of these results win be presented.

  5. The q-profile effect on high-order harmonic q = 1 tearing mode generation during sawtooth crashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Zhengxiong; Wei Lai; Wang Xiaogang

    2012-06-15

    The effect of q-profiles on the excitation of high-order harmonic q=1 tearing modes during sawtooth crashes is investigated by a collisionless fluid model with the electron inertia term in Ohm's law. It is found that for a flat q-profile in the core region, the high-order harmonics, such as m/n=2/2 and/or m/n=3/3 modes, comparable to or stronger than the m/n=1/1 component, can be excited during tokamak sawteeth. The stronger the magnetic shear on the q=1 surface is, the more unstable the higher-m modes are. For smoothly monotonously increased q-profiles, a lower q value on the plasma edge tends to easily excite higher-m harmonics at the same level as the m = 1 mode simultaneously. The spatial characteristics of the eigenmodes in the cases with the typical q-profiles are also discussed. In addition, the basic feature of the magnetic island structures in the nonlinear evolution is numerically obtained, which is consistent qualitatively with the experimentally reconstructed phenomenon.

  6. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  7. The targeted heating and current drive applications for the ITER electron cyclotron system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, M.; Darbos, C.; Gandini, F.; Gassmann, T.; Loarte, A.; Omori, T.; Purohit, D.; Saibene, G.; Gagliardi, M.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Hanson, G.; Poli, E.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-02-15

    A 24 MW Electron Cyclotron (EC) system operating at 170 GHz and 3600 s pulse length is to be installed on ITER. The EC plant shall deliver 20 MW of this power to the plasma for Heating and Current Drive (H and CD) applications. The EC system is designed for plasma initiation, central heating, current drive, current profile tailoring, and Magneto-hydrodynamic control (in particular, sawteeth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode) in the flat-top phase of the plasma. A preliminary design review was performed in 2012, which identified a need for extended application of the EC system to the plasma ramp-up, flattop, and ramp down phases of ITER plasma pulse. The various functionalities are prioritized based on those applications, which can be uniquely addressed with the EC system in contrast to other H and CD systems. An initial attempt has been developed at prioritizing the allocated H and CD applications for the three scenarios envisioned: ELMy H-mode (15 MA), Hybrid (∼12 MA), and Advanced (∼9 MA) scenarios. This leads to the finalization of the design requirements for the EC sub-systems.

  8. Reversed-field pinch studies in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Henry, J.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1993-04-03

    Studies of large-size (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.5 m), moderate current (I < 750 kA) reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas are carried out in the Madison Symmetric Torus in order to evaluate and improve RFP confinement, study general toroidal plasma MHD issues, determine the mechanism of the RFP dynamo, and measure fluctuation-induced transport and anomalous ion heating. MST confinement has been improved by reduction of magnetic field errors with correction coils in the primary circuit and reduction of impurities using boronization; high densities have been achieved with hydrogen pellet injection. MHD tearing modes with poloidal mode number m = 1 and toroidal mode numbers n = 5--7 are prevalent and nonlinearly couple to produce sudden relaxations akin to tokamak sawteeth. Edge fluctuation-induced transport has been measured with a variety of insertable probes. Ions exhibit anomalous heating, with increases of ion temperature occuring during strong MHD relaxation. The RFP dynamo has been studied with attention to various possible mechanisms, including motion-EMF drive, the Hall effect, and superthermal electrons. Initial profile control experiments have begun using insertable biased probes and plasma guns. The toroidal field capacity of MST will be upgraded during Summer, 1993 to allow low-current tokamak operation as well as improved RFP operation.

  9. STATIONARY HIGH-PERFORMANCE DISCHARGES IN THE DII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUCE,TC; WADE,MR; FERRON,JR; HYATT,AW; KELLMAN,AG; KINSEY,JE; LAHAYE,RJ; LASNIER,CJ; MURAKAMI,M; POLITZER,PA; SCOVILLE,JT

    2002-11-01

    A271 STATIONARY HIGH-PERFORMANCE DISCHARGES IN THE DII-D TOKAMAK. Discharges which can satisfy the high gain goals of burning plasma experiments have been demonstrated in the DIII-D tokamak under stationary conditions at relatively low plasma current (q{sub 95} > 4). A figure of merit for fusion gain ({beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2}) has been maintained at values corresponding to ! = 10 operation in a burning plasma for > 6 s or 36{tau}{sub E} and 2{tau}{sub R}. The key element is the relaxation of the current profile to a stationary state with q{sub min} > 1. In the absence of sawteeth and fishbones, stable operation has been achieved up to the estimated no-wall {beta} limit. Feedback control of the energy content and particle inventory allow reproducible, stationary operation. The particle inventory is controlled by gas fueling and active pumping; the wall plays only a small role in the particle balance. The reduced current lessens significantly the potential for structural damage in the event of a major disruption. In addition, the pulse length capability is greatly increased, which is essential for a technology testing phase of a burning plasma experiment where fluence (duty cycle) is important.

  10. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Brunner, D.; Ennever, P.; Garrett, M. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Ochoukov, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2014-02-12

    Impurity contamination and localized heat loads associated with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna operation are among the most challenging issues for ICRF utilization.. Another challenge is maintaining maximum coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. Here, we report on an experimental assessment of a field aligned (FA) antenna with respect to impurity contamination, impurity sources, RF enhanced heat flux and load tolerance. In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to and the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E? (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 2030% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. Further we observe that the fraction of RF energy deposited upon the antenna is less than 0.4 % of the total injected RF energy in dipole phasing. The total deposited energy increases significantly when the FA antenna is operated in monopole phasing. The FA antenna also exhibits an unexpected load tolerance for ELMs and confinement transitions compared to the TA antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing. In monopole phasing, the FA antenna has the highest plasma

  11. Weldability of Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; Maziasz, P.J.; David, S.A.; McKamey, C.G.

    1992-08-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the weldability of Fe{sub 3}Al type alloys. Sigmajig tests of a commercial heat of FA-129 alloy indicate that hot-cracking may not be a problem for this alloy. Additionally, several new Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminides were evaluated for weldability. The preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that some of these alloys have comparable or better weldability than FA-129 based iron-aluminides. For the first time, successful welds, without hot or cold cracking, were made on 13 mm (0.5 in.) thick plates from a commercial heat of FA-129 using the proper choice of welding conditions and parameters.

  12. Weldability of Fe sub 3 Al based iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; Maziasz, P.J.; David, S.A.; McKamey, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the weldability of Fe{sub 3}Al type alloys. Sigmajig tests of a commercial heat of FA-129 alloy indicate that hot-cracking may not be a problem for this alloy. Additionally, several new Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminides were evaluated for weldability. The preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that some of these alloys have comparable or better weldability than FA-129 based iron-aluminides. For the first time, successful welds, without hot or cold cracking, were made on 13 mm (0.5 in.) thick plates from a commercial heat of FA-129 using the proper choice of welding conditions and parameters.

  13. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Sabin, Noah D.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Ogg, Robert J.; Boop, Frederick A.; Jane, John A.; Hua, Chiaho

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  14. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  15. Species differences in methanol and formic acid pharmacokinetics in mice, rabbits and primates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeting, J. Nicole; Siu, Michelle; McCallum, Gordon P.; Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2010-08-15

    Methanol (MeOH) is metabolized primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase in humans, but by catalase in rodents, with species variations in the pharmacokinetics of its formic acid (FA) metabolite. The teratogenic potential of MeOH in humans is unknown, and its teratogenicity in rodents may not accurately reflect human developmental risk due to differential species metabolism, as for some other teratogens. To determine if human MeOH metabolism might be better reflected in rabbits than rodents, the plasma pharmacokinetics of MeOH and FA were compared in male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys over time (24, 48 and 6 h, respectively) following a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 or 2 g/kg MeOH or its saline vehicle. Following the high dose, MeOH exhibited saturated elimination kinetics in all 3 species, with similar peak concentrations and a 2.5-fold higher clearance in mice than rabbits. FA accumulation within 6 h in primates was 5-fold and 43-fold higher than in rabbits and mice respectively, with accumulation being 10-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Over 48 h, FA accumulation was nearly 5-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Low-dose MeOH in mice and rabbits resulted in similarly saturated MeOH elimination in both species, but with approximately 2-fold higher clearance rates in mice. FA accumulation was 3.8-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Rabbits more closely than mice reflected primates for in vivo MeOH metabolism, and particularly FA accumulation, suggesting that developmental studies in rabbits may be useful for assessing potential human teratological risk.

  16. User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token VDI_WP_RSA_Remote_Guide_Final.pdf (1.22 MB) More Documents & Publications User Guide for Remote Access to VDI/Workplace Using PIV Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09

  17. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Collaboration: Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-15

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  18. Microsoft Word - Testimony of Gregory H Friedman, June 24, 2013 _FINAL_

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy SMail_Secure_Web-Based_Email_v3 _2_.doc Microsoft Word - SMail_Secure_Web-Based_Email_v3 _2_.doc Instructions for Using Secure Email via Outlook Web Access (455.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

    BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE FEDERAL WORKFORCE AND AGENCY ORGANIZATION FOR RELEASE ON

  19. Using regulations.gov to find dockets and documents

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Your RSA token is used to esbablish a connection to the Internet and connect to https://connect.doe.gov . Using-TwoFactorRSA-Token w VPN.pdf (469 KB) More Documents & Publications Instructions for WebVPN Connectivity Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc of Energy

    Using Weather Data to Improve Capacity of Existing Power Lines Using Weather Data to Improve

  20. Problems with interface change | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ex.php?titleData:1c1ac6b9-5085-41f4-b478-2927d2fa41e7tab3.Energy http:en.openei.orgservicesrestutilityrates?versionlatest&formatjsonplain&detailfull&getpageData:1c1a...

  1. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ER RI I W Wi in nt te er r S Su ur rf fa ac ce e G Gr re ee en nh ho ou us se e F Fl lu ux xe es s Greenhouse Gas Emission Band (cm -1 ) GL Flux (Wm 2 ) AERI Flux (Wm 2 ) CFC-11...

  2. Dr. Donald Bryant | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donald Bryant September 29, 2014 Dr. Donald Bryant "Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria." View Seminar Here Original Event info: September 22, 2014 - 11:00am Washington University, Brauer Hall Room 12

  3. BPA-2012-00330-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10512011 1004 Daniel C. APLC FA O8 998 8975 P.0011011 DANIEL C. MINUTILLO Professional Law Corporation rED BV BP 941 Blossom Hill Road, Suite 205 FOIL OtFCCE T 1 i i P.O. Box...

  4. Characterisation of magnesium potassium phosphate cements blended with fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Laura J.; Bernal, Susan A.; Walling, Samuel A.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Provis, John L.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-08-15

    Magnesium potassium phosphate cements (MKPCs), blended with 50 wt.% fly ash (FA) or ground granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) to reduce heat evolution, water demand and cost, were assessed using compressive strength, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on {sup 25}Mg, {sup 27}Al, {sup 29}Si, {sup 31}P and {sup 39}K nuclei. We present the first definitive evidence that dissolution of the glassy aluminosilicate phases of both FA and GBFS occurred under the pH conditions of MKPC. In addition to the main binder phase, struvite-K, an amorphous orthophosphate phase was detected in FA/MKPC and GBFS/MKPC systems. It was postulated that an aluminium phosphate phase was formed, however, no significant Al–O–P interactions were identified. High-field NMR analysis of the GBFS/MKPC system indicated the potential formation of a potassium-aluminosilicate phase. This study demonstrates the need for further research on these binders, as both FA and GBFS are generally regarded as inert fillers within MKPC.

  5. S_".

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7 cf hc fomcf kestinghc.use EltCttlC COrpOFation faCilit?* t0 CletefmiM wpethef It contains f-e, iduol 1 oi ivacLlv I I) crdceaole CC acrivttles concL;cttc or bthdif 6f tpt? ...

  6. A=17F (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electromagnetic transitions: (BA59M, FA59E, RA60B, BA64AA, GR65E, KA65F, MA66BB, KA67J, ... The decay is to the ground state of 17O. The spectrum has the allowed shape down to 150 ...

  7. A=17O (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagram for 17O) GENERAL: See also Table 17.2 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Theory: (BA56E, KA56C, KI56B, LE56E, SC56H, VI56, AM57B, AM57C, FA57, FE57C, PE57B, RA57B,...

  8. Soft and Small Imaging Breakthrough | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... DE-AC02-05CH11231. Z.W. and D.G.S. acknowledge support under the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-10-1-0123, C.G.B. acknowledges an NSF Graduate Research ...

  9. A=17O (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO69B, NO69G, PA69D, PI69, SA69, SC69F, SC69O, BA70A, HA70L, MC70Q, SU70A). Ground state: -1.89371 0.00009 nm (SH67N); Q 26.5 3.0 mb (LI64H). See also (FA59E,...

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), longchain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart.

  11. Semi-Batch Deoxygenation of Canola- and Lard-Derived Fatty Acids to Diesel-Range Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, JP; Thapaliya, N; Kelly, MJ; Roberts, WL; Lamb, HH

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) derived via thermal hydrolysis of food-grade lard and canola oil were deoxygenated in the liquid phase using a commercially available 5 wt % Pd/C catalyst. Online quadrupole mass spectrometry and gas chromatography were used to monitor the effluent gases from the semi-batch stirred autoclave reactors. Stearic, oleic, and palmitic acids were employed as model compounds. A catalyst lifetime exceeding 2200 turnovers for oleic acid deoxygenation was demonstrated at 300 degrees C and 15 atm under 10% H-2. The initial decarboxylation rate of palmitic acid under 5% H-2 decreases sharply with increasing initial concentration; in contrast, the initial decarbonylation rate increases linearly, indicative of first-order kinetics. Scale-up of diesel-range hydrocarbon production was investigated by increasing the reactor vessel size, initial FA concentration, and FA/catalyst mass ratio. Lower CO2 selectivity and batch productivity were observed at the larger scales (600 and 5000 mL), primarily because of the higher initial FA concentration (67 wt %) employed. Because unsaturated FAs must be hydrogenated before deoxygenation can proceed at an appreciable rate, the additional batch time required for FA hydrogenation reduces the batch productivity for unsaturated feedstocks. Low-temperature hydrogenation of unsaturated feedstocks (using Pd/C or another less-expensive catalyst) prior to deoxygenation is recommended.

  12. Microbial Reduction of Furfurals to Furan Alcohols by a Microbial Species

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2011-10-04

    An ORNL researcher developed a method for producing furfuryl alcohol (FA) through bioprocessing using a thermophilic microorganism. This organism has been shown to be highly resistant to the toxic effects of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and can propagate in the presence of over 48 g/L (500 mM) of furfural....

  13. Two-Factor Authentication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) (also known as 2-Step Verification) is a system that employs two methods to identify an individual. More secure than reusable passwords, when a token's random number...

  14. A=20Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1986VA18, 1986VA23, 1986WE1C, 1987FA09, 1987KO15, 1987NI04, 1987RI03, 1987RO10). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1983RO1E, 1984EL1D, 1984GR03, 1985MI1D,...

  15. Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects DOE F 4600.2 FA RepReqChklst FINAL 10-2014.docx (88.14 KB) More Documents & Publications POLICY FLASH 2015-01 1 1

  16. Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d N Ne et tw wo or rk ki in ng g R Re ec ce ep pt ti io on n ( (l li ig gh ht t f fa ar re e) ) THURSDAY, APRIL 3 7:00 am R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ...

  17. Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    bl 7-L c"v. tP cq 9hi 8 documen t? O?,?O sta 0f-A Je 4 %muw pace? and-.-G?-. fi::ur-e;. Q&LOPifx3, Series.... ' d o,.L Plxmam-*twe,m%-h,itu. vzP-1014uMalg* budi&&ah...

  18. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; Kim, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Sauter, O.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; et al

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different depositionmore » position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (βN~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.« less

  19. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ∼ 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ∼ 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  20. Plasma rotation and NTM onset driven by central EC deposition in TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, S.; Lazzaro, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma CNR, Euratom Association, 20125 Milano (Italy); Sauter, O.; Canal, G.; Duval, B.; Federspiel, L.; Karpushov, A. N.; Kim, D.; Reimerders, H.; Rossel, J.; Testa, D.; Wagner, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Raju, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Collaboration: TCV Team

    2014-02-12

    The effects of the central electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) on the spontaneous plasma rotation and on the presence of Tearing Modes (TM), observed in the TCV tokamak[1], were recently investigated as an interplay between the toroidal velocity and NTM onset in absence of sawteeth, ELMs and error fields [23]. In a set of reproducible TCV discharges (I{sub p}? ?150 kA, B{sub t}? ?1.4 T, ne,{sub av?} 1.5 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}, T{sub e}? 3 keV and T{sub i}?0.25 keV, q{sub 95}?5.8) with both pure EC heating and current drive the cnt-Ip toroidal velocity was observed to be reduced with subsequent co-Ip appearance of 3/2 and 2/1 modes during the ramp up EC phases. The understanding of the capability of the on-axis EC power to modify the rotation profiles before and after the TM onset and of the sudden disappearance of 3/2 mode when 2/1 starts is the main purpose of this work. The velocity profile modifications are due to a direct effect of the EC absorbed power and also related to some variation of the perpendicular diffusion of the toroidal momentum and to magnetic braking effects of the kind of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) due to the NTM resonant field perturbations associated to the presence of TM. Numerical investigations are performed using a 1D toroidal momentum balance equation including contributions by external sources, as EC power, and NTV torques. Furthermore, the combined evolution of the 3/2 and 2/1 modes requires considering also coupling effects included in a generalized Rutherford equation for the modelling of the TM time growth.

  1. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; Kim, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Sauter, O.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H.; Park, H.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different deposition position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (βN~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.

  2. DISCHARGE IMPROVEMENT THROUGH CONTROL OF NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODES BY LOCALIZED ECCD IN DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRATER,R; LAHAYE,RJ; LOHR,J; LUCE,TC; PETTY,CC; FERRON,JR; HUMPHREYS,DA; STRAIT,EJ; PERKINS,FW; HARVEY,RW

    2002-10-01

    A271 DISCHARGE IMPROVEMENT THROUGH CONTROL OF NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODES BY LOCALIZED ECCD IN DIII-D. Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are MHD modes which can limit the performance of high beta discharges in tokamaks, in some cases leading to a major disruption. The destabilizing effect which results in NTM growth is a helical decrease in the bootstrap current caused by a local reduction of the plasma pressure gradient by seed magnetic islands. The NTM is particularly well suited to control since the mode is linearly stable although nonlinearly unstable, so if the island amplitude can be decreased below a threshold size the mode will decay and vanish. One means of shrinking the island is the replacement of the missing bootstrap current by a localized current generated by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). This method has been applied to the m=3/n=2 neoclassical tearing mode in DIII-D, in H-mode plasmas with ongoing ELMs and sawteeth, both of which generate seed islands periodically. In the case of the 3/2 mode, full suppression was obtained robustly by applying about 1.5 MW of ECCD very near the rational surface of the mode. When the mode first appears in the plasma the stored energy decreases by 20%, but after the mode is stabilized by the ECCD the beta may be raised above the initial threshold pressure by 20% by additional neutral beam heating, thereby generating an improvement in the limiting beta of nearly a factor 2. An innovative automated search algorithm was implemented to find and retain the optimum location for the ECCD in the presence of the mode.

  3. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipids and Metabolites in Tissues by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; yang, Pengxiang; Prieto, Mari; Laskin, Julia

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of tissue sections is a new frontier in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Here we report on fast 3D imaging of lipids and metabolites associated with mouse uterine decidual cells and embryo at the implantation site on day 6 of pregnancy. 2D imaging of 16-20 serial tissue sections deposited on the same glass slide was performed using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) an ambient ionization technique that enables sensitive localized analysis of analytes on surfaces without special sample pre-treatment. In this proof-of-principle study, nano-DESI was coupled to a high-resolution Q-Exactive instrument operated at high repetition rate of >5 Hz with moderate mass resolution of 35,000 (m/?m at m/z 200), which enabled acquisition of the entire 3D image with a spatial resolution of ~150 ?m in less than 4.5 hours. The results demonstrate localization of acetylcholine in the primary decidual zone (PDZ) of the implantation site throughout the depth of the tissue examined, indicating an important role of this signaling molecule in decidualization. Choline and phosphocholine metabolites associated with cell growth are enhanced in the PDZ and abundant in other cellular regions of the implantation site. Very different 3D distributions were obtained for fatty acids (FA), oleic acid and linoleic acid (FA 18:1 and FA 18:2), differing only by one double bond. Localization of FA 18:2 in the PDZ indicates its important role in decidualization while FA 18:1 is distributed more evenly throughout the tissue. In contrast, several lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC) observed in this study show donut-like distributions with localization around the PDZ. Complementary distributions with minimal overlap were observed for LPC 18:0 and FA 18:2 while the 3D image of the potential precursor phosphatidylcholine (PC 36:2) showed a significant overlap with both LPC 18:0 and FA 18:2.

  4. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body s-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter k{sub F}a=0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter k{sub F}a: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=? with ?=1.34 from the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for k{sub F}a>? and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=?. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86F}a<1.56) for the ferromagnetic phase. At sufficiently large negative effective range, the ferromagnetic phase disappears. On the other hand, the appearance of positive-energy bound state resonantly enhances the two-body decay rate around k{sub F}a=? and may prevent the study of equilibrium phases and ferromagnetism of the upper branch Fermi gas. - Highlights: Nonperturbative interaction energy is obtained within the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach. Positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter. The upper branch Fermi gas exhibits an energy maximum

  5. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A.; Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M.; Saleem, M.A.; Topham, P.S.

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub ?FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub ?FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub ?FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  6. Acute airway effects of airborne formaldehyde in sensitized and non-sensitized mice housed in a dry or humid environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Søren Thor Wolkoff, Peder Hammer, Maria Kofoed-Sørensen, Vivi Clausen, Per Axel Nielsen, Gunnar Damgård

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the role of air humidity and allergic sensitization on the acute airway response to inhaled formaldehyde (FA) vapor. Mice were sensitized to the immunogen ovalbumin (OVA) by three intraperitoneal injections followed by two aerosol challenges, giving rise to allergic airway inflammation. Control mice were sham sensitized by saline injections and challenged by saline aerosols. Once sensitized, the mice were housed at high (85–89%) or low (< 10%) relative humidity, respectively for 48 h prior to a 60-min exposure to either 0.4, 1.8 or about 5 ppm FA. Before, during and after exposure, breathing parameters were monitored. These included the specific markers of nose and lung irritations as well as the expiratory flow rate, the latter being a marker of airflow limitation. The sensory irritation response in the upper airways was not affected by allergic inflammation or changes in humidity. At high relative humidity, the OVA-sensitized mice had a decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to the saline control mice after exposure to approximately 5 ppm FA. This is in accordance with the observations that asthmatics are more sensitive than non-asthmatics to higher concentrations of airway irritants including FA. In the dry environment, the opposite trend was seen; here, the saline control mice had a significantly decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to OVA-sensitized mice when exposed to 1.8 and 4 ppm FA. We speculate that increased mucus production in the OVA-sensitized mice has increased the “scrubber effect” in the nose, consequently protecting the conducting and lower airways. - Highlights: ► Role of air humidity and allergy on sensitivity to an airway irritant was studied. ► In the humid environment, allergy amplified the effects of formaldehyde. ► In the dry environment, allergy reduced the effect of formaldehyde. ► Neither allergy nor humidity changed the formaldehyde-induced nasal irritation.

  7. Prediction of microalgae hydrothermal liquefaction products from feedstock biochemical composition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leow, Shijie; Witter, John R.; Vardon, Derek R.; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2015-05-11

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) uses water under elevated temperatures and pressures (200–350 °C, 5–20 MPa) to convert biomass into liquid “biocrude” oil. Despite extensive reports on factors influencing microalgae cell composition during cultivation and separate reports on HTL products linked to cell composition, the field still lacks a quantitative model to predict HTL conversion product yield and qualities from feedstock biochemical composition; the tailoring of microalgae feedstock for downstream conversion is a unique and critical aspect of microalgae biofuels that must be leveraged upon for optimization of the whole process. This study developed predictive relationships for HTL biocrude yield and othermore » conversion product characteristics based on HTL of Nannochloropsis oculata batches harvested with a wide range of compositions (23–59% dw lipids, 58–17% dw proteins, 12–22% dw carbohydrates) and a defatted batch (0% dw lipids, 75% dw proteins, 19% dw carbohydrates). HTL biocrude yield (33–68% dw) and carbon distribution (49–83%) increased in proportion to the fatty acid (FA) content. A component additivity model (predicting biocrude yield from lipid, protein, and carbohydrates) was more accurate predicting literature yields for diverse microalgae species than previous additivity models derived from model compounds. FA profiling of the biocrude product showed strong links to the initial feedstock FA profile of the lipid component, demonstrating that HTL acts as a water-based extraction process for FAs; the remainder non-FA structural components could be represented using the defatted batch. These findings were used to introduce a new FA-based model that predicts biocrude oil yields along with other critical parameters, and is capable of adjusting for the wide variations in HTL methodology and microalgae species through the defatted batch. Lastly, the FA model was linked to an upstream cultivation model (Phototrophic Process Model

  8. Prediction of microalgae hydrothermal liquefaction products from feedstock biochemical composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leow, Shijie; Witter, John R.; Vardon, Derek R.; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2015-05-11

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) uses water under elevated temperatures and pressures (200–350 °C, 5–20 MPa) to convert biomass into liquid “biocrude” oil. Despite extensive reports on factors influencing microalgae cell composition during cultivation and separate reports on HTL products linked to cell composition, the field still lacks a quantitative model to predict HTL conversion product yield and qualities from feedstock biochemical composition; the tailoring of microalgae feedstock for downstream conversion is a unique and critical aspect of microalgae biofuels that must be leveraged upon for optimization of the whole process. This study developed predictive relationships for HTL biocrude yield and other conversion product characteristics based on HTL of Nannochloropsis oculata batches harvested with a wide range of compositions (23–59% dw lipids, 58–17% dw proteins, 12–22% dw carbohydrates) and a defatted batch (0% dw lipids, 75% dw proteins, 19% dw carbohydrates). HTL biocrude yield (33–68% dw) and carbon distribution (49–83%) increased in proportion to the fatty acid (FA) content. A component additivity model (predicting biocrude yield from lipid, protein, and carbohydrates) was more accurate predicting literature yields for diverse microalgae species than previous additivity models derived from model compounds. FA profiling of the biocrude product showed strong links to the initial feedstock FA profile of the lipid component, demonstrating that HTL acts as a water-based extraction process for FAs; the remainder non-FA structural components could be represented using the defatted batch. These findings were used to introduce a new FA-based model that predicts biocrude oil yields along with other critical parameters, and is capable of adjusting for the wide variations in HTL methodology and microalgae species through the defatted batch. Lastly, the FA model was linked to an upstream cultivation model (Phototrophic Process Model

  9. Spitzer ultra faint survey program (surfs up). I. An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradač, Maruša; Huang, Kuang-Han; Cain, Benjamin; Hall, Nicholas; Lubin, Lori; Ryan, Russell; Casertano, Stefano; Lemaux, Brian C.; Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Allen, Steve; Von der Linden, Anja; Gladders, Mike; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-04-20

    Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program is a joint Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z ≳ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest-frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z ≳ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hr of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ∼30 hr exposure time in both 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm in the central 4' × 4' field and ∼15 hr in the flanking fields. This results in 3σ sensitivity limits of ∼26.6 and ∼26.2 AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z ≳ 7 sources (using a z = 9.5 galaxy behind MACS J1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical point-spread function models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.

  10. A=15N (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15N) GENERAL: See Table 15.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(HA57B, BR59M, FE59E, TA60L, BA61N, BU63D, KU63I, MA64HH, CO65I, FA65A, GR65E, GU65A, ZA65B, EL66B, SO66A, CO67M, EL67C, PA67K, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, SH68D, WA68E, ZH68A, CH69, EL69B). General calculations and reviews:(EV64, BE65G, OL66B, WI66E, FA67A, LO67E, BI68C, ZH68, HA69M, IW69A). Electromagnetic transitions:(RO65O, HA66O, PO66F, RO66C, RO66M, WA66D, KU67J,

  11. A low-temperature processed environment-friendly full-organic carrier collection layer for polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Ai-Li; Li, Yan-Qing E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn Jiang, Xiao-Chen; Ma, Zhong-Sheng; Wang, Qian-Kun; Guo, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Dan-Dan E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn Lee, Shuit-Tong; Tang, Jian-Xin E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn

    2014-08-04

    We constructed a concept of the full-organic carrier collection layer (CCL) used for polymer solar cells. The CCL is composed of dipyrazino[2,3-f:2?,3?-h]quinoxaline-2,3,6,7,10,11-hexacarbonitrile as hole collection layer (HCL) and chlorine-free solvents (formic acid (FA)) processed 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) as electron collection layer, exhibiting good solubility, and environmental protection. The FA based device shows ideal power conversion efficiency (3.75%), which is higher than that of control device (3.6%). Besides, the HCL shows a different mechanism in hole extraction by functioning as a charge recombination zone for electrons injected from anode and holes extracted from the donor materials.

  12. CIPS Validation Data Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Dinh

    2012-03-01

    This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

  13. Compact, flexible, frequency agile parametric wavelength converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Velsko, Stephan P.; Yang, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    This improved Frequency Agile Optical Parametric Oscillator provides near on-axis pumping of a single QPMC with a tilted periodically poled grating to overcome the necessity to find a particular crystal that will permit collinear birefringence in order to obtain a desired tuning range. A tilted grating design and the elongation of the transverse profile of the pump beam in the angle tuning plane of the FA-OPO reduces the rate of change of the overlap between the pumped volume in the crystal and the resonated and non-resonated wave mode volumes as the pump beam angle is changed. A folded mirror set relays the pivot point for beam steering from a beam deflector to the center of the FA-OPO crystal. This reduces the footprint of the device by as much as a factor of two over that obtained when using the refractive telescope design.

  14. A=7Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 7.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1967FA1A, 1968GO01, 1969TA1H, 1971CO28, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49). Cluster model: (1965NE1B, 1968HA1G, 1971NO02, 1972HI16, 1972KU12, 1972LE1L). Rotational and deformed models: (1965VO1A, 1966EL08). Special levels: (1966BA26, 1966EL08, 1967FA1A, 1969HA1G, 1969HA1F, 1971CO28, 1971NO02, 1972BB26, 1973AS02, 1973FE1J).

  15. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-31

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI. If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than HI/2π, CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehowmore » does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Lastly, avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.« less

  16. Current status and perspective of advanced loop type fast reactor in fast reactor cycle technology development project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Hajime; Aoto, Kazumi; Morishita, Masaki

    2007-07-01

    After selecting the combination of the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) with oxide fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication as the most promising concept of FR cycle system, 'Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems' was finalized in 2006. Instead, a new project, Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT Project) was launched in Japan focusing on development of the selected concepts. This paper describes the current status and perspective of the advanced loop type SFR system in the FaCT Project, especially on the design requirements, current design as well as the related innovative technologies together with the development road-map. Some considerations on advantages of the advanced loop type design are also described. (authors)

  17. Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software BEopt 2.4 Now Available! With the release of BEopt Version 2.4 Beta, users can now perform modeling analysis on multifamily buildings! Other new options for input include: heat pump clothes dryers; electric/gas clothes dryers; condensing tank water heaters; door construction and area; window areas defined by façade-specific WWRs; and 2013 ASHRAE 62.2

  18. Surface runoff from full-scale coal combustion product pavements during accelerated loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.M.; Taerakul, P.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing coal combustion products (CCPs) was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under well-controlled conditions. An equivalent of 20 years of highway traffic loading was simulated at the OSU/OU Accelerated Pavement Load Facility (APLF). Three types of portland cement concrete driving surface layers were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (PC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). In general, the concentrations of minor and trace elements were higher in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates than in the leachates obtained from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure and ASTM leaching procedures. Importantly, none of the leachate concentrations exceeded the TCLP limits or primary drinking water standards. Surface runoff monitoring results showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, whereas there were little differences in release rates between PC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for Cr, elements were released as particulates (>0.45 {mu} m) rather than dissolved constituents. The incorporation of fly ash in the PC cement concrete pavements examined in this study resulted in little or no deleterious environmental impact from the leaching of inorganic elements over the lifetime of the pavement system.

  19. Comparing mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of chicken manure: Microbial community dynamics and process resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Qigui; Takemura, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kengo; Li, Yu-You

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Microbial community dynamics and process functional resilience were investigated. • The threshold of TAN in mesophilic reactor was higher than the thermophilic reactor. • The recoverable archaeal community dynamic sustained the process resilience. • Methanosarcina was more sensitive than Methanoculleus on ammonia inhibition. • TAN and FA effects the dynamic of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria obviously. - Abstract: While methane fermentation is considered as the most successful bioenergy treatment for chicken manure, the relationship between operational performance and the dynamic transition of archaeal and bacterial communities remains poorly understood. Two continuous stirred-tank reactors were investigated under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions feeding with 10%TS. The tolerance of thermophilic reactor on total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) was found to be 8000 mg/L with free ammonia (FA) 2000 mg/L compared to 16,000 mg/L (FA1500 mg/L) of mesophilic reactor. Biomethane production was 0.29 L/gV S{sub in} in the steady stage and decreased following TAN increase. After serious inhibition, the mesophilic reactor was recovered successfully by dilution and washing stratagem compared to the unrecoverable of thermophilic reactor. The relationship between the microbial community structure, the bioreactor performance and inhibitors such as TAN, FA, and volatile fatty acid was evaluated by canonical correspondence analysis. The performance of methanogenic activity and substrate removal efficiency were changed significantly correlating with the community evenness and phylogenetic structure. The resilient archaeal community was found even after serious inhibition in both reactors. Obvious dynamics of bacterial communities were observed in acidogenic and hydrolytic functional bacteria following TAN variation in the different stages.

  20. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Addthis 1 of 3 PPG Industries and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are partnering to develop a new class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and façade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG Industries 2 of 3 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group physicist Paul

  1. Tn-seq of Caulobacter crescentus under uranium stress reveals genes essential for detoxification and stress tolerance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yung, Mimi C.; Park, Dan M.; Overton, K. Wesley; Blow, Matthew J.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Smit, John R.; Murray, Sean R.; Ricci, Dante P.; Christen, Beat; Bowman, Grant R.; et al

    2015-07-20

    Ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. In order to gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFamore » and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. These results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus.« less

  2. Surviving Operation Desert Storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vice, J. )

    1992-08-01

    The importance of aircraft survivability during the invasion of Iraq is examined detailing anecdotal evidence of susceptibility and vulnerability reduction. Among the aircraft used that were designed to be more survivable than their predecessors were the F-117, A-10, F/A-18, and the AH-64. Reduced vulnerability is incorporated into the aircraft designs in the form of damage tolerant components, redundancy, self-sealing fluid systems, and miniaturization.

  3. Monthly Performance Report October 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monthly Performance Report October 2009 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report October 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 1 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report October 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 1 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key Accomplishments

  4. Weldability and hot ductility of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, D.I.; Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); David, S.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The weldability of iron aluminide alloys is discussed. Although readily welded with electron beam (EB) and gas-tungsten arc (GTA) techniques, iron aluminides are sometimes susceptible to cracking during cooling when welded with the GTA welding process. Taken into account are the effects of microstructural instability (grain growth), weld heat input (cooling rate) and environment on the hot ductility of an iron aluminide alloy designated FA-129. 64 refs., 59 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  6. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Monthly Performance Report December 2009 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report December 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 3 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report December 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 3 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key

  7. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Monthly Performance Report January 2010 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report January 2010 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 4 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report January 2010 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 4 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key Accomplishments

  8. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monthly Performance Report November 2009 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report November 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 2 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report November 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 2 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key

  9. Microbial Reduction of Furfurals to Furan Alcohols by a Microbial Species -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Microbial Reduction of Furfurals to Furan Alcohols by a Microbial Species Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryAn ORNL researcher developed a method for producing furfuryl alcohol (FA) through bioprocessing using a thermophilic microorganism. This organism has been shown to be highly resistant to the toxic effects of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and can propagate in the presence of over 48 g/L (500

  10. Meet CMI Researcher Eric Schwegler | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schwegler Eric Schwegler, FA4 Deputy CMI researcher Eric Schwegler is the leader for Focus Area 4, Crosscutting Research, and the Thrust Lead for Enabling Science. Previously he served as Deputy Lead for Focus Area 4. Eric received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 1998 from the University of Minnesota, following undergraduate degrees in computer science and chemistry from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. His thesis research was focused on the development of linear scaling

  11. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences Building a secondary containment system Broder, M.F. (1994) 144 Methods and opportunities in the recycling of rare earth based materials Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.; Jones, L.L. (1994) 134 Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. (1999) 128 Ammonia usage in vapor compression for refrigeration and air-conditioning in the United States

  12. Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles Dynamic model of organic Rankine cycle with R245fa working fluid and conservative component efficiencies predict power generation in excess of electrical accessory load demand under highway drive cycle deer11_hussain.pdf (688.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Automotive Thermoelectric Generator Design Issues

  13. Differences in Supratentorial Damage of White Matter in Pediatric Survivors of Posterior Fossa Tumors With and Without Adjuvant Treatment as Detected by Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Driever, Pablo Hernaiz; Blankenburg, Friederike; Luedemann, Lutz; Henze, Guenter; Bruhn, Harald

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To elucidate morphologic correlates of brain dysfunction in pediatric survivors of posterior fossa tumors by using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine neuroaxonal integrity in white matter. Patients and Methods: Seventeen medulloblastoma (MB) patients who had received surgery and adjuvant treatment, 13 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) patients who had been treated only with surgery, and age-matched healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging on a 3-Tesla system. High-resolution conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and DTI data sets were obtained. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics, a part of the Functional MRI of the Brain Software Library. Results: Compared with control subjects, FA values of MB patients were significantly decreased in the cerebellar midline structures, in the frontal lobes, and in the callosal body. Fractional anisotropy values of the PA patients were not only decreased in cerebellar hemispheric structures as expected, but also in supratentorial parts of the brain, with a distribution similar to that in MB patients. However, the amount of significantly decreased FA was greater in MB than in PA patients, underscoring the aggravating neurotoxic effect of the adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: Neurotoxic mechanisms that are present in PA patients (e.g., internal hydrocephalus and damaged cerebellar structures affecting neuronal circuits) contribute significantly to the alteration of supratentorial white matter in pediatric posterior fossa tumor patients.

  14. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0.46(22)fm2, with a much larger uncertainty than determined inmore » the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμn → μ-p)|Ev=1GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10-39cm2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.« less

  15. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    2009-08-05

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

  16. Sun light mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles as carrier for 6-mercaptopurine: Preparation, characterization and toxicity studies in zebrafish embryo model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Sathish Kumar, Muniram; Dinesh, Murugan Girija; Kannappan, Sudalyandi; Suguna, Lonchin

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? Gold nanoparticles prepared using eco-friendly method with good in vitro stability. ? Can be used as drug delivery system. ? Did not show any toxicity in zebrafish embryo. ? More toxic to cancer cells when compared to N-Au-Mp and Mp. -- Abstract: The objective of this study is to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles by sun light irradiation method. The prepared gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were modified using folic acid and then coupled with 6-mercaptopurine. These modified nanoparticles were used as a tool for targeted drug delivery to treat laryngeal cancer. In the present study, novel bionanocomposites containing nutrient agar coated gold nano particles (N-AuNPs) coupled with 6-mercaptopurine (drug) (N-AuNPs-Mp), folic acid (ligand) (N-AuNPs-Mp-Fa) and rhodamine (dye) (N-AuNPs-Rd), a fluorescent agent, were prepared and characterized by IR, UV, TEM, Particle size analysis and in vitro stability. The toxicity and fluorescence of N-Au was studied using zebrafish embryo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free Mp, N-Au-Mp and N-Au-Mp-Fa against HEp-2 cells was compared and found that the amount of Mp required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (IC{sub 50}) was much lower in N-Au-Mp-Fa than in free Mp and N-Au-Mp.

  17. A = 11B (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11B) GENERAL: See Table 11.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KU56, KU57A, BI60, TA60L, BA61D, BA61N, KO61L, KU61E, TR61, UM61, AM64, NE64C, CO65I, FA65A, FA65C, HA66F, MA66S, CO67M, FA67A, KU68A). Collective model:(BR59M, CL61D, CL62G, MA64HH, NE65E, EL66B, MI66J, RI67J, GO68). Ground state properties:(BE62L, BE63T, LI64H, LI64I, ST64, HU65C, RI66F, WI66E, BA67E, RH67A, SH67C, BA68B). Other:(SE63G, OL64A, TH64A, WI66F, BA67HH, PO67G).

  18. A Combined Experimental and Computational Study on the Stability of Nanofluids Containing Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annapureddy, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-01-23

    Computational studies on nanofluids composed of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) were performed using molecular modeling techniques. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used to study adsorption behavior of 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane (R-245fa) in a MIL-101 MOF at various temperatures. To understand the stability of the nanofluid composed of MIL-101 particles, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to compute potentials of mean force between hypothetical MIL-101 fragments terminated with two different kinds of modulators in R-245fa and water. Our computed potentials of mean force results indicate that the MOF particles tend to disperse better in water than in R-245fa. The reasons for this observation were analyzed and discussed. Our results agree with experimental results indicating that the employed potential models and modeling approaches provide good description of molecular interactions and the reliabilities. Work performed by LXD was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Work performed by HVRA, SKN, RKM, and PBM was supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  19. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in ?-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of ?-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at ?-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within ?-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a JohnsonMehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: Precipitation of ? and ? phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed Johnson-Mehltype equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  20. Launch of fast reactor cycle technology development project in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagayama, Yutaka

    2007-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA launched a new Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development f (FaCT) Project in cooperation with the Japanese electric utilities. The FaCT project is based on the conclusion of the previous project, namely the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems (FS) which carried out in last seven years. In the FS, the combination of the sodium-cooled fast reactor with oxide fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication was selected as the main concept which should be developed principally because it was the most promising concept for commercialization. A conceptual design study of the main concept and research and development of innovative technologies adopted in the main concept are implemented toward an important milestone at 2015. The development targets, which were set up at the beginning stage of FS, were revised for the FaCT project based on the results of FS and change in Japanese society environment and in the world situation. International collaboration is promoted to pursue fast reactor cycle technology which deserves the global standard and its efficient development. (author)

  1. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-10

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the “tokamak” concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of “H-mode” and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the “missing” current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM “seeding” instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a “wild card” may be broadening of the localized

  2. MHD-induced Energetic Ion Loss during H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.S. Medley; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Andre; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; A.L. Roquemore; and the NSTX Team

    2004-03-15

    MHD-induced energetic ion loss in neutral-beam-heated H-mode [high-confinement mode] discharges in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] is discussed. A rich variety of energetic ion behavior resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity is observed in the NSTX using a horizontally scanning Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) whose sightline views across the three co-injected neutral beams. For example, onset of an n = 2 mode leads to relatively slow decay of the energetic ion population (E {approx} 10-100 keV) and consequently the neutron yield. The effect of reconnection events, sawteeth, and bounce fishbones differs from that observed for low-n, low-frequency, tearing-type MHD modes. In this case, prompt loss of the energetic ion population occurs on a time scale of less than or equal to 1 ms and a precipitous drop in the neutron yield occurs. This paper focuses on MHD-induced ion loss during H-mode operation in NSTX. After H-mode onset, the NPA charge-exchange spectrum usually exhibits a significant loss of energetic ions only for E > E(sub)b/2 where E(sub)b is the beam injection energy. The magnitude of the energetic ion loss was observed to decrease with increasing tangency radius, R(sub)tan, of the NPA sightline, increasing toroidal field, B(sub)T, and increasing neutral-beam injection energy, E(sub)b. TRANSP modeling suggests that MHD-induced ion loss is enhanced during H-mode operation due to an evolution of the q and beam deposition profiles that feeds both passing and trapped ions into the region of low-n MHD activity. ORBIT code analysis of particle interaction with a model magnetic perturbation supported the energy selectivity of the MHD-induced loss observed in the NPA measurements. Transport analysis with the TRANSP code using a fast-ion diffusion tool to emulate the observed MHD-induced energetic ion loss showed significant modifications of the neutral- beam heating as well as the power balance, thermal diffusivities, energy confinement times

  3. SU-E-J-143: Short- and Near-Term Effects of Proton Therapy On Cerebral White Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, J; Merchant, T; Ogg, R; Sabin, N; Hua, C; Indelicato, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess early effects of proton therapy on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in relation to the subsequent near-term development of such effects. Methods: Sixteen children (aged 2–19 years) with craniopharyngioma underwent proton therapy of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) in a prospective therapeutic trial. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed at baseline before proton therapy and every 3 months thereafter. Tract-based spatial statics analysis of DTI data was performed to derive the fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) in 26 volumes of interest (VOIs). The dose distributions were spatially normalized to identify VOIs prone to high doses. The longitudinal percentage changes of the FA and RD in these VOIs at 3 and 12 months from the baseline were calculated, and their relationships were evaluated. Results: The average dose was highest to the cerebral peduncle (CP), corticospinal tract (CST) in the pons, pontine crossing tract (PCT), anterior/posterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC/PLIC), and genu of the corpus callosum (GCC). It ranged from 33.3 GCE (GCC) to 49.7 GCE (CP). A mild but statistically significant (P<0.05) decline of FA was observed 3 months after proton therapy in all VOIs except the PLIC and ranged from −1.7% (ALIC) to −2.8% (PCT). A significant increase of RD was found in the CP (3.5%) and ALIC (2.1%). The average longitudinal change from the baseline was reduced at 12 months for most VOIs. However, the standard deviation increased, indicating that the temporal pattern varied individually. The follow-up measurements at 3 and 12 months correlated for the CP, CST, PCT, and GCC (P < 0.04). Conclusion: DTI data suggest early (3 months) effects of proton therapy on microstructures in the white matter. The subsequent follow-up indicated individual variation of the changes, which was partly implied by the early effects.

  4. Differences in Brainstem Fiber Tract Response to Radiation: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Li, Yimei; Feng, Tianshu; Gajjar, Amar; Ogg, Robert J.; Hua, Chiaho

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation-induced changes in white matter tracts are uniform across the brainstem. Methods and Materials: We analyzed serial diffusion tensor imaging data, acquired before radiation therapy and over 48 to 72 months of follow-up, from 42 pediatric patients (age 6-20 years) with medulloblastoma. FSL software (FMRIB, Oxford, UK) was used to calculate fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial, radial, and mean diffusivities. For a consistent identification of volumes of interest (VOIs), the parametric maps of each patient were transformed to a standard brain space (MNI152), on which we identified VOIs including corticospinal tract (CST), medial lemniscus (ML), transverse pontine fiber (TPF), and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) at the level of pons. Temporal changes of DTI parameters in VOIs were compared using a linear mixed effect model. Results: Radiation-induced white matter injury was marked by a decline in FA after treatment. The decline was often accompanied by decreased axial diffusivity, increased radial diffusivity, or both. This implied axonal damage and demyelination. We observed that the magnitude of the changes was not always uniform across substructures of the brainstem. Specifically, the changes in DTI parameters for TPF were more pronounced than in other regions (P<.001 for FA) despite similarities in the distribution of dose. We did not find a significant difference among CST, ML, and MCP in these patients (P>.093 for all parameters). Conclusions: Changes in the structural integrity of white matter tracts, assessed by DTI, were not uniform across the brainstem after radiation therapy. These results support a role for tract-based assessment in radiation treatment planning and determination of brainstem tolerance.

  5. Nuclear Data Sheets for A=77

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh B.; Nica N.; Singh,B.; Nica,N.

    2012-05-01

    The experimental nuclear spectroscopic data for known nuclides of mass number 77 (Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y) have been evaluated and presented together with adopted properties for levels and {gamma} rays. New high-spin data are available for {sup 77}Ga, {sup 77}Br and {sup 77}Kr. New precise single-particle transfer cross section data are available for {sup 77}Ge, {sup 77}As, {sup 77}Se and {sup 77}Br from eight different reactions (2009Ka06,2008Sc03); these data give information for occupancy of valence neutron orbitals in the ground states of target nuclides: {sup 76}Ge, {sup 76}Se and {sup 78}Se. No significant new data since the 1997 NDS for A = 77 (1997Fa12) have been reported for {sup 77}Rb and {sup 77}Sr. No data are yet available for excited states in {sup 77}Ni, {sup 77}Cu and {sup 77}Y. Level schemes from the radioactive decays of {sup 77}Ni to {sup 77}Cu and {sup 77}Y to {sup 77}Sr are unknown, while those for the decays of {sup 77}Cu to {sup 77}Zn and {sup 77}Ga to {sup 77}Ge are incomplete. Detailed gamma-ray data for {sup 77}Ge from thermal-neutron capture in {sup 76}Ge, together with extensive gamma-ray data from {sup 77}Ge decay to {sup 77}As have become available from 2012Me04. This work benefited from earlier evaluations (1997Fa12,1989Fa07,1980Si05,1973Ur02) of A = 77 nuclides, however, the data presented here supersede those in above evaluations.

  6. Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.

    2011-06-07

    The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

  7. Tn-seq of Caulobacter crescentus under uranium stress reveals genes essential for detoxification and stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yung, Mimi C.; Park, Dan M.; Overton, K. Wesley; Blow, Matthew J.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Smit, John R.; Murray, Sean R.; Ricci, Dante P.; Christen, Beat; Bowman, Grant R.; Jiao, Yongqin

    2015-07-20

    Ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. In order to gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFa and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. These results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus.

  8. Effect of surface condition on the aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion characteristics of Fe-Al-based alloys were evaluated by electrochemical methods. Cyclic anodic polarization evaluations were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution (pH = 4,200 ppm Cl{sup {minus}}) on the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84 (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05B, at %), FA-129 (Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.2C, at %), and FAL-Mo (Fe-28Al-5Cr-1Mo-0.04B-0.08Zr, at %), on the FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385 (Fe-35.65Al-0.20Mo-0.05Zr-0.11C, at %). The surface conditions evaluated were: As received (i.e. with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned (ground through 600-grit SiC paper), and chemically cleaned (10% HNO{sub 3}, 2%HF, at 43 {degree}C). The principal electrochemical parameter of interest was the critical putting potential with lower values indicating less resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion. For all materials evaluated, the critical pitting potential was found to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. Mechanisms responsible for the detrimental high-temperature-oxide effect are under study.

  9. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hua Chiaho; Merchant, Thomas E.; Gajjar, Amar; Broniscer, Alberto; Zhang, Yong; Li Yimei; Glenn, George R.; Kun, Larry E.; Ogg, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4-39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54-59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6-5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7-59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response in

  10. Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Regulatory Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects DOE F 4600.2 FA RepReqChklst FINAL 10-2014.docx (88.14 KB) More Documents & Publications POLICY FLASH 2015-01 1 1 Department of Energy

    for RD&D Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for RD&D Projects DOE F 4600.2, Financial Assistance Reporting Checklist for RD and D (154.3 KB) Attachment 1, Research Performance Progress Report (183.52 KB) More

  11. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

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    AERI Observations in the Arctic: Monthly-Average Radiance Spectra and Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Walden, V.P., Revercomb, H.E., Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Ciganovich, N., Dedecker, R.G., Dirkx, T., Garcia, R.K., Herbsleb, R., Howell, H.B., McRae, D., Short, J., and Tobin, D., Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/Space Science and Engineering Center/University of Wisconsin Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Atmospheric Emitted Radiance

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Comparison of High Spectral Resolution Infrared Cloud Boundary Algorithms using S-HIS and AERI Measurements Holz, R.E.(a), Antonelli, P.(a), Ackerman, S.(a), McGill, M.J.(a), Nagel, F.(a), Feltz, W.F.(a), and Turner, D.D.(b), Univeristy of Wisconsin, Madison (a), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud top pressure is an important parameter in determining the radiative impact of clouds on climate. In addition,

  13. NRFE-07-28

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Proprietary Class 3 Page 1 of 10 FFT-13-34 ©2013 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC All Rights Reserved To: Jess Gehin - AMA FA Lead Rose Montgomery - AMA Deputy Lead cc: Z. Karoutas (W) From: J. Yan (W) Date: April 16, 2013 Tel: (803) 647-2047 Our Ref: PFT-13-34 Fax: (803) 695-3985 Subject: CASL Technical Note: Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation Keywords: Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation, LOCA, CFD Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation Pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment buildings are

  14. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Tobin, D.C., F.A. Best, P.D. Brown, S.A. Clough, R.G. Dedecker, R.G. Ellingson, R.K. Garcia, H.B. Howell, R.O. Knuteson, E.J. Mlawer, H.E. Revercomb, J.F. Short, P.F.W. van Delst, and V.P. Walden, 1999. "Downwelling spectral radiance observations at the SHEBA ice station:

  15. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington,

  16. TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    --____ R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal/Storage a Research Organization a Government 0 Other Sponsored i F[fa' tty ------__------__ I Prime 5 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order a Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit p CgNTRACTING PERIOD: L.&G , PX& & cx LFkoL ~~~~~~~~~----------_ __ _______ OWNERSH; P: AEC/MED AEC/MED GOVT GOVT

  17. ORISE: Faculty Research Experiences - Dr. Miguel Castro

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    Miguel Castro Research opportunity puts chemistry professor on the FaST track Dr. Miguel Castro Miguel Castro, from the University of Puerto Rico, spent part of the summer conducting research on surface tension in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Faculty Student Team Research program. Click image to enlarge. Many people believe that to get to the heart of a matter one has to delve below the surface. For chemistry professor Miguel Castro, Ph.D., of the University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez, the

  18. Argonne Lea Computing F A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lea Computing F A r g o n n e L e a d e r s h i p C o m p u t i n g FA c i l i t y 2 0 1 3 S c i e n c e H i g H l i g H t S Argonne leadership computing Facility C O N T E N T S About ALCF ...............................................................................................................................2 MirA...............................................................................................................................................3 SCienCe DireCtor'S MeSSAge

  19. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  20. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Soils Soil Series and Phase D Fa D LaB _ TrB D TrC _ VeC .Wm '" Vegetation Compartment 28 Community D Mixed Pine/Hardwood D Upland Hardwod D Bottomland Hardwood _Water D Sandhill Scrub oak/Pine D Sandhill Pine/Scrub oak N Streams Roads _Water [2LJ Other Set-Asides DTES Plants (2) llilliJ Hydric Soils Road 8.11 560 Meters Figure 29-1. Plant cOllll1lunities and soils associated with the Scrub Oak Natural Area. 29-5 Set-Aside 29: Scrub Oak Natural Area

  1. CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMA.NRC.P5.01 CASL NRC Commissioner Technical Seminar Jess Gehin Oak Ridge National Laboratory December 22, 2012 CASL-U-2014-0076-000-a CASL-U-2012-0076-000-a 1 CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors NRC Commissioner Technical Seminar November 30, 2012 Doug Kothe (ORNL) CASL Director Doug Burns (INL) CASL Deputy Director Paul Turinsky (NCSU) CASL Chief Scientist Jess Gehin (ORNL) CASL AMA FA

  2. ,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O'

  3. CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your

  4. LL Pm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LL Pm ' F II c iJr Fa, i n m n ys m * t F t F c* F F -- ORAU 89/G-77 IL. 17- Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning U.S. Department of Energy RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 18 HENDERSON STREET JOLIET, ILLINOIS M. R. LANDIS Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 . rlly mfhct Ez of the 8pmnmtng Institutiona of Oak Ridga Asaodatd ThsoplnlonBoxpmnsdhDrDlndonotnnasn IJnm

  5. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  6. Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2011-05-17

    A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

  7. 12B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1948JE03: 12B; measured T1/2. 1956TA07, 1957CO59, 1958CO66, 1958KA31: 12B. 1957CO57: 12B; measured T1/2. 1958KR65: 12B; measured T1/2. 1959FA03: 12B; measured T1/2. 1961SC09: 12B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962NE14: 12B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962PO02: 12B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963AL15: 12B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FI05: 12B; measured

  8. 12N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1949AL05: 12N; measured T1/2. 1958VE20: 12N; measured T1/2. 1959FA03: 12N; measured T1/2. 1962MA22: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962PO02: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FI05: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963GL04: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963PE10: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963WI05: 12N; measured not

  9. L3:THM.CFD.P3.03 Summary of THM Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary of THM Meeting with EDF Robert Lowrie Los Alamos National Laboratory August 24, 2011 CASL-U-2011-0281-000 CASL-U-2011-0281-000 Summary of THM Meeting with EDF On August 24, 2011, Rob Lowrie (THM FA Lead) met with Olivier Marchand (EDF) at ORNL. Marchand leads R&D efforts at EDF. The focus of this meeting was to begin potential collaborations between CASL and EDF in the area of thermal hydraulics. Marchand went through two presentations on their Saturne [1] and Neptune [2] codes.

  10. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R.; David, S.A.

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  11. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 1\ ".~ -. , ;J Community _ Loblolly Pine _ Slash Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood ~ Upland Hard'MJod Bottomland Hand'MJod Mixed Swamp Forest I!!!!I Carolina Bay Wetland _Water 8 Bottomland Hand'MJod/Pine DForb/Grassland _ Other* Disturbed Area &:i Scrub/Shrub %~~~sBoundary :tfW'Roads o Utimy ROW Streams NPDES outfalls o Monitoring Wells * Wastesites CJ TES Plants (2) ~ Other Set*Asides .-. SRS Bays Areas D Hydric Soiis o Soils Soil Series and Phase D AnB D BaB D BaC D Ch I::!:I Fa D LaB _

  12. Compartment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 Road 8-3.1 a Community _Loblolly Pine I!!i!iILongleaf Pine DMixed Pine/Hardwood C]Carolina Bay Wetland _Water hW#IHydric Soils f I TES Plants (1) 1M. Roads /YI. Streams '1\1 Site Boundary 280 Soil Series and Phase D BaB oDoA LJ Fa o FuB o LaB o Rm .Wm o 280 Soils 560 Meters N A Figure 25-1. Plant cOllllllunities and soils associated with the Mona Bay and Woodward Bay Set- Aside Area. 25-5 Set-Aside 25: Mona Bay and Woodward

  13. Future challenges for MEMS failure analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen

    2003-07-01

    MEMS processes and components are rapidly changing in device design, processing, and, most importantly, application. This paper will discuss the future challenges faced by the MEMS failure analysis as the field of MEMS (fabrication, component design, and applications) grows. Specific areas of concern for the failure analyst will also be discussed. MEMS components are extremely diverse in their application and function. Failure analysts will have to be equally diverse and/or multidisciplinary in their analysis of these devices. Many tools and techniques developed from the IC industry have been used for MEMS FA, but more MEMS-specific FA toolsets have to be developed for diagnosis of these failure mechanisms. Many of the devices discussed in this paper have global issues associated with failure analysis. Many non destructive techniques must be developed to assess the failure mechanisms. Tools and techniques that can perform these functions on a larger scale will also be required. To achieve this, industry will have to work with academia and government institutions to create the knowledge base required for tool and technique development for global and local defect localization.

  14. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenfen Zhu; Masaki Takaoka; Kenji Shiota; Kazuyuki Oshita; Yoshinori Kitajima

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCl, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl{sub 2}, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCl, 37% as CaCl{sub 2}, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. 25 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  16. Passive Two-Phase Cooling for Automotive Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated and tested using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245 fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator concept that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce its size was designed. Simulation results indicate the concept's thermal resistance can be 58% to 65% lower than automotive dual-side-cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers-plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  17. DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, T.; Chandler, G.; Daugherty, W.; Imrich, K.; Jankins, C.

    1996-09-12

    To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.

  18. Effect of landfill leachate organic acids on trace metal adsorption by kaolinite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroth, B.; Garrison, Sposito

    1997-02-01

    Hexanoic (hex) and fulvic acid (FA), representing early and later stages of landfill leachate evolution, were examined for influence on trace metal adsorption by a poorly crystallized kaolinite (KGa-2). Our experiments represented a model approach to examine possible reaction mechanisms in an environmentally important ternary metal-ligand-mineral surface system. Batch experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol kg(-1) NaClO4 at pH 3-8. Concentrations of metals (Cu, Cd, and Pb) and ligands were representative of those found typically in groundwater immediately downgradient of a landfill. The presence of FA resulted in enhancement of metal adsorption below pH 5, whereas the presence of hex produced no significant net change in metal uptake. Measured surface charge properties of KGa-2 were combined with binary and ternary system data in constructing a quantitative model of the system. The simple combination of binary system results was not effective in predicting the observed ternary system behavior. In both ternary systems, the addition of ternary surface complexes (TSCs) to the models resulted in a satisfactory fit to the data. Our work suggests the strong possibility that TSC involvement in surface reactions of natural adsorbents may be a useful concept.

  19. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  20. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  1. TU-C-12A-07: Characterization of Longitudinal Reproducibility of Quantitative Diffusion Imaging Data Acquired with Four Different Protocols Using a Phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X; Buzzelli, M; Randazzo, W; Yanasak, N

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the longitudinal reproducibility of diffusion imaging data acquired with four different protocols using a phantom. Methods: The Diffusive Quantitative Imaging Phantom (DQIP) was constructed using fifteen cylindrical compartments within a larger compartment, filled with deionized water doped with CuSO4 and NaCl. The smaller compartments contained arrays of hexagonal or cylindrical glass capillaries of varying inner diameters, for differing restraint of water diffusion. The sensitivity of diffusion imaging metrics to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was probed by doping compartments with differing ratios of deuterium oxide to H2O. A cork phantom enclosure was constructed to increase thermal stability during scanning and a cork holder was made to reproduce scanner positioning. Four different protocols of DWI (diffusion weighted imaging) and DTI (Diffusion tensor imaging) imaging were assembled on a GE Excite HDx 3.0T MRI scanner to collect imaging data over 9-10 days. Data was processed with in-house software created in Matlab to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Results: All DTI and DWI sequences showed good longitudinal stability of mean FA and ADC values per compartment, exhibiting low standard deviation ∼9%. A t-test was performed to compare mean FA values from the DTI clinical protocol to those of the DTI special protocol, indicating significantly different values in the majority of compartments. ANOVA performed on ADC values for all DTI and DWI sequences also showed significantly different values in a majority of compartments. Conclusion: This work has the potential for quantifying systemic variations between diffusion imaging sequences from different platforms. Characterization of DWI and DTI performance were done over four sequences with predictable results. This data suggests that the DQIP phantom may be a reliable method of monitoring day-to-day and scan-to-scan variation in

  2. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W.

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial 235U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, …, 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for 134Cs/137Cs 134Cs/154Eu, and 154Eu/137Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial 235U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the

  3. A=10B (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10B) GENERAL: See (BA59F, BR59M, TA60L, TR61, IN62, BU63D, KU63B, ME63A, MO63C, OL63B, VL63A, WA63C, AM64, BA64V, FR64D, GR64C, MA64HH, NE64C, OL64A, ST64, VA64F, FA65C, NE65). See also Table 10.6 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground State: μ = +1.8007 nm (FU65E). Q = +0.08 b (FU65E). 1. 6Li(α, γ)10B Qm = 4.461 Six resonances are observed in the range Eα = 0.5 to 2.6 MeV, corresponding to 10B*(4.76 - 6.06 MeV): see Table 10.8 (in PDF or PS).

  4. A=12C (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1968AJ02) and Table 12.8 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1967SV1A, 1968BA1L, 1968DR1B, 1968FA1B, 1968FU1B, 1968GO01, 1968GU1C, 1968HA11, 1968RO1G, 1969GU1E, 1969GU03, 1969IK1A, 1969LA26, 1969MO1F, 1969SA1A, 1969SV1A, 1969WA06, 1969WO05, 1970AR21, 1970BE26, 1970BO33, 1970BO1J, 1970CO1H, 1970DE1F, 1970DO1A, 1970EI06, 1970GI11, 1970GU11, 1970KH01, 1970KO04, 1970KR1D, 1970LO1C, 1970RE1G, 1970RU1A, 1970RY1A,

  5. A=13C (1970AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13C) GENERAL: See Table 13.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1959BR1E, 1960PH1A, 1960TA1C, 1960ZE1B, 1961BA1G, 1961BA1E, 1961KU17, 1961KU1C, 1961NE1B, 1962EA01, 1963BO1G, 1963MA1E, 1963PE04, 1963SE19, 1963TR02, 1964AM1D, 1964NA1D, 1964ST1B, 1965CO25, 1965MA1T, 1965ME1C, 1965NE1C, 1965WE1D, 1966EL08, 1966GU08, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966NO1B, 1966RI12, 1966WI1E, 1967BA12, 1967CO32, 1967FA1A, 1967HU1C, 1967KU1E, 1967PO1J, 1967RI1B,

  6. A=13N (1970AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13N) GENERAL: See Table 13.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1955LA1A, 1957HU1C, 1959BA1D, 1960PH1A, 1960TA1C, 1961KU17, 1961KU1C, 1961NE1B, 1962IN02, 1962TA1E, 1963BA43, 1963BO1G, 1963SE19, 1963TR02, 1964AM1D, 1964BO1K, 1964ST1B, 1965BO1N, 1965MA1T, 1965ME1C, 1965WE1D, 1966EL08, 1966HA18, 1966NO1B, 1967BR1Q, 1967FA1A, 1967HU1C, 1967KU1E, 1967NE1D, 1967PO1J, 1967WA1C, 1968FI1F, 1968GO01, 1968HO1H, 1969VA1C, 1969ZU1B). Other:

  7. A=14O (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14O) GENERAL: See Table 14.26 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See (OT59, PI60B, TA60L, FR61B, BL63C, LO64C, KO65F, BO66J, KE66C, MI66C, AU67A, EI68, FA68C, NE68A, GA69O, SO69A). 1. 14O(β+)14N Qm = 5.144 The decay proceeds primarily to the Jπ = 0+; T = 1 first excited state of 14N: see Table 14.27 (in PDF or PS). Weak branches are also observed to the ground state of 14N and to the 3.95 MeV state. The ground-state decay is considerably faster than

  8. Characteristics of the WWR-K test core and the LEU LTAS to be placed in the central experimental beryllium device.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arinkin, F.; Chakrov, P.; Chekushina, L.; Gizatulin,, Sh.; Koltochnik, S.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Kazakhstan Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

    2010-03-01

    In 2010 life test of three LEU (19.7%) lead test assemblies (LTA) is expected in the existing WWR-K reactor core with regular WWR-C-type fuel assemblies and a smaller core with a beryllium insert. Preliminary analysis of test safety is to be carried out. It implies reconstruction of the reactor core history for last three years, including burnup calculation for each regular fuel assembly (FA), as well as calculation of characteristics of the test core. For the planned configuration of the test core a number of characteristics have been calculated. The obtained data will be used as input for calculations on LTA test core steady-state thermal hydraulics and on transient analysis.

  9. NERSC Climate PIs Telecon!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Systems Update NERSC Systems Early 2015 2 x 10 Gb 1 x 100 Gb So#ware D efined N etworking Data---Intensive S ystems Carver, P DSF, J GI,KBASE,HEP 1 4x Q DR Vis & A naly3cs D ata T ransfer N odes Adv. A rch. Testbeds S cience G ateways Global Scratch 3.6 PB 5 x S FA12KE /project 5 PB DDN9900 & NexSAN /home 250 TB NetApp 5 460 50 P B s tored, 2 40 PB c apacity, 2 0 years o f community d ata HPSS 80 GB/s 50 GB/s 5 GB/s 12 GB/s 16 x Q DR I B 2.2 PB Local Scratch 70 G B/s Hopper: 1

  10. Interrelation of technologies for RW preparation and sites for final isolation of the wastes from pyrochemical processing of SNF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupalo, V.S.; Chistyakov, V.N.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.; Kormilitsyna, L.A.

    2013-07-01

    For the justification of engineering solutions and practical testing of the radiochemical component of the perspective nuclear power complex with on-site variant of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC), it is planned to establish a multi-functional research-development complex (MFCRC) for radiochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) from fast reactors. MFCRC is being established at the NIIAR site, it comprises technological process lines, where innovation pyro-electrochemical and hydrometallurgical technologies are realized, with an option for closing the inter-chain material flows for testing the combined radiochemically converted materials. The technological flowchart for processing at the MFCRC is subdivided into 3 segments: -) complex of the lead operations for dismantling the fuel elements (FE) and fuel assemblies (FA), -) pyrochemical extraction flowchart for processing SNF, and -) hydrometallurgical flowchart for processing SNF. The engineered solutions for the management and disposition of the radioactive wastes from MFCRC are reviewed.

  11. RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 , RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V : w ~?g+QZ FM USAEC NYK @5 TO USAEC LEMUMT Ill.. AEC WWC ; I _. _' FOR A TAMwsflO h@G NR tt0 PD Tti18~18~~10 APPROVE pf TWJNTY GRAM8 ENRICHED 1 '. , URANlUM TO 8YLyANI~q FOR W8E. IWTREPARIWG~F~VE U&AN,!UU SLUGS 7/.8 lF4j34 ' .' : ' . ~ , . LQ~JG m S/8 1%~ ~IAhiiilER pa THE-DIE WI& CW!. APOROX 300 DOLLARS Am " , SIX ~uN-~Y# WILL BE REQI!!REl! FW WJG FA~ICf' TlW PD ?eJJRCt+A= @ fmR woull] BE m OUT to 8YLVANIA AND WNT TO, V L PAf?SEGIAN Cy

  12. FY 2008 Annual Performance Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hyd rog en Tan k Res earc h, LLN L PH EN IX Ex pe rim en t, BN L Fu el Ce ll Re sea rch , AN L Ca rb on Se qu es tra tio n Re se ar ch , PN NL Hi gh Ex pl os iv es Ap pl ic at io ns Fa ci lit y, LL NL Com put er Sim ulat ion The ater , LAN L Al ga e Re se ar ch , NR EL Ad va nc ed Bio fue ls Re se arc h, LB NL T ra in in g Nuc lear Mat eria ls Sto rag e, SRS C o a l G a s if ic a ti o n R e s e a rc h , P N N L Cli ma te Mo de lin g, OR NL AnnuAl PerformAnce rePort fY 2008 Table of Contents

  13. Electronics for the APEX silicon array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perera, P.A.A.

    1993-10-01

    APEX uses 432 Si PIN diodes to measure the energy and time of flight of electrons and positrons. Each detector connects to a fast-slow preamplifier (PA). Thirty-six PAs mount on one motherboard that distributes the input and output signals and monitors detector voltage and leakage currents. An 8-channel Shaping Amplifier (SA) shapes and amplifies the slow signal from the preamplifier. A 16-channel Peak-to-FERA Converter (PTF) stretches the output signal of the SA. A Fast-Encoding & Readout ADC (FERA) digitizes the stretched signal. A 16-channel Fast Amplifier (FA) amplifies the fast timing signal from the preamplifier. The amplified signal triggers a Constant-Fraction Discriminator (CFD). A FERA digitizes the charge output of the CFD. All of these components, except the FAs and the FERAs, have been custom built for APEX, Their design and performance will be discussed.

  14. Weldability of polycrystalline aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasching, A.A.; Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R.; David, S.A.

    1996-07-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen cracking. Magnetic arc oscillation and weld pool inoculation were implemented to refine the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide alloy FA-129 weldments. Magnetic arc oscillation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure, and slow strain rate tensile tests showed fine-grained microstructures to be less susceptible to hydrogen cracking. However, magnetic arc oscillation was found to be suitable only for well-controlled fabrication environments. Weld pool inoculation offers a potentially more robust refinement method. Titanium inoculation was also shown to effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure, but weldment properties were not improved using this refinement method. The effect of titanium on the size, shape and distribution of the second phase particles in the fusion zone appears to be the cause of the observed decrease in weldment properties.

  15. Weldability of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, S.A.; Zacharia, T.; Reed, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was carried out to determine the weldability of a class of advanced iron aluminides. Thin sheets of iron aluminides were gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welded at different travel speeds and power levels. The results indicate that the weldability of these alloys is very sensitive to the welding conditions and compositions, producing good welds sometimes and severely cracked welds at other times. Alloys containing TiB{sub 2} additions for improved strength and ductility cracked severely upon welding. Alloys without boron and zirconium, in particular alloy FA-129, was found to show more promise for welding than most of the other iron aluminides. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Weldability of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    Improvements in the ductility of iron aluminide alloys, achieved through control of composition and microstructure, has led to growing interest in using these materials for structural applications. weldability is a key issues in the utilization of these alloys for structural components. This paper describes the welding and welding behavior of an Fe{sub 3}Al alloy (FA-129) containing niobium and carbon. Weldability of this alloy has been found to be a strong function of composition, welding process and processing conditions. Crack free welds were made on both sheet and plate material using the electron beam (EB) welding process. Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds, on the other hand, exhibited a tendency for delayed cold cracking. However, the study clearly demonstrated that successful welds can be made using matching filler metal and proper choice of processing conditions. 15 ref., 5 figs.

  17. A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W.

    2010-05-15

    A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

  18. Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Soil Series and Phase D Bae D Da rn Fa D FuB D LuB ~ 09 _ Pk _ TrB _ TuE DUo _ vee D VeD o o * '='1 ~*.1* **..oC'" ~) OJ rI.:) o.Q 600 1200 Soils n O~:-* ilL 10., 1800 O~ c? ~ 0 ~ O~ Community _ Loblolly Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood o Upland Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood _ Water a Bottomland HardwoodlPine o Monitoringwells .._.' *** TES Plants (1) :l!.-.~I ... 0 TES Plants (2) :='.Y-r::.: ~ Streams ){" ~ Rails . :1'\;:'/ Utility ROW ""If WasteSItes III NPDES outfalls CZI

  19. Enhanced air/fuel mixing for automotive Stirling engine turbulator-type combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riecke, G.T.; Stotts, R.E.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes a combustor for use in a Stirling engine and the like. It comprises: a combustor chamber; a fuel inlet couple to the chamber to inject fuel therein; a turbulator means disposed in the chambers downstream of the fuel inlet means for injecting combustion air into the chamber, the turbulator means being so positioned to cause a mixing of the combustion air and fuel injected in the chamber; diverter means for dividing the combustion air and creating a primary mixing zone downstream fa the primary mixing zone; and wherein the primary mixing zone comprises a fuel rich zone where combustion initiates and the secondary mixing zone has sufficient combustion air to complete combustion of the fuel.

  20. Jason Hick! Storage Systems Group! NERSC User Group Meeting!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group! ! NERSC User Group Meeting! February 6, 2014 Storage Systems: 2014 and beyond The compute and storage systems 2013 Produc(on C lusters Carver, P DSF, J GI,KBASE,HEP 1 4x Q DR Global Scratch 3.6 PB 5 x S FA12KE /project 5 PB DDN9900 & NexSAN /home 250 TB NetApp 5 460 50 P B s tored, 2 40 PB c apacity, 3 5 years o f community d ata HPSS 16 x Q DR I B 2.2 P B L ocal Scratch 70 GB/s 6.4 P B L ocal Scratch 140 GB/s 16 x F DR I B Ethernet & I B F abric Science F riendly S ecurity

  1. A=20F (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20F) GENERAL: See Table 20.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1959BR1E, 1963KU19, 1964MO1E, 1965DE1H, 1965DE1M, 1966CH1G, 1966PI1B, 1967BO09, 1967GU05, 1967GU1D, 1968AR02, 1968CO11, 1968GU1E, 1968HA17, 1968HA1P, 1969HO32, 1970AN27, 1970BA66, 1971AR25, 1971JO01, 1971WI01). Other theoretical calculations: (1967ST1N, 1968CE1A, 1968DW1A, 1969SC14, 1971LE1H, 1971TE06). General experimental work: (1970FA01, 1971AR02). Ground state: μ

  2. A=6Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 6.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26, 1968BA35, 1968FA1B, 1968VA1H, 1969TH1C, 1970LA1D). Other topics: (1965GO1D, 1966GO1B, 1970FO1B, 1972AN05, 1972CA37, 1972GH1A, 1972JA14, 1973WE18). 1. (a) 3He(3He, γ)6Be Qm = 11.488 Eb = 11.488 (b) 3He(3He, p)5Li Qm = 10.89 (c) 3He(3He, 2p)4He Qm = 12.8601 (d) 3He(3He, 3p)3H Qm = -6.9546 (e) 3He(3He, 3He)3He (f) 3He(3He, d)4Li Qm = -8.4 The

  3. A=6He (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6He) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 6.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1967HE01, 1967TH02, 1968BA35, 1968FA1B, 1968GO24, 1968VA1H, 1969HE1G, 1969LA19, 1969SO08, 1969TH1C, 1970AH1C, 1971JA06). Meson and muon interactions: (1970DE1M, 1970PA1E, 1972MU07, 1972TR1E, 1973BA2G, 1973BA62, 1973KA1D, 1973MU11, 1973VE1F, 1974VE02). Special reactions: (1965WH1A, 1967AU1B, 1969KR20, 1970KR1G, 1972VO06, 1973FO09,

  4. A=7Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965KU09, 1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966WI1E, 1967BO1C, 1967BO22, 1967CO32, 1967FA1A, 1969GU03, 1969TA1H, 1969VA1C, 1970ZO1A, 1971CO28, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Cluster model: (1965NE1B, 1968HA1G, 1968KU1B, 1969ME1C, 1969SM1A, 1969VE1B, 1969WI21, 1970BA1Q, 1972HA06, 1972HI16, 1972JA23, 1972KU12, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03, 1973KU12).

  5. FROM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :s. B. ' Brown S"BJJ=T:WIDEKLY IUSWiT ,BDR WBMlC BHDIBG WlLBcB 28, 1951 L:' -F k-2.M0 _ firlt, )fa~rQf ti' + " ' ; /=jo A?T?i id' ! CP~) ~c~cd.: &JL& c"/ . ,Q.~~,~~~.- GJ I; ' " ;?%lT Scrap RecoverJT Kellex wae requested to expand their inveatigation.of poaeible 7-7 ;. I i * meam for recoverfng uran' itlm from low-grade wastes and reeiduee to . include all reeiduee containing above about 0.1% U. S-lee were .- collected from the IOOU and Hairt eitsr for this research

  6. Effect of Protein Incorporation on the Nanostructure of the Bicontinuous Microemulsion Phase of Winsor-III Systems: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hayes, Douglas G.; Gomez del Rio, Javier A.; Ye, Ran; Urban, Volker S.; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; O’Neill, Hugh M.

    2015-01-20

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis using the Teubner₋Strey model has been employed to evaluate the effect of protein incorporation into the middle, bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) phase of Winsor-III (WIII) systems formed by an aerosol-OT (AOT)/alkyl ethoxylate mixed surfactant system to understand better the extraction of proteins into and out of BμEs and to study the effect of proteins on a system that serves as a biomimetic analog of cell membranes. Under conditions of high salinity, the incorporation of positively charged proteins cytochrome c, lysozyme, and α-chymotrypsin, near their solubilization limit in the BμEs promoted the release of water and oilmore » from the BμEs, a decrease in the quasi-periodic repeat distance (d), an increase in ordering (a decrease in the amphiphilicity factor, fa) for the surfactant monolayers, and a decrease in the surface area per surfactant headgroup, suggesting that the proteins affected the self-assembly of components in the BμE phase and produced Debye shielding of AOTs sulfonate headgroup. For WIII systems possessing lower salinity, cytochrome c reduced the efficiency of surfactant in the BμE phase, noted by increases in d and fa, suggesting that the enzyme and AOT underwent ion pairing. We find that the results of this study demonstrate the importance of ionic strength to modulate proteinsurfactant interactions, which in turn will control the release of proteins encapsulated in the BμEs, relevant to WIII-based protein extraction and controlled release from BμE delivery systems, and demonstrate the utility of BμEs as a model system to understand the effect of proteins on biomembranes.« less

  7. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and ?H2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  8. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in landfill leachate during the combined treatment process of air stripping, Fenton, SBR and coagulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, ZhiPing; Wu, WenHui; Shi, Ping; Guo, JinSong; Cheng, Jin

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • DOM fractions spectra analysis during the whole treatment process. • Efficient method was achieved to remove organic matters in landfill leachate. • Molecular weight distribution and fractions were discussed. - Abstract: A combined treatment process of air stripping + Fenton + sequencing batch reactor (SBR)+ coagulation was performed to remove the pollutants in landfill leachate. Molecular weight (MW) distribution and fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were discussed to study the characteristics. The experiment showed that the removal rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD), five day biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) and ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}−N) by the combined process were 92.8%, 87.8% and 98.0%, respectively. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) were the main fractions in raw leachate with 81.8% of the total COD concentration, while hydrophilic organic matter (HyI) was the dominant fraction in the final effluent of the combined process with 63.5% of the total COD concentration. After the combined treatment process, the removal rate of DOM and fractions HA, FA, HyI were 91.9%, 97.1%, 95.8% and 71.7%, respectively. Organic matters of MW < 2 k and MW > 100 k were removed with 90.5% and 97.9% COD concentration after the treatment. The ultraviolet–visible spectra (UV–vis), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrices spectra (EEMs) indicated that benzene materials and phenol compounds were preferentially removed in air stripping. High MW matters, aromatic rings, conjugated moieties and some functional groups were mainly removed by Fenton. While small MW fractions, carboxylic acids, alcohols and protein-like materials were preferentially biodegraded via SBR. Fulvic-like and humic-like materials were mainly destroyed via Fenton oxidation and coagulation.

  9. Macro-to-microchannel transition in two-phase flow: Part 1 - Two-phase flow patterns and film thickness measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, C.L.; Thome, J.R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL-STI-IGM-LTCM, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    The classification of macroscale, mesoscale and microscale channels with respect to two-phase processes is still an open question. The main objective of this study focuses on investigating the macro-to-microscale transition during flow boiling in small scale channels of three different sizes with three different refrigerants over a range of saturation conditions to investigate the effects of channel confinement on two-phase flow patterns and liquid film stratification in a single circular horizontal channel (Part 2 covers the flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux). This paper presents the experimental two-phase flow pattern transition data together with a top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison for refrigerants R134a, R236fa and R245fa during flow boiling in small channels of 1.03, 2.20 and 3.04 mm diameter. Based on this work, an improved flow pattern map has been proposed by determining the flow patterns transitions existing under different conditions including the transition to macroscale slug/plug flow at a confinement number of Co {approx} 0.3-0.4. From the top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison results, it was observed that the gravity forces are fully suppressed and overcome by the surface tension and shear forces when the confinement number approaches 1, Co {approx} 1. Thus, as a new approximate rule, the lower threshold of macroscale flow is Co = 0.3-0.4 while the upper threshold of symmetric microscale flow is Co {approx} 1 with a transition (or mesoscale) region in-between. (author)

  10. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.