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Sample records for dynamics md density

  1. RADIATION PRESSURE DETECTION AND DENSITY ESTIMATE FOR 2011 MD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micheli, Marco; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T. E-mail: tholen@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-06-10

    We present our astrometric observations of the small near-Earth object 2011 MD (H ? 28.0), obtained after its very close fly-by to Earth in 2011 June. Our set of observations extends the observational arc to 73 days, and, together with the published astrometry obtained around the Earth fly-by, allows a direct detection of the effect of radiation pressure on the object, with a confidence of 5?. The detection can be used to put constraints on the density of the object, pointing to either an unexpectedly low value of ?=(640±330)kg m{sup ?3} (68% confidence interval) if we assume a typical probability distribution for the unknown albedo, or to an unusually high reflectivity of its surface. This result may have important implications both in terms of impact hazard from small objects and in light of a possible retrieval of this target.

  2. Dynamics of a globular protein and its hydration water studied by neutron scattering and MD simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Lagi, Marco; Chu, Xiang-qiang; Zhang, Yang; Kim, Chansoo; Faraone, Antonio; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero

    2010-01-01

    This review article describes our neutron scattering experiments made in the past four years for the understanding of the single-particle (hydrogen atom) dynamics of a protein and its hydration water and the strong coupling between them. We found that the key to this strong coupling is the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon occurring at around T L = 225±5 K in the hydration water. On lowering of the temperature toward FSC, the structure of hydration water makes a transition from predominantly the high density form (HDL), a more fluid state, to predominantly the low density formmore » (LDL), a less fluid state, derived from the existence of a liquid–liquid critical point at an elevated pressure. We show experimentally that this sudden switch in the mobility of hydration water on Lysozyme, B-DNA and RNA triggers the dynamic transition, at a temperature T D = 220 K, for these biopolymers. In the glassy state, below T D , the biopolymers lose their vital conformational flexibility resulting in a substantial diminishing of their biological functions. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a realistic model of hydrated lysozyme powder, which confirms the existence of the FSC and the hydration level dependence of the FSC temperature. Furthermore, we show a striking feature in the short time relaxation ( β -relaxation) of protein dynamics, which is the logarithmic decay spanning 3 decades (from ps to ns). The long time α -relaxation shows instead a diffusive behavior, which supports the liquid-like motions of protein constituents. We then discuss our recent high-resolution X-ray inelastic scattering studies of globular proteins, Lysozyme and Bovine Serum Albumin. We were able to measure the dispersion relations of collective, intra-protein phonon-like excitations in these proteins for the first time. We found that the phonon energies show a marked softening and at the same time their population increases substantially in a certain wave vector range when temperature crosses over the T D . Thus the increase of biological activities above T D has positive correlation with activation of slower and large amplitude collective motions of a protein.« less

  3. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Granados...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Granados, Carlos G. Uppsala University (Sweden); Weiss, Christian JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States) 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY...

  4. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Citation Details ... Report Number(s): JLAB-THY--13-1763; DOEOR--23177-2641 Journal ID: ISSN 1029-8479; TRN: ...

  5. Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory calculations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    field theory calculations for the compressed lanthanides Ce, Pr, and Nd Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory ...

  6. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In the partonic (or light-front) description of relativistic systems the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent charge and magnetization densities in transverse space. This formulation allows one to identify the chiral components of nucleon structure as the peripheral densities at transverse distances b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and compute them in a parametrically controlled manner. A dispersion relation connects the large-distance behavior of the transverse charge and magnetization densities to the spectral functions of the Dirac and Pauli form factors near the two--pion threshold at timelike t = 4 M{ sub {pi}}{sup 2}, which can be computed in relativistic chiral effective field theory. Using the leading-order approximation we (a) derive the asymptotic behavior (Yukawa tail) of the isovector transverse densities in the "chiral" region b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and the "molecular" region b = O(M{sub N}{sup 2}/M{sub {pi}}{sup 3}); (b) perform the heavy-baryon expansion of the transverse densities; (c) explain the relative magnitude of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities in a simple mechanical picture; (d) include Delta isobar intermediate states and study the peripheral transverse densities in the large-N{ sub c} limit of QCD; (e) quantify the region of transverse distances where the chiral components of the densities are numerically dominant; (f) calculate the chiral divergences of the b{sup 2}-weighted moments of the isovector transverse densities (charge and anomalous magnetic radii) in the limit M{sub {pi}} -> 0 and determine their spatial support. Our approach provides a concise formulation of the spatial structure of the nucleon's chiral component and offers new insights into basic properties of the chiral expansion. It relates the information extracted from low-t elastic form factors to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  7. Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory calculations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a combination of the local-density approximation (LDA) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), or LDA+DMFT. The 4f moment, spectra, and the total energy among other properties are ...

  8. Dynamics and diffusion mechanism of low-density liquid silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Dong, F.; Guo, Y. R.; Zhang, R. J.; Zheng, Y. X.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.; Chen, L. Y.

    2015-11-05

    A first-order phase transition from a high-density liquid to a low-density liquid has been proposed to explain the various thermodynamic anomies of water. It also has been proposed that such liquid–liquid phase transition would exist in supercooled silicon. Computer simulation studies show that, across the transition, the diffusivity drops roughly 2 orders of magnitude, and the structures exhibit considerable tetrahedral ordering. The resulting phase is a highly viscous, low-density liquid silicon. Investigations on the atomic diffusion of such a novel form of liquid silicon are of high interest. Here we report such diffusion results from molecular dynamics simulations using themore » classical Stillinger–Weber (SW) potential of silicon. We show that the atomic diffusion of the low-density liquid is highly correlated with local tetrahedral geometries. We also show that atoms diffuse through hopping processes within short ranges, which gradually accumulate to an overall random motion for long ranges as in normal liquids. There is a close relationship between dynamical heterogeneity and hopping process. We point out that the above diffusion mechanism is closely related to the strong directional bonding nature of the distorted tetrahedral network. Here, our work offers new insights into the complex behavior of the highly viscous low density liquid silicon, suggesting similar diffusion behaviors in other tetrahedral coordinated liquids that exhibit liquid–liquid phase transition such as carbon and germanium.« less

  9. Dynamics and diffusion mechanism of low-density liquid silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Dong, F.; Guo, Y. R.; Zhang, R. J.; Zheng, Y. X.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.; Chen, L. Y.

    2015-11-05

    A first-order phase transition from a high-density liquid to a low-density liquid has been proposed to explain the various thermodynamic anomies of water. It also has been proposed that such liquid–liquid phase transition would exist in supercooled silicon. Computer simulation studies show that, across the transition, the diffusivity drops roughly 2 orders of magnitude, and the structures exhibit considerable tetrahedral ordering. The resulting phase is a highly viscous, low-density liquid silicon. Investigations on the atomic diffusion of such a novel form of liquid silicon are of high interest. Here we report such diffusion results from molecular dynamics simulations using the classical Stillinger–Weber (SW) potential of silicon. We show that the atomic diffusion of the low-density liquid is highly correlated with local tetrahedral geometries. We also show that atoms diffuse through hopping processes within short ranges, which gradually accumulate to an overall random motion for long ranges as in normal liquids. There is a close relationship between dynamical heterogeneity and hopping process. We point out that the above diffusion mechanism is closely related to the strong directional bonding nature of the distorted tetrahedral network. Here, our work offers new insights into the complex behavior of the highly viscous low density liquid silicon, suggesting similar diffusion behaviors in other tetrahedral coordinated liquids that exhibit liquid–liquid phase transition such as carbon and germanium.

  10. Charged nanoparticle attraction in multivalent salt solution: A classical-fluids density functional theory and molecular dynamics study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Salerno, K. Michael; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, negatively charged nanoparticles (NPs) in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 electrolyte solutions are studied in a primitive ion model using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT). We determine the conditions for attractive interactions between the like-charged NPs. Ion density profiles and NP–NP interaction free energies are compared between the two methods and are found to be in qualitative agreement. The NP interaction free energy is purely repulsive for monovalent counterions, but can be attractive for divalent and trivalent counterions. Using DFT, the NP interaction free energy for different NP diameters and charges is calculated. The depthmore » and location of the minimum in the interaction depend strongly on the NPs’ charge. For certain parameters, the depth of the attractive well can reach 8–10 kBT, indicating that kinetic arrest and aggregation of the NPs due to electrostatic interactions is possible. Rich behavior arises from the geometric constraints of counterion packing at the NP surface. Layering of counterions around the NPs is observed and, as secondary counterion layers form the minimum of the NP–NP interaction free energy shifts to larger separation, and the depth of the free energy minimum varies dramatically. We find that attractive interactions occur with and without NP overcharging.« less

  11. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J.; Levit, M. Creon

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  12. Density matrix renormalization group with efficient dynamical electron correlation through range separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan Knecht, Stefan; Reiher, Markus; Kielberg, Jesper Skau; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-06-14

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems.

  13. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecularmore » dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.« less

  14. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology.

  15. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materialsmore » science, chemistry, and biology.« less

  16. Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory calculations for the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    compressed lanthanides Ce, Pr, and Nd (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory calculations for the compressed lanthanides Ce, Pr, and Nd Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory calculations for the compressed lanthanides Ce, Pr, and Nd This paper reports calculations for compressed Ce (4f{sup 1}), Pr (4f{sup 2}), and Nd (4f{sup 3}) using a combination of the

  17. Density-Dependent Carrier Dynamics in a Quantum Dots-in-a-Well

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heterostructure. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Density-Dependent Carrier Dynamics in a Quantum Dots-in-a-Well Heterostructure. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Density-Dependent Carrier Dynamics in a Quantum Dots-in-a-Well Heterostructure. Abstract not provided. Authors: Chow, Weng W. ; Prasankumar, Rohit P. ; Urayama, Junji ; Attaluri, R. S. ; Shenoi, R. V. ; Krishna, S. ; Taylor, A. J. Publication Date: 2010-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1121942 Report Number(s): SAND2010-7836J

  18. Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge density

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wave in TbTe 3 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge density wave in TbTe 3 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 24, 2017 Title: Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge density wave in TbTe 3 Authors: Moore, R. G. ; Lee, W. S. ; Kirchman, P. S. ; Chuang, Y. D. ; Kemper, A. F. ; Trigo, M. ; Patthey, L. ; Lu, D. H. ; Krupin, O. ; Yi, M. ; Reis, D. A. ;

  19. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2015-07-31

    The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. The new representation (a) explains the parametric order of the peripheral transverse densities; (b) establishes an inequality between the spin-independentmore » and -dependent densities; (c) exposes the role of pion orbital angular momentum in chiral dynamics; (d) reveals a large left-right asymmetry of the current in a transversely polarized nucleon and suggests a simple interpretation. The light-front representation enables a first-quantized, quantum-mechanical view of chiral dynamics that is fully relativistic and exactly equivalent to the second-quantized, field-theoretical formulation. It relates the charge and magnetization densities measured in low-energy elastic scattering to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes. The method can be applied to nucleon form factors of other operators, e.g. the energy-momentum tensor.« less

  20. miniMD v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-12

    Simple parallel MD code that serves as a microapplication in the Mantevo suite. Study of computer system design and implementation, benchmarking of new and existing computer systems.

  1. Effects of the density of collision cascades: Separating contributions from dynamic annealing and energy spikes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titov, A I; Karaseov, P A; Azarov, A Y; Kucheyev, S O

    2008-08-13

    We present a quantitative model for the efficiency of the molecular effect in damage buildup in semiconductors. Our model takes into account only one mechanism of the cascade density dependence: nonlinear energy spikes. In our three-dimensional analysis, the volume of each individual collision cascade is divided into small cubic cells, and the number of cells that have an average density of displacements above some threshold value is calculated. We assume that such cells experience a catastrophic crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition, while defects in the cells with lower displacement densities have perfect annihilation. For the two limiting cases of heavy (500 keV/atom {sup 209}Bi) and light (40 keV/atom {sup 14}N) ion bombardment of Si, theory predictions are in good agreement with experimental data for a threshold displacement density of 4.5 at.%. For intermediate density cascades produced by small 2.1 keV/amu PF{sub n} clusters, we show that dynamic annealing processes entirely dominate cascade density effects for PF{sub 2} ions, while energy spikes begin contributing in the case of PF{sub 4} cluster bombardment.

  2. APS March Meeting (Baltimore, MD) - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APS March Meeting (Baltimore, MD) APS March Meeting (Baltimore, MD) Mon, Mar 14, 2016 8:00am 08:00 Fri, Mar 18, 2016 9:00am 09:00 Baltimore Convention Center 1 W Pratt St Baltimore, MD 21201 United States Bryan Beckingham and Daniel Miller, "Quantitative Monitoring of Membrane Permeation via In-Situ ATR FT-IR Spectroscopy" Abstract: Ion conducting membranes are of interest for various energy applications including fuel cells and artificial photosynthesis systems. Within the context of

  3. Dynamic density field measurements of an explosively driven ????? phase transition in iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, L. M.; Gray, G. T.; Warthen, B. J.

    2014-07-28

    We provide a unique set of observations of the behavior of the ??? phase transition under a complex axially symmetric loading path created by sweeping a detonation wave along the end surface of a cylindrical sample. The primary data sets are the measured mass density distributions acquired at 5 independent times during the sweep of the detonation along the surface. Shocked regions and boundaries are measured, as well as regions and boundaries of elevated density (presumed to be the ??phase iron). The formation and dynamics of these regions were captured and are available for comparisons to material descriptions. We also applied 16 Photon Doppler Velocimetry probes to capture the free surface velocity along a discrete set of radially distributed points in order to compare and correlate the density measurements with previous shock wave studies. The velocimetry data are in nearly exact agreement with previous shock wave studies of the ??? phase transition, the density distributions, while generally in agreement with expectations evolved from the shock wave studies, show that the epsilon phase is generated in regions of high shear stress but at hydrostatic stresses below the typically quoted 13?GPa value. The density field measurements are particularly useful for observing the effects of the forward and reverse transformation kinetics, as well as the reverse transformation hysteresis.

  4. Coupled-Channels Density-Matrix Approach to Low-Energy Nuclear Reaction Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2011-10-28

    Atomic nuclei are complex, quantum many-body systems whose structure manifests itself through intrinsic quantum states associated with different excitation modes or degrees of freedom. Collective modes (vibration and/or rotation) dominate at low energy (near the ground-state). The associated states are usually employed, within a truncated model space, as a basis in (coherent) coupled channels approaches to low-energy reaction dynamics. However, excluded states can be essential, and their effects on the open (nuclear) system dynamics are usually treated through complex potentials. Is this a complete description of open system dynamics? Does it include effects of quantum decoherence? Can decoherence be manifested in reaction observables? In this contribution, I discuss these issues and the main ideas of a coupled-channels density-matrix approach that makes it possible to quantify the role and importance of quantum decoherence in low-energy nuclear reaction dynamics. Topical applications, which refer to understanding the astrophysically important collision {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C and achieving a unified quantum dynamical description of relevant reaction processes of weakly-bound nuclei, are highlighted.

  5. Structure and dynamics in liquid bismuth and Bi{sub n} clusters: A density functional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akola, J.; Atodiresei, N.; Kalikka, J.; Larrucea, J.; Jones, R. O.

    2014-11-21

    Density functional/molecular dynamics simulations with more than 500 atoms have been performed on liquid bismuth at 573, 773, 923, and 1023 K and on neutral Bi clusters with up to 14 atoms. There are similar structural patterns (coordination numbers, bond angles, and ring patterns) in the liquid and the clusters, with significant differences from the rhombohedral crystalline form. We study the details of the structure (structure factor, pair, and cavity distribution functions) and dynamical properties (vibration frequencies, diffusion constants, power spectra), and compare with experimental results where available. While the three short covalent bonds typical to pnictogens are characteristic in both liquid and clusters, the number of large voids and the total cavity volume is much larger in the liquid at 1023 K, with larger local concentration variations. The inclusion of spin-orbit coupling results in a lowering of the cohesive energies in Bi{sub n} clusters of 0.3–0.5 eV/atom.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Johns Hopkins University - MD 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Johns Hopkins University - MD 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY (MD.02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Baltimore , Maryland MD.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MD.02-2 Site Operations: Conducted spectroscopic studies under contract number AT(49-1)-309. MD.02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantities of material used in a controlled

  7. Quadrupole collective dynamics from energy density functionals: Collective Hamiltonian and the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, K.; Vretenar, D.; Niksic, T.; Otsuka, T.; Shimizu, N.

    2011-07-15

    Microscopic energy density functionals have become a standard tool for nuclear structure calculations, providing an accurate global description of nuclear ground states and collective excitations. For spectroscopic applications, this framework has to be extended to account for collective correlations related to restoration of symmetries broken by the static mean field, and for fluctuations of collective variables. In this paper, we compare two approaches to five-dimensional quadrupole dynamics: the collective Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrations and rotations and the interacting boson model (IBM). The two models are compared in a study of the evolution of nonaxial shapes in Pt isotopes. Starting from the binding energy surfaces of {sup 192,194,196}Pt, calculated with a microscopic energy density functional, we analyze the resulting low-energy collective spectra obtained from the collective Hamiltonian, and the corresponding IBM Hamiltonian. The calculated excitation spectra and transition probabilities for the ground-state bands and the {gamma}-vibration bands are compared to the corresponding sequences of experimental states.

  8. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laganapan, A. M. K.; Videcoq, A. Bienia, M.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Bochicchio, D.; Ferrando, R.

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  9. Detonation shock dynamics calibration for pBX 9502 with temperature, density, and material lot variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Larry G; Aslam, Tariq D

    2010-01-01

    We present a methodology for scaling the detonation shock dynamics D{sub n}[{kappa}] calibration function to accommodate variations in the HE starting material. We apply our model to the insensitive TATB-based explosive PBX 9502, for which we have enough front curvature rate stick data to characterize three material attributes: initial temperature T{sub 0}, nominal density {rho}{sub 0}, and manufacturing lot (representing different microstructures). A useful feature of the model is that it returns an absolute estimate for the reaction zone thickness, {delta}. Lacking demonstrated material metrics(s), we express microstructural variation indirectly, in terms of its effect on {delta}. This results in a D{sub n}[{kappa}] function that depends on T{sub 0}, {rho}{sub 0}, and {delta}. After examining the separate effects of each parameter on D{sub n}[{kappa}], we compute an arc geometry as a validation problem. We compare the calculation to a PBX 9502 arc experiment that was pressed from one of the calibrated HE lots. The agreement between the model and experiment is excellent. We compute worst, nominal, and best-performing material parameter combinations to show how much difference accrues throughout the arc.

  10. Conformational dynamics of a crystalline protein from microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and diffuse X-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wall, Michael E.; Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Adams, Paul D.; Fraser, James S.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction from protein crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering is limited to what is available in the mean electron density. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the electron density variations and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins. Previous studies using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to model diffuse scattering have been hindered by insufficient sampling of the conformational ensemble. To overcome this issue, we have performed a 1.1-μs MD simulation of crystalline staphylococcal nuclease, providing 100-fold more sampling than previous studies. This simulation enables reproducible calculationsmore » of the diffuse intensity and predicts functionally important motions, including transitions among at least eight metastable states with different active-site geometries. The total diffuse intensity calculated using the MD model is highly correlated with the experimental data. In particular, there is excellent agreement for the isotropic component of the diffuse intensity, and substantial but weaker agreement for the anisotropic component. The decomposition of the MD model into protein and solvent components indicates that protein–solvent interactions contribute substantially to the overall diffuse intensity. In conclusion, diffuse scattering can be used to validate predictions from MD simulations and can provide information to improve MD models of protein motions.« less

  11. Conformational dynamics of a crystalline protein from microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and diffuse X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Michael E.; Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Adams, Paul D.; Fraser, James S.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction from protein crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering is limited to what is available in the mean electron density. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the electron density variations and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins. Previous studies using molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to model diffuse scattering have been hindered by insufficient sampling of the conformational ensemble. To overcome this issue, we have performed a 1.1-?s MD simulation of crystalline staphylococcal nuclease, providing 100-fold more sampling than previous studies. This simulation enables reproducible calculations of the diffuse intensity and predicts functionally important motions, including transitions among at least eight metastable states with different active-site geometries. The total diffuse intensity calculated using the MD model is highly correlated with the experimental data. In particular, there is excellent agreement for the isotropic component of the diffuse intensity, and substantial but weaker agreement for the anisotropic component. The decomposition of the MD model into protein and solvent components indicates that protein–solvent interactions contribute substantially to the overall diffuse intensity. In conclusion, diffuse scattering can be used to validate predictions from MD simulations and can provide information to improve MD models of protein motions.

  12. Impact of the pedestal plasma density on dynamics of edge localized mode crashes and energy loss scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.

    2014-12-15

    The latest BOUT++ studies show an emerging understanding of dynamics of edge localized mode (ELM) crashes and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELM energy losses with the world multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT++ simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELM energy losses vs collisionality via a density scan. Linear results demonstrate that as the pedestal collisionality decreases, the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning modes decreases for high n but increases for low n (1?density plays a major role in determining the ELM energy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. The critical trend emerges as a transition (1) linearly from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collisionality with decreasing density and (2) nonlinearly from turbulence spreading dynamics at high collisionality into avalanche-like dynamics at low collisionality.

  13. Electric Double-Layer Structure in Primitive Model Electrolytes. Comparing Molecular Dynamics with Local-Density Approximations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giera, Brian; Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Henson, Neil; Kober, Edward M.; Shell, M. Scott; Squires, Todd M.

    2015-02-27

    We evaluate the accuracy of local-density approximations (LDAs) using explicit molecular dynamics simulations of binary electrolytes comprised of equisized ions in an implicit solvent. The Bikerman LDA, which considers ions to occupy a lattice, poorly captures excluded volume interactions between primitive model ions. Instead, LDAs based on the Carnahan–Starling (CS) hard-sphere equation of state capture simulated values of ideal and excess chemical potential profiles extremely well, as is the relationship between surface charge density and electrostatic potential. Excellent agreement between the EDL capacitances predicted by CS-LDAs and computed in molecular simulations is found even in systems where ion correlations drivemore » strong density and free charge oscillations within the EDL, despite the inability of LDAs to capture the oscillations in the detailed EDL profiles.« less

  14. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. II. Absolute density dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. The present, second, paper of the study is related to the discharge characterization in terms of the absolute density of species using resonant absorption spectroscopy. The results on the time-resolved density evolution of the neutral and singly-ionized Ti ground state atoms as well as the metastable Ti and Ar atoms during the discharge on- and off-time are presented. Among the others, the questions related to the inversion of population of the Ti energy sublevels, as well as to re-normalization of the two-dimensional density maps in terms of the absolute density of species, are stressed.

  15. An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, Joel C; Hilley, George E; Fildani, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to establish the hydrodynamic conditions needed for sediment deposition along the margins of a density current which ultimately may evolve into confining levees. We suggest that erosion into a previously unchannelized substrate is the mostly likely source of this partial confinement.

  16. Micromagnetic analysis of dynamical bubble-like solitons based on the time domain evolution of the topological density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puliafito, Vito Azzerboni, Bruno; Finocchio, Giovanni; Torres, Luis; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2014-05-07

    Dynamical bubble-like solitons have been recently investigated in nanocontact-based spin-torque oscillators with a perpendicular free layer. Those magnetic configurations can be excited also in different geometries as long as they consist of perpendicular materials. Thus, in this paper, a systematic study of the influence of both external field and high current on that kind of dynamics is performed for a spin-valve point-contact geometry where both free and fixed layers present strong perpendicular anisotropy. The usage of the topological density tool highlights the excitation of complex bubble/antibubble configurations. In particular, at high currents, a deformation of the soliton and its simultaneous shift from the contact area are observed and can be ascribable to the Oersted field. Results provide further detailed information on the excitation of solitons in perpendicular materials for application in spintronics, magnonics, and domain wall logic.

  17. Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez, Ariel; Gonzalez, Jose; Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo; Clausse, Alejandro

    2012-01-15

    Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

  18. ERSUG Meeting: June 25-26, 1996 (Germantown, MD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ERSUG Meeting: June 25-26, 1996 (Germantown, MD) Dates June 25, 26th, 1996 Location The Hampton Inn Germantown, MD Notes and Action Items ERSUG Action Items from June 1996 meeting at Germantown, MD Get DOE staff on mailers for broadcast of ERSUG issues Responsibility: Kendall and Kitchens Review and comment on ERSUG Proposal to SAC Responsibility: All of ERSUG Comments to Rick Kendall by July 17th email: ra_kendall@pnl.gov Fax : (509) 375-6631 Review and comment on Requirements Document

  19. Dynamic density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions: Theoretical development and application in the study of phase separation in gas-liquid systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikkinides, E. S.; Monson, P. A.

    2015-03-07

    Building on recent developments in dynamic density functional theory, we have developed a version of the theory that includes hydrodynamic interactions. This is achieved by combining the continuity and momentum equations eliminating velocity fields, so the resulting model equation contains only terms related to the fluid density and its time and spatial derivatives. The new model satisfies simultaneously continuity and momentum equations under the assumptions of constant dynamic or kinematic viscosity and small velocities and/or density gradients. We present applications of the theory to spinodal decomposition of subcritical temperatures for one-dimensional and three-dimensional density perturbations for both a van der Waals fluid and for a lattice gas model in mean field theory. In the latter case, the theory provides a hydrodynamic extension to the recently studied dynamic mean field theory. We find that the theory correctly describes the transition from diffusive phase separation at short times to hydrodynamic behaviour at long times.

  20. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A. E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar; Lebrero, Mariano C. González E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar

    2014-04-28

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  1. The density matrix functional approach to electron correlation: Dynamic and nondynamic correlation along the full dissociation coordinate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mentel, ?. M.; Meer, R. van; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-06-07

    For chemistry an accurate description of bond weakening and breaking is vital. The great advantage of density matrix functionals, as opposed to density functionals, is their ability to describe such processes since they naturally cover both nondynamical and dynamical correlation. This is obvious in the Löwdin-Shull functional, the exact natural orbital functional for two-electron systems. We present in this paper extensions of this functional for the breaking of a single electron pair bond in N-electron molecules, using LiH, BeH{sup +}, and Li{sub 2} molecules as prototypes. Attention is given to the proper formulation of the functional in terms of not just J and K integrals but also the two-electron L integrals (K integrals with a different distribution of the complex conjugation of the orbitals), which is crucial for the calculation of response functions. Accurate energy curves are obtained with extended Löwdin-Shull functionals along the complete dissociation coordinate using full CI calculations as benchmark.

  2. Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA -Annual Report FY15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deter, Dean D.

    2015-10-01

    There are many areas of MD and HD vehicles that can be improved by new technologies and optimized control strategies. Component optimization and idle reduction need to be addressed, this is best done by a two part approach that includes selecting the best component technology, and/or architecture, and optimized controls that are vehicle focused. While this is a common focus in the light duty industry it has been gaining momentum in the MD and HD market as the market gets more competitive and the regulations become more stringent. When looking into systems optimization and idle reduction technologies, affected vehicle systems must first be considered, and if possible included in the new architecture to get the most benefit out of these new capabilities. Typically, when looking into idle reduction or component optimization for MD/HD, the vehicle s accessories become a prime candidate for electrification or hybridization. While this has already been studied on light duty vehicles (especially on hybrids and electric vehicles) it has not made any head way or market penetration in most MD and HD applications. If hybrids and electric MD and HD vehicles begin to break into the market this would be a necessary step into the ability to make those vehicles successful by allowing for independent, optimized operation separate from the engine.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bendix Corp Frieze Division - MD 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Corp Frieze Division - MD 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: BENDIX CORP., FRIEZE DIVISION (MD.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Baltimore , Maryland MD.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MD.0-01-3 Site Operations: Produced "classified units" believed to be electronics components - no radioactive materials involved. MD.0-01-1 MD.0-01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive materials handled at this

  4. Coupled-channels density-matrix approach to low-energy nuclear collision dynamics: A technique for quantifying quantum decoherence effects on reaction observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2010-11-15

    The coupled-channels density-matrix technique for nuclear reaction dynamics, which is based on the Liouville-von Neumann equation with Lindblad dissipative terms, is developed with the inclusion of full angular momentum couplings. It allows a quantitative study of the role and importance of quantum decoherence in nuclear scattering. Formulas of asymptotic observables that can reveal effects of quantum decoherence are given. A method for extracting energy-resolved scattering information from the time-dependent density matrix is introduced. As an example, model calculations are carried out for the low-energy collision of the {sup 16}O projectile on the {sup 154}Sm target.

  5. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  6. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: Level density, level dynamics, thermal properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stránský, Pavel; Macek, Michal; Cejnar, Pavel

    2014-06-15

    Quantum systems with a finite number of freedom degrees f develop robust singularities in the energy spectrum of excited states as the system’s size increases to infinity. We analyze the general form of these singularities for low f, particularly f=2, clarifying the relation to classical stationary points of the corresponding potential. Signatures in the smoothed energy dependence of the quantum state density and in the flow of energy levels with an arbitrary control parameter are described along with the relevant thermodynamical consequences. The general analysis is illustrated with specific examples of excited-state singularities accompanying the first-order quantum phase transition. -- Highlights: •ESQPTs found in infinite-size limit of systems with low numbers of freedom degrees f. •ESQPTs related to non-analytical evolutions of classical phase–space properties. •ESQPT signatures analyzed for general f, particularly f=2, extending known case f=1. •ESQPT signatures identified in smoothened density and flow of energy spectrum. •ESQPTs shown to induce a new type of thermodynamic anomalies.

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production | Department of Energy Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD, Production DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, MD, Production This urban infill community features a package of SIP walls, geothermal heat pumps, solar PV, and a proprietary energy management system. PDF icon Nexus EnergyHomes - Frederick, MD More Documents & Publications Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Nexus EnergyHomes - Frederick, Maryland DOE Zero Energy

  8. BERAC Meeting, February 21-22, 2013, Rockville, MD | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) February 21-22, 2013 BERAC Rockville, MD Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings February 21-22, 2013 BERAC Rockville, MD Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BERAC Meeting, February 21-22, 2013, Rockville, MD Agenda .pdf file (10KB) Presentations: Sharlene Weatherwax .pdf

  9. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  10. Influence of surface oxidation on ion dynamics and capacitance in porous and nonporous carbon electrodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Zhang, Yu; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Cummings, Peter T.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-04-07

    Here, we investigate the influence of surface chemistry and ion confinement on capacitance and electrosorption dynamics of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in supercapacitors. Using air oxidation and vacuum annealing, we produced defunctionalized and oxygen-rich surfaces of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). While oxidized surfaces of porous CDCs improve capacitance and rate handling abilities of ions, defunctionalized nonporous GNPs improve charge storage densities on planar electrodes. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) probed the structure, dynamics, and orientation of RTIL ions confined in divergently functionalized pores. Oxidized, ionophilic surfaces draw ions closer to pore surfaces andmore » enhance potential-driven ion transport during electrosorption. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations corroborated experimental data and demonstrated the significance of surface functional groups on ion orientations, accumulation densities, and capacitance.« less

  11. 32nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Cloverleaf Building, Germantown MD, April

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    23-25, 2013 | Department of Energy 2nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Cloverleaf Building, Germantown MD, April 23-25, 2013 32nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Cloverleaf Building, Germantown MD, April 23-25, 2013 32nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting, Cloverleaf Building, Germantown MD, April 23-25, 2013 The Tritium Focus Group (TFG), is a long standing DOE Working Group, whose purpose is to promote cost-effective improvements in tritium safety, handling, transportation, storage, and operations, and

  12. Dynamic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dynamic , and Static , Res.ponse of the Government Oil Shale Mine at ' , . , Rifle, Colorado, to the Rulison Event. , . ; . . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. p ( y c - - a 2-1 0 -4- REPORT AT (29-2) 914 USBM 1 0 0 1 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT O F THE I NTERIOR BUREAU OF MINES e s.09 P. L. R U S S E L L RESEARCH D l RECTOR Februory 2, lB7O DYNAMIC AND STATIC RESPONSE 'OF THE GOVERNMENT

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Cummins MD &...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Cummins MD &...

  15. LDRD Final Report (08-ERD-037): Important Modes to Drive Protein MD Simulations to the Next Conformational Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadigh, B

    2011-04-07

    Every action in biology is performed by dynamic proteins that convert between multiple states in order to engage their functions. Often binding to various ligands is essential for the rates of desired transitions to be enhanced. The goal of computational biology is to study these transitions and discover the different states to fully understand the protein's normal and diseased function, design drugs to target/bias specific states, and understand all of the interactions in between. We have developed a new methodology that is capable of calculating the absolute free energy of proteins while taking into account all the interactions with the solvent molecules. The efficiency of the new scheme is an order of magnitude greater than any existing technique. This method is now implemented in the massively parallel popular MD program package NAMD. This now makes it possible to calculate the relative stability of different conformational states of biological macromolecules as well as their binding free energies to various ligands.

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-induced phase transformation of BeO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, H. Y.; Duan, G.; Zu, X. T.; Weber, W. J.

    2011-05-05

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) method has been used to study high pressure-induced phase transformation in BeO based on the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Both methods show that the wurtzite (WZ) and zinc blende (ZB) BeO transforms to the rocksalt (RS) structure smoothly at high pressure. The transition pressures obtained from the LDA method are about 40 GPa larger than the GGA result for both WZ ? RS and ZB ? RS phase transformations, and the phase transformation mechanisms revealed by the LDA and GGA methods are different. For WZ ? RS phase transformations both mechanisms obtained from the LDA and GGA methods are not comparable to the previous ab initio MD simulations of WZ BeO at 700 GPa based on the GGA method. It is suggested that the phase transformation mechanisms of BeO revealed by the ab initio MD simulations are affected remarkably by the exchange–correlation functional employed and the way of applying pressure.

  17. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF)] [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL] [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France] [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada] [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  18. Anharmonic lattice dynamics of Ag2O studied by inelastic neutron scattering and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Tian [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Li, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Hillary [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Rossman, George [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2014-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on silver oxide (Ag2O) with the cuprite structure were performed at temperatures from 40 to 400 K, and Fourier transform far-infrared spectra were measured from 100 to 300 K. The measured phonon densities of states and the infrared spectra showed unusually large energy shifts with temperature, and large linewidth broadenings. First principles molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed at various temperatures, successfully accounting for the negative thermal expansion (NTE) and local dynamics. Using the Fourier-transformed velocity autocorrelation method, the MD calculations reproduced the large anharmonic effects of Ag2O, and were in excellent agreement with the neutron scattering data. The quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) was less successful in accounting for much of the phonon behavior. The QHA could account for some of the NTE below 250 K, although not at higher temperatures. Strong anharmonic effects were found for both phonons and for the NTE. The lifetime broadenings of Ag2O were explained by anharmonic perturbation theory, which showed rich interactions between the Ag-dominated modes and the O-dominated modes in both up- and down-conversion processes.

  19. A molecular dynamics investigation of the unusual concentration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    138, 228-234 (2011) DOI: 10.1016j.micromeso.2010.09.032 Full-size image (19 K) Abstract: Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to determine the self-diffusivitiy,...

  20. A molecular dynamics investigation of the diffusion characteristics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    137, 83-91 (2011) DOI: 10.1016j.micromeso.2010.08.026 Full-size image (36 K) Abstract: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the diffusion characteristics...

  1. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,362 2013 2,590 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from

  2. DOE/EH-0467 Interview with Dr. John W. Gofman, M.D., Ph.D.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE/EH-0467 Interview with Dr. John W. Gofman, M.D., Ph.D. Ju n e 1995 Setting: D ecem ber 20,1994, University of Califomia, San Francisco Interviewers; Karoline Gourley (DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments) and Loretta Hefner (LBL) ORAL fflSTORY OF DR. JOHN W, GOFMAN, M.D., Ph.D. Conducted on December 20, 1994 in San Francisco, California, by Loretta Hefner, archivist for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Karoline Gourley, a re- searcher for the Office o f Human Radiation Experiments,

  3. MD 715

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thermodynamic Properties in Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Bin; Gao, Fei; Li, Xin; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Akinlalu, Ademola V.; Liu, L.

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide (UO2) by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As for solid UO2, the lattice parameter, density, and enthalpy obtained by MD simulations were in good agreement with existing experimental data and previous theoretical predictions. The calculated thermal conductivities matched the experiment results at the midtemperature range but were underestimated at very low and very high temperatures. The calculation results of mean square displacement represented the stability of uranium at all temperatures and the high mobility of oxygen toward 3000 K. By fitting the diffusivity constant of oxygen with the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman law, we noticed a secondary phase transition near 2006.4 K, which can be identified as a ‘‘strong’’ to ‘‘fragile’’ supercooled liquid or glass phase transition in UO2. By fitting the oxygen diffusion constant with the Arrhenius equation, activation energies of 2.0 and 2.7 eV that we obtained were fairly close to the recommended values of 2.3 to 2.6 eV. Xiangyu Wang, Bin Wu, Fei Gao, Xin Li, Xin Sun, Mohammed A. Khaleel, Ademola V. Akinlalu and Li Liu

  5. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  6. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in coolingmore » to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.« less

  7. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  8. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-raymore » fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.« less

  9. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wavefunctions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. We work to address this puzzle by (A) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (B) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble.

  10. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Norway

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,909 5,810 2,900 2014 2,621 2,995 2015 3,097 3,105 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry

  11. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 2,790 2013 2,776 2014 2,984 2,986 2015 2,844 3,045 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied

  12. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 2,984 2,621 5,981 2015 2,844 3,045 3,097 3,105 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Cove Point,

  13. Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 2000's NA NA NA 4.79 6.32 8.38 8.48 7.50 -- -- 2010's -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  14. Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 11.66 7.83 7.22 7.46 4.20 2010's 5.49 -- -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016

  15. NATIONAL HARBOR, Md.,May 21, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    director echoes cyber concerns May 21, 2013 Securing the grid will be key for energy security going forward NATIONAL HARBOR, Md.,May 21, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan told a gathering of energy executives today that securing the electrical grid is a major concern now and it's only becoming more serious. "If you look back at the last year, there were several hundred attacks on critical infrastructure," McMillan said, addressing attendees at the Deloitte

  16. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AN~~.N~dtAN, MD. Y.P.H.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,' ,...- -., -.- . . we#lnty..: - DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AN~~.N~dtAN, MD. Y.P.H. April 30, 1979 . _-- _' . U.S.E.P.A. Radiation Branch 26 Federal Plaz;a, Boom 9079 New York, N. Y. 10007 Attention: Miss Feldman:, Gentlemen: In accordance with your request to Calvin E. Weber, P.E., Assistant Commissioner of Health for Environmental Quality, I am forwarding a copy of a report prepared by him concerning a radiation survey conducted in the vicinity of the former Canadian Radium and Uranium Corpora+on

  17. Integrated Mesoscale Architectures for Sustainable Catalysis...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Integrated Mesoscale Architectures for Sustainable Catalysis (IMASC) Energy Frontier ... science, molecular dynamics (MD), density functional theory (DFT), quantum ...

  18. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S.; Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  19. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of High Energy Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 1401 Publisher: Springer Berlin Research Org: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator ...

  20. Comparison of binary collision approximation and molecular dynamics for displacement cascades in GaAs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foiles, Stephen Martin

    2011-10-01

    The predictions of binary collision approximation (BCA) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of displacement cascades in GaAs are compared. There are three issues addressed in this work. The first is the optimal choice of the effective displacement threshold to use in the BCA calculations to obtain the best agreement with MD results. Second, the spatial correlations of point defects are compared. This is related to the level of clustering that occurs for different types of radiation. Finally, the size and structure of amorphous zones seen in the MD simulations is summarized. BCA simulations are not able to predict the formation of amorphous material.

  1. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids in contact

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the bulk (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids in contact with the bulk Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids in contact with the bulk A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study is reported of the structural and rheological properties of confined n-decane between two Au(111) surfaces in contact with its bulk under constant normal loads or

  2. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL KY MD NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MD NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Aberdeen Proving Ground Los Alamos National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Savannah River Site Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox

  3. Kinetic energy deficit in the symmetric fission of /sup 259/Md. [Light particle emission in /sup 256/Fm fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    The fragment energies of about 725 coincidence events have now been observed in the spontaneous fission (SF) decay of 105-min /sup 259/Md since its discovery in 1977. The fission of /sup 259/Md is characterized by a symmetric mass distribution, similar to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, but with a broad total kinetic energy (anti TKE) distribution which peaks at about 195 MeV, in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, for which the anti TKE is about 240 MeV. This kinetic energy deficit, approx. 40 MeV, has been postulated to be due to the emission of hydrogen-like particles by /sup 259/Md at the scission point in a large fraction of the fissions, leaving the residual fissioning nucleus with 100 protons. The residual nucleus would then be able to divide into two ultrastable tin-like fission fragments, but with less kinetic energy than that observed in the SF of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, because of binding-energy losses and a reduction in the Coulomb repulsion of the major fragments. To test this hypothesis, counter-telescope experiments aimed at detecting and identifying these light particles were performed. In 439 SF events 3 + 3 protons of the appropriate energy were observed, too few to account for the kinetic energy deficit in the fission of /sup 259/Md. There seems to be no explanation for this problem within the framework of current fission theory. These results are discussed along with preliminary measurements of light-particle emission in the SF of /sup 256/Fm. 5 figures.

  4. Hai Wang, Z. Hua, W. Lua, M.D. Thouless - Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Department of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hai Wang, Z. Hua, W. Lua, M.D. Thouless - Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan One of the fundamental challenges of multi-scale modeling is the integration of atomistic-scale effects to continuum scale calculations. For example, the analysis of creep deformation requires continuum-level finite-element calculations to compute local stresses and temperatures which are then used in atomistic models to determine local atom

  5. Two worlds collide: Image analysis methods for quantifying structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steenbergen, K. G.; Gaston, N.

    2014-02-14

    Inspired by methods of remote sensing image analysis, we analyze structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics (MD) simulations through a unique application of the principal component analysis (PCA) and Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). The PCA analysis characterizes the geometric shape of the cluster structure at each time step, yielding a detailed and quantitative measure of structural stability and variation at finite temperature. Our PCC analysis captures bond structure variation in MD, which can be used to both supplement the PCA analysis as well as compare bond patterns between different cluster sizes. Relying only on atomic position data, without requirement for a priori structural input, PCA and PCC can be used to analyze both classical and ab initio MD simulations for any cluster composition or electronic configuration. Taken together, these statistical tools represent powerful new techniques for quantitative structural characterization and isomer identification in cluster MD.

  6. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wave functions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. Two key questions involve (1) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (2) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble. In Section II, we will address these questions by first demonstrating that thermodynamic expectations can be evaluated by averaging over certain many-body pure states, which we will call thermal states, and then constructing TDDFT states that approximate these thermal states. In Section III, we will present some numerical tests of the resulting theory, and in Section IV, we will summarize our main results and discuss some possible future directions for this work.

  7. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state bymore » a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wave functions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. Two key questions involve (1) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (2) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble. In Section II, we will address these questions by first demonstrating that thermodynamic expectations can be evaluated by averaging over certain many-body pure states, which we will call thermal states, and then constructing TDDFT states that approximate these thermal states. In Section III, we will present some numerical tests of the resulting theory, and in Section IV, we will summarize our main results and discuss some possible future directions for this work.« less

  8. Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Heather A.; Masukawa, Keven M.; Rubins, Kathleen; Bushman, Frederic; Jorgensen, William L.; Lins, Roberto; Briggs, James; Mccammon, Andy

    2000-05-11

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of ''dynamic'' pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a ''static'' pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors.

  9. Visualization of electronic density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; Hashibon, Adham; Yaish, Yuval; Adler, Joan

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  10. Visualization of electronic density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; Hashibon, Adham; Yaish, Yuval; Adler, Joan

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  11. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  12. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  13. Predicting Low Energy Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors using Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-05-02

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating dopant density profiles in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. Their scheme incorporates several necessary methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and pair specific screened Coulomb potentials. Accumulative damage is accounted for using a Kinchin-Pease type model, inelastic energy loss is represented by a Firsov expression, and electronic stopping is described by a modified Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains a single adjustable ion-target dependent parameter. Thus, the program is easily extensible beyond a given validation range, and is therefore truly predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy and to situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using the code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon and gallium-arsenide. Here they can predict the experimental profile over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  14. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of {sup 4}He nanodroplets on surfaces: {sup 4}He/graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-21

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He–surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on {sup 4}He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of {sup 4}He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the {sup 4}He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  15. Tuning Pore Size to Enhance the Capacitance of Supercapacitors...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ion diameter is a novel feature accurately predicted by molecular dynamics (MD) and qualitatively reproduced by the computationally more efficient density functional theory (DFT). ...

  16. Center for Understanding and Control of Acid Gas-induced Evolution...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    class of materials to accelerate materials discovery for large-scale energy applications. ... and scattering, molecular dynamics (MD), density functional theory (DFT), monte carlo ...

  17. Predicting solute partitioning in lipid bilayers: Free energies and partition coefficients from molecular dynamics simulations and COSMOmic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobtorweihen, S. Ingram, T.; Gerlach, T.; Smirnova, I.; Zuniga, A. Chaides; Keil, F. J.

    2014-07-28

    Quantitative predictions of biomembrane/water partition coefficients are important, as they are a key property in pharmaceutical applications and toxicological studies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate free energy profiles for different solutes in lipid bilayers. How to calculate partition coefficients from these profiles is discussed in detail and different definitions of partition coefficients are compared. Importantly, it is shown that the calculated coefficients are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we compare free energy profiles from MD simulations to profiles obtained by the recent method COSMOmic, which is an extension of the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation to micelles and biomembranes. The free energy profiles from these molecular methods are in good agreement. Additionally, solute orientations calculated with MD and COSMOmic are compared and again a good agreement is found. Four different solutes are investigated in detail: 4-ethylphenol, propanol, 5-phenylvaleric acid, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, whereby the latter belongs to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The convergence of the free energy profiles from biased MD simulations is discussed and the results are shown to be comparable to equilibrium MD simulations. For 5-phenylvaleric acid the influence of the carboxyl group dihedral angle on free energy profiles is analyzed with MD simulations.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  19. Density Equalizing Map Projections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    A geographic map is mathematically transformed so that the subareas of the map are proportional to a given quantity such as population. In other words, population density is equalized over the entire map. The transformed map can be used as a display tool, or it can be statistically analyzed. For example, cases of disease plotted on the transformed map should be uniformly distributed at random, if disease rates are everywhere equal. Geographic clusters of diseasemore » can be readily identified, and their statistical significance determined, on a density equalized map.« less

  20. The structure and IR signatures of the arginine-glutamate salt bridge. Insights from the classical MD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vener, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Wehmeyer, C.; Sebastiani, D.

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges and ionic interactions play an important role in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, and protein folding. Here, we provide the classical MD simulations of the structure and IR signatures of the arginine (Arg)–glutamate (Glu) salt bridge. The Arg-Glu model is based on the infinite polyalanine antiparallel two-stranded ?-sheet structure. The 1 ?s NPT simulations show that it preferably exists as a salt bridge (a contact ion pair). Bidentate (the end-on and side-on structures) and monodentate (the backside structure) configurations are localized [Donald et al., Proteins 79, 898–915 (2011)]. These structures are stabilized by the short {sup +}N–H?O{sup ?} bonds. Their relative stability depends on a force field used in the MD simulations. The side-on structure is the most stable in terms of the OPLS-AA force field. If AMBER ff99SB-ILDN is used, the backside structure is the most stable. Compared with experimental data, simulations using the OPLS all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field describe the stability of the salt bridge structures quite realistically. It decreases in the following order: side-on > end-on > backside. The most stable side-on structure lives several nanoseconds. The less stable backside structure exists a few tenth of a nanosecond. Several short-living species (solvent shared, completely separately solvated ionic groups ion pairs, etc.) are also localized. Their lifetime is a few tens of picoseconds or less. Conformational flexibility of amino acids forming the salt bridge is investigated. The spectral signature of the Arg-Glu salt bridge is the IR-intensive band around 2200 cm{sup ?1}. It is caused by the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the {sup +}N–H?O{sup ?} fragment. Result of the present paper suggests that infrared spectroscopy in the 2000–2800 frequency region may be a rapid and quantitative method for the study of salt bridges in peptides and ionic interactions between proteins. This region is usually not considered in spectroscopic studies of peptides and proteins.

  1. Effect of Cu2+ Activation on Interfacial Water Structure at the Sphalerite Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-12-10

    In the first part of this paper, an experimental contact angle study of the fresh and Cu2+ activated sphalerite-ZnS surface as well as the covellite-CuS (001) surface is reported describing the increased hydrophobic character of the surface during Cu2+ activation. In addition to these experimental results, the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite- CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS). Our MDS results on the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite-CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces include simulated contact angles, water number density distribution, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The copper content at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface seems to account for the increased hydrophobicity as revealed by both experimental and MD simulated contact angle measurements. The relatively greater hydrophobic character developed at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface and at the copper-zinc sulfide surface has been described by MDS, based on the structure of interfacial water and its dynamic properties. L.X.D. acknowledges funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  2. Energy in density gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  3. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  4. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  5. Density Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Density Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Density Log Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration...

  6. Rock Density | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique...

  7. Critical interpretation of CH– and OH– stretching regions for infrared spectra of methanol clusters (CH{sub 3}OH){sub n} (n = 2–5) using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Irle, Stephan; Witek, Henryk A.

    2014-09-07

    Vibrational infrared (IR) spectra of gas-phase O–H???O methanol clusters up to pentamer are simulated using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding method using two distinct methodologies: standard normal mode analysis and Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function. The twofold simulations aim at the direct critical assignment of the C–H stretching region of the recently recorded experimental spectra [H.-L. Han, C. Camacho, H. A. Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144309 (2011)]. Both approaches confirm the previous assignment (ibid.) of the C–H stretching bands based on the B3LYP/ANO1 harmonic frequencies, showing that ?{sub 3}, ?{sub 9}, and ?{sub 2} C–H stretching modes of the proton-accepting (PA) and proton-donating (PD) methanol monomers experience only small splittings upon the cluster formation. This finding is in sharp discord with the assignment based on anharmonic B3LYP/VPT2/ANO1 vibrational frequencies (ibid.), suggesting that some procedural faults, likely related to the breakdown of the perturbational vibrational treatment, led the anharmonic calculations astray. The IR spectra based on the Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function include new, previously unaccounted for physical factors such as non-zero temperature of the system and large amplitude motions of the clusters. The elevation of temperature results in a considerable non-homogeneous broadening of the observed IR signals, while the presence of large-amplitude motions (methyl group rotations and PA-PD flipping), somewhat surprisingly, does not introduce any new features in the spectrum.

  8. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Chemical Reactions of Solid Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate at Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C J; Manaa, M R; Fried, L E

    2006-05-30

    We have carried out density functional based tight binding (DFTB) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study energetic reactions of solid Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) at conditions approximating the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation state. We found that the initial decomposition of PETN molecular solid is characterized by uni-molecular dissociation of the NO{sub 2}groups. Interestingly, energy release from this powerful high explosive was found to proceed in several stages. The large portion of early stage energy release was found to be associated with the formation of H{sub 2}O molecules within a few picoseconds of reaction. It took nearly four times as long for majority of CO{sub 2} products to form, accompanied by a slow oscillatory conversion between CO and CO{sub 2}. The production of N{sub 2} starts after NO{sub 2} loses its oxygen atoms to hydrogen or carbon atoms to form H{sub 2}O or CO. We identified many intermediate species that emerge and contribute to reaction kinetics, and compared our simulation with a thermo-chemical equilibrium calculation. In addition, a detailed chemical kinetics of formation of H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} were developed. Rate constants of formations of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} were reported.

  9. Training Session: Frederick, MD

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero net-energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be...

  10. Gedanken densities and exact constraints in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perdew, John P.; Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 ; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei; Burke, Kieron

    2014-05-14

    Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is not an approximation to it. We further derive a strongly and optimally tightened bound on the exchange enhancement factor of a two-electron density, which is satisfied by the local density approximation but is violated by all published GGA's or meta-GGA’s. Finally, some consequences of the non-uniform density-scaling behavior for the asymptotics of the exchange enhancement factor of a GGA or meta-GGA are given.

  11. Dynamics of helium films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, B.E.; Epstein, J.L.; Krotscheck, E.; Tymczak, C.J.; Saarela, M.

    1992-11-01

    The authors present quantitative calculations for the static structure and the dynamics of quantum liquid films on a translationally invariant substrate. The excitation spectrum is calculated by solving the equations of motion for time-dependent one- and two-body densities. They find significant corrections to the Feynman spectrum for the phonon-like collective excitations. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Dynamics of polydots: Soft luminescent polymeric nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maskey, Sabina; Osti, Naresh C.; Grest, Gary S.; Perahia, Dvora

    2016-03-04

    The conformation and dynamics of luminescent polymers collapsed into nanoparticles or polydots were studied using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, providing a first insight into their internal dynamics. Controlling the conformation and dynamics of confined polymers is essential for realization of the full potential of polydots in nanomedicine and biotechnology. Specifically, the shape and internal dynamics of polydots that consist of highly rigid dialkyl p-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) are probed as a function of temperature. At room temperature, the polydots are spherical without any correlations between the aromatic rings on the PPE backbone. With increasing temperature, they expand and becomemore » slightly aspherical; however, the polymers remain confined. The coherent dynamic structure factor reveals that the internal motion of the polymer backbone is arrested, and the side chains dominate the internal dynamics of the polydots. Lastly, these new soft nanoparticles retain their overall shape and dynamics over an extended temperature range, and their conformation is tunable via their degree of expansion.« less

  13. Reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications -- Canam Steel Corporation Point of Rocks, MD case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monfet, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications is not an environmental constraint, it is an economic opportunity. This case study shows how the industry can reap economic benefits from VOC reductions while improving air quality. The Canam Steel Corporation plant located in Point of Rocks, MD operates dip tanks for primer application on fabricated steel joists and joist girders. This process is presently subject to a regulation that limits the paint VOC content to 3.5 pounds per gallon of coating less water. As a result of the high paint viscosity associated with that regulation, the paint thickness of the dipped steel is thicker than the customers` specifications. Most of the VOC emissions can therefore be associated with the excess of paint applied to the products rather than to the required thickness of the coating. The higher paint usage rate has more than environmental consequences, it increases the cost of the applied coating. The project is to reduce the paint usage by controlling the viscosity of the coating in the tank. Experimental results as well as actual mass balance calculations show that using a higher VOC content paint would reduce the overall VOC emissions. The author explained the project to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Air and Radiation Management Administration. First, the MDE agreed to develop a new RACT determination for fabricated steel dipping operations. The new regulation would limit the amount of VOC than can be emitted to dip coat a ton of fabricated steel. Second, the MDE agreed to allow experimentation of the higher VOC content paint as a pilot project for the new regulation. This paper demonstrates the need for a RACT determination specific to fabricated steel dipping operations.

  14. Orbital-optimized density cumulant functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, Alexander Yu. Schaefer, Henry F.

    2013-11-28

    In density cumulant functional theory (DCFT) the electronic energy is evaluated from the one-particle density matrix and two-particle density cumulant, circumventing the computation of the wavefunction. To achieve this, the one-particle density matrix is decomposed exactly into the mean-field (idempotent) and correlation components. While the latter can be entirely derived from the density cumulant, the former must be obtained by choosing a specific set of orbitals. In the original DCFT formulation [W. Kutzelnigg, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 171101 (2006)] the orbitals were determined by diagonalizing the effective Fock operator, which introduces partial orbital relaxation. Here we present a new orbital-optimized formulation of DCFT where the energy is variationally minimized with respect to orbital rotations. This introduces important energy contributions and significantly improves the description of the dynamic correlation. In addition, it greatly simplifies the computation of analytic gradients, for which expressions are also presented. We offer a perturbative analysis of the new orbital stationarity conditions and benchmark their performance for a variety of chemical systems.

  15. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  16. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    densities (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral

  17. Isomorphic phase transformation in shocked cerium using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C; Chen, Shao - Ping

    2010-08-12

    Cerium (Ce) undergoes a significant ({approx}16%) volume collapse associated with an isomorphic fcc-fcc phase transformation when subject to compressive loading. We present here a new Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential for Cerium that models two minima for the two fcc phases. We show results from its use in Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of Ce samples subjected to shocks with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 25 GPa. A split wave structure is observed, with an elastic precursor followed by a plastic wave. The plastic wave causes the expected fcc-fcc phase transformation. Comparisons to experiments and MD simulations on Cesium (Cs) indicate that three waves could be observed. The construction of the EAM potential may be the source of the difference.

  18. Structure And Dynamics of the Hydrated Palladium(II) Ion in Aqueous Solution a QMCF MD Simulation And EXAFS Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofer, T.S.; Randolf, B.R.; Shah, S.Adnan Ali; Rode, B.M.; Persson, I.

    2009-06-01

    The pharmacologically and industrially important palladium(II) ion is usually characterised as square-planar structure in aqueous solution, similar to the platinum(II) ion. Our investigations by means of the most modern experimental and theoretical methods give clear indications, however, that the hydrated palladium(II) ion is hexa-coordinated, with four ligands arranged in a plane at 2.0 {angstrom} plus two additional ligands in axial positions showing an elongated bond distance of 2.7-2.8 A. The second shell consists in average of 8.0 ligands at a mean distance of 4.4 {angstrom}. This structure provides a new basis for the interpretation of the kinetic properties of palladium(II) complexes.

  19. System Dynamics Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACSystem Dynamics Model

  20. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMay, J.D.

    1991-11-19

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

  1. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMay, James D. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  2. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMay, James D. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular from which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  3. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Curro, J.G.; Quintana, C.A.; Russick, E.M.; Shaw, M.T.

    1985-10-02

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the reusltant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 ..mu..m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  4. Low density microcellular foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Curro, John G.; Quintana, Carlos A.; Russick, Edward M.; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    1987-01-01

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the resultant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Means for subjecting such a solvent to one-dimensional cooling are also provided. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 .mu.m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  5. A NEW RECIPE FOR OBTAINING CENTRAL VOLUME DENSITIES OF PRESTELLAR CORES FROM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Yorke, Harold W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2011-07-10

    We propose a simple analytical method for estimating the central volume density of prestellar molecular cloud cores from their column density profiles. Prestellar cores feature a flat central part of the column density and volume density profiles of the same size indicating the existence of a uniform-density inner region. The size of this region is set by the thermal pressure force which depends only on the central volume density and temperature of the core, and can provide a direct measurement of the central volume density. Thus, a simple length measurement can immediately yield a central density estimate independent of any dynamical model for the core and without the need for fitting. Using the radius at which the column density is 90% of the central value as an estimate of the size of the flat inner part of the column density profile yields an estimate of the central volume density within a factor of two for well-resolved cores.

  6. Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge density wave in TbTe 3 ... Title: Ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction dynamics of the charge density wave in ...

  7. Simulations of liquid ribidium expanded to the critical density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, M; Yang, L H; Pilgrim, W

    2006-05-16

    Quantum molecular dynamic simulations were used to examine the change in atomic and electronic structure in liquid rubidium along its liquid-vapor coexistence curve. Starting from the liquid at the triple point, with increasing expansion we observe a continuous increase in the electron localization leading to ion clustering near the metal-nonmetal transition at about twice the critical density, in agreement with electrical measurements, and to the presence of dimers near and below the critical density.

  8. High Energy Density Microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, R.M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the RF98 Workshop entitled `High Energy Density Microwaves` held in California in October, 1998. The topics discussed were predominantly accelerator{minus}related. The Workshop dealt, for the most part, with the generation and control of electron beams, the amplification of RF signals, the design of mode converters, and the effect of very high RF field gradients. This Workshop was designed to address the concerns of the microwave tube industry worldwide, the plasma physicists who deal with very high beam currents and gigawatts of RF power, and researchers in accelerator centers around the world. Papers were presented on multibeam klystrons, gyrotron development, plasmas in microwave tubes, RF breakdown, and alternatives to conventional linear coliders at 1 TeV and above. The Workshop was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy. There were 46 papers presented at the conference,out of which 19 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  9. Noncanonical Hamiltonian density formulation of hydrodynamics and ideal MHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, P.J.; Greene, J.M.

    1980-04-01

    A new Hamiltonian density formulation of a perfect fluid with or without a magnetic field is presented. Contrary to previous work the dynamical variables are the physical variables, rho, v, B, and s, which form a noncanonical set. A Poisson bracket which satisfies the Jacobi identity is defined. This formulation is transformed to a Hamiltonian system where the dynamical variables are the spatial Fourier coefficients of the fluid variables.

  10. Molecular dynamics for 400 million particles with short-range interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Y.; McCoy, R.A.; Marr, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    We report the design and performance of a computational molecular dynamics (MD) code for 400 million particles interacting through the standard pairwise 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential on a 1024-node Intel Paragon, a distributed-memory MIMD parallel computer. The initially recorded {open_quotes}particle-step time{close_quotes} was .4 microseconds. A new inter-node communication strategy ensures high parallel efficiency for a large number of nodes. Besides the ability to tackle large problems, our implementation incorporates a novel method for dynamic load balancing. Our communication and load balancing enhancements provide increased efficiency and flexibility for our MD code. vet are general enough for use in other parallel algorithms.

  11. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  12. Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    collisions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions We estimate the energy density and the gluon distribution associated with the classical fields describing the early-time dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. In the McLerran-Venugopalan model, we first decompose the energy density into

  13. Soil Density/Moisture Gauge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a soil moisture/density gauge (Class 7 -...

  14. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP)more » methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.« less

  15. Category:Rock Density | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Density page? For detailed information on Rock Density as...

  16. Function and dynamics of aptamers: A case study on the malachite green aptamer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tianjiao

    2008-12-01

    Aptamers are short single-stranded nucleic acids that can bind to their targets with high specificity and high affinity. To study aptamer function and dynamics, the malachite green aptamer was chosen as a model. Malachite green (MG) bleaching, in which an OH- attacks the central carbon (C1) of MG, was inhibited in the presence of the malachite green aptamer (MGA). The inhibition of MG bleaching by MGA could be reversed by an antisense oligonucleotide (AS) complementary to the MGA binding pocket. Computational cavity analysis of the NMR structure of the MGA-MG complex predicted that the OH{sup -} is sterically excluded from the C1 of MG. The prediction was confirmed experimentally using variants of the MGA with changes in the MG binding pocket. This work shows that molecular reactivity can be reversibly regulated by an aptamer-AS pair based on steric hindrance. In addition to demonstrate that aptamers could control molecular reactivity, aptamer dynamics was studied with a strategy combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and experimental verification. MD simulation predicted that the MG binding pocket of the MGA is largely pre-organized and that binding of MG involves reorganization of the pocket and a simultaneous twisting of the MGA terminal stems around the pocket. MD simulation also provided a 3D-structure model of unoccupied MGA that has not yet been obtained by biophysical measurements. These predictions were consistent with biochemical and biophysical measurements of the MGA-MG interaction including RNase I footprinting, melting curves, thermodynamic and kinetic constants measurement. This work shows that MD simulation can be used to extend our understanding of the dynamics of aptamer-target interaction which is not evident from static 3D-structures. To conclude, I have developed a novel concept to control molecular reactivity by an aptamer based on steric protection and a strategy to study the dynamics of aptamer-target interaction by combining MD simulation and experimental verification. The former has potential application in controlling metabolic reactions and protein modifications by small reactants and the latter may serve as a general approach to study the dynamics of aptamer-target interaction for new insights into mechanisms of aptamer-target recognition.

  17. Attractor comparisons based on density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, T. L.

    2015-01-15

    Recognizing a chaotic attractor can be seen as a problem in pattern recognition. Some feature vector must be extracted from the attractor and used to compare to other attractors. The field of machine learning has many methods for extracting feature vectors, including clustering methods, decision trees, support vector machines, and many others. In this work, feature vectors are created by representing the attractor as a density in phase space and creating polynomials based on this density. Density is useful in itself because it is a one dimensional function of phase space position, but representing an attractor as a density is also a way to reduce the size of a large data set before analyzing it with graph theory methods, which can be computationally intensive. The density computation in this paper is also fast to execute. In this paper, as a demonstration of the usefulness of density, the density is used directly to construct phase space polynomials for comparing attractors. Comparisons between attractors could be useful for tracking changes in an experiment when the underlying equations are too complicated for vector field modeling.

  18. Direct experimental determination of spectral densities of molecular complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-07

    Determining the spectral density of a molecular system immersed in a proteomic scaffold and in contact to a solvent is a fundamental challenge in the coarse-grained description of, e.g., electron and energy transfer dynamics. Once the spectral density is characterized, all the time scales are captured and no artificial separation between fast and slow processes need to be invoked. Based on the fluorescence Stokes shift function, we utilize a simple and robust strategy to extract the spectral density of a number of molecular complexes from available experimental data. Specifically, we show that experimental data for dye molecules in several solvents, amino acid proteins in water, and some photochemical systems (e.g., rhodopsin and green fluorescence proteins), are well described by a three-parameter family of sub-Ohmic spectral densities that are characterized by a fast initial Gaussian-like decay followed by a slow algebraic-like decay rate at long times.

  19. Low density carbonized composite foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Fung-Ming

    1991-01-01

    A carbonized composite foam having a density less than about 50 mg/cm.sup.3 and individual cell sizes no greater than about 1 .mu.m in diameter is described, and the process of making it.

  20. Low density carbonized composite foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Fung-Ming

    1993-01-01

    A carbonized composite foam having a density less than about 50 mg/cm.sup.3 and individual cell sizes no greater than about 1 .mu.m in diameter is described, and the process of making it.

  1. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  2. Chemical Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARPA-E Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences and Engineering Chemical Sciences ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Chemical Dynamics HomeTransportation ...

  3. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Japan Science and Technology Agency, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 ; Ando, Koji

    2014-05-07

    Liquid para-hydrogen (p-H{sub 2}) is a typical quantum liquid which exhibits strong nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) and thus anomalous static and dynamic properties. We propose a real-time simulation method of wave packet (WP) molecular dynamics (MD) based on non-empirical intra- and inter-molecular interactions of non-spherical hydrogen molecules, and apply it to condensed-phase p-H{sub 2}. The NQEs, such as WP delocalization and zero-point energy, are taken into account without perturbative expansion of prepared model potential functions but with explicit interactions between nuclear and electron WPs. The developed MD simulation for 100 ps with 1200 hydrogen molecules is realized at feasible computational cost, by which basic experimental properties of p-H{sub 2} liquid such as radial distribution functions, self-diffusion coefficients, and shear viscosities are all well reproduced.

  4. Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat

    2015-01-06

    The Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2013) was held in Saint Malo, France, at the Palais du Grand Large on 25-28 June 2013 (http://web.luli.polytechnique.fr/ICHED2013/). This meeting was the fourth in a series which was first held in 2008. This conference covered all the important aspects of High Energy Density Physics including fundamental topics from strong-field physics to creating new states of matter (including radiation-dominated, high-pressure quantum and relativistic plasmas) and ultra-fast lattice dynamics on the timescale of atomic transitions.

  5. High Density Sensor Network Development | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Density Sensor Network Development

  6. Neutron diffraction measurements of dislocation density in copper crystals deformed at high strain rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Mala N.; Chaplot, S. L.; Rawat, S.

    2013-02-05

    Neutron diffraction measurements of the rocking curves were carried out for single crystals of copper subjected to dynamic compression at 10{sup 3}/s strain rate. The line broadening is expected to be produced by dislocations, and an analysis of this broadening gives the dislocation density. Dislocation density is found to increase with increase of pressure.

  7. Dynamics of capillary condensation in aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, R.; Miyashita, W.; Yoneyama, K.; Okuda, Y. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2006-03-15

    Dynamics of capillary condensation of liquid {sup 4}He in various density silica aerogels was investigated systematically. Interfaces were clearly visible when bulk liquid was rapidly sucked into the aerogel. Time evolution of the interface positions was consistent with the Washburn model and their effective pore radii were obtained. Condensation was a single step in a dense aerogel and two steps in a low density aerogel. Crossover between the two types of condensation was observed in an intermediate density aerogel. Variety of the dynamics may be the manifestation of the fractal nature of aerogels which had a wide range of distribution of pore radii.

  8. Molecular dynamics study of two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectra at vapor/water interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectra at vapor/water interface were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with a classical flexible and nonpolarizable model. The present model well describes the spectral diffusion of 2D infrared spectrum of bulk water as well as 2D HD-VSFG at the interface. The effect of isotopic dilution on the 2D HD-VSFG was elucidated by comparing the normal (H{sub 2}O) water and HOD water. We further performed decomposition analysis of 2D HD-VSFG into the hydrogen-bonding and the dangling (or free) OH vibrations, and thereby disentangled the different spectral responses and spectral diffusion in the 2D HD-VSFG. The present MD simulation demonstrated the role of anharmonic coupling between these modes on the cross peak in the 2D HD-VSFG spectrum.

  9. Using Molecular Dynamics to quantify the electrical double layer and examine the potential for its direct observation in the in-situ TEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, David A.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Hatchell, Hanna J.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-03-25

    Understanding the fundamental processes taking place at the electrode-electrolyte interface in batteries will play a key role in the development of next generation energy storage technologies. One of the most fundamental aspects of the electrode-electrolyte interface is the electrical double layer (EDL). Given the recent development of high spatial resolution in-situ electrochemical cells for scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), there now exists the possibility that we can directly observe the formation and dynamics of the EDL. In this paper we predict electrolyte structure within the EDL using classical models and atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations show that the classical models fail to accurately reproduce concentration profiles that exist within the electrolyte. It is thus suggested that MD must be used in order to accurately predict STEM images of the electrode-electrolyte interface. Using MD and image simulations together for a high contrast electrolyte (the high atomic number CsCl electrolyte), it is determined that, for a smooth interface, concentration profiles within the EDL should be visible experimentally. When normal experimental parameters such as rough interfaces and low-Z electrolytes (like those used in Li-ion batteries) are considered, observation of the EDL appears to be more difficult.

  10. Using Molecular Dynamics to quantify the electrical double layer and examine the potential for its direct observation in the in-situ TEM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Welch, David A.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Hatchell, Hanna J.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-03-25

    Understanding the fundamental processes taking place at the electrode-electrolyte interface in batteries will play a key role in the development of next generation energy storage technologies. One of the most fundamental aspects of the electrode-electrolyte interface is the electrical double layer (EDL). Given the recent development of high spatial resolution in-situ electrochemical cells for scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), there now exists the possibility that we can directly observe the formation and dynamics of the EDL. In this paper we predict electrolyte structure within the EDL using classical models and atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations show thatmore » the classical models fail to accurately reproduce concentration profiles that exist within the electrolyte. It is thus suggested that MD must be used in order to accurately predict STEM images of the electrode-electrolyte interface. Using MD and image simulations together for a high contrast electrolyte (the high atomic number CsCl electrolyte), it is determined that, for a smooth interface, concentration profiles within the EDL should be visible experimentally. When normal experimental parameters such as rough interfaces and low-Z electrolytes (like those used in Li-ion batteries) are considered, observation of the EDL appears to be more difficult.« less

  11. High-density fluid compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, D.C.

    1981-09-29

    Clear, high-density fluids suitable for use as well completion, packing, and perforation media comprise aqueous solutions of zinc bromide and calcium bromide having densities lying in the range of about 14.5 up to about 18.0 pounds per gallon and measured PH's lying in the range of about 3.5 up to about 6.0. Optionally, such fluids may also comprise calcium chloride and/or a soluble film-forming amine-based corrosion inhibitor. Such fluids under conditions of ordinary use exhibit low corrosion rates and have crystallization points lying well below the range of temperatures under which they are used.

  12. Current density partitioning in time-dependent current density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Wasserman, Adam; Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907

    2014-05-14

    We adapt time-dependent current density functional theory to allow for a fragment-based solution of the many-electron problem of molecules in the presence of time-dependent electric and magnetic fields. Regarding a molecule as a set of non-interacting subsystems that individually evolve under the influence of an auxiliary external electromagnetic vector-scalar potential pair, the partition 4-potential, we show that there are one-to-one mappings between this auxiliary potential, a sharply-defined set of fragment current densities, and the total current density of the system. The partition electromagnetic (EM) 4-potential is expressed in terms of the real EM 4-potential of the system and a gluing EM 4-potential that accounts for exchange-correlation effects and mutual interaction forces between fragments that are required to yield the correct electron dynamics. We prove the zero-force theorem for the fragmented system, establish a variational formulation in terms of action functionals, and provide a simple illustration for a charged particle in a ring.

  13. Plasma digital density determining device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien C.; Lovell, Thomas W.; Holly, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    The density of a decaying plasma in an electrically conducting enclosure is determined by applying an excitation to the cavity formed by the enclosure and counting digitally the number of resonant frequencies traversed by the combination of the cavity and the decaying plasma.

  14. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  15. Statistical density modification using local pattern matching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-01-23

    A computer implemented method modifies an experimental electron density map. A set of selected known experimental and model electron density maps is provided and standard templates of electron density are created from the selected experimental and model electron density maps by clustering and averaging values of electron density in a spherical region about each point in a grid that defines each selected known experimental and model electron density maps. Histograms are also created from the selected experimental and model electron density maps that relate the value of electron density at the center of each of the spherical regions to a correlation coefficient of a density surrounding each corresponding grid point in each one of the standard templates. The standard templates and the histograms are applied to grid points on the experimental electron density map to form new estimates of electron density at each grid point in the experimental electron density map.

  16. High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids National security depends on science and ...

  17. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional VaryMatrix.png Collaboration with mathematicians and computational...

  18. Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional ...

  19. ARM - Lesson Plans: Air Density and Temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Air Density and Temperature Objective The objective of this activity is to investigate the effect of temperature on the density of air. ...

  20. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a steer's head.'' it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  1. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus_minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a ``steer`s head.`` it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  2. Pion transverse charge density and the edge of hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmignotto, Marco; Horn, Tanja; Miller, Gerald A.

    2014-08-01

    We use the world data on the pion form factor for space-like kinematics and a technique used to extract the proton transverse densities, to extract the transverse pion charge density and its uncertainty due to experimental uncertainties and incomplete knowledge of the pion form factor at large values of Q2. The pion charge density at small values of b<0.1 fm is dominated by this incompleteness error while the range between 0.1-0.3 fm is relatively well constrained. A comparison of pion and proton charge densities shows that the pion is denser than the proton for values of b<0.2 fm. The pion and proton distributions seem to be the same for values of b=0.2-0.6 fm. Future data from Jlab 12 GeV and the EIC will increase the dynamic extent of the data to higher values of Q2 and thus reduce the uncertainties in the extracted pion charge density.

  3. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  4. DENSITY CONTROL IN A REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, J. Jr.

    1961-10-24

    A reactor is described in which natural-uranium bodies are located in parallel channels which extend through the graphite mass in a regular lattice. The graphite mass has additional channels that are out of the lattice and contain no uranium. These additional channels decrease in number per unit volume of graphite from the center of the reactor to the exterior and have the effect of reducing the density of the graphite more at the center than at the exterior, thereby spreading neutron activity throughout the reactor. (AEC)

  5. A molecular dynamics study of nuclear quantum effect on the diffusion of hydrogen in condensed phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Tokumasu, Takashi; Tsuda, Shin-ichi; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Koshi, Mitsuo; Hayashie, A. Koichi

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule on its diffusivity is analyzed using Molecular Dynamics (MD) method. The path integral centroid MD (CMD) method is applied for the reproduction method of time evolution of the molecules. The diffusion coefficient of liquid hydrogen is calculated using the Green-Kubo method. The simulation is performed at wide temperature region and the temperature dependence of the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule is addressed. The calculation results are compared with those of classical MD results. As a result, it is confirmed that the diffusivity of hydrogen molecule is changed depending on temperature by the quantum effect. It is clarified that this result can be explained that the dominant factor by quantum effect on the diffusivity of hydrogen changes from the swollening the potential to the shallowing the potential well around 30 K. Moreover, it is found that this tendency is related to the temperature dependency of the ratio of the quantum kinetic energy and classical kinetic energy.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of salt–solution interface: Solubility and surface charge of salt in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshifumi E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2014-04-14

    The NaCl salt–solution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl salt–solution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a salt–solution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules.

  7. Photodissociation Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photodissociation Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  8. Enhanced molecular dynamics for simulating porous interphase layers in batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Jones, Reese E.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Lee, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Understanding charge transport processes at a molecular level using computational techniques is currently hindered by a lack of appropriate models for incorporating anistropic electric fields in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. An important technological example is ion transport through solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layers that form in many common types of batteries. These layers regulate the rate at which electro-chemical reactions occur, affecting power, safety, and reliability. In this work, we develop a model for incorporating electric fields in MD using an atomistic-to-continuum framework. This framework provides the mathematical and algorithmic infrastructure to couple finite element (FE) representations of continuous data with atomic data. In this application, the electric potential is represented on a FE mesh and is calculated from a Poisson equation with source terms determined by the distribution of the atomic charges. Boundary conditions can be imposed naturally using the FE description of the potential, which then propagates to each atom through modified forces. The method is verified using simulations where analytical or theoretical solutions are known. Calculations of salt water solutions in complex domains are performed to understand how ions are attracted to charged surfaces in the presence of electric fields and interfering media.

  9. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  10. Scattering Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  11. Chemical Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  12. Synergy between pair coupled cluster doubles and pair density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garza, Alejandro J.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2015-01-28

    Pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has been recently studied as a method capable of accounting for static correlation with low polynomial cost. We present three combinations of pCCD with Kohn–Sham functionals of the density and on-top pair density (the probability of finding two electrons on top of each other) to add dynamic correlation to pCCD without double counting. With a negligible increase in computational cost, these pCCD+DFT blends greatly improve upon pCCD in the description of typical problems where static and dynamic correlations are both important. We argue that—as a black-box method with low scaling, size-extensivity, size-consistency, and a simple quasidiagonal two-particle density matrix—pCCD is an excellent match for pair density functionals in this type of fusion of multireference wavefunctions with DFT.

  13. Density gradient effects on transverse shear driven lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Thomas, Edward; Amatucci, William E.; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2014-06-15

    Shear driven instabilities are commonly observed in the near-Earth space, particularly in boundary layer plasmas. When the shear scale length (L{sub E}) is much less than the ion gyro-radius (?{sub i}) but greater than the electron gyro-radius (?{sub e}), the electrons are magnetized in the shear layer, but the ions are effectively un-magnetized. The resulting shear driven instability, the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, is investigated in a new interpenetrating plasma configuration in the Auburn Linear EXperiment for Instability Studies. In order to understand the dynamics of magnetospheric boundary layers, the EIH instability is studied in the presence of a density gradient located at the boundary layer between two plasmas. This paper reports on a recent experiment in which electrostatic lower hybrid waves are identified as the EIH instability, and the effect of a density gradient on the instability properties are investigated.

  14. Spin projection with double hybrid density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Lee M.; Hratchian, Hrant P.

    2014-07-21

    A spin projected double-hybrid density functional theory is presented that accounts for different scaling of opposite and same spin terms in the second order correction. This method is applied to three dissociation reactions which in the unprojected formalism exhibit significant spin contamination with higher spin states. This gives rise to a distorted potential surface and can lead to poor geometries and energies. The projected method presented is shown to improve the description of the potential over unprojected double hybrid density functional theory. Comparison is made with the reference states of the two double hybrid functionals considered here (B2PLYP and mPW2PLYP) in which the projected potential surface is degraded by an imbalance in the description of dynamic and static correlation.

  15. Electronic Structure, Phonon Dynamical Properties, and CO2 Capture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Electronic Structure, Phonon Dynamical Properties, and CO2 Capture Capability of Na2-xMxZrO3 ( MLi ,K): Density-Functional Calculations and Experimental...

  16. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  17. INTERMITTENCY OF SOLAR WIND DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS FROM ION TO ELECTRON SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C. H. K.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Šafránková, J.; N?me?ek, Z.

    2014-07-01

    The intermittency of density fluctuations in the solar wind at kinetic scales has been examined using high time resolution Faraday cup measurements from the Spektr-R spacecraft. It was found that the probability density functions (PDFs) of the fluctuations are highly non-Gaussian over this range, but do not show large changes in shape with scale. These properties are statistically similar to those of the magnetic fluctuations and are important to understanding the dynamics of small scale turbulence in the solar wind. Possible explanations for the behavior of the density and magnetic fluctuations are discussed.

  18. Thermodynamics of technetium: Reconciling theory and experiment using density functional perturbation analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja

    2015-06-11

    The structure, lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of bulk technetium were investigated within the framework of density functional theory. The phonon density of states spectrum computed with density functional perturbation theory closely matches inelastic coherent neutron scattering measurements. The thermal properties of technetium were derived from phonon frequencies calculated within the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA), which introduces a volume dependence of phonon frequencies as a part of the anharmonic effect. As a result, the predicted thermal expansion and isobaric heat capacity of technetium are in excellent agreement with available experimental data for temperatures up to ~1600 K.

  19. Unequal density effect on static structure factor of coupled electron layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saini, L. K. Nayak, Mukesh G.

    2014-04-24

    In order to understand the ordered phase, if any, in a real coupled electron layers (CEL), there is a need to take into account the effect of unequal layer density. Such phase is confirmed by a strong peak in a static structure factor. With the aid of quantum/dynamical version of Singwi, Tosi, Land and Sjölander (so-called qSTLS) approximation, we have calculated the intra- and interlayer static structure factors, S{sub ll}(q) and S{sub 12}(q), over a wide range of density parameter r{sub sl} and interlayer spacing d. In our present study, the sharp peak in S{sub 22}(q) has been found at critical density with sufficiently lower interlayer spacing. Further, to find the resultant effect of unequal density on intra- and interlayer static structure factors, we have compared our results with that of the recent CEL system with equal layer density and isolated single electron layer.

  20. Sheath dynamics induced by ion-acoustic rarefaction wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murakami, M. ); Nishihara, K. )

    1993-09-01

    A simple analytical model is presented to describe the sheath dynamics, when a stationary slab plasma with a uniform density [ital n][sub 0] faces a negatively biased wall with a voltage [phi][sub 0]. The dynamics strongly depends on the sheath thickness [ital s]. If [ital s] is less than a well-defined distance [ital s][sub [ital e

  1. High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

    2007-09-01

    An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

  2. The Quantum Energy Density: Improved E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krogel, Jaron; Yu, Min; Kim, Jeongnim; Ceperley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    We establish a physically meaningful representation of a quantum energy density for use in Quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The energy density operator, dened in terms of Hamiltonian components and density operators, returns the correct Hamiltonian when integrated over a volume containing a cluster of particles. This property is demonstrated for a helium-neon \\gas," showing that atomic energies obtained from the energy density correspond to eigenvalues of isolated systems. The formation energies of defects or interfaces are typically calculated as total energy dierences. Using a model of delta-doped silicon (where dopant atoms form a thin plane) we show how interfacial energies can be calculated more eciently with the energy density, since the region of interest is small. We also demonstrate how the energy density correctly transitions to the bulk limit away from the interface where the correct energy is obtainable from a separate total energy calculation.

  3. Quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-01-01

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  4. Normal and abnormal evolution of argon metastable density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    A controversial problem on the evolution of Ar metastable density as a function of electron density (increasing trend versus decreasing trend) was resolved by discovering the anomalous evolution of the argon metastable density with increasing electron density (discharge power), including both trends of the metastable density [Daltrini et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Later, by virtue of an adequate physical explanation based on a simple global model, both evolutions of the metastable density were comprehensively understood as part of the abnormal evolution occurring at low- and high-density regimes, respectively, and thus the physics behind the metastable evolution has seemed to be clearly disclosed. In this study, however, a remarkable result for the metastable density behavior with increasing electron density was observed: even in the same electron density regime, there are both normal and abnormal evolutions of metastable-state density with electron density depending on the measurement position: The metastable density increases with increasing electron density at a position far from the inductively coupled plasma antenna but decreases at a position close to the antenna. The effect of electron temperature, which is spatially nonuniform in the plasma, on the electron population and depopulation processes of Argon metastable atoms with increasing electron density is a clue to understanding the results. The calculated results of the global model, including multistep ionization for the argon metastable state and measured electron temperature, are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Method of synthesizing a low density material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lorensen, L.E.; Monaco, S.B.

    1987-02-27

    A novel method of synthesizing a polymeric material of low density of the order of 50mg/cc or less. Such a low density material has applications in many areas including laser target fabrication. The method comprises preparing a polymer blend of two incompatible polymers as a major and a minor phase by mixing them and extruding the mixture, and then selectively extracting the major component, to yield a fine, low density structure.

  6. Mini-review of Electron Density Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, Joan; Adler, Omri; Kreif, Meytal; Cohen, Or; Grosso, Bastien; Hashibon, Adham; Cooper, Valentino R

    2015-01-01

    We describe both educational and research oriented examples of electronic density visualization with AViz. Several detailed cases are presented and the procedures for their preparation are described.

  7. 3-D capacitance density imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, G.E.

    1988-03-18

    A three-dimensional capacitance density imaging of a gasified bed or the like in a containment vessel is achieved using a plurality of electrodes provided circumferentially about the bed in levels and along the bed in channels. The electrodes are individually and selectively excited electrically at each level to produce a plurality of current flux field patterns generated in the bed at each level. The current flux field patterns are suitably sensed and a density pattern of the bed at each level determined. By combining the determined density patterns at each level, a three-dimensional density image of the bed is achieved. 7 figs.

  8. Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory and Information Content of New Measurements Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly...

  9. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2014-09-10

    This grant had two components: Density functional theory and pairing and Nuclear reactions. This final report summarizes the activities for this SciDAC-2 project.

  10. Breast Density and Cancer | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home > Innovation > Breast Cancer Awareness Series: Understanding Breast Density Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click...

  11. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  12. Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is one of the main ... In particular, we cover the topics of parameter estimation for inverse problems, statistical analysis of model ...

  13. Electronic Structure, Phonon Dynamical Properties, and Capture Capability

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Na2-xMxZrO3 (M=Li,K): Density-Functional Calculations and Experimental Validations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electronic Structure, Phonon Dynamical Properties, and Capture Capability of Na2-xMxZrO3 (M=Li,K): Density-Functional Calculations and Experimental Validations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic Structure, Phonon Dynamical Properties, and Capture Capability of Na2-xMxZrO3 (M=Li,K): Density-Functional Calculations and Experimental Validations Authors:

  14. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  15. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transitionmore » order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.« less

  16. On the correlation between the photoexcitation pathways and the critical energies required for ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate): A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conforti, Patrick F.; Prasad, Manish; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2008-05-15

    The energetics initiating ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The critical energy to initiate ablation in PMMA following the absorption of photons is investigated for two penetration depths along a range of fluences using a coarse-grained, hybrid Monte Carlo-MD scheme. Both heating and direct bond scission are simulated separately after photon absorption with additional transformation of material occurring via chemical reactions following the photochemical bond cleavage. For a given type of absorption and reaction channel, a critical energy can well describe the amount of energy required to initiate ablation. The simulations show a decrease in the critical energy when a greater amount of photochemistry is introduced in the system. The simulations complement experimental studies and elucidate how enhanced photochemistry lowers ablation thresholds in polymer substrates.

  17. High bandwidth vapor density diagnostic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Globig, Michael A.; Story, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    A high bandwidth vapor density diagnostic system for measuring the density of an atomic vapor during one or more photoionization events. The system translates the measurements from a low frequency region to a high frequency, relatively noise-free region in the spectrum to provide improved signal to noise ratio.

  18. High density laser-driven target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindl, John D.

    1981-01-01

    A high density target for implosion by laser energy composed of a central quantity of fuel surrounded by a high-Z pusher shell with a low-Z ablator-pusher shell spaced therefrom forming a region filled with low-density material.

  19. Enhancing critical current density of cuprate superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhari, Praveen

    2015-06-16

    The present invention concerns the enhancement of critical current densities in cuprate superconductors. Such enhancement of critical current densities include using wave function symmetry and restricting movement of Abrikosov (A) vortices, Josephson (J) vortices, or Abrikosov-Josephson (A-J) vortices by using the half integer vortices associated with d-wave symmetry present in the grain boundary.

  20. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combinatorial nuclear level-density model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combinatorial nuclear level-density model A microscopic nuclear level-density model is ...

  1. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup ?3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 ?s. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  2. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo Zhong, Chongli

    2014-05-28

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid?liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  3. Ions in solution: Density corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Sim, Eunji; Burke, Kieron

    2014-05-14

    Standard density functional approximations often give questionable results for odd-electron radical complexes, with the error typically attributed to self-interaction. In density corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT), certain classes of density functional theory calculations are significantly improved by using densities more accurate than the self-consistent densities. We discuss how to identify such cases, and how DC-DFT applies more generally. To illustrate, we calculate potential energy surfaces of HO·Cl{sup −} and HO·H{sub 2}O complexes using various common approximate functionals, with and without this density correction. Commonly used approximations yield wrongly shaped surfaces and/or incorrect minima when calculated self consistently, while yielding almost identical shapes and minima when density corrected. This improvement is retained even in the presence of implicit solvent.

  4. Dynamics of dendritic polymers in the bulk and under confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrissopoulou, K.; Fotiadou, S.; Androulaki, K.; Anastasiadis, S. H.; Tanis, I.; Karatasos, K.; Prevosto, D.; Labardi, M.; Frick, B.

    2014-05-15

    The structure and dynamics of a hyperbranched polyesteramide (Hybrane® S 1200) polymer and its nanocomposites with natural montmorillonite (Na{sup +}-MMT) are investigated by XRD, DSC, QENS, DS and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. In bulk, the energy-resolved elastically scattered intensity from the polymer exhibits two relaxation steps, one attributed to sub-T{sub g} motions and one observed at temperatures above the glass transition, T{sub g}. The QENS spectra measured over the complete temperature range are consistent with the elastic measurements and can be correlated to the results emerging from the detailed description afforded by the atomistic simulations, which predict the existence of three relaxation processes. Moreover, dielectric spectroscopy shows the sub- T{sub g} beta process as well as the segmental relaxation. For the nanocomposites, XRD reveals an intercalated structure for all hybrids with distinct interlayer distances due to polymer chains residing within the galleries of the Na{sup +}-MMT. The polymer chains confined within the galleries show similarities in the behavior with that of the polymer in the bulk for temperatures below the bulk polymer T{sub g}, whereas they exhibit frozen dynamics under confinement at temperatures higher than that.

  5. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, Adam R.; Atkinson, Rachel L.; Reddy, Jay P.; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li; Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae; Atkinson, Bradley J.; Brewster, Abeena; Ueno, Naoto T.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients and IBC patient-derived cell lines. A more expansive study is needed to verify these observations.

  6. Periodic subsystem density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele; Ceresoli, Davide

    2014-11-07

    By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of Kohn–Sham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with Kohn–Sham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

  7. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "Clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density.ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100.circle.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  8. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density .ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 .ANG.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  9. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.

    1988-05-26

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer ''clusters''. The covalent crosslinking of these ''clusters'' produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density less than or equal to100 mg/cc; cell size less than or equal to0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent,dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 A/degree/. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.

    1989-10-10

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer clusters. The covalent crosslinking of these clusters produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density [<=]100 mg/cc; cell size [<=]0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 [angstrom]. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  11. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  12. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng F.; Tu, Yi

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  13. Separation of carbon nanotubes in density gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hersam, Mark C.; Stupp, Samuel I.; Arnold, Michael S.

    2010-02-16

    The separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), by chirality and/or diameter, using centrifugation of compositions of SWNTs in and surface active components in density gradient media.

  14. Shock compression of low-density foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, N.C.

    1993-07-01

    Shock compression of very low density micro-cellular materials allows entirely new regimes of hot fluid states to be investigated experimentally. Using a two-stage light-gas gun to generate strong shocks, temperatures of several eV are readily achieved at densities of roughly 0.5--1 g/cm{sup 3} in large, uniform volumes. The conditions in these hot, expanded fluids are readily found using the Hugoniot jump conditions. We will briefly describe the basic methodology for sample preparation and experimental measurement of shock velocities. We present data for several materials over a range of initial densities. This paper will explore the applications of these methods for investigations of equations of state and phase diagrams, spectroscopy, and plasma physics. Finally, we discus the need for future work on these and related low-density materials.

  15. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A high density peg which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  16. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-01-29

    A high density peg is disclosed which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 4 figs.

  17. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) cosmological measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Don N.

    2014-11-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmological constant.

  18. Separation of carbon nanotubes in density gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hersam, Mark C.; Stupp, Samuel I.; Arnold, Michael S.

    2012-02-07

    The separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), by chirality and/or diameter, using centrifugation of compositions of SWNTs in and surface active components in density gradient media.

  19. Fact #661: February 7, 2011 Population Density

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The density of the population in the U.S., measured as the number of people per square mile, affects the way goods and people are transported. The newly released 2010 Census data show that, on a...

  20. Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    clathrates (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates Authors: Tulk, C.A. ; dos Santos, A.M. ; Neuefeind, J.C. ; Molaison, J.J. ; Sales, B.C. ; Honkimäki, V. [1] ; ESRF) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (ORNL) ( Publication Date: 2015-09-22 OSTI Identifier: 1221429 Resource Type: Journal Article

  1. Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    clathrates (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates The pressure induced crystalline collapse at 14.7 GPa and polyamorphic structures of the semiconductor clathrate Sr8Ga16Ge30 are reported up to 35 GPa. In-situ total scattering measurements under pressure allow the direct microscopic inspection

  2. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Wen, Jin; Ma, Jing

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changes and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.

  3. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates: A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jiyun; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Peteanu, Linda A.; Wen, Jin; Ma, Jing

    2014-11-13

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changes and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.

  4. BanuelosSANS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAXS and MD-derived mean RTIL density as a function of pore filling fraction. (b) MD-obtained RTIL density profiles inside micro/mesopores. FIRST Center Research Perspective: Structural and Dynamic Properties of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Confined within Hierarchical Porous Materials José Leobardo Bañuelos, Pasquale F. Fulvio, Gernot Rother, Sheng Dai, David J. Wesolowski Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Guang Feng, Song Li, Peter Cummings Vanderbilt University Research Summary: The

  5. Single crystal plasticity by modeling dislocation density rate behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Benjamin L; Bronkhorst, Curt; Beyerlein, Irene; Cerreta, E. K.; Dennis-Koller, Darcie

    2010-12-23

    The goal of this work is to formulate a constitutive model for the deformation of metals over a wide range of strain rates. Damage and failure of materials frequently occurs at a variety of deformation rates within the same sample. The present state of the art in single crystal constitutive models relies on thermally-activated models which are believed to become less reliable for problems exceeding strain rates of 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. This talk presents work in which we extend the applicability of the single crystal model to the strain rate region where dislocation drag is believed to dominate. The elastic model includes effects from volumetric change and pressure sensitive moduli. The plastic model transitions from the low-rate thermally-activated regime to the high-rate drag dominated regime. The direct use of dislocation density as a state parameter gives a measurable physical mechanism to strain hardening. Dislocation densities are separated according to type and given a systematic set of interactions rates adaptable by type. The form of the constitutive model is motivated by previously published dislocation dynamics work which articulated important behaviors unique to high-rate response in fcc systems. The proposed material model incorporates thermal coupling. The hardening model tracks the varying dislocation population with respect to each slip plane and computes the slip resistance based on those values. Comparisons can be made between the responses of single crystals and polycrystals at a variety of strain rates. The material model is fit to copper.

  6. Capacitance-level/density monitor for fluidized-bed combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E.; Utt, Carroll E.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple segment three-terminal type capacitance probe with segment selection, capacitance detection and compensation circuitry and read-out control for level/density measurements in a fluidized-bed vessel is provided. The probe is driven at a high excitation frequency of up to 50 kHz to sense quadrature (capacitive) current related to probe/vessel capacitance while being relatively insensitive to the resistance current component. Compensation circuitry is provided for generating a negative current of equal magnitude to cancel out only the resistive component current. Clock-operated control circuitry separately selects the probe segments in a predetermined order for detecting and storing this capacitance measurement. The selected segment acts as a guarded electrode and is connected to the read-out circuitry while all unselected segments are connected to the probe body, which together form the probe guard electrode. The selected probe segment capacitance component signal is directed to a corresponding segment channel sample and hold circuit dedicated to that segment to store the signal derived from that segment. This provides parallel outputs for display, computer input, etc., for the detected capacitance values. The rate of segment sampling may be varied to either monitor the dynamic density profile of the bed (high sampling rate) or monitor average bed characteristics (slower sampling rate).

  7. The tokamak density limit: A thermo-resistive disruption mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, D. A.; Brennan, D. P.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; White, R. B.

    2015-06-15

    The behavior of magnetic islands with 3D electron temperature and the corresponding 3D resistivity effects on growth are examined for islands with near-zero net heating in the island interior. We refer to the resulting class of non-linearities as thermo-resistive effects. In particular, the effects of varying impurity mix on the previously proposed local island onset threshold [Gates and Delgado-Aparicio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165004 (2012)] are examined and shown to be consistent with the well established experimental scalings for tokamaks at the density limit. A surprisingly simple semi-analytic theory is developed which imposes the effects of heating/cooling in the island interior as well as the effects of island geometry. For the class of current profiles considered, it is found that a new term that accounts for the thermal effects of island asymmetry is required in the modified Rutherford equation. The resultant model is shown to exhibit a robust onset of a rapidly growing tearing mode—consistent with the disruption mechanism observed at the density limit in tokamaks. A fully non-linear 3D cylindrical calculation is performed that simulates the effect of net island heating/cooling by raising/suppressing the temperature in the core of the island. In both the analytic theory and the numerical simulation, the sudden threshold for rapid growth is found to be due to an interaction between three distinct thermal non-linearities which affect the island resistivity, thereby modifying the growth dynamics.

  8. Direct comparisons of X-ray scattering and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations for precise acid copolymers and ionomers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buitrago, C. Francisco; Bolintineanu, Dan; Seitz, Michelle E.; Opper, Kathleen L.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Stevens, Mark J.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Winey, Karen I.

    2015-02-09

    Designing acid- and ion-containing polymers for optimal proton, ion, or water transport would benefit profoundly from predictive models or theories that relate polymer structures with ionomer morphologies. Recently, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study the morphologies of precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymer and ionomer melts. Here, we present the first direct comparisons between scattering profiles, I(q), calculated from these atomistic MD simulations and experimental X-ray data for 11 materials. This set of precise polymers has spacers of exactly 9, 15, or 21 carbons between acid groups and has been partially neutralized with Li, Na, Cs, or Zn. Inmore » these polymers, the simulations at 120 °C reveal ionic aggregates with a range of morphologies, from compact, isolated aggregates (type 1) to branched, stringy aggregates (type 2) to branched, stringy aggregates that percolate through the simulation box (type 3). Excellent agreement is found between the simulated and experimental scattering peak positions across all polymer types and aggregate morphologies. The shape of the amorphous halo in the simulated I(q) profile is in excellent agreement with experimental I(q). We found that the modified hard-sphere scattering model fits both the simulation and experimental I(q) data for type 1 aggregate morphologies, and the aggregate sizes and separations are in agreement. Given the stringy structure in types 2 and 3, we develop a scattering model based on cylindrical aggregates. Both the spherical and cylindrical scattering models fit I(q) data from the polymers with type 2 and 3 aggregates equally well, and the extracted aggregate radii and inter- and intra-aggregate spacings are in agreement between simulation and experiment. Furthermore, these dimensions are consistent with real-space analyses of the atomistic MD simulations. By combining simulations and experiments, the ionomer scattering peak can be associated with the average distance between branches of type 2 or 3 aggregates. Furthermore, this direct comparison of X-ray scattering data to the atomistic MD simulations is a substantive step toward providing a comprehensive, predictive model for ionomer morphology, gives substantial support for this atomistic MD model, and provides new credibility to the presence of stringy, branched, and percolated ionic aggregates in precise ionomer melts.« less

  9. General relation between density of states and dwell times in mesoscopic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iannaccone, G. Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione: Elettronica, Informatica e Telecomunicazioni, Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa )

    1995-02-15

    A relevant relation between the dwell time and the density of states for a three-dimensional system of arbitrary shape with an arbitrary number of incoming channels is derived. This result extends the one obtained by Gasparian and co-workers for the case of a one-dimensional symmetrical potential barrier. We believe that such a strong relation is rich in physical significance because the dwell time is the most widely accepted time measure of a particle's dynamics and the density of states in a given region is one of the most relevant properties of a system in equilibrium.

  10. The effects of side-chain-induced disorder on the emission spectra and quantum yields of oligothiophene nano-aggregates. A combined experimental and MD-TDDFT study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hong, Jiyun; Jeon, SuKyung; Kim, Janice J.; Devi, Diane; Chacon-Madrid, Kelly; Lee, Wynee; Koo, Seung Moh; Wildeman, Jurjen; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Peteanu, Linda A.; et al

    2014-07-24

    Oligomeric thiophenes are commonly-used components in organic electronics and solar cells. These molecules stack and/or aggregate readily under the processing conditions used to form thin films for these applications, significantly altering their optical and charge-transport properties. To determine how these effects depend on the substitution pattern of the thiophene main chains, nano-aggregates of three sexi-thiophene (6T) oligomers having different alkyl substitution patterns were formed using solvent poisoning techniques and studied using steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results indicate the substantial role played by the side-chain substituents in determining the emissive properties of these species. Both the measured spectral changesmore » and their dependence on substitution are well modeled by combined quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations connect the side-chain-induced disorder, which determines the favorable chain packing configurations within the aggregates, with their measured electronic spectra.« less

  11. Fabrication of low density ceramic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.; Sheinberg, H.

    1985-01-01

    A precursor mixture and a method of making a low-density ceramic structural material are disclosed. The precursor mixture includes hollow microballoons, typically made of glass, together with a cementing agent capable of being cured by microwave irradiation. A preferred cementing agent is liquid hydrated potassium silicate, which is mixed with the glass microballoons to form a slurry. Upon irradiation the potassium silicate is dehydrated to form a solid porous matrix in which the microballoons are evenly distributed. Ground glass or other filling agents may be included in the slurry to enhance the properties of the final product. Low-density structural ceramics having densities on the order of 0.1 to 0.3 are obtained.

  12. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  13. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2014-10-15

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  14. Low density, microcellular foams, preparation, and articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, A.T.

    1982-03-03

    A microcellular low-density foam of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) particularly useful for forming targets for inertial confinement fusion has been developed. Articles made from the foam have been machined to tolerances of 0.0001 inch, although the densities of the fragile foam are low (about 10 to about 100 mg/cc) and the cell sizes are small (about 10 to about 30 ..mu..m). Methods for forming the foam and articles are given. The yield strength of the foam of the invention is higher than was obtained in other structures of this same material.

  15. NEUTRON DENSITY CONTROL IN A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, G.J.

    1959-06-30

    The method and means for controlling the neutron density in a nuclear reactor is described. It describes the method and means for flattening the neutron density distribution curve across the reactor by spacing the absorbing control members to varying depths in the central region closer to the center than to the periphery of the active portion of the reactor to provide a smaller neutron reproduction ratio in the region wherein the members are inserted, than in the remainder of the reactor thereby increasing the over-all potential power output.

  16. Low density, microcellular foams, preparation, and articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Ainslie T.; Marsters, Robert G.; Moreno, Dawn K.

    1984-01-01

    A microcellular low density foam of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) which is particularly useful for forming targets for inertial confinement fusion has been developed. Articles made from the foam have been machined to tolerances of 0.0001 inch, although the densities of the fragile foam are low (about 10 to about 100 mg/cc) and the cell sizes are small (about 10 to about 30 .mu.m). Methods for forming the foam and articles are given; and the yield strength of the foam of the invention is higher than was obtained in other structures of this same material.

  17. The response of plasma density to breaking inertial gravity wave in the lower regions of ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Wenbo Mahalov, Alex

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional numerical study for the E and lower F region ionosphere coupled with the neutral atmosphere dynamics. This model is developed based on a previous ionospheric model that examines the transport patterns of plasma density given a prescribed neutral atmospheric flow. Inclusion of neutral dynamics in the model allows us to examine the charge-neutral interactions over the full evolution cycle of an inertial gravity wave when the background flow spins up from rest, saturates and eventually breaks. Using Lagrangian analyses, we show the mixing patterns of the ionospheric responses and the formation of ionospheric layers. The corresponding plasma density in this flow develops complex wave structures and small-scale patches during the gravity wave breaking event.

  18. Interferometer for the measurement of plasma density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Abram R.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer which combines the advantages of a coupled cavity interferometer requiring alignment of only one light beam, and a quadrature interferometer which has the ability to track multi-fringe phase excursions unambiguously. The device utilizes a Bragg cell for generating a signal which is electronically analyzed to unambiguously determine phase modulation which is proportional to the path integral of the plasma density.

  19. Durable high-density data storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutz, R.A.; Lamartine, B.C.

    1996-09-01

    This paper will discuss the Focus Ion Beam (FIB) milling process, media life considerations, and methods of reading the micromilled data. The FIB process for data storage provides a new non-magnetic storage method for archiving large amounts of data. The process stores data on robust materials such as steel, silicon, and gold coated silicon. The storage process was developed to provide a method to insure the long term storage life of data. We estimate the useful life of data written on silicon or gold coated silicon to be a few thousand years. The process uses an ion beam to carve material from the surface much like stone cutting. The deeper information is carved into the media the longer the expected life of the information. The process can read information in three formats: (1) binary at densities of 3.5 Gbits/cm{sup 2}, (2) alphanumeric at optical or non-optical density, and (3) graphical at optical and non-optical density. The formats can be mixed on the same media; and thus it is possible to record, in a human readable format, instructions that can be read using an optical microscope. These instructions provide guidance on reading the higher density information.

  20. Density waves in the Calogero model - revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardek, V. Feinberg, J. Meljanac, S.

    2010-03-15

    The Calogero model bears, in the continuum limit, collective excitations in the form of density waves and solitary modulations of the density of particles. This sector of the spectrum of the model was investigated, mostly within the framework of collective-field theory, by several authors, over the past 15 years or so. In this work we shall concentrate on periodic solutions of the collective BPS-equation (also known as 'finite amplitude density waves'), as well as on periodic solutions of the full static variational equations which vanish periodically (also known as 'large amplitude density waves'). While these solutions are not new, we feel that our analysis and presentation add to the existing literature, as we explain in the text. In addition, we show that these solutions also occur in a certain two-family generalization of the Calogero model, at special points in parameter space. A compendium of useful identities associated with Hilbert transforms, including our own proofs of these identities, appears in Appendix A. In Appendix B we also elucidate in the present paper some fine points having to do with manipulating Hilbert-transforms, which appear ubiquitously in the collective field formalism. Finally, in order to make this paper self-contained, we briefly summarize in Appendix C basic facts about the collective field formulation of the Calogero model.

  1. Fast magnetic reconnection in low-density electron-positron plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessho, Naoki; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2010-10-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been performed to study magnetic reconnection in low-density electron-positron plasmas without a guide magnetic field. Impulsive reconnection rates become of the order of unity when the background density is much smaller than 10% of the density in the initial current layer. It is demonstrated that the outflow speed is less than the upstream Alfven speed, and that the time derivative of the density must be taken into account in the definition of the reconnection rate. The reconnection electric fields in the low-density regime become much larger than the ones in the high-density regime, and it is possible to accelerate the particles to high energies more efficiently. The inertial term in the generalized Ohm's law is the most dominant term that supports a large reconnection electric field. An effective collisionless resistivity is produced and tracks the extension of the diffusion region in the late stage of the reconnection dynamics, and significant broadening of the diffusion region is observed. Because of the broadening of the diffusion region, no secondary islands, which have been considered to play a role to limit the diffusion region, are generated during the extension of the diffusion region in the outflow direction.

  2. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  3. Probability density function method for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond J

    2010-01-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are extended to variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. We apply the new method to compute the joint PDF of density and velocity in a non-premixed binary mixture of different-density molecularly mixing fluids under gravity. The full time-evolution of the joint PDF is captured in the highly non-equilibrium flow: starting from a quiescent state, transitioning to fully developed turbulence and finally dissipated by molecular diffusion. High-Atwood-number effects (as distinguished from the Boussinesq case) are accounted for: both hydrodynamic turbulence and material mixing are treated at arbitrary density ratios, with the specific volume, mass flux and all their correlations in closed form. An extension of the generalized Langevin model, originally developed for the Lagrangian fluid particle velocity in constant-density shear-driven turbulence, is constructed for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven flows. The persistent small-scale anisotropy, a fundamentally 'non-Kolmogorovian' feature of flows under external acceleration forces, is captured by a tensorial diffusion term based on the external body force. The material mixing model for the fluid density, an active scalar, is developed based on the beta distribution. The beta-PDF is shown to be capable of capturing the mixing asymmetry and that it can accurately represent the density through transition, in fully developed turbulence and in the decay process. The joint model for hydrodynamics and active material mixing yields a time-accurate evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress anisotropy without resorting to gradient diffusion hypotheses, and represents the mixing state by the density PDF itself, eliminating the need for dubious mixing measures. Direct numerical simulations of the homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor instability are used for model validation.

  4. Shared and Dynamic Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shared and Dynamic Libraries Shared and Dynamic Libraries The Edison system can support applications that use dynamic shared libraries (DSL) on the compute nodes. Some "out-of-the-box" applications require DSLs and some popular applications like Python use DSLs as well. Using System Shared and Dynamic Libraries "System" DSLs include those that support software packages found in "typical" Linux distributions, e.g. Python and Perl. To build an application that will

  5. Shared and Dynamic Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shared and Dynamic Libraries Shared and Dynamic Libraries The Hopper system can support applications that use dynamic shared libraries (DSL) on the compute nodes. Some "out-of-the-box" applications require DSLs and some popular applications like Python use DSLs as well. Using System Shared and Dynamic Libraries "System" DSLs include those that support software packages found in "typical" Linux distributions, e.g. Python and Perl. To build an application that will

  6. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  7. Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: Non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, T.; Lander, B.; Seifert, U.; Speck, T.

    2013-11-28

    We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

  8. Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced Thermoelectric Power Factor Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced ...

  9. Electron density magnification of the collective spin-orbit field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron density magnification of the collective spin-orbit field in quantum wells ... This content will become publicly available on September 27, 2016 Title: Electron density ...

  10. Real-Time Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition of Single Ultrafine Diesel Tailpipe Particles Real-Time Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition of ...

  11. Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for embolic biomedical applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low density biodegradable shape memory...

  12. Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors 2012 ...

  13. Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel Production: Fact Sheet ... Fact Sheets Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel ... ...

  14. Research on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Research on Factors Relating to Density and Climate Change Agency...

  15. Density Functional Theory Approach to Nuclear Fission (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Density Functional Theory Approach to Nuclear Fission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Density Functional Theory Approach to Nuclear Fission Authors: Schunck, N Publication ...

  16. Pairing Nambu-Goldstone Modes within Nuclear Density Functional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pairing Nambu-Goldstone Modes within Nuclear Density Functional Theory Citation Details ... Title: Pairing Nambu-Goldstone Modes within Nuclear Density Functional Theory Authors: ...

  17. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combinatorial nuclear level-density model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combinatorial nuclear level-density model You are accessing a document from the Department ...

  18. BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF) The ...

  19. Accuracy of density functionals for molecular electronics: The...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accuracy of density functionals for molecular electronics: The Anderson junction Title: Accuracy of density functionals for molecular electronics: The Anderson junction Authors: ...

  20. Molecular adsorption on metal surfaces with van der Waals density...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular adsorption on metal surfaces with van der Waals density functionals Title: Molecular adsorption on metal surfaces with van der Waals density functionals Authors: Li, Guo ...

  1. Ultra Low Density Amorphous Shape Memory polymer Foams. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultra Low Density Amorphous Shape Memory polymer Foams. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra Low Density Amorphous Shape Memory polymer Foams. You are accessing a ...

  2. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program NNSA invests in next ...

  3. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Authors: Schunck, N ; McDonnell,...

  4. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory You are accessing a document...

  5. Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Presentation ...

  6. Time-averaged quantum dynamics and the validity of the effective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We develop a technique for finding the dynamical evolution in time of an averaged density matrix. The result is an equation of evolution that includes an effective Hamiltonian, as ...

  7. The problem of the universal density functional and the density matrix functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobrov, V. B. Trigger, S. A.

    2013-04-15

    The analysis in this paper shows that the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem is the constellation of two statements: (i) the mathematically rigorous Hohenberg-Kohn lemma, which demonstrates that the same ground-state density cannot correspond to two different potentials of an external field, and (ii) the hypothesis of the existence of the universal density functional. Based on the obtained explicit expression for the nonrel-ativistic particle energy in a local external field, we prove that the energy of the system of more than two non-interacting electrons cannot be a functional of the inhomogeneous density. This result is generalized to the system of interacting electrons. It means that the Hohenberg-Kohn lemma cannot provide justification of the universal density functional for fermions. At the same time, statements of the density functional theory remain valid when considering any number of noninteracting ground-state bosons due to the Bose condensation effect. In the framework of the density matrix functional theory, the hypothesis of the existence of the universal density matrix functional corresponds to the cases of noninteracting particles and to interaction in the Hartree-Fock approximation.

  8. Towards time-dependent current-density-functional theory in the non-linear regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escartín, J. M.; Vincendon, M.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.; Romaniello, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2015-02-28

    Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) is a well-established theoretical approach to describe and understand irradiation processes in clusters and molecules. However, within the so-called adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential, TDDFT can show insufficiencies, particularly in violently dynamical processes. This is because within ALDA the xc potential is instantaneous and is a local functional of the density, which means that this approximation neglects memory effects and long-range effects. A way to go beyond ALDA is to use Time-Dependent Current-Density-Functional Theory (TDCDFT), in which the basic quantity is the current density rather than the density as in TDDFT. This has been shown to offer an adequate account of dissipation in the linear domain when the Vignale-Kohn (VK) functional is used. Here, we go beyond the linear regime and we explore this formulation in the time domain. In this case, the equations become very involved making the computation out of reach; we hence propose an approximation to the VK functional which allows us to calculate the dynamics in real time and at the same time to keep most of the physics described by the VK functional. We apply this formulation to the calculation of the time-dependent dipole moment of Ca, Mg and Na{sub 2}. Our results show trends similar to what was previously observed in model systems or within linear response. In the non-linear domain, our results show that relaxation times do not decrease with increasing deposited excitation energy, which sets some limitations to the practical use of TDCDFT in such a domain of excitations.

  9. Inductor Geometry With Improved Energy Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, H; Ngo, KDT; Moss, J; Lim, MHF; Rey, E

    2014-10-01

    The "constant-flux" concept is leveraged to achieve high magnetic-energy density, leading to inductor geometries with height significantly lower than that of conventional products. Techniques to shape the core and to distribute the winding turns to shape a desirable field profile are described for the two basic classes of magnetic geometries: those with the winding enclosed by the core and those with the core enclosed by the winding. A relatively constant flux distribution is advantageous not only from the density standpoint, but also from the thermal standpoint via the reduction of hot spots, and from the reliability standpoint via the suppression of flux crowding. In this journal paper on a constant-flux inductor (CFI) with enclosed winding, the foci are operating principle, dc analysis, and basic design procedure. Prototype cores and windings were routed from powder-iron disks and copper sheets, respectively. The design of CFI was validated by the assembled inductor prototype.

  10. Ultra-high density diffraction grating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Padmore, Howard A.; Voronov, Dmytro L.; Cambie, Rossana; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2012-12-11

    A diffraction grating structure having ultra-high density of grooves comprises an echellette substrate having periodically repeating recessed features, and a multi-layer stack of materials disposed on the echellette substrate. The surface of the diffraction grating is planarized, such that layers of the multi-layer stack form a plurality of lines disposed on the planarized surface of the structure in a periodical fashion, wherein lines having a first property alternate with lines having a dissimilar property on the surface of the substrate. For example, in one embodiment, lines comprising high-Z and low-Z materials alternate on the planarized surface providing a structure that is suitable as a diffraction grating for EUV and soft X-rays. In some embodiments, line density of between about 10,000 lines/mm to about 100,000 lines/mm is provided.

  11. Global coherence of dust density waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André

    2014-06-15

    The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

  12. Energy flux density in a thermoacoustic couple

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, N.; Chen, S. |; Olson, R.; Swift, G.W.

    1996-06-01

    The hydro- and thermodynamical processes near and within a thermoacoustic couple are simulated and analyzed by numerical solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes, continuity, and energy equations for an ideal gas, concentrating on the time-averaged energy flux density in the gas. The numerical results show details of the heat sink at one end of the plates in the thermoacoustic couple. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Density-Dependent Carrier Dynamics in a Quantum Dots-in-a-Well...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Related Information: Proposed for publication in ...

  14. Ultrafast dynamics of a near-solid-density layer in an intense...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nm) femtosecond laser using time-resolved pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. An initial red-shift is observed in the reflected third harmonic ( 266 nm) probe pulse, which gets...

  15. Dynamics of a Two-Dimensional System of Quantum Dipoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzanti, F.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Boronat, J.; Zillich, R. E.

    2009-03-20

    A detailed microscopic analysis of the dynamic structure function S(k,{omega}) of a two-dimensional Bose system of dipoles polarized along the direction perpendicular to the plane is presented and discussed. Starting from ground-state quantities obtained using a quantum diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm, the density-density response is evaluated in the context of the correlated basis functions (CBF) theory. CBF predicts a sharp peak and a multiexcitation component at higher energies produced by the decay of excitations. We discuss the structure of the phonon-roton peak and show that the Feynman and Bogoliubov predictions depart from the CBF result already at low densities. We finally discuss the emergence of a roton in the spectrum, but find the roton energy not low enough to make the system unstable under density fluctuations up to the highest density considered that is close to the freezing point.

  16. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  17. Effects of argon gas pressure on its metastable-state density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    The effect of argon gas pressure on its metastable density in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) is investigated by using the laser-induced fluorescence method. Our results show that the metastable-state density of argon varies with the gas pressure depending on the measurement position; the density decreases with the pressure at a position far from the ICP antenna, whereas it increases with the pressure at a position near the antenna. This contrast in the metastable-state density trend with the pressure is explained by considering the electron temperature variations at the two measurement positions. The theoretical interpretation and calculation using a global model are also addressed in detail in this paper.

  18. High Energy Density Utracapacitors: Low-Cost, High Energy and Power Density, Nanotube-Enhanced Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FastCAP is improving the performance of an ultracapacitor—a battery-like electronic device that can complement, and possibly even replace, an HEV or EV battery pack. Ultracapacitors have many advantages over conventional batteries, including long lifespans (over 1 million cycles, as compared to 10,000 for conventional batteries) and better durability. Ultracapacitors also charge more quickly than conventional batteries, and they release energy more quickly. However, ultracapacitors have fallen short of batteries in one key metric: energy density—high energy density means more energy storage. FastCAP is redesigning the ultracapacitor’s internal structure to increase its energy density. Ultracapacitors traditionally use electrodes made of irregularly shaped, porous carbon. FastCAP’s ultracapacitors are made of tiny, aligned carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide a regular path for ions moving in and out of the ultracapacitor’s electrode, increasing the overall efficiency and energy density of the device.

  19. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics–quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid—alcohols—has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  20. Melting behaviour of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters by molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Yee Pin; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    The melting behavior of bimetallic gold-platinum nanoclusters is studied by applying Brownian-type isothermal molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, a program modified from the cubic coupling scheme (CCS). The process begins with the ground-state structures obtained from global minimum search algorithm and proceeds with the investigation of the effect of temperature on the thermal properties of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters. N-body Gupta potential has been employed in order to account for the interactions between gold and platinum atoms. The ground states of the nanoalloy clusters, which are core-shell segregated, are heated until they become thermally segregated. The detailed melting mechanism of the nanoalloy clusters is studied via this approach to provide insight into the thermal stability of the nanoalloy clusters.

  1. Prediction of Thermal Conductivity for Irradiated SiC/SiC Composites by Informing Continuum Models with Molecular Dynamics Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Gao, Fei; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-05-01

    This article proposes a new method to estimate the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites subjected to neutron irradiation. The modeling method bridges different scales from the atomic scale to the scale of a 2D SiC/SiC composite. First, it studies the irradiation-induced point defects in perfect crystalline SiC using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to compute the defect thermal resistance as a function of vacancy concentration and irradiation dose. The concept of defect thermal resistance is explored explicitly in the MD data using vacancy concentrations and thermal conductivity decrements due to phonon scattering. Point defect-induced swelling for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC as a function of irradiation dose is approximated by scaling the corresponding MD results for perfect crystal ?-SiC to experimental data for CVD-SiC at various temperatures. The computed thermal defect resistance, thermal conductivity as a function of grain size, and definition of defect thermal resistance are used to compute the thermal conductivities of CVD-SiC, isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated (ICVI) SiC and nearly-stoichiometric SiC fibers. The computed fiber and ICVI-SiC matrix thermal conductivities are then used as input for an Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach to compute the thermal conductivities of 2D SiC/SiC composites subjected to neutron irradiation within the same irradiation doses. Predicted thermal conductivities for an irradiated Tyranno-SA/ICVI-SiC composite are found to be comparable to available experimental data for a similar composite ICVI-processed with these fibers.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion coefficients and structural properties of some alkylbenzenes in supercritical carbon dioxide at infinite dilution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jinyang; Zhong, Haimin; Qiu, Wenda; Chen, Liuping; Feng, Huajie

    2014-03-14

    The binary infinite dilute diffusion coefficients, D{sub 12}{sup ?}, of some alkylbenzenes (Ph-C{sub n}, from Ph-H to Ph-C{sub 12}) from 313 K to 333 K at 15 MPa in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) have been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD values agree well with the experimental ones, which indicate MD simulation technique is a powerful way to predict and obtain diffusion coefficients of solutes in supercritical fluids. Besides, the local structures of Ph-C{sub n}/CO{sub 2} fluids are further investigated by calculating radial distribution functions and coordination numbers. It qualitatively convinces that the first solvation shell of Ph-C{sub n} in scCO{sub 2} is significantly influenced by the structure of Ph-C{sub n} solute. Meanwhile, the mean end-to-end distance, the mean radius of gyration and dihedral angle distribution are calculated to gain an insight into the structural properties of Ph-C{sub n} in scCO{sub 2}. The abnormal trends of radial distribution functions and coordination numbers can be reasonably explained in term of molecular flexibility. Moreover, the computed results of dihedral angle clarify that flexibility of long-chain Ph-C{sub n} is the result of internal rotation of C-C single bond (?{sub c-c}) in alkyl chain. It is interesting that compared with n-alkane, because of the existence of benzene ring, the flexibility of alkyl chain in Ph-C{sub n} with same carbon atom number is significantly reduced, as a result, the carbon chain dependence of diffusion behaviors for long-chain n-alkane (n ? 5) and long-chain Ph-C{sub n} (n ? 4) in scCO{sub 2} are different.

  3. A study of density modulation index in the inner heliospheric solar wind during solar cycle 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Janardhan, P.; Ingale, M.; Subramanian, P.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K. E-mail: jerry@prl.res.in E-mail: p.subramanian@iiserpune.ac.in E-mail: tokumaru@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2014-11-01

    The ratio of the rms electron density fluctuations to the background density in the solar wind (density modulation index, ? {sub N} ? ?N/N) is of vital importance for understanding several problems in heliospheric physics related to solar wind turbulence. In this paper, we have investigated the behavior of ? {sub N} in the inner heliosphere from 0.26 to 0.82 AU. The density fluctuations ?N have been deduced using extensive ground-based observations of interplanetary scintillation at 327 MHz, which probe spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers. The background densities (N) have been derived using near-Earth observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer. Our analysis reveals that 0.001 ? ? {sub N} ? 0.02 and does not vary appreciably with heliocentric distance. We also find that ? {sub N} declines by 8% from 1998 to 2008. We discuss the impact of these findings on problems ranging from our understanding of Forbush decreases to the behavior of the solar wind dynamic pressure over the recent peculiar solar minimum at the end of cycle 23.

  4. Radiography to measure the longitudinal density gradients of Pd compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, D.D.

    1992-05-14

    This study used radiography to detect and quantify density gradients in green compacts of Palladium powder. Ultrasonic velocity measurements had been tried previously, but they were affected by material properties, in addition to the density, so that an alternative was sought. The alternative technique used radiographic exposures of a series of standard compacts whose density is known and correlated with the radiographic film density. These correlations are used to predict the density in subsequent compacts.

  5. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scour-tracc-cfd TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Computational Fluid Dynamics Overview of CFD: Video Clip with Audio Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research uses mathematical and computational models of flowing fluids to describe and predict fluid response in problems of interest, such as the flow of air around a moving vehicle or the flow of water and sediment in a river. Coupled with appropriate and prototypical

  7. Dynamical principles in neuroscience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Varona, Pablo; Selverston, Allen I.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2006-10-15

    Dynamical modeling of neural systems and brain functions has a history of success over the last half century. This includes, for example, the explanation and prediction of some features of neural rhythmic behaviors. Many interesting dynamical models of learning and memory based on physiological experiments have been suggested over the last two decades. Dynamical models even of consciousness now exist. Usually these models and results are based on traditional approaches and paradigms of nonlinear dynamics including dynamical chaos. Neural systems are, however, an unusual subject for nonlinear dynamics for several reasons: (i) Even the simplest neural network, with only a few neurons and synaptic connections, has an enormous number of variables and control parameters. These make neural systems adaptive and flexible, and are critical to their biological function. (ii) In contrast to traditional physical systems described by well-known basic principles, first principles governing the dynamics of neural systems are unknown. (iii) Many different neural systems exhibit similar dynamics despite having different architectures and different levels of complexity. (iv) The network architecture and connection strengths are usually not known in detail and therefore the dynamical analysis must, in some sense, be probabilistic. (v) Since nervous systems are able to organize behavior based on sensory inputs, the dynamical modeling of these systems has to explain the transformation of temporal information into combinatorial or combinatorial-temporal codes, and vice versa, for memory and recognition. In this review these problems are discussed in the context of addressing the stimulating questions: What can neuroscience learn from nonlinear dynamics, and what can nonlinear dynamics learn from neuroscience?.

  8. Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis 1998 Annual Report Grand Challenge Projects biocatalysis.gif A model of the Michaelis complex for the TEM-1/penicillin system from molecular dynamics simulations. Investigators: P. A. Bash, Northwestern University Medical School and M. Karplus, Harvard University Research Objectives A guiding principle of molecular biology is that the structure of a biomolecule defines its function. This principle is especially true in the case

  9. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwarz, R.I.

    1998-04-21

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use. 2 figs.

  10. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  11. Method of high-density foil fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blue, Craig A.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Ohriner, Evan K.

    2003-12-16

    A method for preparing flat foils having a high density includes the steps of mixing a powdered material with a binder to form a green sheet. The green sheet is exposed to a high intensity radiative source adapted to emit radiation of wavelengths corresponding to an absorption spectrum of the powdered material. The surface of the green sheet is heated while a lower sub-surface temperature is maintained. An apparatus for preparing a foil from a green sheet using a radiation source is also disclosed.

  12. High-rate Plastic Deformation of Nanocrystalline Tantalum to Large Strains: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, R E

    2009-02-05

    Recent advances in the ability to generate extremes of pressure and temperature in dynamic experiments and to probe the response of materials has motivated the need for special materials optimized for those conditions as well as a need for a much deeper understanding of the behavior of materials subjected to high pressure and/or temperature. Of particular importance is the understanding of rate effects at the extremely high rates encountered in those experiments, especially with the next generation of laser drives such as at the National Ignition Facility. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the high-rate deformation of nanocrystalline tantalum to investigate the processes associated with plastic deformation for strains up to 100%. We use initial atomic configurations that were produced through simulations of solidification in the work of Streitz et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, (2006) 225701]. These 3D polycrystalline systems have typical grain sizes of 10-20 nm. We also study a rapidly quenched liquid (amorphous solid) tantalum. We apply a constant volume (isochoric), constant temperature (isothermal) shear deformation over a range of strain rates, and compute the resulting stress-strain curves to large strains for both uniaxial and biaxial compression. We study the rate dependence and identify plastic deformation mechanisms. The identification of the mechanisms is facilitated through a novel technique that computes the local grain orientation, returning it as a quaternion for each atom. This analysis technique is robust and fast, and has been used to compute the orientations on the fly during our parallel MD simulations on supercomputers. We find both dislocation and twinning processes are important, and they interact in the weak strain hardening in these extremely fine-grained microstructures.

  13. Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biocatalysis.gif A model of the Michaelis complex for the TEM-1penicillin system from molecular dynamics simulations. Investigators: P. A. Bash, Northwestern University Medical...

  14. Shared and Dynamic Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some "out-of-the-box" applications require DSLs and some popular applications like Python use DSLs as well. Using System Shared and Dynamic Libraries "System" DSLs include...

  15. Dynamical dipole gamma radiation in heavy-ion collisions on the basis of a quantum molecular dynamics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H. L.; Tian, W. D.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Chen, J. G.; Fang, D. Q.; Guo, W.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    Dynamical dipole gamma-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions is explored in the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The studies are focused on systems of {sup 40}Ca bombarding {sup 48}Ca and its isotopes at different incident energies and impact parameters. Yields of gamma rays are calculated and the centroid energy and dynamical dipole emission width of the gamma spectra are extracted to investigate the properties of gamma emission. In addition, sensitivities of dynamical dipole gamma-ray emission to the isospin and the symmetry energy coefficient of the equation of state are studied. The results show that detailed study of dynamical dipole gamma radiation can provide information on the equation of state and the symmetry energy around the normal nuclear density.

  16. Time-averaged quantum dynamics and the validity of the effective

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hamiltonian model (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Time-averaged quantum dynamics and the validity of the effective Hamiltonian model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-averaged quantum dynamics and the validity of the effective Hamiltonian model We develop a technique for finding the dynamical evolution in time of an averaged density matrix. The result is an equation of evolution that includes an effective Hamiltonian, as well as decoherence terms in Lindblad form. Applying

  17. Dynamically Generated Mott Gap from Holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edalati, Mohammad; Leigh, Robert G.; Phillips, Philip W.

    2011-03-04

    In the fermionic sector of top-down approaches to holographic systems, one generically finds that the fermions are coupled to gravity and gauge fields in a variety of ways, beyond minimal coupling. In this Letter, we take one such interaction--a Pauli, or dipole, interaction--and study its effects on fermion correlators. We find that this interaction modifies the fermion spectral density in a remarkable way. As we change the strength of the interaction, we find that spectral weight is transferred between bands, and beyond a critical value, a gap emerges in the fermion density of states. A possible interpretation of this bulk interaction then is that it drives the dynamical formation of a (Mott) gap, in the absence of continuous symmetry breaking.

  18. VASP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VASP VASP Description VASP is a package for performing ab initio quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics (MD) using pseudopotentials and a plane wave basis set. The approach implemented in VASP is based on a finite-temperature local-density approximation (with the free energy as variational quantity) and an exact evaluation of the instantaneous electronic ground state at each MD step using efficient matrix diagonalization schemes and an efficient Pulay mixing. Access to VASP VASP is available

  19. REVISED MD-110 REFERENCE GUIDE SEPTERMBER 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... See Bulluck v. Department of Veterans Affairs, EEOC Appeal No. 0120114276 (Mar. 14, 2012); Richardson v. U.S. Postal Service, EEOC Appeal No. 0120111122 (Feb. 1, 2012); and ...

  20. Alfred L. Frechette, M.D. COYYISIIONE~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    E. Nott. Mrector Envlromental Control Technology Dlvlslon bee: AeoSpa&-- WEMott, 'ECT EV-131 AJWhitman 121079 EV-131:AJ man:ngm:112179: Retyped 121079 REF: MC 66089...

  1. High energy density redox flow device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  2. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-08-28

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  3. Reformulation of Density Functional Theory for N-Representable Densities and the Resolution of the v-Representability Problem

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gonis, A.; Zhang, X. G.; Stocks, G. M.; Nicholson, D. M.

    2015-10-23

    Density functional theory for the case of general, N-representable densities is reformulated in terms of density functional derivatives of expectation values of operators evaluated with wave functions leading to a density, making no reference to the concept of potential. The developments provide a complete solution of the v-representability problem by establishing a mathematical procedure that determines whether a density is v-representable and in the case of an affirmative answer determines the potential (within an additive constant) as a derivative with respect to the density of a constrained search functional. It also establishes the existence of an energy functional of themore » density that, for v-representable densities, assumes its minimum value at the density describing the ground state of an interacting many-particle system. The theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn emerge as special cases of the formalism.« less

  4. Reformulation of Density Functional Theory for N-Representable Densities and the Resolution of the v-Representability Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonis, A.; Zhang, X. G.; Stocks, G. M.; Nicholson, D. M.

    2015-10-23

    Density functional theory for the case of general, N-representable densities is reformulated in terms of density functional derivatives of expectation values of operators evaluated with wave functions leading to a density, making no reference to the concept of potential. The developments provide a complete solution of the v-representability problem by establishing a mathematical procedure that determines whether a density is v-representable and in the case of an affirmative answer determines the potential (within an additive constant) as a derivative with respect to the density of a constrained search functional. It also establishes the existence of an energy functional of the density that, for v-representable densities, assumes its minimum value at the density describing the ground state of an interacting many-particle system. The theorems of Hohenberg and Kohn emerge as special cases of the formalism.

  5. Finite Element Solver for Fission Dynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-01-30

    FELIX is a physics computer code used to model fission fragment mass distributions in a fully quantum-mechanical, misroscopic framework that only relies on our current knowledge of nuclear forces. It is an implementation of the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM), which simulates the dynamics of a collective quantum wave-packet assuming the motion is adiabatic. In typical applications of the TDGCM, the nuclear collective wavepacket is obtained as a superposition of wavefunctions obtained by solving themore » Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations of nuclear density functional theory (DFT). The program calculates at each time step the coefficients of that superposition.« less

  6. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-14

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene.

  7. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is {delta}-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  8. File:Air Density Lab.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Air Density Lab.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Air Density Lab.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600...

  9. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Lithium coatings on the ...

  10. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control You are accessing a ...

  11. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  12. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon's chiral

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    periphery (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon's chiral periphery Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon's chiral periphery In the light-front description of nucleon structure the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent transverse densities of charge and magnetization. Recent work has studied the transverse densities at

  13. Solar Dynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dynamics Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Dynamics Place: Ottumwa, Iowa Zip: IA 52501 Sector: Solar Product: Solar Dynamics is a US-based solar powered attic roof vents...

  14. Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrison; Neil , Singleton; John , Migliori; Albert

    2008-08-05

    A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

  15. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joe A.; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold:  First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties;  Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data;  Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  16. Current Density Scaling in Electrochemical Flow Capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyt, NC; Wainright, JS; Savinell, RF

    2015-02-18

    Electrochemical flow capacitors (EFCs) are a recently developed energy storage technology. One of the principal performance metrics of an EFC is the steady-state electrical current density that it can accept or deliver. Numerical models exist to predict this performance for specific cases, but here we present a study of how the current varies with respect to the applied cell voltage, flow rate, cell dimensions, and slurry properties using scaling laws. The scaling relationships are confirmed by numerical simulations and then subsequently by comparison to results from symmetric cell EFC experiments. This modeling approach permits the delimitation of three distinct operational regimes dependent on the values of two nondimensional combinations of the pertinent variables (specifically, a capacitive Graetz number and a conductivity ratio). Lastly, the models and nondimensional numbers are used to provide design guidance in terms of criteria for proper EFC operation. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (CC BY, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse of the work in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. All rights reserved.

  17. Multipulsed dynamic moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.

    1991-01-01

    An improved dynamic moire interferometer comprised of a lasing medium providing a plurality of beams of coherent light, a multiple q-switch producing multiple trains of 100,000 or more pulses per second, a combining means collimating multiple trains of pulses into substantially a single train and directing beams to specimen gratings affixed to a test material, and a controller, triggering and sequencing the emission of the pulses with the occurrence and recording of a dynamic loading event.

  18. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  19. State densities and spectrum fluctuations: Information propagation in complex nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, J.B.; Kota, V.K.B.

    1988-01-01

    At excitation energies in nuclei where the state density is unambiguously defined there is a sharp separation between the smoothed spectrum (which defines the density) and fluctuations about it which have recently been studied with a view to understanding some aspects of quantum chaos. We briefly review these two complementary subjects, paying special attention to: the role of the effective interaction in determining the density; the calculation of interacting-particle state and level densities, and of expectation values of interesting operators; the information about the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction which is carried both by the density and the fluctuations. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Matching pre-equilibrium dynamics and viscous hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Mauricio; Strickland, Michael

    2010-02-15

    We demonstrate how to match pre-equilibrium dynamics of a 0+1-dimensional quark-gluon plasma to second-order viscous hydrodynamical evolution. The matching allows us to specify the initial values of the energy density and shear tensor at the initial time of hydrodynamical evolution as a function of the lifetime of the pre-equilibrium period. We compare two models for pre-equilibrium quark-gluon plasma, longitudinal free streaming and collisionally broadened longitudinal expansion, and present analytic formulas that can be used to fix the necessary components of the energy-momentum tensor. The resulting dynamical models can be used to assess the effect of pre-equilibrium dynamics on quark-gluon plasma observables. Additionally, we investigate the dependence of entropy production on pre-equilibrium dynamics and discuss the limitations of the standard definitions of nonequilibrium entropy.

  1. Optical pressure/density measuring means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-05-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for rapidly and accurately determining the pressure of a fluid medium in either a static or dynamic state. The pressure is determined by making a measurement of the velocity of a light beam that is directed through the fluid medium along a pathway that enables an integrated pressure measurement to be made along the pathway, rather than making such a measurement only at a single point in the medium. A HeNe laser is configured to emit a beam of two frequencies separated by about 2 MHz. One of these beam frequencies is directed through the fluid medium and is reflected back through the medium to a non-linear diode detector. The other beam frequency is passed directly to a diode detector without traversing said medium. The diode detector is operated to determine the frequency shift or beat frequency between the two beam frequencies. Any variation in the frequency of said reflected beam that is caused by a change in its velocity as it is passed through the fluid medium causes a change in the beat frequency. This beat frequency change is then converted to an output signal value corresponding to the pressure of the medium. The measurement instrument apparatus is remotely positioned relative to the medium being measured, thus the apparatus is immune from electro-magnetic interference and can operate in conditions of high radiation, corrosion and extraordinarily high temperature. 4 figs.

  2. Optical pressure/density measuring means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-05-09

    An apparatus and method for rapidly and accurately determining the pressure of a fluid medium in either a static or dynamic state. The pressure is determined by making a measurement of the velocity of a light beam that is directed through the fluid medium along a pathway that enables an integrated pressure measurement to be made along the pathway, rather than making such a measurement only at a single point in the medium. A HeNe laser is configured to emit a beam of two frequencies separated by about 2 MHz. One of these beam frequencies is directed through the fluid medium and is reflected back through the medium to a non-linear diode detector. The other beam frequency is passed directly to a diode detector without traversing said medium. The diode detector is operated to determine the frequency shift or beat frequency between the two beam frequencies. Any variation in the frequency of said reflected beam that is caused by a change in its velocity as it is passed through the fluid medium causes a change in the beat frequency. This beat frequency change is then converted to an output signal value corresponding to the pressure of the medium. The measurement instrument apparatus is remotely positioned relative to the medium being measured, thus the apparatus is immune from electro-magnetic interference and can operate in conditions of high radiation, corrosion and extraordinarily high temperature.

  3. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics-Based Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Polyols in Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caratzoulas, Stavros; Courtney, Timothy; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2011-01-01

    We use the conversion of protonated glycerol to acrolein for a case study of the mechanism of acid-catalyzed dehydration of polyols in aqueous environments. We employ hybrid Quamtum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Molecular Dynamics (QM/MM MD) simulations with biased sampling and perform free energy calculations for the elementary steps of the reaction. We investigate the effects of solvent dynamics and in particular the role of quantum mechanical water in the dehydration mechanism. We present results supporting a mechanism that proceeds via water-mediated proton transfers and thus through an enol intermediate. We find that the first dehydration may take place by two, low-energy pathways requiring, respectively, 20.9 and 18.8 kcal/mol of activation free energy. The second dehydration requires 19.9 kcal/mol of activation free energy while for the overall reaction we compute a free energy change of -8 kcal/mol.

  4. Comparison of electron transport calculations in warm dense matter using the Ziman formula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burrill, D. J.; Feinblum, D. V.; Charest, M. R. J.; Starrett, C. E.

    2016-02-10

    The Ziman formulation of electrical conductivity is tested in warm and hot dense matter using the pseudo-atom molecular dynamics method. Several implementation options that have been widely used in the literature are systematically tested through a comparison to the accurate, but expensive Kohn–Sham density functional theory molecular dynamics (KS-DFT-MD) calculations. As a result, the comparison is made for several elements and mixtures and for a wide range of temperatures and densities, and reveals a preferred method that generally gives very good agreement with the KS-DFT-MD results, but at a fraction of the computational cost.

  5. Dynamic consolidation of aluminum-silicon carbide composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabin, B.H.; Korth, G.E.; Williamson, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic consolidation was investigated as a potential method for producing P/M metal matrix composites. In this study, 2124 aluminum powders were mixed with silicon carbide particulate and consolidated using explosives. Numerical simulations were performed to provide insight into the consolidation process and to aid in the selection of experimental conditions. The microstructure of the as-consolidated product was dependent upon processing variables. Careful control of the shock parameters allowed full density, crack free composites to be achieved in cylindrical geometries. Although full density was obtained, low fracture strengths suggested a lack of interparticle bonding, probably resulting from the limited ability to redistribute surface oxides during consolidation. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  6. WE-G-BRE-07: Proton Therapy Enhanced by Tumor-Targeting Gold Nanoparticles: A Pilot in Vivo Experiment at The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, T; Grant, J; Wolfe, A; Gillin, M; Krishnan, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Assess tumor-growth delay and survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with tumor-targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and proton therapy. Methods: We first examined the accumulation of targeting nanoparticles within prostate tumors by imaging AuNPs with ultrasound-guided photoacoustics at 24h after the intravenous administration of goserelin-conjugated AuNPs (gAuNP) in three mice. Nanoparticles were also imaged at the cellular level with TEM in PC3 cells incubated with gAuNP for 24h. Pegylated AuNPs (pAuNP) were also imaged in vivo and in vitro for comparison. PC3 cells were then implanted subcutaneously in nude mice; 51mice with 8–10mm tumors were included. AuNPs were injected intravenously at 0.2%w/w final gold concentration 24h before irradiation. A special jig was designed to facilitate tumor irradiation perpendicular to the proton beam. Proton energy was set to 180MeV, the radiation field was 18×18cm{sup 2}, and 9cm or 13.5cm thick solid-water compensators were used to position the tumors at either the beam entrance (BE) or the SOBP. Physical doses of 5Gy were delivered to all tumors on a patient beam line at MD Anderson's Proton Therapy Center. Results: The photoacoustic experiment reveled that our nanoparticles leak from the tumor-feeding vasculature and accumulate within the tumor volume over time. Additionally, TEM images showed gAuNP are internalized in cancer cells, accumulating within the cytoplasm, whereas pAuNP are not. Tumor-growth was delayed by 11 or 32days in mice receiving gAuNP irradiated at the BE or the SOBP, relative to proton radiation alone. Survival curves (ongoing experiment) reveal that gAuNPs improved survival by 36% or 74% for tumors irradiated at the BE or SOBP. Conclusion: These important, albeit preliminary, in vivo findings reveal nanoparticles to be potent sensitizers to proton therapy. Further, conjugation of AuNPs to tumor-specific antigens that promote enhanced cellular internalization improved both tumor-growth delay and survival of mice after proton therapy.

  7. A DENSITY-INDEPENDENT FORMULATION OF SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Makino, Junichiro

    2013-05-01

    The standard formulation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) assumes that the local density distribution is differentiable. This assumption is used to derive the spatial derivatives of other quantities. However, this assumption breaks down at the contact discontinuity. At the contact discontinuity, the density of the low-density side is overestimated while that of the high-density side is underestimated. As a result, the pressure of the low-density (high-density) side is overestimated (underestimated). Thus, unphysical repulsive force appears at the contact discontinuity, resulting in the effective surface tension. This tension suppresses fluid instabilities. In this paper, we present a new formulation of SPH, which does not require the differentiability of density. Instead of the mass density, we adopt the internal energy density (pressure) and its arbitrary function, which are smoothed quantities at the contact discontinuity, as the volume element used for the kernel integration. We call this new formulation density-independent SPH (DISPH). It handles the contact discontinuity without numerical problems. The results of standard tests such as the shock tube, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, point-like explosion, and blob tests are all very favorable to DISPH. We conclude that DISPH solved most of the known difficulties of the standard SPH, without introducing additional numerical diffusion or breaking the exact force symmetry or energy conservation. Our new SPH includes the formulation proposed by Ritchie and Thomas as a special case. Our formulation can be extended to handle a non-ideal gas easily.

  8. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H{sub 2}O with D{sub 2}O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl{sup ?} and F{sup ?}.

  9. Anti-hierarchical evolution of the active galactic nucleus space density in a hierarchical universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2014-10-10

    Recent observations show that the space density of luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) peaks at higher redshifts than that of faint AGNs. This downsizing trend in the AGN evolution seems to be contradictory to the hierarchical structure formation scenario. In this study, we present the AGN space density evolution predicted by a semi-analytic model of galaxy and AGN formation based on the hierarchical structure formation scenario. We demonstrate that our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the AGN space density evolution. The reason for the downsizing trend in our model is a combination of the cold gas depletion as a consequence of star formation, the gas cooling suppression in massive halos, and the AGN lifetime scaling with the dynamical timescale. We assume that a major merger of galaxies causes a starburst, spheroid formation, and cold gas accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SMBH). We also assume that this cold gas accretion triggers AGN activity. Since the cold gas is mainly depleted by star formation and gas cooling is suppressed in massive dark halos, the amount of cold gas accreted onto SMBHs decreases with cosmic time. Moreover, AGN lifetime increases with cosmic time. Thus, at low redshifts, major mergers do not always lead to luminous AGNs. Because the luminosity of AGNs is correlated with the mass of accreted gas onto SMBHs, the space density of luminous AGNs decreases more quickly than that of faint AGNs. We conclude that the anti-hierarchical evolution of the AGN space density is not contradictory to the hierarchical structure formation scenario.

  10. Dynamic worth of control element assemblies in PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, P.; Popovic, D. ); Pesic, M. )

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic worth of control element assemblies (CEAs) in a nuclear reactor is considered in this paper. Conservation of the CEA worth for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) as a function of fuel burnup, xenon and samarium poisoning, boric acid concentration, and power density axial offset value is analyzed. Calculations of the dynamic worth of CEAs are carried out by newly developed quasi-static four-group neutron one-dimensional and two-dimensional diffusion computer codes. The nonconservation of the CEA worth is shown.

  11. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  13. Modeling the ion density distribution in collisional cooling RF multipole ion guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Collisional cooling radio frequency (RF) multipoles are widely used in mass spectrometry, as ion guides and two-dimensional (2D) ion traps. Understanding the behavior of ions in these devices is important in choosing a multipole configuration. We have developed a computer model based on ion trajectory calculations in the RF multipole electric field, taking into account ion-ion and ion-neutral interactions. The two-dimensional model for idealized infinite RF multipoles gives accurate description of the ion density distribution. We consider first a basic case of a single m/z ion cloud in the 2D RF quadrupole after equilibrium is reached. Approximate theoretical relationships for the ion cloud configuration in the 2D ion trap are tested based on simulations results. Next we proceed with a case of an ion cloud consisting of several different m/z ion species. The ion relaxation dynamics and the process of establishing the stratified ion density distribution are followed. Simulations reveal a different relaxation dynamics for the axial and radial ion kinetic energy components. The kinetic energy relaxation rate is dependent on ion population and bath gas pressure. The equilibrium distribution agrees well with the ion stratification theory, as demonstrated by simulations for RF quadrupole and octupole 2D ion traps.

  14. A wrench in the works of human acetylcholinesterase: Soman induced conformational changes revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bennion, Brian J.; Essiz, Sebnem G.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Fattebert, Jean -Luc; Emigh, Aiyana; Lightstone, Felice C.; Salsbury , Jr, Freddie

    2015-04-13

    Irreversible inactivation of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) by organophosphorous pesticides (OPs) and chemical weapon agents (CWA) has severe morbidity and mortality consequences. We present data from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and 80 classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the apo and soman-adducted forms of hAChE to investigate the effects on the dynamics and protein structure when the catalytic Serine 203 is phosphonylated. We find that the soman phosphonylation of the active site Ser203 follows a water assisted addition-elimination mechanism with the elimination of the fluoride ion being the highest energy barrier at 6.5 kcal/mole. We observe soman-dependent changes in backbone andmore » sidechain motions compared to the apo form of the protein. These alterations restrict the soman-adducted hAChE to a structural state that is primed for the soman adduct to be cleaved and removed from the active site. The altered motions and resulting structures provide alternative pathways into and out of the hAChE active site. In the soman-adducted protein both side and back door pathways are viable for soman adduct access. Correlation analysis of the apo and soman adducted MD trajectories shows that the correlation of gorge entrance and back door motion is disrupted when hAChE is adducted. This supports the hypothesis that substrate and product can use two different pathways as entry and exit sites in the apo form of the protein. These alternative pathways have important implications for the rational design of medical countermeasures.« less

  15. Textured-surface quartz resonator fluid density and viscosity monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen J.; Wiczer, James J.; Cernosek, Richard W.; Frye, Gregory C.; Gebert, Charles T.; Casaus, Leonard; Mitchell, Mary A.

    1998-08-25

    A pair of thickness-shear mode resonators, one smooth and one with a textured surface, allows fluid density and viscosity to be independently resolved. A textured surface, either randomly rough or regularly patterned, leads to trapping of liquid at the device surface. The synchronous motion of this trapped liquid with the oscillating device surface allows the device to weigh the liquid; this leads to an additional response that depends on liquid density. This additional response enables a pair of devices, one smooth and one textured, to independently resolve liquid density and viscosity; the difference in responses determines the density while the smooth device determines the density-viscosity product, and thus, the pair determines both density and viscosity.

  16. Investigation of density limit processes in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maingi, R.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Petrie, T.W.

    1999-02-01

    A series of experiments has been conducted in DIII-D to investigate density-limiting processes. The authors have studied divertor detachment and MARFEs on closed field lines and find semi-quantitative agreement with theoretical calculations of onset conditions. They have shown that the critical density for MARFE onset at low edge temperature scales as I{sub p}/a{sup 2}, i.e. similar to Greenwald scaling. They have also shown that the scaling of the critical separatrix density with heating power at partial detachment onset agrees with Borass` model. Both of these processes yield high edge density limits for reactors such as ITER. By using divertor pumping and pellet fueling they have avoided these and other processes and accessed densities > 1.5{times} Greenwald limit scaling with H-mode confinement, demonstrating that the Greenwald limit is not a fundamental limit on the core density.

  17. COLLAPSE AND FRAGMENTATION OF MAGNETIC MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH THE ENZO AMR MHD CODE. I. UNIFORM DENSITY SPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2013-02-20

    Magnetic fields are important contributors to the dynamics of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and can have a major effect on whether collapse results in a single protostar or fragmentation into a binary or multiple protostar system. New models are presented of the collapse of magnetic cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.0. The code was used to calculate the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of initially spherical, uniform density, and rotation clouds with density perturbations, i.e., the Boss and Bodenheimer standard isothermal test case for three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics codes. After first verifying that Enzo reproduces the binary fragmentation expected for the non-magnetic test case, a large set of models was computed with varied initial magnetic field strengths and directions with respect to the cloud core axis of rotation (parallel or perpendicular), density perturbation amplitudes, and equations of state. Three significantly different outcomes resulted: (1) contraction without sustained collapse, forming a denser cloud core; (2) collapse to form a single protostar with significant spiral arms; and (3) collapse and fragmentation into binary or multiple protostar systems, with multiple spiral arms. Comparisons are also made with previous MHD calculations of similar clouds with a barotropic equations of state. These results for the collapse of initially uniform density spheres illustrate the central importance of both magnetic field direction and field strength for determining the outcome of dynamic protostellar collapse.

  18. Dynamic cable analysis models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, P.A.; Meggitt, D.J.; Nordell, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the development and validation of undersea cable dynamics computer models by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL) under the sponsorship of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. These models allow for the analysis of both small displacement (strumming) and large displacement (static and dynamic) deformations of arbitrarily configured cable structures. All of the large displacement models described in this paper are available to the public. This paper does not emphasize the theoretical development of the models (this information is available in other references) but emphasizes the various features of the models, the comparisons between model output and experimental data, and applications for which the models have been used.

  19. Inhomogeneity smoothing using density valley formed by ion beam deposition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in ICF fuel pellet (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Inhomogeneity smoothing using density valley formed by ion beam deposition in ICF fuel pellet Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inhomogeneity smoothing using density valley formed by ion beam deposition in ICF fuel pellet We study the beam non-uniformity smoothing effect of the radiation transport in the density valley formed by an ion-beam deposition in an ion-beam inertial confinement fusion pellets by numerical simulation.

  20. Near-surface Density Currents Observed in the Southeast Pacific

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stratocumulus-topped Marine Boundary Layer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Near-surface Density Currents Observed in the Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus-topped Marine Boundary Layer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Near-surface Density Currents Observed in the Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus-topped Marine Boundary Layer Density currents (i.e. cold pools or outflows) beneath marine stratocumulus clouds are characterized using a

  1. Method for solvent extraction with near-equal density solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birdwell, Joseph F.; Randolph, John D.; Singh, S. Paul

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a modified centrifugal contactor for separating solutions of near equal density. The modified contactor has a pressure differential establishing means that allows the application of a pressure differential across fluid in the rotor of the contactor. The pressure differential is such that it causes the boundary between solutions of near-equal density to shift, thereby facilitating separation of the phases. Also disclosed is a method of separating solutions of near-equal density.

  2. Method for measuring the density of lightweight materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snow, Samuel G.; Giacomelli, Edward J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a nondestructive method for measuring the density of articles composed of elements having a low atomic number such as plastic and carbon composites. The measurement is accomplished by striking the article with a collimated beam of X radiation, simultaneously monitoring the radiation scattered and the radiation transmitted by the article, then relating the ratio of the radiation scattered to the radiation transmitted with the density of the article. The above method is insensitive to all variables except density.

  3. Laser Propagation in Nanostructured Ultra-Low-Density Materials (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Laser Propagation in Nanostructured Ultra-Low-Density Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser Propagation in Nanostructured Ultra-Low-Density Materials The nanostructure of very-low-density aerogels (< 10 mg/cm3) affects the laser heating and propagation of the subsequent heat front. Simulations treat these materials as an atomistic medium without any structure differentiating between

  4. Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Theory (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation in Nuclear Density Functional Theory Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is one of the main theoretical tools used to study the properties of heavy and superheavy elements, or to describe the structure of nuclei far from stability. While on-going eff orts seek to better root

  5. Development of High Power Density Driveline for Vehicles | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss058_fenske_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of High Power Density Driveline for Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of High Power Density Driveline for Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of High Power Density

  6. High Island Densities and Long Range Repulsive Interactions:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    long range repulsive interactions. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory calculations support this conclusion. In addition to answering an outstanding...

  7. Centrality evolution of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Centrality evolution of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density over a broad ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Centrality evolution of the charged-particle ...

  8. PLZT Nano-Precursors for High Energy Density Applications - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Find More Like This Return to Search PLZT Nano-Precursors for High Energy Density Applications Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology ...

  9. Controlling the Actuation Rate of Low Density Shape Memory Polymer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Memory Polymer Foams in Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlling the Actuation Rate of Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams in Water Authors: Singhal, P ; ...

  10. Internal field, density & temperature measurements in MTF plasmas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Internal field, density & temperature measurements in MTF plasmas using Pulsed Polarimetry final report Authors: Smith, Roger J. Publication Date: 2014-08-11 OSTI ...

  11. Ultra Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams With Tunable Physicochemi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Polymer Foams With Tunable Physicochemical Properties for Treatment of intracranial Aneurysms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra Low Density Shape Memory Polymer ...

  12. 3-D capacitance density imaging of fluidized bed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional capacitance density imaging of a gasified bed or the like in a containment vessel is achieved using a plurality of electrodes provided circumferentially about the bed in levels and along the bed in channels. The electrodes are individually and selectively excited electrically at each level to produce a plurality of current flux field patterns generated in the bed at each level. The current flux field patterns are suitably sensed and a density pattern of the bed at each level determined. By combining the determined density patterns at each level, a three-dimensional density image of the bed is achieved.

  13. Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for embolic biomedical applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for embolic biomedical applications ...

  14. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Xinfa; Yu Guisheng

    2012-11-10

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  15. Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley, Et Al., 1987) Exploration...

  16. Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry > Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    During the Chemical Transformation from Cobalt to Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell...

  17. Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area...

  18. Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Wilt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Wilt & Haar, 1986) Exploration...

  19. Density of sodium chloride solutions at high temperatures and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; SEAWATER; DENSITY; SODIUM CHLORIDES; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; ...

  20. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Steady advances in increasing the energy, power, and brightness of lasers and particle beams and advances in pulsed power systems ...

  1. Ultra Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams With Tunable Physicochemi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Memory Polymer Foams With Tunable Physicochemical Properties for Treatment of intracranial Aneurysms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra Low Density Shape Memory ...

  2. Ultra Low Density and Highly Crosslinked Biocompatible Shape...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biocompatible Shape Memory Polyurethane Foams Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra Low Density and Highly Crosslinked Biocompatible Shape Memory Polyurethane Foams ...

  3. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PARTICLES AND FIELDS Generalized parton distributions, transverse charge and magnetization densities, chiral effective field theory, light-front quantization Word Cloud More ...

  4. Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable Li...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Rechargeable LiS Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable LiS Batteries Authors: Gao, Jie ; ...

  5. HIGH-DENSITY, BIO-COMPATIBLE, AND HERMETIC ELECTRICAL FEEDTHROUGHS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is a high-density, low temperature, cost-effective, and robust method of miniaturizing electrical feedthroughs for a wide range of implantable bio-medical device applications. ...

  6. Practicality of magnetic compression for plasma density control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    control Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 16, 2017 Title: Practicality of magnetic compression for plasma density control ...

  7. Dwarf galaxy dark matter density profiles inferred from stellar and gas kinematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Joshua J.; Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Bender, Ralf; Thomas, Jens [Max-Planck Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany); Van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Van de Ven, Glenn [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Barentine, John C.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Murphy, Jeremy D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Swaters, R. A., E-mail: jjadams@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: jja439@gmail.com [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present new constraints on the density profiles of dark matter (DM) halos in seven nearby dwarf galaxies from measurements of their integrated stellar light and gas kinematics. The gas kinematics of low-mass galaxies frequently suggest that they contain constant density DM cores, while N-body simulations instead predict a cuspy profile. We present a data set of high-resolution integral-field spectroscopy on seven galaxies and measure the stellar and gas kinematics simultaneously. Using Jeans modeling on our full sample, we examine whether gas kinematics in general produce shallower density profiles than are derived from the stars. Although two of the seven galaxies show some localized differences in their rotation curves between the two tracers, estimates of the central logarithmic slope of the DM density profile, ?, are generally robust. The mean and standard deviation of the logarithmic slope for the population are ? = 0.67 ± 0.10 when measured in the stars and ? = 0.58 ± 0.24 when measured in the gas. We also find that the halos are not under-concentrated at the radii of half their maximum velocities. Finally, we search for correlations of the DM density profile with stellar velocity anisotropy and other baryonic properties. Two popular mechanisms to explain cored DM halos are an exotic DM component or feedback models that strongly couple the energy of supernovae into repeatedly driving out gas and dynamically heating the DM halos. While such models do not yet have falsifiable predictions that we can measure, we investigate correlations that may eventually be used to test models. We do not find a secondary parameter that strongly correlates with the central DM density slope, but we do find some weak correlations. The central DM density slope weakly correlates with the abundance of ? elements in the stellar population, anti-correlates with H I fraction, and anti-correlates with vertical orbital anisotropy. We expect, if anything, the opposite of these three trends for feedback models. Determining the importance of these correlations will require further model developments and larger observational samples.

  8. Dynamical dipole mode in fusion reactions with exotic nuclear beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baran, V.; Rizzo, C.; Colonna, M.; Toro, M. Di; Pierroutsakou, D.

    2009-02-15

    We report the properties of the prompt dipole radiation, produced via a collective bremsstrahlung mechanism, in fusion reactions with exotic beams. We show that the {gamma} yield is sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy below/around saturation. Moreover, we find that the angular distribution of the emitted photons from such fast collective mode can represent a sensitive probe of its excitation mechanism and of fusion dynamics in the entrance channel.

  9. How important is self-consistency for the dDsC density dependent dispersion correction?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brémond, Éric; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Golubev, Nikolay; Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 ; Steinmann, Stephan N.

    2014-05-14

    The treatment of dispersion interactions is ubiquitous but computationally demanding for seamless ab initio approaches. A highly popular and simple remedy consists in correcting for the missing interactions a posteriori by adding an attractive energy term summed over all atom pairs to standard density functional approximations. These corrections were originally based on atom pairwise parameters and, hence, had a strong touch of empiricism. To overcome such limitations, we recently proposed a robust system-dependent dispersion correction, dDsC, that is computed from the electron density and that provides a balanced description of both weak inter- and intramolecular interactions. From the theoretical point of view and for the sake of increasing reliability, we here verify if the self-consistent implementation of dDsC impacts ground-state properties such as interaction energies, electron density, dipole moments, geometries, and harmonic frequencies. In addition, we investigate the suitability of the a posteriori scheme for molecular dynamics simulations, for which the analysis of the energy conservation constitutes a challenging tests. Our study demonstrates that the post-SCF approach in an excellent approximation.

  10. Bonding Low-density Nanoporous Metal Foams Using Sputtered Solder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bono, M; Cervantes, O; Akaba, C; Hamza, A; Foreman, R; Teslich, N

    2007-08-21

    A method has been developed for bonding low-density nanoporous metal foam components to a substrate using solder that is sputtered onto the surfaces. Metal foams have unusual properties that make them excellent choices for many applications, and as technologies for processing these materials are evolving, their use in industry is increasing dramatically. Metal foams are lightweight and have advantageous dynamic properties, which make them excellent choices for many structural applications. They also provide good acoustic damping, low thermal conductivity, and excellent energy absorption characteristics. Therefore, these materials are commonly used in the automotive, aerospace, construction, and biomedical industries. The synthesis of nanoporous metal foams with a cell size of less then 1 {micro}m is an emerging technology that is expected to lead to widespread application of metal foams in microdevices, such as sensors and actuators. One of the challenges to manufacturing components from metal foams is that they can be difficult to attach to other structures without degrading their properties. For example, traditional liquid adhesives cannot be used because they are absorbed into foams. The problem of bonding or joining can be particularly difficult for small-scale devices made from nanoporous foam, due to the requirement for a thin bond layer. The current study addresses this problem and develops a method of soldering a nanoporous metal foam to a substrate with a bond thickness of less than 2 {micro}m. There are many applications that require micro-scale metal foams precisely bonded to substrates. This study was motivated by a physics experiment that used a laser to drive a shock wave through an aluminum foil and into a copper foam, in order to determine the speed of the shock in the copper foam. To avoid disturbing the shock, the interface between the copper foam and the aluminum substrate had to be as thin as possible. There are many other applications that could benefit from the bonding technology developed in this study, such as small-scale lightweight structural members, high-strength thermal insulating layers for electronics, and micro-scale mechanical dampers, to name but a few. Each of these applications requires one or more small metal foam components precisely bonded to a substrate. Several methods for bonding metal foam components have been developed by previous researchers. Macroscopic metal foam parts have been successfully bonded by laser welding to create T-sections and butt joints. Ultrasonic welding has been used to join aluminum sheet metal to aluminum foam for structural applications. These methods work well for bonding large foam components, but reducing these methods to a smaller length scale would be challenging. One method that has shown great potential for bonding layers of metal foams to substrates is a brazing process that uses a sputter-deposited interface material. Shirzadi et al.[9] have demonstrated bonds between stainless steel foam and a stainless steel substrate using a layer of copper-titanium filler metal that is sputtered onto the interface surfaces. The foam pieces that they bonded were approximately 10 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with a cell size of approximately 200 {micro}m. After depositing the filler material, pressing the materials together, and heating them with an induction heater, bonds were achieved without causing significant damage to the foam. The current study also uses a sputter-deposited interface material to bond foam to a substrate. However, in contrast to previous work, the current study examines bonding microscale pieces of fragile nanoporous metal foam. In this study, a method is developed to bond a thin sheet of fragile, low-density nanoporous copper foam to an aluminum foil substrate of thickness 40 {micro}m. By sputter depositing an indium-silver alloy onto the foam and the substrate, a solder joint with a thickness of less than 2 {micro}m was achieved.

  11. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  12. Ablation dynamics in coiled wire-array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Swadling, G.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Knapp, P. F.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Chalenski, D. A.; Blesener, K. S.; Greenly, J. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2013-02-15

    Experiments to study the ablation dynamics of coiled wire arrays were performed on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College, and on the COBRA generator at Cornell University's Laboratory of Plasma Studies (1 MA, 100 ns). The MAGPIE generator was used to drive coiled wires in an inverse array configuration to study the distribution of ablated plasma. Using interferometry to study the plasma distribution during the ablation phase, absolute quantitative measurements of electron line density demonstrated very high density contrasts between coiled ablation streams and inter-stream regions many millimetres from the wire. The measured density contrasts for a coiled array were many times greater than that observed for a conventional array with straight wires, indicating that a much greater axial modulation of the ablated plasma may be responsible for the unique implosion dynamics of coiled arrays. Experiments on the COBRA generator were used to study the complex redirection of plasma around a coiled wire that gives rise to the ablation structure exhibited by coiled arrays. Observations of this complex 3D plasma structure were used to validate the current model of coiled array ablation dynamics [Hall et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 065003 (2008)], demonstrating irrefutably that plasma flow from the wires behaves as predicted. Coiled wires were observed to ablate and implode in the same manner on both machines, indicating that current rise time should not be an issue for the scaling of coiled arrays to larger machines with fast current rise times.

  13. An Efficient Molecular Dynamics Scheme for Predicting Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1998-09-15

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating the concentration profile of dopants implanted in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. The program incorporates methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model, instead of the binary collision approximation (BCA) used in implant simulators such as TRIM and Marlowe, to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and screened Coulomb potentials. Inelastic energy loss is accounted for using a Firsov model, and electronic stopping is described by a Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains the single adjustable parameter for the entire scheme. Thus, the program is easily extensible to new ion-target combinations with the minimum of tuning, and is predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy, large angle implants, and for situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using their code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon, silicon-germanium blends, and gallium-arsenide. They can predict the experimental profiles over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  14. Spatiotemporal temperature and density characterization of high-power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    atmospheric flashover discharges over inert poly(methyl methacrylate) and energetic pentaerythritol tetranitrate dielectric surfaces (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Spatiotemporal temperature and density characterization of high-power atmospheric flashover discharges over inert poly(methyl methacrylate) and energetic pentaerythritol tetranitrate dielectric surfaces Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spatiotemporal temperature and density characterization of high-power atmospheric

  15. Symmetry Energy as a Function of Density and Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielewicz, Pawel; Lee, Jenny

    2007-10-26

    Energy in nuclear matter is, in practice, completely characterized at different densities and asymmetries, when the density dependencies of symmetry energy and of energy of symmetric matter are specified. The density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities produces mass dependence of nuclear symmetry coefficient and, thus, can be constrained by that latter dependence. We deduce values of the mass dependent symmetry coefficients, by using excitation energies to isobaric analog states. The coefficient systematic, for intermediate and high masses, is well described in terms of the symmetry coefficient values of a{sub a}{sup V} = (31.5-33.5) MeV for the volume coefficient and a{sub a}{sup S} = (9-12) MeV for the surface coefficient. These two further correspond to the parameter values describing density dependence of symmetry energy, of L{approx}95 MeV and K{sub sym}{approx}25 MeV.

  16. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niedziela, J. L., E-mail: niedzielajl@ornl.gov [Instrument and Source Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Stone, M. B., E-mail: stonemb@ornl.gov [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-09-08

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80?K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  17. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  18. Phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perera, Dilina Landau, David P.; Nicholson, Don M.; Malcolm Stocks, G.; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Gregory

    2014-05-07

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian parameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer simulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, additional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  19. Entanglement dynamics in chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghose, Shohini [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Sanders, Barry C. [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2004-12-01

    We study quantum chaos for systems with more than one degree of freedom, for which we present an analysis of the dynamics of entanglement. Our analysis explains the main features of entanglement dynamics and identifies entanglement-based signatures of quantum chaos. We discuss entanglement dynamics for a feasible experiment involving an atom in a magneto-optical trap and compare the results with entanglement dynamics for the well-studied quantum kicked top.

  20. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  1. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  2. Roaming Molecule Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roaming Molecule Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  3. computational fluid dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computational fluid dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  4. Dynamical impurity problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  5. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molloi, Sabee Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  6. Probing topological relations between high-density and low-density regions of 2MASS with hexagon cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yongfeng; Xiao, Weike

    2014-02-01

    We introduced a new two-dimensional (2D) hexagon technique for probing the topological structure of the universe in which we mapped regions of the sky with high and low galaxy densities onto a 2D lattice of hexagonal unit cells. We defined filled cells as corresponding to high-density regions and empty cells as corresponding to low-density regions. The numbers of filled cells and empty cells were kept the same by controlling the size of the cells. By analyzing the six sides of each hexagon, we could obtain and compare the statistical topological properties of high-density and low-density regions of the universe in order to have a better understanding of the evolution of the universe. We applied this hexagonal method to Two Micron All Sky Survey data and discovered significant topological differences between the high-density and low-density regions. Both regions had significant (>5?) topological shifts from both the binomial distribution and the random distribution.

  7. Optical Properties of the Charge-Density-Wave Polychalcogenide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optical Properties of the Charge-Density-Wave Polychalcogenide Compounds R2Te5 (RNd, Sm and Gd) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optical Properties of the...

  8. Efficient Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficient Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Method and its Application to a Collision of an Ion with a 2D Material Title: Efficient Real-Time Time-Dependent ...

  9. COLLOQUIUM: Frontiers in Plasma Science: A High Energy Density...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 13, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG AUDITORIUM COLLOQUIUM: Frontiers in Plasma Science: A High Energy Density Perspective Dr. Bruce A. Remington Lawrence Livermore ...

  10. Controlling the Actuation Rate of Low Density Shape Memory Polymer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Memory Polymer Foams in Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlling the Actuation Rate of Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams in Water You are accessing a ...

  11. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by x-ray diffraction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The ...

  12. Paper area density measurement from forward transmitted scattered light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koo, Jackson C.

    2001-01-01

    A method whereby the average paper fiber area density (weight per unit area) can be directly calculated from the intensity of transmitted, scattered light at two different wavelengths, one being a non-absorpted wavelength. Also, the method makes it possible to derive the water percentage per fiber area density from a two-wavelength measurement. In the optical measuring technique optical transmitted intensity, for example, at 2.1 microns cellulose absorption line is measured and compared with another scattered, optical transmitted intensity reference in the nearby spectrum region, such as 1.68 microns, where there is no absorption. From the ratio of these two intensities, one can calculate the scattering absorption coefficient at 2.1 microns. This absorption coefficient at this wavelength is, then, experimentally correlated to the paper fiber area density. The water percentage per fiber area density can be derived from this two-wavelength measurement approach.

  13. Low density lipoprotein fraction assay for cardiac disease risk

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Orr, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A variable rate density gradient electrophoric gel is described which separate LDL subfractions with the precision of ultracentrifugation techniques. Also, an innovative bottom inlet mixing chamber particularly useful for producing these gels is described.

  14. Low density lipoprotein fraction assay for cardiac disease risk

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, R.M.; Blanche, P.J.; Orr, J.

    1999-07-20

    A variable rate density gradient electrophoric gel is described which separates LDL subfractions with the precision of ultracentrifugation techniques. Also, an innovative bottom inlet mixing chamber particularly useful for producing these gels is described. 8 figs.

  15. Optical Properties of the Charge-Density-Wave Polychalcogenide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the rare-earth polychalcogenide Rsub 2Tesub 5 (R Nd, Sm and Gd) charge-density-wave (CDW) compounds by optical methods. From the absorption spectrum we extract the...

  16. Effect of Chemical Pressure on the Charge Density Wave Transition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Chemical Pressure on the Charge Density Wave Transition in Rare-Earth Tritellurides RTe3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Chemical Pressure on the ...

  17. Surface modification of low density silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriend, K. A. (Kimberly A.); Loy, D. A. (Douglas A.); Salazar, K. V. (Kenneth V.); Wilson, K. V. (Kennard V.)

    2004-01-01

    Silica and bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels are low density materials that are attractive for applications such as, thermal insulation, porous separation media or catalyst supports, adsorbents. However, aerogels are notoriously weak and brittle making it difficult to handle and machine monoliths into desired forms. This prevents the development of many applications that would otherwise benefit from the use of the low density materials. We will describe our efforts to chemically modify and mechanically enhance silica-based aerogels using chemical vapor techniques without sacrificing their characteristic low densities. Monolithic silica and organically bridged polysilsesquioxane aerogels were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of the respective methoxysilane monomers followed by supercritical carbon dioxide drying of the gels. Reactive modification of the gels with volatile silylating compounds during and after the drying process and these effects on the mechanical properties and density of the aerogels will be described.

  18. Distribution of Radiation Density in a Homogeneous Cloudy Laye

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Radiation Density in a Homogeneous Cloudy Layer S. V. Dvoryashin, K. A. Shukorov, A. H. Shukurov, and G. S. Golitsyn A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian...

  19. A Comprehensive Study Of Fracture Patterns And Densities In The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    specific knowledge of these in the Geysers area. (2)By locating zones of high fracture density it will be possible to reduce the cost of geothermal power development with the...

  20. Density functional theory study of skyrmion pinning by atomic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Density functional theory study of skyrmion pinning by atomic defects in MnSi Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on ...

  1. Exact and approximate Kohn-Sham potentials in ensemble density...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Exact and approximate Kohn-Sham potentials in ensemble density-functional theory Authors: Yang, Zeng-hui ; Trail, John R. ; Pribram-Jones, Aurora ; Burke, Kieron ; Needs, ...

  2. Plasma density diagnostic for capillary-discharge based plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plasma density diagnostic for capillary-discharge based plasma channels Authors: Daniels, J. 1 Search SciTech Connect for author "Daniels, J." Search SciTech Connect for...

  3. Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    showed that beaming microwaves into the center of the plasma can be used to control the density in the center of the plasma, where a fusion reactor would produce most of its power. ...

  4. Inhomogeneity smoothing using density valley formed by ion beam...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We study the beam non-uniformity smoothing effect of the radiation transport in the ... non-uniformity can be smoothed out by the radiation transport along the density valley. ...

  5. Tuning nucleation density of metal island with charge doping...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Further kinetic Monte Carlo simulation showed that the nucleation island number density can be increased up to six times larger under hole-doping and can be decreased down to ten ...

  6. Separation of solids by varying the bulk density of a fluid separating medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Palmer L.; Duffy, James B.; Tokarz, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus for separating objects having a density greater than a selected density value from objects having a density less than said selected density value. The method typically comprises: (a) providing a separation vessel having an upper and lower portion, said vessel containing a liquid having a density exceeding said selected density value; (b) reducing the apparent density of the liquid to said selected density value by introducing solid, bubble-like bodies having a density less than that of the liquid into the lower portion of the vessel and permitting them to rise therethrough; (c) introducing the objects to be separated into the separation vessel and permitting the objects having a density greater than the apparent density of the liquid to sink to the lower portion of the vessel, while the objects having a density less than said selected density value float in the upper portion of the vessel; and (d) separately removing the higher density objects in the lower portion and the lower density objects in the upper portion from the separation vessel. The apparatus typically comprises: (a) a vessel containing a liquid having a density such that at least part of said objects having a density exceeding said selected density value will float therein; (b) means to place said objects into said vessel; (c) means to reduce the effective density of at least a portion of said liquid to said selected density value, whereby said objects having a density exceeding said selected density value sink into said liquid and said objects having a density less than said selected density value remain afloat, said means to adjust the effective density comprising solid, bubble-like bodies having a density less than said selected density value and means for introducing said bodies into said liquid; and (d) means for separately removing said objects having a density exceeding said selected density value and said objects having a density less than said selected density value from said vessel.

  7. Preface: Special Topic on Advances in Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    This Special Topic Issue on the Advances in Density Functional Theory, published as a celebration of the fifty years of density functional theory, contains a retrospective article, a perspective article, and a collection of original research articles that showcase recent theoretical advances in the field. It provides a timely discussion reflecting a cross section of our understanding, and the theoretical and computational developments, which have significant implications in broad areas of sciences and engineering.

  8. Internal field, density & temperature measurements in MTF plasmas using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pulsed Polarimetry (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Internal field, density & temperature measurements in MTF plasmas using Pulsed Polarimetry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Internal field, density & temperature measurements in MTF plasmas using Pulsed Polarimetry final report Authors: Smith, Roger J. Publication Date: 2014-08-11 OSTI Identifier: 1149491 Report Number(s): 001 DOE Contract Number: SC0002396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research

  9. Lanai high-density irradiance sensor network for characterizing solar

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    resource variability of MW-scale PV system. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Lanai high-density irradiance sensor network for characterizing solar resource variability of MW-scale PV system. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lanai high-density irradiance sensor network for characterizing solar resource variability of MW-scale PV system. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and SunPower Corporation (SunPower) have completed design and deployment of an autonomous irradiance

  10. Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for embolic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    biomedical applications (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for embolic biomedical applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for embolic biomedical applications Authors: Singhal, P ; Small, W ; Cosgriff-Hernandez, E ; Maitland, D ; Wilson, T Publication Date: 2013-02-27 OSTI Identifier: 1122211 Report Number(s):

  11. Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on June 4, 2016 Title: Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas Authors: Mikkelsen, D. R. [1] Search SciTech Connect for author "Mikkelsen, D. R."

  12. ELECTRON DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS AND FLUCTUATION-INDUCED TRANSPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ELECTRON DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS AND FLUCTUATION-INDUCED TRANSPORT IN THE REVERSED-FIELD PINCH by Nicholas E. Lanier A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Physics) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison 1999 i ELECTRON DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS AND FLUCTUATION- INDUCED TRANSPORT IN THE REVERSED-FIELD PINCH Nicholas E. Lanier Under the supervision of Professor Stewart C. Prager At the University of Wisconsin-Madison An extensive study

  13. A density-matching approach for optimization under uncertainty (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect A density-matching approach for optimization under uncertainty Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A density-matching approach for optimization under uncertainty Authors: Seshadri, Pranay ; Constantine, Paul ; Iaccarino, Gianluca ; Parks, Geoffrey Search SciTech Connect for author "Parks, Geoffrey" Search SciTech Connect for ORCID "0000000181885047" Search orcid.org for ORCID "0000000181885047" Publication Date: 2016-06-01 OSTI

  14. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  15. Pairing Nambu-Goldstone Modes within Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Pairing Nambu-Goldstone Modes within Nuclear Density Functional Theory Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 11, 2017 Title: Pairing Nambu-Goldstone Modes within Nuclear Density Functional Theory Authors: Hinohara, Nobuo ; Nazarewicz, Witold Publication Date: 2016-04-11 OSTI Identifier: 1246764 Grant/Contract Number: SC0013365; SC0008511 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review

  16. Laser Propagation in Nanostructured Ultra-Low-Density Materials (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Laser Propagation in Nanostructured Ultra-Low-Density Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser Propagation in Nanostructured Ultra-Low-Density Materials × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology.

  17. BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF) (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF) The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and

  18. COHERENCE AND INTERMITTENCY OF ELECTRON DENSITY IN SMALL-SCALE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COHERENCE AND INTERMITTENCY OF ELECTRON DENSITY IN SMALL-SCALE INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE P. W. Terry and K. W. Smith Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas and Department of Physics, University of WisconsinYMadison, Madison, WI 53706; pwterry@wisc.edu Received 2006 December 14; accepted 2007 April 19 ABSTRACT Spatial intermittency in decaying kinetic Alfve ´n wave turbulence is investigated to determine if it produces non- Gaussian density fluctuations in

  19. Density Functional Theory with Dissipation: Transport through Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieron Burke

    2012-04-30

    A huge amount of fundamental research was performed on this grant. Most of it focussed on fundamental issues of electronic structure calculations of transport through single molecules, using density functional theory. Achievements were: (1) First density functional theory with dissipation; (2) Pseudopotential plane wave calculations with master equation; (3) Weak bias limit; (4) Long-chain conductance; and (5) Self-interaction effects in tunneling.

  20. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Steady advances in increasing the energy, power, and brightness of lasers and particle beams and advances in pulsed power systems have made possible the exploration of matter at extremely high energy density in the laboratory. Exciting new experimental regimes are being realized by exploiting the scientific capabilities of existing ICF Office facilities, as well as the relevant Department of Defense (DoD) and university

  1. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas NNSA's Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion and DOE's Office of Science established a joint program in HEDLP in 2008. Initially, this program was a combination of work that was funded as part of the NNSA's Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program in the research area of high energy density physics and the DOE Office of Science's HEDLP Program and Innovative Confinement Concepts Program. Steady advances in increasing the energy,

  2. Ultra Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams With Tunable Physicochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Properties for Treatment of intracranial Aneurysms (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Ultra Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams With Tunable Physicochemical Properties for Treatment of intracranial Aneurysms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra Low Density Shape Memory Polymer Foams With Tunable Physicochemical Properties for Treatment of intracranial Aneurysms Authors: Singhal, P ; Maitland, D J ; Wilson, T S Publication Date: 2013-05-08 OSTI

  3. Ultra Low Density and Highly Crosslinked Biocompatible Shape Memory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Polyurethane Foams (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ultra Low Density and Highly Crosslinked Biocompatible Shape Memory Polyurethane Foams Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra Low Density and Highly Crosslinked Biocompatible Shape Memory Polyurethane Foams Authors: Singhal, P ; Rodriguez, J N ; Small IV, W ; Eagleaston, S ; De Water, J V ; Maitland, D J ; Wilson, T S Publication Date: 2011-09-15 OSTI Identifier: 1111124 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-501951 DOE Contract Number:

  4. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate

  5. Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Udell, K.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; Udell, K.

    1992-01-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ``Dynamic Stripping`` to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving the contaminated site in FY 92.

  6. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, T. S. Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-15

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is “at least as stable” as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  7. The National Ignition Facility: Ushering in a new age for high energy density science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E. I.; Boyd, R. N.; Remington, B. A.; Keane, C. J.; Al-Ayat, R.

    2009-04-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 012003 (2008); https://lasers.llnl.gov/], completed in March 2009, is the highest energy laser ever constructed. The high temperatures and densities achievable at NIF will enable a number of experiments in inertial confinement fusion and stockpile stewardship, as well as access to new regimes in a variety of experiments relevant to x-ray astronomy, laser-plasma interactions, hydrodynamic instabilities, nuclear astrophysics, and planetary science. The experiments will impact research on black holes and other accreting objects, the understanding of stellar evolution and explosions, nuclear reactions in dense plasmas relevant to stellar nucleosynthesis, properties of warm dense matter in planetary interiors, molecular cloud dynamics and star formation, and fusion energy generation.

  8. Probing strong electroweak symmetry breaking dynamics through...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Probing strong electroweak symmetry breaking dynamics through quantum interferometry at ... Title: Probing strong electroweak symmetry breaking dynamics through quantum ...

  9. Dynamic octahedral fluctuations and the effects on orbital ordering in YTiO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bing; Louca, Despina; Hu, Biao; Niedziela, Jennifer L; Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    YTiO3 is revisited to investigate the influence of local lattice dynamics on orbital ordering using inelastic neutron scattering. Orbital order survives well above the ferromagnetic transition, into the paramagnetic state, but what eventually leads to disorder is not well understood. By probing the local lattice dynamics via the dynamic pair density function analysis, it is found that local fluctuations associated with octahedral tilting and rotational modes and Y displacements persist up to 60 meV. The local fluctuations exhibit a temperature dependence that may lead to the suppression of the Ti orbital overlap leading to a temperature dependent orbital disorder.

  10. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature ismore » roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.« less

  11. Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-01

    The Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package is a general library for aerosol modeling to address aerosol general dynamics, including formation from gas phase reactions, surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis with linkage to DSMC studies, and thermal radiative transport. The library is based upon Cantera, a C++ Cal Tech code that handles gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics. The method uses a discontinuous galerkinmore » formulation for the condensation and coagulation operator that conserves particles, elements, and enthalpy up to round-off error. Both O-D and 1-D time dependent applications have been developed with the library. Multiple species in the solid phase are handled as well. The O-D application, called Tdcads (Time Dependent CADS) is distributed with the library. Tdcads can address both constant volume and constant pressure adiabatic homogeneous problems. An extensive set of sample problems for Tdcads is also provided.« less

  12. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

  13. Equation of state of dense plasmas: Orbital-free molecular dynamics as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics for high-Z elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danel, J.-F.; Blottiau, P.; Kazandjian, L.; Piron, R.; Torrent, M.

    2014-10-15

    The applicability of quantum molecular dynamics to the calculation of the equation of state of a dense plasma is limited at high temperature by computational cost. Orbital-free molecular dynamics, based on a semiclassical approximation and possibly on a gradient correction, is a simulation method available at high temperature. For a high-Z element such as lutetium, we examine how orbital-free molecular dynamics applied to the equation of state of a dense plasma can be regarded as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics at high temperature. For the normal mass density and twice the normal mass density, we show that the pressures calculated with the quantum approach converge monotonically towards those calculated with the orbital-free approach; we observe a faster convergence when the orbital-free approach includes the gradient correction. We propose a method to obtain an equation of state reproducing quantum molecular dynamics results up to high temperatures where this approach cannot be directly implemented. With the results already obtained for low-Z plasmas, the present study opens the way for reproducing the quantum molecular dynamics pressure for all elements up to high temperatures.

  14. DIFFUSE MOLECULAR CLOUD DENSITIES FROM UV MEASUREMENTS OF CO ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2013-09-10

    We use UV measurements of interstellar CO toward nearby stars to calculate the density in the diffuse molecular clouds containing the molecules responsible for the observed absorption. Chemical models and recent calculations of the excitation rate coefficients indicate that the regions in which CO is found have hydrogen predominantly in molecular form and that collisional excitation is by collisions with H{sub 2} molecules. We carry out statistical equilibrium calculations using CO-H{sub 2} collision rates to solve for the H{sub 2} density in the observed sources without including effects of radiative trapping. We have assumed kinetic temperatures of 50 K and 100 K, finding this choice to make relatively little difference to the lowest transition. For the sources having T{sup ex}{sub 10} only for which we could determine upper and lower density limits, we find (n(H{sub 2})) = 49 cm{sup -3}. While we can find a consistent density range for a good fraction of the sources having either two or three values of the excitation temperature, there is a suggestion that the higher-J transitions are sampling clouds or regions within diffuse molecular cloud material that have higher densities than the material sampled by the J = 1-0 transition. The assumed kinetic temperature and derived H{sub 2} density are anticorrelated when the J = 2-1 transition data, the J = 3-2 transition data, or both are included. For sources with either two or three values of the excitation temperature, we find average values of the midpoint of the density range that is consistent with all of the observations equal to 68 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 100 K and 92 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 50 K. The data for this set of sources imply that diffuse molecular clouds are characterized by an average thermal pressure between 4600 and 6800 K cm{sup -3}.

  15. Touching the void: A striking drop in stellar halo density beyond 50 kpc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deason, A. J.; Rockosi, C. M.; Belokurov, V.; Koposov, S. E.

    2014-05-20

    We use A-type stars selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 9 photometry to measure the outer slope of the Milky Way stellar halo density profile beyond 50 kpc. A likelihood-based analysis is employed that models the ugr photometry distribution of blue horizontal branch and blue straggler stars. In the magnitude range 18.5 < g < 20.5, these stellar populations span a heliocentric distance range of: 10 ? D {sub BS}/kpc ? 75, 40 ? D {sub BHB}/kpc ? 100. Contributions from contaminants, such as QSOs, and the effect of photometric uncertainties, are also included in our modeling procedure. We find evidence for a very steep outer halo profile, with power-law index ? ? 6 beyond Galactocentric radii r = 50 kpc, and even steeper slopes favored (? ? 6-10) at larger radii. This result holds true when stars belonging to known overdensities, such as the Sagittarius stream, are included or excluded. We show that, by comparison to numerical simulations, stellar halos with shallower slopes at large distances tend to have more recent accretion activity. Thus, it is likely that the Milky Way has undergone a relatively quiet accretion history over the past several gigayears. Our measurement of the outer stellar halo profile may have important implications for dynamical mass models of the Milky Way, where the tracer density profile is strongly degenerate with total mass estimates.

  16. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, themore » dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.« less

  17. Orbital-free extension to Kohn-Sham density functional theory equation of state calculations: Application to silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjostrom, Travis; Crockett, Scott

    2015-09-02

    The liquid regime equation of state of silicon dioxide SiO2 is calculated via quantum molecular dynamics in the density range of 5 to 15 g/cc and with temperatures from 0.5 to 100 eV, including the α-quartz and stishovite phase Hugoniot curves. Below 8 eV calculations are based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and above 8 eV a new orbital-free DFT formulation, presented here, based on matching Kohn-Sham DFT calculations is employed. Recent experimental shock data are found to be in very good agreement with the current results. Finally both experimental and simulation data are used in constructing a new liquid regime equation of state table for SiO2.

  18. Orbital-free extension to Kohn-Sham density functional theory equation of state calculations: Application to silicon dioxide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sjostrom, Travis; Crockett, Scott

    2015-09-02

    The liquid regime equation of state of silicon dioxide SiO2 is calculated via quantum molecular dynamics in the density range of 5 to 15 g/cc and with temperatures from 0.5 to 100 eV, including the α-quartz and stishovite phase Hugoniot curves. Below 8 eV calculations are based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and above 8 eV a new orbital-free DFT formulation, presented here, based on matching Kohn-Sham DFT calculations is employed. Recent experimental shock data are found to be in very good agreement with the current results. Finally both experimental and simulation data are used in constructing a newmore » liquid regime equation of state table for SiO2.« less

  19. DENSITY WAVES EXCITED BY LOW-MASS PLANETS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. LINEAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Ruobing; Stone, James M.; Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R. E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu E-mail: cpetrovi@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-11-01

    Density waves excited by planets embedded in protoplanetary disks play a central role in planetary migration and gap opening processes. We carry out two-dimensional shearing sheet simulations to study the linear regime of wave evolution with the grid-based code Athena and provide detailed comparisons with theoretical predictions. Low-mass planets (down to {approx}0.03 M{sub Circled-Plus} at 1 AU) and high spatial resolution (256 grid points per scale height) are chosen to mitigate the effects of wave nonlinearity. To complement the existing numerical studies, we focus on the primary physical variables such as the spatial profile of the wave, torque density, and the angular momentum flux carried by the wave, instead of secondary quantities such as the planetary migration rate. Our results show percent level agreement with theory in both physical and Fourier spaces. New phenomena such as the change of the toque density sign far from the planet are discovered and discussed. Also, we explore the effect of the numerical algorithms and find that a high order of accuracy, high resolution, and an accurate planetary potential are crucial to achieve good agreement with the theory. We find that the use of a too large time step without properly resolving the dynamical timescale around the planet produces incorrect results and may lead to spurious gap opening. Global simulations of planet migration and gap opening violating this requirement may be affected by spurious effects resulting in, e.g., the incorrect planetary migration rate and gap opening mass.

  20. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Plowman, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  1. Intrinsic decoherence dynamics in smooth Hamiltonian systems: Quantum-classical correspondence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Jiangbin; Brumer, Paul [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2003-08-01

    A direct classical analog of the quantum dynamics of intrinsic decoherence in Hamiltonian systems, characterized by the time dependence of the linear entropy of the reduced density operator, is introduced. The similarities and differences between the classical and quantum decoherence dynamics of an initial quantum state are exposed using both analytical and computational results. In particular, the classicality of early-time intrinsic decoherence dynamics is explored analytically using a second-order perturbative treatment, and an interesting connection between decoherence rates and the stability nature of classical trajectories is revealed in a simple approximate classical theory of intrinsic decoherence dynamics. The results offer deeper insights into decoherence, dynamics of quantum entanglement, and quantum chaos.

  2. Statistical dynamics of classical systems: A self-consistent field approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzetic, Douglas J. Wickham, Robert A.; Shi, An-Chang

    2014-06-28

    We develop a self-consistent field theory for particle dynamics by extremizing the functional integral representation of a microscopic Langevin equation with respect to the collective fields. Although our approach is general, here we formulate it in the context of polymer dynamics to highlight satisfying formal analogies with equilibrium self-consistent field theory. An exact treatment of the dynamics of a single chain in a mean force field emerges naturally via a functional Smoluchowski equation, while the time-dependent monomer density and mean force field are determined self-consistently. As a simple initial demonstration of the theory, leaving an application to polymer dynamics for future work, we examine the dynamics of trapped interacting Brownian particles. For binary particle mixtures, we observe the kinetics of phase separation.

  3. Dynamics, Spectral Geometry and Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burghelea, Dan

    2011-02-10

    The paper is an informal report on joint work with Stefan Haller on Dynamics in relation with Topology and Spectral Geometry. By dynamics one means a smooth vector field on a closed smooth manifold; the elements of dynamics of concern are the rest points, instantons and closed trajectories. One discusses their counting in the case of a generic vector field which has some additional properties satisfied by a still very large class of vector fields.

  4. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School » Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School The Seventeenth Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Program Information and Application Process Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2718 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email How to Apply Students should email the following documents to LADSSApply@lanl.gov Application Form (pdf) A one-page cover letter describing your interest

  5. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School The Seventeenth Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School School overview and focus. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email The Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School is a very selective summer school in which top upper-level US-citizen undergraduate students from universities around the nation attend lectures and work in teams of three

  6. 2007 Time_Dependent Density-Functional Therory (July 15-20, 2007 Colby College, Maine)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich Carsten Nancy Ryan Gray

    2008-09-19

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) provides an efficient, elegant, and formally exact way of describing the dynamics of interacting many-body quantum systems, circumventing the need for solving the full time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the 20 years since it was first rigorously established in 1984, the field of TDDFT has made rapid and significant advances both formally as well as in terms of successful applications in chemistry, physics and materials science. Today, TDDFT has become the method of choice for calculating excitation energies of complex molecules, and is becoming increasingly popular for describing optical and spectroscopic properties of a variety of materials such as bulk solids, clusters and nanostructures. Other growing areas of applications of TDDFT are nonlinear dynamics of strongly excited electronic systems and molecular electronics. The purpose and scope of this Gordon Research Conference is to provide a platform for discussing the current state of the art of the rapidly progressing, highly interdisciplinary field of TDDFT, to identify and debate open questions, and to point out new promising research directions. The conference will bring together experts with a diverse background in chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  7. Phonon densities of states and related thermodynamic properties of high temperature ceramics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loong, C.-K.

    1998-08-28

    Structural components and semiconductor devices based on silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and gallium nitride are expected to function more reliably at elevated temperatures and at higher levels of performance because of the strong atomic bonding in these materials. The degree of covalency, lattice specific heat, and thermal conductivity are important design factors for the realization of advanced applications. We have determined the phonon densities of states of these ceramics by the method of neutron scattering. The results provide a microscopic interpretation of the mechanical and thermal properties. Moreover, experimental data of the static, structures, and dynamic excitations of atoms are essential to the validation of interparticle potentials employed for molecular-dynamics simulations of high-temperature properties of multi-component ceramic systems. We present an overview of neutron-scattering investigations of the atomic organization, phonon excitations, as well as calculations of related thermodynamic properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, {beta}-sialon, AlN and GaN. The results are compared with those of the oxide analogs such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  8. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Seventeenth Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Program Information and Application Process Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email Executive...

  9. Dynamic bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stormo, Keith E. (Moscow, ID)

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix.

  10. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) typemore » map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.« less

  11. The Nosé–Hoover looped chain thermostat for low temperature thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughtrie, David J.; Tew, David P.

    2014-05-21

    We have used a generalised coherent state resolution of the identity to map the quantum canonical statistical average for a general system onto a phase-space average over the centre and width parameters of a thawed Gaussian wave packet. We also propose an artificial phase-space density that has the same behaviour as the canonical phase-space density in the low-temperature limit, and have constructed a novel Nosé–Hoover looped chain thermostat that generates this density in conjunction with variational thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics. This forms a new platform for evaluating statistical properties of quantum condensed-phase systems that has an explicit connection to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, whilst retaining many of the appealing features of path-integral molecular dynamics.

  12. On the density limit in the helicon plasma sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotelnikov, Igor A.

    2014-12-15

    Existence of the density limit in the helicon plasma sources is revisited. The low- and high-frequency regimes of a helicon plasma source operation are distinguished. In the low-frequency regime with ω<√(ω{sub ci}ω{sub ce}), the density limit is deduced from the Golant-Stix criterion of the accessibility of the lower hybrid resonance. In the high-frequency case, ω>√(ω{sub ci}ω{sub ce}), an appropriate limit is given by the Shamrai-Taranov criterion. Both these criteria are closely related to the phenomenon of the coalescence of the helicon wave with the Trivelpiece-Gould mode. We draw a conclusion that the derived density limits are not currently achieved in existing devices, perhaps, because of high energy cost of gas ionization.

  13. Low-density microcellular foam and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinde, James A.

    1977-01-01

    Low-density microcellular foam having a cell size of not greater than 2 .mu.m and method of making by dissolving cellulose acetate in an acetone-based solvent, gelling the solution in a water bath maintained at 0.degree.-10.degree. C for a selected period of time to allow impurities to diffuse out, freezing the gel, and then freeze-drying wherein water and solvents sublime and the gel structure solidifies into low-density microcellular foam. The foam has a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3 and cell size of about 0.3 to 2 .mu.m. The small cell size foam is particularly applicable for encapsulation of laser targets.

  14. Method of making a cellulose acetate low density microcellular foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinde, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Low-density microcellular foam having a cell size of not greater than 2 .mu.m and method of making by dissolving cellulose acetate in an acetone-based solvent, gelling the solution in a water bath maintained at 0-10.degree. C for a selected period of time to allow impurities to diffuse out, freezing the gel, and then freeze-drying wherein water and solvents sublime and the gel structure solidifies into low-density microcellular foam. The foam has a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3 and cell size of about 0.3 to 2 .mu.m. The small cell size foam is particularly adaptable for encapsulation of laser targets.

  15. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  16. PREPARATION OF HIGH-DENSITY THORIUM OXIDE SPHERES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNees, R.A. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.

    1963-12-31

    A method of preparing high-density thorium oxide spheres for use in pellet beds in nuclear reactors is presented. Sinterable thorium oxide is first converted to free-flowing granules by means such as compression into a compact and comminution of the compact. The granules are then compressed into cubes having a density of 5.0 to 5.3 grams per cubic centimeter. The cubes are tumbled to form spheres by attrition, and the spheres are then fired at 1250 to 1350 deg C. The fired spheres are then polished and fired at a temperature above 1650 deg C to obtain high density. Spherical pellets produced by this method are highly resistant to mechanical attrition hy water. (AEC)

  17. The density gradient effect on quantum Weibel instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahdavi, M. Khodadadi Azadboni, F.

    2015-03-15

    The Weibel instability plays an important role in stopping the hot electrons and energy deposition mechanism in the fast ignition of inertial fusion process. In this paper, the effects of the density gradient and degeneracy on Weibel instability growth rate are investigated. Calculations show that decreasing the density degenerate in the plasma corona, near the relativistic electron beam emitting region by 8.5% leads to a 92% reduction in the degeneracy parameter and about 90% reduction in Weibel instability growth rate. Also, decreasing the degenerate density near the fuel core by 8.5% leads to 1% reduction in the degeneracy parameter and about 8.5% reduction in Weibel instability growth rate. The Weibel instability growth rate shrinks to zero and the deposition condition of relativistic electron beam energy can be shifted to the fuel core for a suitable ignition by increasing the degeneracy parameter in the first layer of plasma corona.

  18. Stable laser–plasma accelerators at low densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Mirzaie, Mohammad; Ge, Xulei; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-07-28

    We report stable laser wakefield acceleration using 17–50 TW laser pulses interacting with 4?mm-long helium gas jet. The initial laser spot size was relatively large (28??m) and the plasma densities were 0.48–2.0?×?10{sup 19?}cm{sup ?3}. High-quality 100–MeV electron beams were generated at the plasma density of 7.5?×?10{sup 18?}cm{sup ?3}, at which the beam parameters (pointing angle, energy spectrum, charge, and divergence angle) were measured and stabilized. At higher densities, filamentation instability of the laser-plasma interaction was observed and it has led to multiple wakefield accelerated electron beams. The experimental results are supported by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The achievement presented here is an important step toward the use of laser-driven accelerators in real applications.

  19. Low density microcellular carbon foams and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Charles; Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Rand, Peter B.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    A low density, open-celled microcellular carbon foam is disclosed which is prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer or copolymer in a solvent, pouring the solution into a mold, cooling the solution, removing the solvent, and then carbonizing the polymer or copolymer in a high temperature oven to produce the foam. If desired, an additive can be introduced in order to produce a doped carbon foam, and the foams can be made isotropic by selection of a suitable solvent. The low density, microcellular foams produced by this process are particularly useful in the fabrication of inertial confinement fusion targets, but can also be used as catalysts, absorbents, and electrodes.

  20. Low density microcellular carbon foams and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Rand, P.B.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    A low density, open-celled microcellular carbon foam is disclosed which is prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer or copolymer in a solvent, pouring the solution into a mold, cooling the solution, removing the solvent, and then carbonizing the polymer or copolymer in a high temperature oven to produce the foam. If desired, an additive can be introduced in order to produce a doped carbon foam, and the foams can be made isotropic by selection of a suitable solvent. The low density, microcellular foams produced by this process are particularly useful in the fabrication of inertial confinement fusion targets, but can also be used as catalysts, absorbents, and electrodes.

  1. High density electronic circuit and process for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, William P.

    1999-01-01

    High density circuits with posts that protrude beyond one surface of a substrate to provide easy mounting of devices such as integrated circuits. The posts also provide stress relief to accommodate differential thermal expansion. The process allows high interconnect density with fewer alignment restrictions and less wasted circuit area than previous processes. The resulting substrates can be test platforms for die testing and for multi-chip module substrate testing. The test platform can contain active components and emulate realistic operational conditions, replacing shorts/opens net testing.

  2. High density electronic circuit and process for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, W.P.

    1999-06-29

    High density circuits with posts that protrude beyond one surface of a substrate to provide easy mounting of devices such as integrated circuits are disclosed. The posts also provide stress relief to accommodate differential thermal expansion. The process allows high interconnect density with fewer alignment restrictions and less wasted circuit area than previous processes. The resulting substrates can be test platforms for die testing and for multi-chip module substrate testing. The test platform can contain active components and emulate realistic operational conditions, replacing shorts/opens net testing. 8 figs.

  3. Extended length microchannels for high density high throughput electrophoresis systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    High throughput electrophoresis systems which provide extended well-to-read distances on smaller substrates, thus compacting the overall systems. The electrophoresis systems utilize a high density array of microchannels for electrophoresis analysis with extended read lengths. The microchannel geometry can be used individually or in conjunction to increase the effective length of a separation channel while minimally impacting the packing density of channels. One embodiment uses sinusoidal microchannels, while another embodiment uses plural microchannels interconnected by a via. The extended channel systems can be applied to virtually any type of channel confined chromatography.

  4. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript 6.54] revealed by X-ray diffraction (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript 6.54] revealed by X-ray diffraction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript 6.54] revealed by X-ray diffraction Authors: Forgan, E. M. ; Blackburn, E. ; Holmes, A.

  5. Semi-exact concentric atomic density fitting: Reduced cost and increased accuracy compared to standard density fitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollman, David S.; Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 ; Schaefer, Henry F.; Valeev, Edward F.

    2014-02-14

    A local density fitting scheme is considered in which atomic orbital (AO) products are approximated using only auxiliary AOs located on one of the nuclei in that product. The possibility of variational collapse to an unphysical “attractive electron” state that can affect such density fitting [P. Merlot, T. Kjærgaard, T. Helgaker, R. Lindh, F. Aquilante, S. Reine, and T. B. Pedersen, J. Comput. Chem. 34, 1486 (2013)] is alleviated by including atom-wise semidiagonal integrals exactly. Our approach leads to a significant decrease in the computational cost of density fitting for Hartree–Fock theory while still producing results with errors 2–5 times smaller than standard, nonlocal density fitting. Our method allows for large Hartree–Fock and density functional theory computations with exact exchange to be carried out efficiently on large molecules, which we demonstrate by benchmarking our method on 200 of the most widely used prescription drug molecules. Our new fitting scheme leads to smooth and artifact-free potential energy surfaces and the possibility of relatively simple analytic gradients.

  6. Effect of point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar

    2015-07-21

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel is an important materials property that affects fuel performance since it is a key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. [1] The thermal conductivity of UO2 nuclear fuel is also affected by fission gas, fission products, defects, and microstructural features such as grain boundaries. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of irradiation induced point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2, as a function of defect concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel [2].

  7. Structure of rigid polymers confined to nanoparticles: Molecular dynamics simulations insight

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maskey, Sabina; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-02-04

    Nanoparticles (NPs) grafted with organic layers form hybrids able to retain their unique properties through integration into the mesoscopic scale. The organic layer structure and response often determine the functionality of the hybrids on the mesoscopic length scale. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we probe the conformation of luminescent rigid polymers, dialkyl poly(p-phenylene ethynylene)s (PPE), end-grafted onto a silica nanoparticle in different solvents as the molecular weights and polymer coverages are varied. We find that, in contrast to NP-grafted flexible polymers, the chains are fully extended independent of the solvent. In toluene and decane, which are good solvents, the graftedmore » PPEs chains assume a similar conformation to that observed in dilute solutions. In water, which is a poor solvent for the PPEs, the polymer chains form one large cluster but remain extended. The radial distribution of the chains around the core of the nanoparticle is homogeneous in good solvents, whereas in poor solvents clusters are formed independent of molecular weights and coverages. As a result, the clustering is distinctively different from the response of grafted flexible and semiflexible polymers.« less

  8. 369 TFlop/s molecular dynamics simulations on the Roadrunner general-purpose heterogeneous supercomputer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminarayan, Sriram; Germann, Timothy C; Kadau, Kai; Fossum, Gordon C

    2008-01-01

    The authors present timing and performance numbers for a short-range parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code, SPaSM, that has been rewritten for the heterogeneous Roadrunner supercomputer. Each Roadrunner compute node consists of two AMD Opteron dual-core microprocessors and four PowerXCell 8i enhanced Cell microprocessors, so that there are four MPI ranks per node, each with one Opteron and one Cell. The interatomic forces are computed on the Cells (each with one PPU and eight SPU cores), while the Opterons are used to direct inter-rank communication and perform I/O-heavy periodic analysis, visualization, and checkpointing tasks. The performance measured for our initial implementation of a standard Lennard-Jones pair potential benchmark reached a peak of 369 Tflop/s double-precision floating-point performance on the full Roadrunner system (27.7% of peak), corresponding to 124 MFlop/Watt/s at a price of approximately 3.69 MFlops/dollar. They demonstrate an initial target application, the jetting and ejection of material from a shocked surface.

  9. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rathermore » than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.« less

  10. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.

  11. Building Conceptual Models of Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport in a Dynamic Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.

    2008-12-04

    Subsurface simulation is being used to build, test, and couple conceptual process models to better understand controls on a 0.4 km by 1.0 km uranium plume that has persisted above the drinking water standard in the groundwater of the Hanford 300 Area over the last 15 years. At this site, uranium-contaminated sediments in the vadose zone and aquifer are subject to significant variations in water levels and velocities driven by the diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and episodic Columbia River stage dynamics. Groundwater flow reversals typically occur twice a day with significant exchange of river water and groundwater in the near-river aquifer. Mixing of the dilute solution chemistry of the river with the groundwater complicates the uranium sorption behavior as the mobility of U(VI) has been shown experimentally to be a function of pH, carbonate, calcium, and uranium. Furthermore, uranium mass transfer between solid and aqueous phases has been observed to be rate-limited in the context of the high groundwater velocities resulting from the river stage fluctuations and the highly transmissive sediments (hydraulic conductivities ~1500 m/d). One- and two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional simulations of variably-saturated flow and reactive transport, based on laboratory-derived models of distributed rate mass transfer and equilibrium multicomponent surface complexation, are used to assess uranium transport at the dynamic vadose zone – aquifer interface as well as changes to uranium mobility due to incursions of river water into the aquifer.

  12. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: Templating, molding, and superdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2014-11-07

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer (“templating” effect). In turn, the first layer induces a “molding” effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  13. High Density Polymer-Based Integrated Electgrode Array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Hamilton, Julie K.

    2006-04-25

    A high density polymer-based integrated electrode apparatus that comprises a central electrode body and a multiplicity of arms extending from the electrode body. The central electrode body and the multiplicity of arms are comprised of a silicone material with metal features in said silicone material that comprise electronic circuits.

  14. Single particle density of trapped interacting quantum gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, Renu; Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-05-15

    An expression for single particle density for trapped interacting gases has been obtained in first order of interaction using Green’s function method. Results are easily simplified for homogeneous quantum gases and are found to agree with famous results obtained by Huang-Yang-Luttinger and Lee-Yang.

  15. Method to reduce dislocation density in silicon using stress

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Bertoni, Mariana; Argon, Ali; Castellanos, Sergio; Fecych, Alexandria; Powell, Douglas; Vogl, Michelle

    2013-03-05

    A crystalline material structure with reduced dislocation density and method of producing same is provided. The crystalline material structure is annealed at temperatures above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature of the crystalline material structure. One or more stress elements are formed on the crystalline material structure so as to annihilate dislocations or to move them into less harmful locations.

  16. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-04

    CFDLib05 is the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics LIBrary. This is a collection of hydrocodes using a common data structure and a common numerical method, for problems ranging from single-field, incompressible flow, to multi-species, multi-field, compressible flow. The data structure is multi-block, with a so-called structured grid in each block. The numerical method is a Finite-Volume scheme employing a state vector that is fully cell-centered. This means that the integral form of the conservation lawsmore » is solved on the physical domain that is represented by a mesh of control volumes. The typical control volume is an arbitrary quadrilateral in 2D and an arbitrary hexahedron in 3D. The Finite-Volume scheme is for time-unsteady flow and remains well coupled by means of time and space centered fluxes; if a steady state solution is required, the problem is integrated forward in time until the user is satisfied that the state is stationary.« less

  18. An analysis of quantum effects on the thermodynamic properties of cryogenic hydrogen using the path integral method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagashima, H.; Tsuda, S.; Tsuboi, N.; Koshi, M.; Hayashi, K. A.; Tokumasu, T.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we describe the analysis of the thermodynamic properties of cryogenic hydrogen using classical molecular dynamics (MD) and path integral MD (PIMD) method to understand the effects of the quantum nature of hydrogen molecules. We performed constant NVE MD simulations across a wide density–temperature region to establish an equation of state (EOS). Moreover, the quantum effect on the difference of molecular mechanism of pressure–volume–temperature relationship was addressed. The EOS was derived based on the classical mechanism idea only using the MD simulation results. Simulation results were compared with each MD method and experimental data. As a result, it was confirmed that although the EOS on the basis of classical MD cannot reproduce the experimental data of saturation property of hydrogen in the high-density region, the EOS on the basis of PIMD well reproduces those thermodynamic properties of hydrogen. Moreover, it was clarified that taking quantum effects into account makes the repulsion force larger and the potential well shallower. Because of this mechanism, the intermolecular interaction of hydrogen molecules diminishes and the virial pressure increases.

  19. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.

    2014-10-20

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5?nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  20. Dynamics of carrier recombination in a semiconductor laser structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhioev, R. I. Kavokin, K. V.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Poletaev, N. K.

    2015-11-15

    Carrier-recombination dynamics is studied by the method of optical orientation at room temperature in the active layer of a laser diode structure. The dependence of the degree of electron-spin orientation on the excitation density is attributed to saturation of the nonradiative-recombination channel. The time of electron capture at recombination centers is determined to be τ{sub e} = 5 × 10{sup –9} s. The temperature of nonequilibrium electrons heated by a He–Ne laser is estimated.

  1. Generalized extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N. Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2014-10-28

    Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory is generalized in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization prior to the force evaluations. The equations of motion are derived directly from the extended Lagrangian under the condition of an adiabatic separation between the nuclear and the electronic degrees of freedom. We show how this separation is automatically fulfilled and system independent. The generalized equations of motion require only one diagonalization per time step and are applicable to a broader range of materials with improved accuracy and stability compared to previous formulations.

  2. Ion dynamics in an E?×?B Hall plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Christopher V. Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-01-26

    We show the time evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in a Hall plasma accelerator during a 20?kHz natural, quasi-periodic plasma oscillation. We apply a time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence technique at different locations along the channel midline, obtaining time- and spatially resolved ion velocity measurements. Strong velocity and density fluctuations and multiple ion populations are observed throughout the so-called “breathing mode” ionization instability, opening an experimental window into the detailed ion dynamics and physical processes at the heart of such devices.

  3. UNIVERSALITY OF PHASE TRANSITION DYNAMICS: TOPOLOGICAL DEFECTS FROM SYMMETRY BREAKING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Del Campo, Adolfo

    2014-02-13

    In the course of a non-equilibrium continuous phase transition, the dynamics ceases to be adiabatic in the vicinity of the critical point as a result of the critical slowing down (the divergence of the relaxation time in the neighborhood of the critical point). This enforces a local choice of the broken symmetry and can lead to the formation of topological defects. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) was developed to describe the associated nonequilibrium dynamics and to estimate the density of defects as a function of the quench rate through the transition. During recent years, several new experiments investigating formation of defects in phase transitions induced by a quench both in classical and quantum mechanical systems were carried out. At the same time, some established results were called into question. We review and analyze the Kibble-Zurek mechanism focusing in particular on this surge of activity, and suggest possible directions for further progress.

  4. Method for detecting a mass density image of an object (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Method for detecting a mass density image of an object Title: Method for detecting a mass density image of an object A method for detecting a mass density image of an object. An ...

  5. Coherent neutron scattering and collective dynamics on mesoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, Vladimir [ORNL; Schweizer, Kenneth S [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    By combining, and modestly extending, a variety of theoretical concepts for the dynamics of liquids in the supercooled regime, we formulate a simple analytic model for the temperature and wavevector dependent collective density fluctuation relaxation time that is measurable using coherent dynamic neutron scattering. Comparison with experiments on the ionic glass-forming liquid Ca K NO3 in the lightly supercooled regime suggests the model captures the key physics in both the local cage and mesoscopic regimes, including the unusual wavevector dependence of the collective structural relaxation time. The model is consistent with the idea that the decoupling between diffusion and viscosity is reflected in a different temperature dependence of the collective relaxation time at intermediate wavevectors and near the main (cage) peak of the static structure factor. More generally, our analysis provides support for the ideas that decoupling information and growing dynamic length scales can be at least qualitatively deduced by analyzing the collective relaxation time as a function of temperature and wavevector, and that there is a strong link between dynamic heterogeneity phenomena at the single and many particle level. Though very simple, the model can be applied to other systems, such as molecular liquids.

  6. Molecular dynamics investigation of the substrate binding mechanism in carboxylesterase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-he

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substratemore » with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, we further predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase rPPEs, which will help guide future development of more efficient rPPE variants.« less

  7. Molecular dynamics investigation of the substrate binding mechanism in carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-he

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, we further predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase rPPEs, which will help guide future development of more efficient rPPE variants.

  8. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and scaling analyses will be presented. In addition to studying fundamental plasma science and high energy density physics, the ZaP and ZaP-HD experiments can be applied to laboratory astrophysics.

  9. X-ray backlighting density measurements of tungsten and aluminum wire and wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammer, D.A.; Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Greenly, J.B.; Sinars, D.B.; Mingaleev, A.R.

    1999-07-01

    Calibrated density measurements in both the coronal plasmas and dense cores of exploding W wire and wire array Z-pinches, powered by the {approximately}450 kA, 100 ns XP-pulser at Cornell University, have been made using two-frame x-ray backlighting in conjunction with known thickness W step wedges. The backlighting images are made by Mo wire X-pinch radiation filtered by 12.5 {micro}m Ti impinging upon a sandwich of films (Micrat VR, Kodak GWL, Kodak DEF) which have different sensitivities to increase the dynamic range of the method. A W step wedge filter is placed in front of the films, giving absolute line density calibration of each exposure with estimated errors ranging from 20 to 50%. Assuming x-ray absorption by the W plasma is the same as for the solid material, the authors are able to measure W areal densities from 3.2 x 10{sup 19} to 2 x 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. These can be converted to number density assuming azimuthal symmetry. For example, for an exploded 7.5 {micro}m wire with a 15--20 {micro}m diameter dense core and a 1 mm corona diameter, the implied W volume density ranges from 2x10{sup 18} to over 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3}. Integration of the line density gives an estimate of the fraction of the wire mass in the corona and core. For example, with 100 kA peak current in a single 7.5 {micro}m W wire, {approximately}70% (>90%) of the W mass is in the corona after 53 ns (61 ns). The authors also observe that the corona has large, roughly axisymmetric axial nonuniformity both in radius and in mass density. In addition, the coronal plasma contains more of the W mass, expands faster and is more uniform when the wire is surface-cleaned by preheating. In arrays of 2--8 wires with the same 100 kA total current, detectable coronal plasma appears after 25--35 ns, and much of it is swept toward the center of the array, forming a dense channel. The portion of the initial wire mass in the coronal plasma increases with smaller wire diameter and decreases with greater wire number: 15% for 4 x 13.5 {micro}m, 35% for 4 x 7.5 {micro}m, and 25% for 8 x 7.5 {micro}m, at 46--48 ns (unheated). Similar measurements are now being made with Al wires and an Al step wedge. Results will be presented.

  10. Fluid Dynamics with Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    RIPPLE is a two-dimensional, transient, free surface incompressible fluid dynamics program. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion forces and has a partial cell treatment which allows curved boundaries and interior obstacles.

  11. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  12. Electrostatic lens to focus an ion beam to uniform density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cleland H.

    1977-01-11

    A focusing lens for an ion beam having a gaussian or similar density profile is provided. The lens is constructed to provide an inner zero electrostatic field, and an outer electrostatic field such that ions entering this outer field are deflected by an amount that is a function of their distance from the edge of the inner field. The result is a beam that focuses to a uniform density in a manner analogous to that of an optical ring lens. In one embodiment, a conically-shaped network of fine wires is enclosed within a cylindrical anode. The wire net together with the anode produces a voltage field that re-directs the outer particles of the beam while the axial particles pass undeflected through a zero field inside the wire net. The result is a focused beam having a uniform intensity over a given target area and at a given distance from the lens.

  13. Defect density and dielectric constant in perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samiee, Mehran; Konduri, Siva; Abbas, Hisham A.; Joshi, Pranav; Zhang, Liang; Dalal, Vikram; Ganapathy, Balaji; Kottokkaran, Ranjith; Noack, Max; Kitahara, Andrew

    2014-10-13

    We report on measurement of dielectric constant, mid-gap defect density, Urbach energy of tail states in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub x}Cl{sub 1?x} perovskite solar cells. Midgap defect densities were estimated by measuring capacitance vs. frequency at different temperatures and show two peaks, one at 0.66?eV below the conduction band and one at 0.24?eV below the conduction band. The attempt to escape frequency is in the range of 2?×?10{sup 11}/s. Quantum efficiency data indicate a bandgap of 1.58?eV. Urbach energies of valence and conduction band are estimated to be ?16 and ?18?meV. Measurement of saturation capacitance indicates that the relative dielectric constant is ?18.

  14. Ultra-low density microcellular polymer foam and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1996-03-19

    An ultra-low density, microcellular open-celled polymer foam and a method for making such foam are disclosed. A polymer is dissolved in a heated solution consisting essentially of at least one solvent for the dissolution of the polymer in the heated solution and the phase inversion of the dissolved polymer to a liquid gel upon sufficient cooling of the heated solution. The heated solution is contained in a containment means provided with a nucleating promoting means having a relatively rough surface formed of fixed nucleating sites. The heated solution is cooled for a period of time sufficient to form a liquid gel of the polymer by phase inversion. From the gel, a porous foam having a density of less than about 12.0 mg/cm{sup 3} and open porosity provided by well interconnected strut morphology is formed.

  15. Ultra-low density microcellular polymer foam and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.

    1996-01-01

    An ultra-low density, microcellular open-celled polymer foam and a method for making such foam. A polymer is dissolved in a heated solution consisting essentially of at least one solvent for the dissolution of the polymer in the heated solution and the phase inversion of the dissolved polymer to a liquid gel upon sufficient cooling of the heated solution. The heated solution is contained in a containment means provided with a nucleating promoting means having a relatively rough surface formed of fixed nucleating sites. The heated solution is cooled for a period of time sufficient to form a liquid gel of the polymer by phase inversion. From the gel, a porous foam having a density of less than about 12.0 mg/cm.sup.3 and open porosity provided by well interconnected strut morphology is formed.

  16. Extreme hydrogen plasma densities achieved in a linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rooij, G. J. van; Veremiyenko, V. P.; Goedheer, W. J.; de Groot, B.; Kleyn, A. W.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Versloot, T. W.; Whyte, D. G.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes

    2007-03-19

    A magnetized hydrogen plasma beam was generated with a cascaded arc, expanding in a vacuum vessel at an axial magnetic field of up to 1.6 T. Its characteristics were measured at a distance of 4 cm from the nozzle: up to a 2 cm beam diameter, 7.5x10{sup 20} m{sup -3} electron density, {approx}2 eV electron and ion temperatures, and 3.5 km/s axial plasma velocity. This gives a 2.6x10{sup 24} H{sup +} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} peak ion flux density, which is unprecedented in linear plasma generators. The high efficiency of the source is obtained by the combined action of the magnetic field and an optimized nozzle geometry. This is interpreted as a cross-field return current that leads to power dissipation in the beam just outside the source.

  17. Carrier Density Modulation in Ge Heterostructure by Ferroelectric Switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponath, Patrick; Fredrickson, Kurt; Posadas, Agham B.; Ren, Yuan; Vasudevan, Rama K; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Jesse, Stephen; Aoki, Toshihiro; McCartney, Martha; Smith, David J; Kalinin, Sergei V; Lai, Keji; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of nonvolatile logic through direct coupling of spontaneous ferroelectric polarization with semiconductor charge carriers is nontrivial, with many issues, including epitaxial ferroelectric growth, demonstration of ferroelectric switching, and measurable semiconductor modulation. Here we report a true ferroelectric field effect carrier density modulation in an underlying Ge(001) substrate by switching of the ferroelectric polarization in the epitaxial c-axis-oriented BaTiO3 (BTO) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on Ge. Using density functional theory, we demonstrate that switching of BTO polarization results in a large electric potential change in Ge. Aberration-corrected electron microscopy confirms the interface sharpness, and BTO tetragonality. Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) indicates the absence of any low permittivity interlayer at the interface with Ge. Using piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM), we confirm the presence of fully switchable, stable ferroelectric polarization in BTO that appears to be single domain. Using microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), we clearly demonstrate a ferroelectric field effect.

  18. High-density FRC formation studies on FRX-L.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Intrator, Thomas; Zhang, S.; Wurden, G. A.; Begay, D. W.; Mignardot, E. R.; Waganaar, W. J.; Siemon, R. E.; Tuszewski, M. G.; Sanchez, P. G.; Degnan, J. H.; Sommars, W.

    2002-01-01

    FRX-L (Field Reversed configuration experiment - Liner) is a magnetized-target injector for magnetized target fusion (MTF) experiments. It was designed with the goal of producing high-density n-1017 cm3 field reversed configurations (FRCs) and translating them into an aluminum liner (1-mm thick, 10-cm diameter cylindrical shell) for further compression to fusion conditions. Although operation at these high densities leads to shorter FRC lifetimes, our application requires thlat the plasma live only long enough to be translated and compressed, or on the order of 10-20 ps. Careful study of FRC formation in situ will be done in the present experiment to differentiate between effects introduced in future experiments by translation, trapping, and compression of the FRC. We present current results on the optimization of the FRC formation process on RX-L and compare the results with those from past experiments.

  19. Method for detecting a mass density image of an object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wernick, Miles N.; Yang, Yongyi

    2008-12-23

    A method for detecting a mass density image of an object. An x-ray beam is transmitted through the object and a transmitted beam is emitted from the object. The transmitted beam is directed at an angle of incidence upon a crystal analyzer. A diffracted beam is emitted from the crystal analyzer onto a detector and digitized. A first image of the object is detected from the diffracted beam emitted from the crystal analyzer when positioned at a first angular position. A second image of the object is detected from the diffracted beam emitted from the crystal analyzer when positioned at a second angular position. A refraction image is obtained and a regularized mathematical inversion algorithm is applied to the refraction image to obtain a mass density image.

  20. Sublinear scaling for time-dependent stochastic density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2015-01-21

    A stochastic approach to time-dependent density functional theory is developed for computing the absorption cross section and the random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energy. The core idea of the approach involves time-propagation of a small set of stochastic orbitals which are first projected on the occupied space and then propagated in time according to the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. The evolving electron density is exactly represented when the number of random orbitals is infinite, but even a small number (≈16) of such orbitals is enough to obtain meaningful results for absorption spectrum and the RPA correlation energy per electron. We implement the approach for silicon nanocrystals using real-space grids and find that the overall scaling of the algorithm is sublinear with computational time and memory.