National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for dynamics beneath seafloor

  1. Oil & Natural Gas Technology Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996 -Workers'OfficialSan Miguel CountyOklahoma City,Oil

  2. Microbes: Life Deep Beneath the Seafloor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David C.

    to acceptor is captured to provide the energy to support basic metabolic functions. Microorganisms-dwelling organisms rely on oxygen, microbes use compounds of sulfur, manganese, iron, and carbon dioxide

  3. Long-Term Monitoring Using Deep Seafloor Boreholes Penetrating the Seismogenic Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunogai, Urumu

    Long-Term Monitoring Using Deep Seafloor Boreholes Penetrating the Seismogenic Zone Masanao, because it has, until now, been impossible to penetrate to such depths below the sea floor. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), scheduled to begin in ,**-, plans to drill boreholes beneath the ocean

  4. Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    2012-01-01

    Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear ...

  5. Wavelet based similarity measurement algorithm for seafloor morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darilmaz, ?lkay

    2006-01-01

    The recent expansion of systematic seafloor exploration programs such as geophysical research, seafloor mapping, search and survey, resource assessment and other scientific, commercial and military applications has created ...

  6. Abiotic Oxidation Rate of Chalcopyrite: Implications for Seafloor Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilenker, Laura Danielle

    2011-01-01

    in Seawater: Implications for Mining Seafloor Hot Spring.American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and PetroleumImplications for Seafloor Mining A Thesis submitted in

  7. Numerical model for steel catenary riser on seafloor support 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Jung Hwan

    2007-04-25

    of development of a simplified seafloor support model. This model simulates the seafloor-pipe interaction as a flexible pipe supported on a bed of springs. Constants for the soil springs were derived from finite element studies performed in a separate, parallel...

  8. Sensing Shallow Seafloor and Sediment Properties, Recent History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael M; Abelev, Andrei; Bentrem, Frank W; Bibee, L Dale

    2008-01-01

    Near surface seafloor properties are needed for recreational, commercial, and military applications. Construction projects on the ocean seafloors often require extensive knowledge about strength, deformability, hydraulic, thermal, acoustic, and seismic characteristics for locating stable environments and ensuring proper functioning of structures, pipelines, and other installations on the surface of and buried into the marine sediments. The military is also interested in a variety of seafloor properties as they impact sound propagation, mine impact burial, trafficability, bearing capacity, time-dependent settlement, and stability of objects on the seafloor. Point measurements of sediment properties are done using core samplers and sediment grab devices (with subsequent lab analysis) and in-situ probes. These techniques are expensive in terms of ship time and provide limited area coverage. Sub-bottom acoustic and electromagnetic sensors can provide profiles of near surface sediment information with improved cov...

  9. Physical properties of seafloor sediments from the Russian Pechora Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarmiento, Sergio Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SEAFLOOR SEDIMENTS FROM THE RUSSIAN PECHORA SEA A Thesis by SERGIO EDUARDO SARMIENTO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1996 Major Subject: Oceanography PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SEAFLOOR SEDIMENTS FROM THE RUSSIAN PECHORA SEA A Thesis by SERGIO EDUARDO SARMIENTO Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  10. Non-linear load-deflection models for seafloor interaction with steel catenary risers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Yaguang

    2009-05-15

    The simulation of seafloor-steel catenary interaction and prediction of riser fatigue life required an accurate characterization of seafloor stiffness as well as realistic description of riser load-deflection (P-y) response. ...

  11. Predicting Groundwater Contamination beneath Stormwater Infiltration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Predicting Groundwater Contamination beneath Stormwater Infiltration Activities Shirley E. Clark, Penn State Harrisburg Robert Pitt, University of Alabama Pollutants of Concern · Classes of stormwaterHighest Observed Concentration Metal Are these waters infiltration quality? Benefits of Urban Stormwater

  12. Deep seafloor arrivals in long range ocean acoustic propagation Ralph A. Stephena)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Deep seafloor arrivals in long range ocean acoustic propagation Ralph A. Stephena) and S. Thompson by ocean acoustic propagation models. These "deep seafloor" arrivals are the largest amplitude arrivals) deep seafloor arrivals correspond to the sea surface reflec- tion of an out-of-plane diffraction from

  13. Multicomponent seismic data have unique value for studying near-seafloor geology in deepwater environments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Multicomponent seismic data have unique value for studying near-seafloor geology in deepwater multicomponent seismic data acquired in deepwater with seafloor sensors show near- seafloor geology wavefields can be separated.Adirect measurement of the downgoing seismic wavelet is thus available

  14. MMS 2007-035 Seafloor Characteristics and Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    seismic data archived with MMS and his unwavering support and patience during all the phases of this study. This study was sponsored by the Minerals Management Service under Contract/Order No. Open Market / 01-03-POOCS Study MMS 2007-035 Seafloor Characteristics and Distribution Patterns of Lophelia pertusa

  15. Marine Electromagnetic Studies of Seafloor Resources and Tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    Marine Electromagnetic Studies of Seafloor Resources and Tectonics Kerry Key Received: 3 December been a period of rapid growth for marine electromagnetic (EM) methods, predominantly due. This growth is illustrated by a database of marine EM publications spanning from the early developments

  16. Deep seafloor arrivals: An unexplained set of arrivals in long-range ocean acoustic propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Deep seafloor arrivals: An unexplained set of arrivals in long-range ocean acoustic propagation to predicted ocean acoustic arrivals and deep shadow zone arrivals leaking below turning points , "deep on the hydrophone array, are observed. These deep seafloor arrivals are an unexplained set of arrivals in ocean

  17. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of eastern California. SV and P wave amplitudes were measured from...

  18. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    more vigorous and energetic fluid circulation beneath the resurgent dome. Although this system apparently died off as a result of mineral deposition and cooling (andor...

  19. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera. Authors Stephan Husen, Robert B. Smith and Gregory P. Waite Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research,...

  20. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  1. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to:...

  2. Structure and Stratigraphy Beneath a Young Phreatic Vent: South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structure and Stratigraphy Beneath a Young Phreatic Vent: South Inyo Crater, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  3. Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot David Fee and Ken ± 1.6 km, with 36­40 km of peak to peak topography. This topography is spatially uncorrelated, providing no evidence for a lower mantle plume currently beneath the hotspot. The topography suggests

  4. Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Eoghan

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

  5. Planet Hunters and Seafloor Explorers: Legitimate Peripheral Participation Through Practice Proxies in Online Citizen Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    contextualized and specific characteristics of primary work practice. Author Keywords Guides; instructions; ACM knowledge about work practices needed for good performance. Such tacit knowledge can be conveyed insteadPlanet Hunters and Seafloor Explorers: Legitimate Peripheral Participation Through Practice Proxies

  6. Recent advances and trends in subsea technologies and seafloor properties characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djikpesse, Hugues

    Following the 2012 SEG Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, the SEG Research Committee sponsored a post-convention research workshop on subsea technologies, in general, and on seafloor characterization in particular. The goal of ...

  7. Mapping bedrock beneath glacial till using CDP seismic reflection methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiswetter, Dean; Black, Ross A.; Steeples, Don W.

    1994-03-01

    This paper is a case history demonstrating the applicability of the common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to image bedrock beneath glacial till in northwestern Iowa. Reflections from the base of the 40-m thick ...

  8. Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsello, Joseph William

    2014-01-01

    Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

  9. Measurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors SALLY J. WARNER AND PARKER MACCREADY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    tides. The tidally averaged power removed from the tidal currents by form drag was 0.2 W m22 , whichMeasurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors SALLY J. WARNER AND PARKER MACCREADY the tidal form drag on a sloping ridge in 200 m of water that forms a 1-km headland at the surface in Puget

  10. Expressions for Tidal Conversion at Seafloor Topography using Physical-Space Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schörghofer, Norbert

    Expressions for Tidal Conversion at Seafloor Topography using Physical-Space Integrals Norbert and a potential source of the required mechanical energy is the generation and breaking of internal gravity waves (Egbert and Ray, 2000; Ledwell et al., 2000). Tidal dissipation has long been recognized as important

  11. Virtual Seafloor Reduces Internal Wave Generation by Tidal Flow Likun Zhang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the applicability of linear theory to global predictions of the conversion of tidal energy into internal wave energy of the energy budget of the oceans requires a determination of the efficiency of conversion of tidal energyVirtual Seafloor Reduces Internal Wave Generation by Tidal Flow Likun Zhang* and Harry L. Swinney

  12. Oxygenation of the ocean and sediments: Consequences for the seafloor carbonate factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    precipitation on the seafloor is caused by a decrease in CaCO3 saturation in sediments related to increased oxic cycling of organic carbon and a decline in the size of the marine DIC reservoir. Using a simple model of CaCO3 saturation in the ocean, we show that changes in ocean­atmosphere redox and the size

  13. Seafloor-precipitated carbonate fans in the Neoproterozoic Rainstorm Member, Johnnie Formation, Death Valley Region, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Seafloor-precipitated carbonate fans in the Neoproterozoic Rainstorm Member, Johnnie Formation Member of the Johnnie Formation, Death Valley, USA. The fans formed in a mixed carbonate of inhibitors to carbonate nucleation (perhaps Fe2+ under anoxic conditions) likely fostered precipitation

  14. Imaging the mantle beneath Iceland using integrated seismological techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    head, this study presents a tomographic image of the mantle structure beneath Iceland to 400 km depth of the body wave and surface wave information reveals a predominantly horizontal low-velocity anomaly extending from the Moho down to $250 km depth, interpreted as a plume head. Below the plume head a near

  15. Mantle structure beneath the western United States and its implications for convection processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    River Plain (ESRP) and the High Lava Plains, and a deep low velocity anomaly (>600 km) beneath the ESRP and dips toward the northwest; (3) shallow low velocity anomalies (upper 200 km) beneath the eastern Snake

  16. Imaging seismic velocity structure beneath the Iceland hot spot: A finite frequency approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yang

    Imaging seismic velocity structure beneath the Iceland hot spot: A finite frequency approach Shu and S wave speeds extending from shallow mantle to 400 km depth beneath Iceland. In reality, seismic waves anomaly beneath Iceland and its geodynamic implications. We developed a tomographic method that utilizes

  17. Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craddock, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

  18. J. Ceomag. Geoelectr., 49, 1327-1342, 1997 Seafloor Electromagnetic Measurements above Axial Seamount,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge S. C. CONSTABLE', G. S. HEINSON2, G. ANDERSON', and A. WHITE2 'Scripps be present only beneath Axial Seamount, surrounded by a resistive lithosphere of 500-50,000 u1m. The tectonic in fractures or pipes. 1. Introduction AxialSeamountlieson the Juan deFucaRidge,about 500km westof

  19. On the Turbulence Beneath Finite Amplitude Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babanin, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    The paper by Beya et al. (2012, hereinafter BPB) has a general title of Turbulence Beneath Finite Amplitude Water Waves, but is solely dedicated to discussing the experiment by Babanin and Haus (2009, hereinafter BH) who conducted measurements of wave-induced non-breaking turbulence by particle image velocimetry (PIV). The authors of BPB conclude that their observations contradict those of BH. Here we argue that the outcomes of BPB do not contradict BH. In addition, although the main conclusion of BPB is that there is no turbulence observed in their experiment, it actually is observed.

  20. Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Structure beneath the Western United States from USArray Regional Phase Analysis /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Janine Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    SN), Mojave (M), Snake River Plain. (SRP), Northern Rockysplitting beneath the Snake River Plain suggests a mantleSierra Nevada (SN), Snake River Plain (SRP), Northern Rocky

  1. Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath aperennial river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constantz, J.; Zhou, Q.

    2007-05-15

    The presence of an unsaturated region beneath a streambedduring groundwater pumping near streams reduces the pumping capacity whenit reaches the well screens, changes flow paths, and alters the types ofbiological transformations in the streambed sediments. Athree-dimensional, multi-phase flow model of two horizontal collectorwells along the Russian River near Forestville, California was developedto investigate the impact of varying the ratio of the aquifer tostreambed permeability on (1) the formation of an unsaturated regionbeneath the stream, (2) the pumping capacity, (3) stream-water fluxesthrough the streambed, and (4) stream-water travel times to the collectorwells. The aquifer to streambed permeability ratio at which theunsaturated region was initially observed ranged from 10 to 100. The sizeof the unsaturated region beneath the streambed increased as the aquiferto streambed permeability ratio increased. The simulations also indicatedthat for a particular aquifer permeability, decreasing the streambedpermeability by only a factor of 2-3 from the permeability wheredesaturation initially occurred resulted in reducing the pumpingcapacity. In some cases, the stream-water fluxes increased as thestreambed permeability decreased. However, the stream water residencetimes increased and the fraction of stream water that reached that thewells decreased as the streambed permeability decreased, indicating thata higher streambed flux does not necessarily correlate to greaterrecharge of stream water around the wells.

  2. Sub-Seafloor Carbon Dioxide Storage Potential on the Juan de Fuca Plate, Western North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Fairley; Robert Podgorney

    2012-11-01

    The Juan de Fuca plate, off the western coast of North America, has been suggested as a site for geological sequestration of waste carbon dioxide because of its many attractive characteristics (high permeability, large storage capacity, reactive rock types). Here we model CO2 injection into fractured basalts comprising the upper several hundred meters of the sub-seafloor basalt reservoir, overlain with low-permeability sediments and a large saline water column, to examine the feasibility of this reservoir for CO2 storage. Our simulations indicate that the sub-seafloor basalts of the Juan de Fuca plate may be an excellent CO2 storage candidate, as multiple trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic, density inversions, and mineralization) act to keep the CO2 isolated from terrestrial environments. Questions remain about the lateral extent and connectivity of the high permeability basalts; however, the lack of wells or boreholes and thick sediment cover maximize storage potential while minimizing potential leakage pathways. Although promising, more study is needed to determine the economic viability of this option.

  3. Plume-lithosphere interaction beneath a fast moving plate Catherine Thoraval,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommasi, Andrea

    , beneath Hawaii, towards Kauai, where the lithosphere is reduced by half [Li et al., 2004]. Heat flow data studies beneath Hawaii lead to opposite conclusions. Surface-wave dispersion as well as sP converted waves also lead to contradictory conclusions. Comparison of on-swell and off-swell data for the Hawaii

  4. Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra-focus earthquakes recorded at broadband seismic stations of the Tanzania network to estimate regional variation of sublithospheric mantle attenuation beneath the Tanzania craton and the eastern branch of the East African Rift

  5. Horizontal subduction and truncation of the Cocos Plate beneath central Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Robert W.

    Horizontal subduction and truncation of the Cocos Plate beneath central Mexico Xyoli Pe from a trans-Mexico temporary broadband seismic network centered on Mexico City, we report that the subducting Cocos Plate beneath central Mexico is horizontal, and tectonically underplates the base

  6. Influence of tides on melting and freezing beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Influence of tides on melting and freezing beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf, Antarctica Keith doubles. With tidal forcing, the spatial pattern and magnitude of basal melting and freezing generally), Influence of tides on melting and freezing beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf, Antarctica, Geophys. Res. Lett

  7. Thermal, hydrous, and mechanical states of the mantle transition zone beneath southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yang

    Thermal, hydrous, and mechanical states of the mantle transition zone beneath southern Africa John cratons in southern Africa; consequently, the mantle transition zone is 20 km thicker than beneath post: lithosphere; upper mantle; transition zone; cratoni convection; Southern Africa 1. Introduction The upper

  8. Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle G. R of Iceland, Bustadavegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland 5 National Energy Authority, Grensasvegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland of the highest-resolution teleseismic tomography study yet performed of the upper mantle beneath Iceland

  9. Belt-parallel mantle flow beneath a halted continental collision: The Western Alps Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Belt-parallel mantle flow beneath a halted continental collision: The Western Alps Guilhem Barruol belts, is a particularly important objective of "mantle tectonics" that may bring a depth extent a coherent picture of upper mantle anisotropy beneath the belt. The large-scale anisotropy pattern

  10. On the tsunami-induced EM fields at the seafloor: Lessons learned from the 2006-2007 Kuril

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    On the tsunami-induced EM fields at the seafloor: Lessons learned from the 2006-2007 Kuril and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis Hiroaki Toh, D.Sc. Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Japan Ctvrtek, 6. r with tsunamis from two earthquakes occurred along the Kuril Trench. Previous seismological analyses indicated

  11. Above the Roof, Beneath the Law: Perceived Justice behind Disruptive Tactics of Migrant Wage Claimants in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, X; Wang, L; Su, Y

    2013-01-01

    bs_bs_banner Above the Roof, Beneath the Law: Perceivedmigrant workers perch on roof tops or towering construction

  12. Grenville foreland thrust belt hidden beneath the eastern US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Grenville foreland thrust structures are observed beneath the eastern US midcontinent on COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) line OH-1 and a short seismic line in southwest Ohio. These structures represent the first evidence for a significant Grenville foreland thrust belt preserved in eastern North America. On the COCORP lines, the structures include a thrust ramp anticline and an associated asymmetric syncline. The Grenville front tectonic zone appears to truncate these foreland structures, indicating a later, second phase expressed as a deeply penetrating, out-of-sequence thrust zone associated with the main uplift of the Grenville province on the east. A short, shallow seismic line in southwestern Ohio reveals an east-dipping sequence of prominently layered rocks that may lie above a footwall ramp to a deeper Grenville thrust fault. A drill hole into the less reflective top of this dipping sequence encountered unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks like those increasingly reported from other drill holes in southwestern Ohio and adjacent states. Although possibly part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift, these clastic sedimentary rocks may instead preserve evidence of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin in eastern North America. Alternatively these Precambrian sedimentary rocks together with an underlying, but yet undrilled, strongly layered sequence may correlate with similarly layered rocks observed on COCORP and industrial seismic lines within the Middle Proterozoic granite-rhyolite province to the west in Indiana and Illinois and indicate that unmetamorphosed sedimentary material is an important constituent of the granite-rhyolite province. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Imaging crust and upper mantle beneath Mount Fuji, Japan, by receiver functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoki, Yosuke

    , resulting in little knowledge about the seismic structure there. To gain more insight into the magma with magmatic differentiation is suppressed. Fujii [2007] concluded that the magma reservoir beneath Mount Fuji

  14. Layered rocks beneath the Phanerozoic platform of the US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1991-03-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks lies hidden beneath the Phanerozoic cover of the central US over large regions. A thick sequence of Precambrian layered rocks in imaged on the COCORP transect across southern Illinois and Indiana. The thickness of this layered sequence varies from 1-3 times the thickness of the overlying Phanerozoic section of the Illinois basin. The layered sequence is observed for close to 200 km in an east-west direction. Similar layered reflections are seen on the COCORP data from Hardeman Co., TX, and neighboring southwest Oklahoma. Both of these known occurrences lie within the region of the middle Proterozoic Granite/Rhyolite province of the US midcontinent, an area within which scattered wells to basement commonly encounter 1.3-1.5 Ga undeformed granite and/or compositionally similar rhyolite. Therefore, these layered assemblages may comprise a thick sequence of silicic volcanic and sedimentary rocks (perhaps also injected by mafic sills) between scattered volcanic-intrusive centers, such as exposed in the St. Francois Mountains of southeast Missouri. However, in places such as Illinois and Indiana, the near absence of deep wells leaves the possibility that the upper portion of these layered rocks may locally be of late Proterozoic or earliest Paleozoic age. The reprocessing of available industry data, analyzed in conjunction with the existing COCORP data, includes extended vibroseis correlation. These industry data are invaluable in the author's effort to expand the known distribution of these layered rocks (e.g., into north-central Illinois) and to map their structures.

  15. The entrainment of oil droplets in flow beneath an oil slick 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Chien-Hwa

    1973-01-01

    THE ENTRAINMENT OF OIL DROPLETS IN PLOW BENEATH AN OIL SLICK A Thesis by CHIEN-HWA CHAO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE August 1973 Ma...)or Sub)ect: Mechanical Engineering THE ENTRAINMENT OF OIL DROPLETS IN FLOW BENEATH AN OIL SLICK A Thesis CHIEN-HWA CHAD Approved as to style and content by: ( hairman o Committee) (Head of De tment) C ( (Member) ber) (Member) August 1973...

  16. Supergranular-scale magnetic flux emergence beneath an unstable filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palacios, J; Guerrero, A; Saiz, E; Cerrato, Y

    2015-01-01

    Here we report evidence of a large solar filament eruption on 2013, September 29. This smooth eruption, which passed without any previous flare, formed after a two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection towards Earth. The coronal mass ejection generated a moderate geomagnetic storm on 2013, October 2 with very serious localized effects. The whole event passed unnoticed to flare-warning systems. We have conducted multi-wavelength analyses of the Solar Dynamics Observatory through Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. The AIA data on 304, 193, 211, and 94 \\AA sample the transition region and the corona, respectively, while HMI provides photospheric magnetograms, continuum, and linear polarization data, in addition to the fully inverted data provided by HMI. [...] We have observed a supergranular-sized emergence close to a large filament in the boundary of the active region NOAA11850. Filament dynamics and magnetogram results suggest that the magnetic flux emergenc...

  17. Rapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind and wave forced oceanic surface mixed layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    Rapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind and wave forced oceanic surface the wind) generates high- frequency internal waves in the stratified fluid below. The internal waves evolveKinnon, and A. E. Tejada-Marti´nez (2008), Rapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind

  18. Exponential growth of ``snow molds'' at sub-zero temperatures: an explanation for high beneath-snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Exponential growth of ``snow molds'' at sub-zero temperatures: an explanation for high beneath organisms of the beneath-snow microbial community, ``snow molds'', exhibit robust exponential growth to -0.3°C for these snow molds vary from 22 to 330. Third, we derive an analytical equation

  19. Evidence from P-to-S mantle converted waves for a flat b660-kmQ discontinuity beneath Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Evidence from P-to-S mantle converted waves for a flat b660-kmQ discontinuity beneath Iceland Z. Du; accepted 19 September 2005 Available online 22 November 2005 Editor: R.D. van der Hilst Abstract Iceland discontinuity beneath central Iceland is shallow relative to peripheral regions and this was interpreted

  20. P-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath Iceland from local earthquake tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yang

    P-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath Iceland from local earthquake and uppermost mantle beneath Iceland, the keys to understanding the magma plumbing system of the hotspot develop a three-dimensional P-wave velocity model of the Icelandic crust and uppermost mantle from

  1. Basal melt rates beneath Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beem, Lucas H.; Jezek, Ken C.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    2010-08-05

    and J.E. Mitchell. 1994. The role of the margins in the dynamics of an active ice stream. J. Glaciol., 40(136), 527–538. Engelhardt, H. 2004a. Ice temperature and high geothermal flux at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, from borehole measurements. J. Glaciol... ratio which varies laterally across the shear margin. Basal drag, ?b, basal velocity, U(b), basal temperature gradient, @T/@z(b), esti- mates of geothermal flux, G, plus knowledge of basal ice properties, density, ?, latent heat of fusion of ice, Li...

  2. Velocity structure of the uppermost mantle beneath East Asia from Pn tomography and its dynamic implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    regions on Earth's surface due to the collision from the India plate and the suctions induced seismicity of the area, we conducted a Pn traveltime tomography to estimate the compressive wave speed. In each region, stable blocks tend to have high Pn velocity while the boundary regions, which show a high

  3. Global warming of the mantle beneath continents back to the Archaean Nicolas Coltice a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global warming of the mantle beneath continents back to the Archaean Nicolas Coltice a, , Hervé triggering melting events without the involvement of hot plumes. This model, called mantle global warming.R., Bertrand, H., Ricard, Y., Rey, P. (2007) Global warming of the mantle at the origin of flood basalts over

  4. Potential for storage of carbon dioxide in the rocks beneath the East Irish Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Research and British Geological Survey Keyworth Nottingham NG12 5GG Email: klsh@bgs.ac.uk Tyndall CentrePotential for storage of carbon dioxide in the rocks beneath the East Irish Sea Karen Kirk February 2006 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 100 #12;Potential for storage

  5. Fossil flat-slab subduction beneath the Illinois basin, USA Heather Bedle , Suzan van der Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Lee, Suzan

    .tecto.2006.06.003 #12;basin and mechanisms of basin formation, and interpret the Illinois basinFossil flat-slab subduction beneath the Illinois basin, USA Heather Bedle , Suzan van der Lee August 2006 Abstract The Illinois basin is one of several well-studied intracratonic sedimentary basins

  6. The electrical resistivity structure of the crust beneath the northern Main Ethiopian Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The electrical resistivity structure of the crust beneath the northern Main Ethiopian Rift K- long profile crossing the NMER in an approxi- mately NW­SE direction, to image subsurface electrical plateau to try to understand the mechanism for plateau uplift. The MT method provides information

  7. The magmatic plumbing system beneath Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala Jeannie A.J. Scott a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    The magmatic plumbing system beneath Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala Jeannie A.J. Scott a, , Tamsin, Guatemala City, Guatemala a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 9 September 2011 storage Ascent path The silicic dome complex of Santiaguito, Guatemala, has exhibited continuous extrusive

  8. Distribution of magma beneath the Toba caldera complex, north Sumatra, Indonesia, constrained by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaffrey, Robert

    Distribution of magma beneath the Toba caldera complex, north Sumatra, Indonesia, constrained and Geophysical Agency, Jakarta, Indonesia R. McCaffrey, D. A. Wark, and S. W. Roecker Department of Earth@rpi.edu) Fauzi and G. Ibrahim Meteorological and Geophysical Agency, Jakarta, Indonesia (fauzi@bmg.go.id) Sukhyar

  9. Supplemental Figures Seismic imaging of the laterally varying D" region beneath the Cocos Plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    Supplemental Figures Seismic imaging of the laterally varying D" region beneath the Cocos Plate-474-1882 Fax: 907-474-5618 Email: mthorne@gi.alaska.edu #12;Supplement A. Transverse component velocity.9982 at 80º. #12;Supplement B. Transverse component displacement synthetics are shown. Synthetics for PREM

  10. Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain and continuing with the still- ongoing volcanism in the High Lava Plains (HLP) and eastern Snake River Plain (SRP waves; shear wave splitting; high lava plains; Snake River Plain; Yellowstone. Index Terms: 8137

  11. Injection of carbon from the shelf to offshore beneath the euphotic zone in the California Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Injection of carbon from the shelf to offshore beneath the euphotic zone in the California Current concentrations of chlorophyll are found in the California Current System over 300 km offshore, far from the coast and transported offshore in the meandering California Current jet. Chlorophyll is forced downward

  12. On the vertical extent of the large low shear velocity province beneath the South Pacific Superswell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barruol, Guilhem

    , the southwestern Pacific events recorded by seismic arrays in southeastern Asia sample its western rim [Takeuchi et the western rim to the southern rim of the Pacific LLSVP is proposed as a result of forward modeling [HeOn the vertical extent of the large low shear velocity province beneath the South Pacific

  13. A Post-Perovskite Lens and D Heat Flux Beneath the Central Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    A Post-Perovskite Lens and Dµ Heat Flux Beneath the Central Pacific Thorne Lay,1 * John Hernlund,2 are attributed to a phase change from perovskite to post-perovskite and then back to perovskite as the temperature increases with depth. Iron enrichment could explain the occurrence of post-perovskite several

  14. Hydrogeochemical niches associated with hyporheic exchange beneath an acid mine drainage-contaminated stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    Hydrogeochemical niches associated with hyporheic exchange beneath an acid mine drainage can be used for remediation of acid mine drainage (AMD), however, as sediment depth increases, Fe that generate acidity, frequently referred to as acid mine drainage (AMD) or, more specifically, coal mine

  15. DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000032 The Immobility of CO2 in Marine Sediments Beneath 1500

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    -than-sea- water CO2 in deep-sea sediments is inherently more secure then storing buoyant supercritical CO2 with the mobility of supercritical CO2 that has been injected into geologically equivalent (i.e., identical porosityDOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000032 The Immobility of CO2 in Marine Sediments Beneath 1500 Meters of Water

  16. Seismic evidence for a tilted mantle plume and north^south mantle ow beneath Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yang

    Seismic evidence for a tilted mantle plume and north^south mantle £ow beneath Iceland Yang Shen a.W., Washington, DC 20015, USA c Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland d Department, Grensasvegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland f Meteorological O/ce of Iceland, Bustadavegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland g US

  17. Mantle upwellings and convective instabilities revealed by seismic tomography and helium isotope geochemistry beneath eastern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montagner, Jean-Paul

    geochemistry beneath eastern Africa Jean-Paul Montagner,1 Bernard Marty,2 Ele´onore Stutzmann,1 De for North and East Africa using a high resolution three-dimensional anisotropic tomographic model derived from seismic data of a French experiment ``Horn of Africa'' and existing broadband data. The joint

  18. Modeling Zinc and Sodium Chloride Migration in Vadose Zone Soils Beneath Stormwater Infiltration Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Modeling Zinc and Sodium Chloride Migration in Vadose Zone Soils Beneath Stormwater Infiltration in stormwater runoff and a decrease in groundwater recharge. Stormwater runoff contains pollutants (nutrients to the degradation of surface waters below stormwater pipe outfalls. Infiltrating stormwater has been shown

  19. Mantle flow beneath northwestern Venezuela: Seismic evidence for a deep origin of the Mrida Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Mantle flow beneath northwestern Venezuela: Seismic evidence for a deep origin of the Mérida Andes University, Houston, TX, USA b Fundación de Investigaciones Simológicas (FUNVISIS), Caracas, Venezuela a b wave splitting from SKS data recorded by the national seismic network of Venezuela and a linear

  20. Transient groundwater dynamics in a coastal aquifer: The effects of tides, the lunar cycle, and the beach profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abarca, Elena

    Detailed field measurements are combined with a numerical modeling to characterize the groundwater dynamics beneath the discharge zone at Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts. Groundwater salinity values revealed a saline circulation ...

  1. Computational Studies of Three-Dimensional Ocean Sound Fields in Areas of Complex Seafloor Topography and Active Ocean Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duda, Timothy F.

    Time-evolving three-dimensional (four-dimensional) numerical modeling of sound is performed for ocean environmental conditions calculated using regional ocean flow models. The flow models solve the appropriate nonlinear ...

  2. Determining the Fate of Methane Released from the Seafloor in Deep and Shallow Water Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Mengran

    2014-08-12

    Marine gas seeps and accidental marine oil spills are sources of methane (CH_(4)) to the ocean, and potentially to the atmosphere, though the magnitude of the fluxes and dynamics of these systems are poorly defined. For example, the ultimate...

  3. Electrical Impedance Tomography of a Seafloor Volcano R.V. Revelle shiptime proposal submitted by David Myer, Steven Constable, and Kerry Key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    Electrical Impedance Tomography of a Seafloor Volcano R.V. Revelle shiptime proposal submitted Seamount). Electrical Resistance Tomography (or ERT), also known as electrical impedance tomography will allow us to build an electrical conductivity image of a horizontal slice through the volcano at a depth

  4. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  5. Analysis of Fracture in Cores from the Tuff Confining Unit beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro

    2008-03-01

    The role fractures play in the movement of groundwater through zeolitic tuffs that form the tuff confining unit (TCU) beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, is poorly known. This is an important uncertainty, because beneath most of Yucca Flat the TCU lies between the sources of radionuclide contaminants produced by historic underground nuclear testing and the regional carbonate aquifer. To gain a better understanding of the role fractures play in the movement of groundwater and radionuclides through the TCU beneath Yucca Flat, a fracture analysis focusing on hydraulic properties was performed on conventional cores from four vertical exploratory holes in Area 7 of Yucca Flat that fully penetrate the TCU. The results of this study indicate that the TCU is poorly fractured. Fracture density for all fractures is 0.27 fractures per vertical meter of core. For open fractures, or those observed to have some aperture, the density is only 0.06 fractures per vertical meter of core. Open fractures are characterized by apertures ranging from 0.1 to 10 millimeter, and averaging 1.1 millimeter. Aperture typically occurs as small isolated openings along the fracture, accounting for only 10 percent of the fracture volume, the rest being completely healed by secondary minerals. Zeolite is the most common secondary mineral occurring in 48 percent of the fractures observed.

  6. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 13, PAGES 2485-2488, JUL 1, 2001 Tectospheric structure beneath southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Lee, Suzan

    beneath southern Africa D. E. James,1 M. J. Fouch,1,2 J. C. VanDecar,1,3 S. van der Lee4 and Kaapvaal Seismic Group5 Abstract. P-wave and S-wave delay times from the broad- band data of the southern Africa in the mantle beneath southern Africa. High velocity mantle roots appear to extend to depths of at least 250 km

  7. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary?) beneath the midcontinent region of the US. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan?) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  8. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary ) beneath the midcontinent region of the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  9. Deep crustal sediment study: Widespread precambrian layered rocks (sedimentary ?) beneath the US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1992-05-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the U.S. midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1-3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence, its ultimate lateral extent, and resource potential are unknown. The objective of this project is to seek and reprocess seismic reflection data provided by industry from the U.S. midcontinent, and together with the COCORP deep reflection data and information from the scattered basement-penetrating drill holes, to begin to constrain the distribution, origin and evolution of this enigmatic layered sequence, particularly to evaluate if sedimentary material may be an important constituent (i.e., deep gas potential).

  10. Deep crustal sediment study: Widespread Precambrian layered rocks (Sedimentary ) beneath the US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1992-01-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence, its ultimate lateral extent, and resource potential are unknown. The objective of this project is to seek and reprocess seismic reflection data provided by industry from the US midcontinent and together with the COCORP deep reflection data and information from the scattered basement-penetrating drill holes, to begin to constrain the distribution, origin and evolution of this enigmatic layered sequence, particularly to evaluate if sedimentary material may be an important constituent (i.e., deep gas potential).

  11. Deep crustal sediment study: Widespread Precambrian layered rocks (Sedimentary ?) beneath the US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1992-06-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence, its ultimate lateral extent, and resource potential are unknown. The objective of this project is to seek and reprocess seismic reflection data provided by industry from the US midcontinent and together with the COCORP deep reflection data and information from the scattered basement-penetrating drill holes, to begin to constrain the distribution, origin and evolution of this enigmatic layered sequence, particularly to evaluate if sedimentary material may be an important constituent (i.e., deep gas potential).

  12. Seismic structure and ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the Earth's mantle beneath Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Lianxing

    Seismic structure and ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the Earth's mantle beneath Southeast t We constrain seismic structure and ultra-low velocity zones near the Earth's core-mantle boundary that the strong scatterers represent ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs). We suggest that the seismic structure

  13. Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late-than early-successional stage biological soil crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil nematode communities are ecologically more mature beneath late- than early-successional stage biological soil crusts Brian J. Darby a,*, Deborah A. Neher a , Jayne Belnap b a Department of Plant and Soil; accepted 12 April 2006 Abstract Biological soil crusts are key mediators of carbon and nitrogen inputs

  14. Groundwatergroundwater Groundwater refers to the saturated layer of Earth's crust extending beneath the land surface to a depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    Groundwatergroundwater Groundwater refers to the saturated layer of Earth's crust extending beneath. The widespread geographical distribution of groundwater and its usually high quality for human consumption and glaciers. The spatial occurrence and quality of groundwater are not uniform, which is the result of geology

  15. On soliton structure of higher order (2+1)-dimensional equations of a relaxing medium beneath high-frequency perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuetche Kamgang Victor; Bouetou Bouetou Thomas; Timoleon Crepin Kofane

    2007-09-27

    We investigate the soliton structure of novel (2+1)-dimensional nonlinear partial differential evolution(NLPDE) equations which may govern the behavior of a barothropic relaxing medium beneath high-frequency perturbations. As a result, we may derive some soliton solutions amongst which three typical pattern formations with loop-, cusp- and hump-like shapes.

  16. Seismic anisotropy in the wedge above the Philippine Sea slab beneath Kanto and southwest Japan derived from shear wave splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seno, Tetsuzo

    Seismic anisotropy in the wedge above the Philippine Sea slab beneath Kanto and southwest Japan generated by shallow and intermediate-depth earthquakes occurring in the subducting Philippine Sea are further divided into PHS1 and PHS2 (upper and lower planes of the double seismic zone in the Philippine

  17. Application of Gaussian-Beam Migration to Multiscale Imaging of the Lithosphere beneath the Hi-CLIMB Array in Tibet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowack, Robert L.

    Application of Gaussian-Beam Migration to Multiscale Imaging of the Lithosphere beneath the Hi Tibet using data from the Hi-CLIMB experiment. We use teleseismic P waves from three groups of earthquakes to the southeast, northeast, and northwest of the Hi-CLIMB array, each within a narrow range

  18. Seismic imaging of deep low-velocity zone beneath the Dead Sea basin and transform fault: Implications for strain localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    consisted of two wide-angle seismic reflection and refraction profiles: a 280-km-long profile along vertical 4.5 Hz geophone, buried, and placed at intervals of 0.65­0.75 km along the profile. The data wereSeismic imaging of deep low-velocity zone beneath the Dead Sea basin and transform fault

  19. P-and S-Wave Receiver Function Images of Crustal Imbrication beneath the Cheyenne Belt in Southeast Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    P- and S-Wave Receiver Function Images of Crustal Imbrication beneath the Cheyenne Belt estimation to constrain the crustal structure across the Archean­Proterozoic Cheyenne belt suture of Proterozoic lower crust across the Chey- enne belt. Both P and S-wave receiver function images delineate

  20. Distribution of radionuclides and water in Bandelier Tuff beneath a former Los Alamos liquid waste disposal site after 33 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Drennon, B.J.; Abeele, W.V.; Trujillo, G.; Herrera, W.J.; Wheeler, M.L.; Booth, J.W.; Purtymun, W.D.

    1984-07-01

    The distribution of radionuclides and water in Bandelier Tuff beneath a former liquid waste disposal site at Los Alamos was investigated. The waste use history of the site was described, as well as several pertinent laboratory and field studies of water and radionuclide migration in Bandelier Tuff. The distribution of plutonium, /sup 241/Am, and water was determined in a set of about 800 tuff samples collected to sampling depths of 30 m beneath two absorption beds. These data were then related to site geohydrologic data. Water and radionuclide concentrations found after 33 years were compared with the results of similar studies previously performed at this site, and the implications of these comparisons are discussed relative to nuclear waste management. 19 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  1. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 13,PAGES 2485-2488, JULY 1,2001 Tectospheric structure beneath southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Stephen Shangxing

    beneath southern Africa D. E. James,1M. J. Fouch,1'2J. C. VanDecar, KaapvaalSeismicGroup5 S. van der Lee4 and Abstract. P-wave and S-wavedelay times from the broad- band data of the southern Africa seismicexperiment southern Africa. High velocity mantle roots appear to extend to depths of at least 250 km, and locally

  2. Data Package for Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-16

    This appendix summarizes historic and recent groundwater data collected from the uppermost aquifer beneath the 200 East and 200 West Areas. Although the area of interest is the Hanford Site Central Plateau, most of the information discussed in this appendix is at the scale of individual single-shell tank waste management areas. This is because the geologic, and thus the hydraulic, properties and the geochemical properties (i.e., groundwater composition) are different in different parts of the Central Plateau.

  3. Mantle flow in subduction systems: The subslab flow field and implications for mantle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mantle flow in subduction systems: The subslab flow field and implications for mantle dynamics 2009; published 28 October 2009. [1] The character of the mantle flow field in subduction zones remains, little attention has been paid to mantle flow beneath subducting slabs. In order to identify processes

  4. Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Rupture through a Branched Fault Configuration at Yucca Mountain, and Resulting Ground of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Solitario km away from the SCF beneath the crest of Yucca Mountain, causing the repository site to experience

  5. Review and model-based analysis of factors influencing soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. A simple, multi-compartment model was developed to predict soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) plantations in the southeastern United States. Soil carbon sequestration is an important component of sustainable switchgrass production for bioenergy because soil organic matter promotes water retention, nutrient supply, and soil properties that minimize erosion. A literature review was included for the purpose of model parameterization and five model-based experiments were conducted to predict how changes in environment (temperature) or crop management (cultivar, fertilization, and harvest efficiency) might affect soil carbon storage and nitrogen losses. Predictions of soil carbon sequestration were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the ratio of belowground to aboveground biomass production, and temperature. Predictions of ecosystem nitrogen loss were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the soil C/N ratio, and nitrogen remobilization efficiency (i.e., nitrogen cycling within the plant). Model-based experiments indicated that 1) soil carbon sequestration can be highly site specific depending on initial soil carbon stocks, temperature, and the amount of annual nitrogen fertilization, 2) response curves describing switchgrass yield as a function of annual nitrogen fertilization were important to model predictions, 3) plant improvements leading to greater belowground partitioning of biomass could increase soil carbon sequestration, 4) improvements in harvest efficiency have no indicated effects on soil carbon and nitrogen, but improve cumulative biomass yield, and 5) plant improvements that reduce organic matter decomposition rates could also increase soil carbon sequestration, even though the latter may not be consistent with desired improvements in plant tissue chemistry to maximize yields of cellulosic ethanol.

  6. Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A; Pasyanos, M E

    2010-02-18

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a major geologic feature that cuts across Cameroon from the south west to the north east. It is a unique volcanic lineament which has both an oceanic and a continental sector and consists of a chain of Tertiary to Recent, generally alkaline volcanoes stretching from the Atlantic island of Pagalu to the interior of the African continent. The oceanic sector includes the islands of Bioko (formerly Fernando Po) and Sao Tome and Principe while the continental sector includes the Etinde, Cameroon, Manengouba, Bamboutos, Oku and Mandara mountains, as well as the Adamawa and Biu Plateaus. In addition to the CVL, three other major tectonic features characterize the region: the Benue Trough located northwest of the CVL, the Central African Shear Zone (CASZ), trending N70 degrees E, roughly parallel to the CVL, and the Congo Craton in southern Cameroon. The origin of the CVL is still the subject of considerable debate, with both plume and non-plume models invoked by many authors (e.g., Deruelle et al., 2007; Ngako et al, 2006; Ritsema and Allen, 2003; Burke, 2001; Ebinger and Sleep, 1998; Lee et al, 1994; Dorbath et al., 1986; Fairhead and Binks, 1991; King and Ritsema, 2000; Reusch et al., 2010). Crustal structure beneath Cameroon has been investigated previously using active (Stuart et al, 1985) and passive (Dorbath et al., 1986; Tabod, 1991; Tabod et al, 1992; Plomerova et al, 1993) source seismic data, revealing a crust about 33 km thick at the south-western end of the continental portion of the CVL (Tabod, 1991) and the Adamawa Plateau, and thinner crust (23 km thick) beneath the Garoua Rift in the north (Stuart et al, 1985) (Figure 1). Estimates of crustal thickness obtained using gravity data show similar variations between the Garoua rift, Adamawa Plateau, and southern part of the CVL (Poudjom et al., 1995; Nnange et al., 2000). In this study, we investigate further crustal structure beneath the CVL and the adjacent regions in Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broadband seismic stations. From the 1-D shear wave velocity models, we obtain new insights into the composition and structure of the crust and upper mantle across Cameroon. After briefly reviewing the geological framework of Cameroon, we describe the data and the joint inversion method, and then interpret variations in crustal structure found beneath Cameroon in terms of the tectonic history of the region.

  7. A Serendipitous, Long-Term Infiltration Experiment: Water and Tritium Circulation Beneath the CAMBRIC Ditch at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R M; Tompson, A B; Kollet, S J

    2008-11-20

    Underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site introduced numerous radionuclides that may be used to characterize subsurface hydrologic transport processes in arid climates. A sixteen year pumping experiment designed to examine radionuclide migration away from the CAMBRIC nuclear test, conducted in groundwater beneath Frenchman Flat in 1965, gave rise to an unintended second experiment involving radionuclide infiltration through the vadose zone, as induced by seepage of pumping effluents beneath an unlined discharge trench. The combined experiments have been reanalyzed using a detailed, three-dimensional numerical model of transient, variably saturated flow and mass transport, tailored specifically for large scale and efficient calculations. Simulations have been used to estimate radionuclide travel and residence times in various parts of the system for comparison with observations in wells. Model predictions of mass transport were able to clearly demonstrate radionuclide recycling behavior between the ditch and pumping well previously suggested by isotopic age dating information; match travel time estimates for radionuclides moving between the ditch, the water table, and monitoring wells; and provide more realistic ways in which to interpret the pumping well elution curves. Collectively, the results illustrate the utility of integrating detailed numerical modeling with diverse observational data in developing accurate interpretations and forecasts of contaminant migration processes.

  8. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, W.C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California (United States)] Kennedy, B.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States)] Farrar, C.D. [U.S. Geological Survey, Carnelian Bay, California (United States)] Hainsworth, L.J. [Chemistry Department, Emory and Henry College, Emory, Virginia (United States)] Hausback, B. [Geology Department, California State University, Sacramento

    1998-07-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source ({delta}thinsp{sup 13}C={minus}4.5 to {minus}5{per_thousand}, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He=4.5 to 6.7 R{sub A}) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO{sub 2} discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills arc associated with CO{sub 2} concentrations of 30{endash}90{percent} in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 gthinspm{sup {minus}2}thinspd{sup {minus}1} at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO{sub 2} discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO{sub 2} flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30{endash}50 t/d of CO{sub 2} are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO{sub 2} and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N{sub 2}/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values indicate that the Mammoth Mountain gases are derived from sources separate from those that supply gas to the hydrothermal system within the Long Valley caldera. Various data suggest that the Mammoth Mountain gas reservoir is a large, low-temperature cap over an isolated hydrothermal system, that it predates the 1989 intrusion, and that it could remain a source of gas discharge for some time. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  9. Mass transfer during drying of colloidal film beneath a patterned mask that contains a hexagonal array of holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu

    2015-01-01

    We simulated an experiment in which a thin colloidal sessile droplet is allowed to dry out on a horizontal hydrophilic surface when a mask just above the droplet predominantly allows evaporation from the droplet free surface directly beneath the holes in the mask [Harris D J, Hu H, Conrad J C and Lewis J A 2007 \\textit{Phys. Rev. Lett.} \\textbf{98} 148301]. We considered one particular case when centre-to-centre spacing between the holes is much less than the drop diameter. In our model, advection, diffusion, and sedimentation were taken into account. FlexPDE was utilized to solve an advection-diffusion equation using the finite element method. The simulation demonstrated that the colloidal particles accumulate below the holes as the solvent evaporates. Diffusion can reduce this accumulation.

  10. F A S T -T R A C K P A P E R The seismic anomaly beneath Iceland extends down to the mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    of the upper mantle yet performed in Iceland, which reveals details of the morphology, temperature and melt distribution beneath the Iceland hotspot and the adjacent oceanic plate boundaries. T H E T O M O G R A P H Y E in size. Timing was provided by GPS, and the data were downloaded to SUN workstations. We hand

  11. Interannual Changes in Seasonal Ground Freezing and Near-surface Heat Flow Beneath Bottom-fast Ice in the Near-shore Zone, Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorman, Brian

    Interannual Changes in Seasonal Ground Freezing and Near-surface Heat Flow Beneath Bottom-fast Ice Resources Canada, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada ABSTRACT Interannual changes in seasonal ground freezing. KEY WORDS: seasonal ground freezing; permafrost; bottom-fast ice; Mackenzie Delta INTRODUCTION Arctic

  12. F A S T -T R A C K P A P E R The seismic anomaly beneath Iceland extends down to the mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    F A S T - T R A C K P A P E R The seismic anomaly beneath Iceland extends down to the mantle, NJ 08544±5807, USA 4 Meteorological Of®ce of Iceland, Bustadavegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland 5 National Energy Authority, Grensasvegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland Accepted 2000 June 15. Received 2000 June 8

  13. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability zone.

  14. Airflow-terrain interactions through a mountain gap, with an example of eolian activity beneath an atmospheric hydraulic jump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, D.R.; Dawson, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    The integration of atmospheric soundings from a fully instrumented aircraft with detailed sedimentary and geomorphic analyses of eolian features in the Ferris dune field of south-central Wyoming lends insight into the manner in which topography interacts with airflow to modify eolian activity. Topographically modified airflow results in zones of airflow deceleration, acceleration, and enhanced atmospheric turbulence, all of which influence the surface morphology and sedimentology. Extreme lateral confluence of prevailing airflow produces accelerated, unidirectional winds. These winds correlate with unusually continuous and elongate parabolic dunes that extend into a mountain gap (Windy Gap). Persistently heightened winds produced at the entrance to Windy Gap have resulted in a concentration of active sand dunes that lack slipfaces. Common development of a strongly amplified atmospheric wave analogous to a hydraulic jump in the gap contributes to the formation of a variety of eolian features that mantle the surface of Windy Gap and the Ferris dune field tail. Heightened, unidirectional winds in this zone promote grain-size segregation, the formation of elongated and aligned sand drifts, climbing and falling dunes, elongate scour streaks, and parabolic dunes that have low-angle (< 20/sup 0/) cross-stratification. Deflation of bedrock and loose sediment has been enhanced in the zone of maximum turbulence beneath the hydraulic jump.

  15. Crustal structure beneath RSTN stations inferred from teleseismic P-waveforms: preliminary results at RSCP, RSSD, and RSNY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, T.J.; Taylor, S.R.; Zandt, G.

    1983-08-08

    We have modeled teleseismic P-waveforms recorded at three Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) stations (RSCP, Cumberland Plateau Observatory, TN; RSSD, Black Hills, SD; RSNY, Adirondack Mtns, NY) to determine local crustal structures. After source effects are removed by deconvolution, seismograms from events clustered in both distance and back azimuth were stacked to enhance the signal and improve confidence in interpreting converted phases at each station. Preliminary analysis indicates that seismograms from RSCP and RSNY generally exhibit less well-developed converted and reflected phases from the crust-mantle boundary than are observed at RSSD and LLNL broadband station ELK (Elko, NV). These differences are likely due to a gradational crust-mantle boundary in the eastern United States. Comparisons of seismograms recorded at the RSTN stations indicate that the waveforms at RSSD and RSCP are much more complex than waveforms from RSNY. This complexity is largely due to low-velocity sedimentary layers at the RSSD and RSCP sites, whereas RSNY is located directly on crystalline basement. At RSCP, we find a crustal thickness of 41 km, which agrees with early refraction profiles in the area. Our data require a 10 km thick transition zone between the crust and upper mantle beneath RSCP. The crustal thickness determined at RSSD is 47 to 50 km. 14 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  16. Real-Space Microscopic Electrical Imaging of n+-p Junction Beneath Front-Side Ag Contact of Multicrystalline Si Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2012-04-15

    We investigated the quality of the n+-p diffused junction beneath the front-side Ag contact of multicrystalline Si solar cells by characterizing the uniformities of electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction using the atomic force microscopy-based electrical imaging techniques of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We found that Ag screen-printing metallization fired at the over-fire temperature significantly degrades the junction uniformity beneath the Ag contact grid, whereas metallization at the optimal- and under-fire temperatures does not cause degradation. Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes were found at the Ag-grid/emitter-Si interface of the over-fired cell, which is associated with the junction damage beneath the Ag grid. Large crystallites protrude into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent re-crystallization with incorporation of Ag and other impurities and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching. The effect of this junction damage on solar cell performance is discussed.

  17. 8/13/09 10:18 AMThe Daily Astorian The North Coast's Newspaper | Seafloor mapping project begins off Oregon Page 1 of 2http://www.dailyastorian.com/print.asp?ArticleID=63236&SectionID=2&SubSectionID=398

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , identify geological hazards, and enhance safe and efficient marine transportation." NOAA awarded $5 million of the seafloor along Oregon's coast. Using the latest technologies, they will measure water depth, search from these surveys, we can model tsunamis, identify marine habitats, select alternative energy sites

  18. Sandia Energy - Scattering Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Scattering Dynamics Scattering DynamicsAshley...

  19. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    dioxide beneath Mammoth Mountain, California, Seismol. Res.unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain, California, J. Volcanol.emission at Mammoth Mountain, California, Earth Planet. Sci.

  20. Plant phenology and life span influence soil pool dynamics: Bromus tectorum invasion of perennial C3–C4 grass communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carol Adair, Elizabeth; Burke, Ingrid C.

    2010-01-01

    differences between soil pools beneath B. tectorum adjusteddifferences between soil pools beneath Bonferroni and nativegrass values indicate that pools were estimate statement).

  1. Adams-R-D, Thickness of the earth's crust beneath the Pacific-Antarctic ridge, New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics. 7; 3, Pages 529-542. 1964.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    Journal of Geology and Geophysics. 7; 3, Pages 529-542. 1964. Allen,-R-M., The mantle plume beneath-frequency traveltimes; I, Theory, Geophysical Journal International. 141; 1, Pages 157-174. 2000. Forsyth-D-W , Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity Variations in a Regionalized Pacific, Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union

  2. Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – Workers recently completed a multiyear project that removed more than 33,000 gallons of non-radioactive chemical solvents from beneath a portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS), preventing those pollutants from entering the local water table and helping the site avoid costs of more than $15 million.

  3. flow beneath the East Pacific Rise. Nature 402, 282285 (1999). 14. Grove, T. L., Kinzler, R. J. & Bryan, W. B. in Mantle Flow and Melt Generation at Mid-Ocean Ridges (eds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01

    flow beneath the East Pacific Rise. Nature 402, 282­285 (1999). 14. Grove, T. L., Kinzler, R. J. & Bryan, W. B. in Mantle Flow and Melt Generation at Mid-Ocean Ridges (eds Morgan, J. P., Blackman, D. K. Dick, H. J. B. in Magmatism in the Ocean Basins (eds Sounders, A. D. & Norry, M. J.) 71­105 (Geol. Soc

  4. Dynamic Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Berthold Klaus Paul

    Dynamic reconstruction is a method for generating images or image sequences from data obtained using moving radiation detection systems. While coded apertures are used as examples of the underlying information collection ...

  5. A New Seafloor Gravimeter Glenn Sasagawa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nooner, Scott

    for the detection of seawater infiltration in offshore natural gas fields during production. Reservoir models with the manned submersible ALVIN in November 2000, to a depth of 2700 m. INTRODUCTION In an offshore natural gas field, water slowly replaces the gas during production. The liquid infiltration has implications

  6. Hierarchical Dynamic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Hierarchical Dynamic Models Will Penny OU Processes Embedding OU(2) process Dynamic Models Hierarchical Dynamic Models Will Penny 26th May 2011 #12;Hierarchical Dynamic Models Will Penny OU Processes Dynamic Models Will Penny OU Processes Embedding OU(2) process Dynamic Models Generalised coordinates

  7. Sandia Energy - Chemical Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Chemical DynamicsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:45:37+00:00...

  8. The Microscopic Linear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    The Microscopic Brain Will Penny Linear Dynamics Exponentials Matrix Exponential Eigendecomposition References The Microscopic Brain Will Penny 7th April 2011 #12;The Microscopic Brain Will Penny Linear;The Microscopic Brain Will Penny Linear Dynamics Exponentials Matrix Exponential Eigendecomposition

  9. Categorical Introduction to Dynamical Systems Symbolic Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahng, Byung-Jay

    Categorical Introduction to Dynamical Systems Symbolic Dynamical Systems Symbolic Embedding Examples Results Embeddings in Symbolic Dynamical Systems Jonathan Jaquette Swarthmore College July 22, 2009 Jonathan Jaquette Embeddings in Symbolic Dynamical Systems #12;Categorical Introduction

  10. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  11. Should Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics be used to calculate reaction rates?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hele, Timothy J H

    2015-01-01

    We apply Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (TRPMD), a recently-proposed approximate quantum dynamics method, to the computation of thermal reaction rates. Its short-time Transition-State Theory (TST) limit is identical to rigorous Quantum Transition-State Theory, and we find that its long-time limit is independent of the location of the dividing surface. TRPMD rate theory is then applied to one-dimensional model systems, the atom-diatom bimolecular reactions H+H$_2$, D+MuH and F+H$_2$, and the prototypical polyatomic reaction H+CH$_4$. Above the crossover temperature, the TRPMD rate is virtually invariant to the strength of the friction applied to the internal ring-polymer normal modes, and beneath the crossover temperature the TRPMD rate generally decreases with increasing friction, in agreement with the predictions of Kramers theory. We therefore find that TRPMD is less accurate than Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) for symmetric reactions, and in certain asymmetric systems closer to the q...

  12. Introduction Dynamical properties of (-)-transformation Dynamical properties of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /04/2010 Digital expansions, dynamics and tilings, Aussois Dynamical properties of the (-)-transformation 1/17 #12 of (-)-transformation Digital expansions, dynamics and tilings, Aussois Dynamical properties of the (-)-transformation 2/17 #12;Introduction Dynamical properties of (-)-transformation Introduction Digital expansions, dynamics

  13. 2/15/11 2:17 PMFormat Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    calderas along the Yellowstone Snake River Plain in Idaho -- could be the work of a column of hot rock-mantle plume beneath the Yellowstone Snake River Plain. Underground column of molten rock found at Yellowstone

  14. Nature of Flow and Gas Dynamics Below Spreading Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Jordan F; Avisar, Dror; Hudson, G. Bryant

    2005-01-01

    breakthrough curve at El Rio #8. Pond 2 El Rio #5 El Rio #6Ne and Xe concentrations in Pond 2 and groundwater samples.vadose zone beneath a spreading pond in more detail than was

  15. Dynamical principles in neuroscience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Varona, Pablo; Selverston, Allen I.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2006-10-15

    Dynamical modeling of neural systems and brain functions has a history of success over the last half century. This includes, for example, the explanation and prediction of some features of neural rhythmic behaviors. Many interesting dynamical models of learning and memory based on physiological experiments have been suggested over the last two decades. Dynamical models even of consciousness now exist. Usually these models and results are based on traditional approaches and paradigms of nonlinear dynamics including dynamical chaos. Neural systems are, however, an unusual subject for nonlinear dynamics for several reasons: (i) Even the simplest neural network, with only a few neurons and synaptic connections, has an enormous number of variables and control parameters. These make neural systems adaptive and flexible, and are critical to their biological function. (ii) In contrast to traditional physical systems described by well-known basic principles, first principles governing the dynamics of neural systems are unknown. (iii) Many different neural systems exhibit similar dynamics despite having different architectures and different levels of complexity. (iv) The network architecture and connection strengths are usually not known in detail and therefore the dynamical analysis must, in some sense, be probabilistic. (v) Since nervous systems are able to organize behavior based on sensory inputs, the dynamical modeling of these systems has to explain the transformation of temporal information into combinatorial or combinatorial-temporal codes, and vice versa, for memory and recognition. In this review these problems are discussed in the context of addressing the stimulating questions: What can neuroscience learn from nonlinear dynamics, and what can nonlinear dynamics learn from neuroscience?.

  16. Dynamic Instruction Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ian

    2012-01-01

    SANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC INSTRUCTION FUSION A thesis submitted in4 2.2 Instruction Fusion & Complex10 3.1 Fusion Selection

  17. Elliptical Galaxy Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1998-11-06

    A review of elliptical galaxy dynamics, with a focus on nonintegrable models. Topics covered include torus construction; modelling axisymmetric galaxies; triaxiality; collisionless relaxation; and collective instabilities.

  18. Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases Robin Kaiser and Mark D. Havey Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases #12;39 E xperimental developments permit in the transport proper- ties of electromagnetic radiation in strongly scattering random media. Even in weakly

  19. Skyrmion Dynamics for Spintronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yizhou

    2013-01-01

    Skyrmion Dynamics for Spintronic Devices A Thesis submittedSkyrmion Dynamics for Spintronic Devices by Yizhou Liua candidate for future spintronic devices. However, Skyrmion

  20. Dynamic Positioning Simulator Dynamic Positioning Simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    to the ocean floor, without using anchors accomplished by two or more propulsive devices controlled by inputs Dynamic Positioning: No tugboats needed; Offshore set-up is quick; Power saving; Precision situations more on Ship: Wind Force Fw = 1 2 air V 2 rw CXw (rw )AT 1 2 air V 2 rw CYw (rw )AL Mw = 1 2 air V 2 rw CMw (rw

  1. Quasistatic dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Dobbs; Mikko Stenlund

    2015-04-08

    We introduce the notion of a quasistatic dynamical system, which generalizes that of an ordinary dynamical system. Quasistatic dynamical systems are inspired by the namesake processes in thermodynamics, which are idealized processes where the observed system transforms (infinitesimally) slowly due to external influence, tracing out a continuous path of thermodynamic equilibria over an (infinitely) long time span. Time-evolution of states under a quasistatic dynamical system is entirely deterministic, but choosing the initial state randomly renders the process a stochastic one. In the prototypical setting where the time-evolution is specified by strongly chaotic maps on the circle, we obtain a description of the statistical behaviour as a stochastic diffusion process, under surprisingly mild conditions on the initial distribution, by solving a well-posed martingale problem. We also consider various admissible ways of centering the process, with the curious conclusion that the "obvious" centering suggested by the initial distribution sometimes fails to yield the expected diffusion.

  2. Dynamics of Nanoconfined Acetonitrile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Cassandra

    2011-04-27

    components of interest in the simulations are the diffusion coefficients and reorientational correlation times, two dynamical constants of a given system, and the causes of the magnitudes and variability of each is explored. The acetonitrile molecules...

  3. Nanoindentation Under Dynamic Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Jeffrey M

    2009-05-22

    and in analysis of the resulting data. Recent development has enabled investigation of materials under several dynamic conditions. The palladium-hydrogen system has a large miscibility gap, where the palladium lattice rapidly expands to form a hydrogen-rich ?...

  4. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  5. SCATTERING BY CRACKS BENEATH FLUIDSOLID INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craster, Richard

    , and accurately determine the position of, cracks. The non­destructive testing of a solid to detect such flaws as the fluid coupling tends to zero is non­uniform, that is, the Rayleigh wave is not related to the Sch

  6. PhotobyMBrandon Beneath the Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    Terschelling Autosub campaign March 00 Text message on cell phone #12;Phytoplankton analysis: Flow cytometry rating J 1000 litres payload J 700 km range J 3 - 4 kt speed J Primary cell battery #12;Fisheries radiated noise 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 100 1000 10000 Centre Frequency (Hz) Measured

  7. Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCenter (LMI-EFRC)Lodging LodgingLogistics Logistics TheAbout

  8. The Dynamical Discrete Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. R. G. Fontes; C. M. Newman; K. Ravishankar; E. Schertzer

    2007-04-20

    The dynamical discrete web (DDW), introduced in recent work of Howitt and Warren, is a system of coalescing simple symmetric one-dimensional random walks which evolve in an extra continuous dynamical parameter s. The evolution is by independent updating of the underlying Bernoulli variables indexed by discrete space-time that define the discrete web at any fixed s. In this paper, we study the existence of exceptional (random) values of s where the paths of the web do not behave like usual random walks and the Hausdorff dimension of the set of such exceptional s. Our results are motivated by those about exceptional times for dynamical percolation in high dimension by H\\"aggstrom, Peres and Steif, and in dimension two by Schramm and Steif. The exceptional behavior of the walks in DDW is rather different from the situation for dynamical random walks of Benjamini, H\\"aggstrom, Peres and Steif. In particular, we prove that there are exceptional values of s for which the walk from the origin S^s(n) has limsup S^s(n)/\\sqrt n \\leq K with a nontrivial dependence of the Hausdorff dimension on K. We also discuss how these and other results extend to the dynamical Brownian web, a natural scaling limit of DDW. The scaling limit is the focus of a paper in preparation; it was studied by Howitt and Warren and is related to the Brownian net of Sun and Swart.

  9. Dynamical laser spike processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shastri, Bhavin J; Tait, Alexander N; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved "spiking" of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate that graphene-coupled laser systems offer a unified low-level spike optical processing paradigm that goes well beyond previously studied laser dynamics. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation---fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system, but the addit...

  10. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  11. Statistics of football dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, R S; Anteneodo, C

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of football matches. Our goal is to characterize statistically the temporal sequence of ball movements in this collective sport game, searching for traits of complex behavior. Data were collected over a variety of matches in South American, European and World championships throughout 2005 and 2006. We show that the statistics of ball touches presents power-law tails and can be described by $q$-gamma distributions. To explain such behavior we propose a model that provides information on the characteristics of football dynamics. Furthermore, we discuss the statistics of duration of out-of-play intervals, not directly related to the previous scenario.

  12. Dynamic cable analysis models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, P.A.; Meggitt, D.J.; Nordell, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the development and validation of undersea cable dynamics computer models by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL) under the sponsorship of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. These models allow for the analysis of both small displacement (strumming) and large displacement (static and dynamic) deformations of arbitrarily configured cable structures. All of the large displacement models described in this paper are available to the public. This paper does not emphasize the theoretical development of the models (this information is available in other references) but emphasizes the various features of the models, the comparisons between model output and experimental data, and applications for which the models have been used.

  13. Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProtein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Protein Dynamics

  14. SEAFLOOR ELECTROMAGNETIC METHODS CONSORTIUM A research proposal submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    MT. Later, both Statoil and ExxonMobil used the SEMC to help develop the controlled source trials, and provides the opportunity to study data collected on surveys supported by other funding. More

  15. Abiotic Oxidation Rate of Chalcopyrite: Implications for Seafloor Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilenker, Laura Danielle

    2011-01-01

    the pump on this lowest usable setting minimized wear on thepump head was shifted once over the course of the run to prevent wear,

  16. Abiotic Oxidation Rate of Chalcopyrite: Implications for Seafloor Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilenker, Laura Danielle

    2011-01-01

    the formation of acid mine drainage: Colonization of pyritegroundwaters yields acid mine drainage. Pulverization of SMSand groundwaters can yield acid mine drainage via overall

  17. Numerical Modeling of Seafloor Interation with Steel Catenary Riser 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Jung Hwan

    2012-10-19

    , and moment. Primary outputs from this model include the deflected shape of the riser pipe and bending moments along riser length. The code also provides the location of maximum trench depth and the position where the maximum bending moment occurs and any...

  18. Seafloor anchoring for platforms in the Messina Strait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manno, Antonioluca

    2010-01-01

    The importance of properly designing and selecting an anchor is key to reliable techniques for floating offshore platforms including power generation from marine currents. Numerous studies have demonstrated how the uplift ...

  19. Microbial Life on the Seafloor: Where's the Energy?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matterEnergyPublicatonsSubstances |Microbial Life on the

  20. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  1. Speeding up dynamic compilation: concurrent and parallel dynamic compilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohm, Igor

    2013-07-02

    The main challenge faced by a dynamic compilation system is to detect and translate frequently executed program regions into highly efficient native code as fast as possible. To efficiently reduce dynamic compilation ...

  2. Dynamic Systems, Measurement,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhose, William

    Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control Technical Briefs Remote Vibration Control for Flexible Beams Subject to Harmonic Disturbances Shang-Teh Wu Department of Mechanical Engineering, National at the boundary are required in the control algorithm, which emulates the behavior of a set of mechanical spring

  3. LABORATORY VI ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab VI - 1 LABORATORY VI ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS So far this semester, you have been asked to think kinematics. OBJECTIVES: Successfully completing this laboratory should enable you to: · Use linear kinematics in a laboratory on earth, before launching the satellite. EQUIPMENT You will use an apparatus that spins

  4. NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics Diverging views on glass transition Gregory B. mc.mckenna@ttu.edu T he glass transition is one of the most intriguing phenomena in the world of soft condensed matter. Despite decades of study, many aspects of the behaviour of glass-forming liquids remain elusive

  5. Shared and Dynamic Libraries on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shared and Dynamic Libraries Shared and Dynamic Libraries The Hopper system can support applications that use dynamic shared libraries (DSL) on the compute nodes. Some...

  6. Active Tectonics and Seafloor Mapping Laboratory Publication 02-01 Interim Seafloor Lithology Maps for Oregon And Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    for Oregon And Washington Version 1.0 Chris Goldfinger Chris Romsos Rondi Robison Randall Milstein Beth Myers for the Oregon and Washington continental margin. The project expands on one recently completed for the Oregon and Washington continental shelves and margins, incorporating many important new datasets collected since

  7. Tools for dynamic model development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaber, Spencer Daniel

    2014-01-01

    For this thesis, several tools for dynamic model development were developed and analyzed. Dynamic models can be used to simulate and optimize the behavior of a great number of natural and engineered systems, from the ...

  8. Marine EM Reference Database http://marineemlab.ucsd.edu/~kkey/MarineEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    for mapping seafloor electrical conductivity. The database also includes student PhD and Mas- ters theses Workshop, held in Giza Egypt during September 2010. The review paper is now available online: Key, K. (2011, Electrical structure beneath the northern MELT line on the East Pacific Rise at 15 degrees 45 ' S

  9. Entanglement dynamics in chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghose, Shohini [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Sanders, Barry C. [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2004-12-01

    We study quantum chaos for systems with more than one degree of freedom, for which we present an analysis of the dynamics of entanglement. Our analysis explains the main features of entanglement dynamics and identifies entanglement-based signatures of quantum chaos. We discuss entanglement dynamics for a feasible experiment involving an atom in a magneto-optical trap and compare the results with entanglement dynamics for the well-studied quantum kicked top.

  10. New Approaches in Embedded Networked Sensing for Terrestrial Ecological Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    methods for measuring energy dynamics beneath vege- tation canopies using either measured or estimated solar and thermal

  11. Nonlinear chemical dynamics Francesc Sagusa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    Nonlinear chemical dynamics Francesc Saguésa and Irving R. Epsteinb a Departament de Química Física March 2003 The interdisciplinary field of nonlinear chemical dynamics has grown significantly in breadth an overview of some of the key results of nonlinear chemical dynamics, with emphasis on those areas most

  12. ANALYSING DYNAMIC FUNCTION SCHEDULING DECISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Michael

    , University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK Abstract: Function allocation, as a process used in the construction, the notion of dynamic function allocation becomes increasingly desirable where in certain situations of dynamic function allocation that reflects typical work activity where the dynamic scheduling of activities

  13. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  14. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  15. Dynamical impurity problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  16. Dynamical Methods in Algebra Dynamical Methods in Algebra [1] Dynamical Methods in Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coquand, Thierry

    Dynamical Methods in Algebra Dynamical Methods in Algebra [1] Dynamical Methods in Algebra We present a possible realisation of Hilbert's program for (some part of) abstract algebra G in number theory) that cannot be eliminated Surprisingly this is not the case for abstract algebra 1 #12

  17. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Preferential Attachment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Prediction and control of network dynamics are grand-challenge problems in network science. The lack of understanding of fundamental laws driving the dynamics of networks is among the reasons why many practical problems of great significance remain unsolved for decades. Here we study the dynamics of networks evolving according to preferential attachment, known to approximate well the large-scale growth dynamics of a variety of real networks. We show that this dynamics is Hamiltonian, thus casting the study of complex networks dynamics to the powerful canonical formalism, in which the time evolution of a dynamical system is described by Hamilton's equations. We derive the explicit form of the Hamiltonian that governs network growth in preferential attachment. This Hamiltonian turns out to be nearly identical to graph energy in the configuration model, which shows that the ensemble of random graphs generated by preferential attachment is nearly identical to the ensemble of random graphs with scale-free degree d...

  18. Symmetries in open quantum dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Jordan

    2014-08-20

    Simple examples are used to introduce and examine a Heisenberg picture of symmetries of open quantum dynamics that can be described by unitary operators. When the symmetries are for Hamiltonian dynamics of an entire system, and the spectrum of the Hamiltonian operator has a lower bound, the symmetry operators commute with the Hamiltonian operator. An example shows that symmetry operators need not commute with the Hamiltonian operator when the spectrum of the Hamiltonian does not have a lower bound. There are many more symmetries that are only for the open dynamics of a subsystem and are described by unitary operators that do not commute with the Hamiltonian for the dynamics of the entire system. Examples show how these symmetries alone can reveal properties of the dynamics and reduce what needs to be done to work out the dynamics. A symmetry of the open dynamics of a subsystem can imply properties of the dynamics for the entire system that are not implied by the symmetries of the dynamics of the entire system. The symmetries are generally not related to constants of the motion for the open dynamics of the subsystem. There are symmetries of the open dynamics of a subsystem that depend only on the dynamics. In the simplest examples, these are also symmetries of the dynamics of the entire system. There are many more symmetries, of a new kind, that also depend on correlations, or absence of correlations, between the subsystem and the rest of the entire system, or on the state of the rest of the entire system. Symmetries that depend on correlations generally cannot be seen in the Schr\\"{o}dinger picture as symmetries of dynamical maps of density matrices for the subsystem.

  19. Mode coupling theory of electrolyte dynamics: Time dependent diffusion, dynamic structure factor and solvation dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susmita Roy; Subramanian Yashonath; Biman Bagchi

    2015-01-08

    A self-consistent mode coupling theory (MCT) with microscopic inputs of equilibrium pair correlation functions is developed to analyze electrolyte dynamics. We apply the theory to calculate concentration dependence of (i) time dependent ion diffusion, (ii) dynamic structure factor of the constituent ions, and (iii) ion solvation dynamics in electrolyte solution. Brownian dynamics (BD) with implicit water molecules and molecular dynamics (MD) method with explicit water are used to check the theoretical predictions. The time dependence of ionic self-diffusion coefficient and the corresponding dynamic structure factor evaluated from our MCT approach show quantitative agreement with early experimental and present Brownian dynamic simulation results. With increasing concentration, the dispersion of electrolyte friction is found to occur at increasingly higher frequency, due to the faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. The wave number dependence of total dynamic structure factor F(k,t), exhibits markedly different relaxation dynamics at different length scales. At small wave numbers, we find the emergence of a step-like relaxation, indicating the presence of both fast and slow time scales in the system. Such behaviour allows an intriguing analogy with temperature dependent relaxation dynamics of supercooled liquids. We find that solvation dynamics of a tagged ion exhibits a power law decay at long times- the decay can also be fitted to a stretched exponential form. The emergence of the power law in solvation dynamics has been tested by carrying out long Brownian dynamics simulations with varying ionic concentrations. This solvation time correlation and ion-ion dynamic structure factor indeed exhibits highly interesting, non-trivial dynamical behaviour at intermediate to longer times that require further experimental and theoretical studies.

  20. Dynamics of Motivations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knoll, Jörn

    ) - Upot, f mean field = C(f(x, p, t)) Collision Term = p2 2m - Upot(x, p) dp1dp2dp3 d d (1 - f)f1(1 - f2, t)) Collision Term = p2 2m - Upot(x, p) dp1dp2dp3 d d (1 - f)f1(1 - f2)f3 + loss term. Voskresensky1,3 1GSI 2Kurchatov Inst. (Moscow) 3Moscow Ins. for Physics and Engineering #12;Dynamics

  1. Jets, Lifts and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O?ul Esen; Hasan Gümral

    2010-11-03

    We show that complete cotangent lifts of vector fields, their decomposition into vertical representative and holonomic part provide a geometrical framework underlying Eulerian equations of continuum mechanics. We discuss Euler equations for ideal incompressible fluid and Vlasov equations of plasma dynamics in connection with the lifts of divergence-free and Hamiltonian vector fields, respectively. As a further application, we obtain kinetic equations of particles moving with the flow of contact vector fields both from Lie-Poisson reductions and with the techniques of present framework.

  2. Dynamic Transfer Limits Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sectorfor $1.14 Per1-ENuclearDynamic Switching

  3. Dynamic Bertrand Oligopoly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledvina, Andrew, E-mail: aledvina@princeton.edu; Sircar, Ronnie, E-mail: sircar@princeton.ed [Princeton University, ORFE Department (United States)

    2011-02-15

    We study continuous time Bertrand oligopolies in which a small number of firms producing similar goods compete with one another by setting prices. We first analyze a static version of this game in order to better understand the strategies played in the dynamic setting. Within the static game, we characterize the Nash equilibrium when there are N players with heterogeneous costs. In the dynamic game with uncertain market demand, firms of different sizes have different lifetime capacities which deplete over time according to the market demand for their good. We setup the nonzero-sum stochastic differential game and its associated system of HJB partial differential equations in the case of linear demand functions. We characterize certain qualitative features of the game using an asymptotic approximation in the limit of small competition. The equilibrium of the game is further studied using numerical solutions. We find that consumers benefit the most when a market is structured with many firms of the same relative size producing highly substitutable goods. However, a large degree of substitutability does not always lead to large drops in price, for example when two firms have a large difference in their size.

  4. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Overview Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email...

  5. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Dr. Kyle J. Alvine, kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 21C...

  6. Algorithms for dynamical overlap fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Schaefer

    2006-09-28

    An overview of the current status of algorithmic approaches to dynamical overlap fermions is given. In particular the issue of changing the topological sector is discussed.

  7. Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Colonna

    2009-02-26

    Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

  8. Dynamic bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stormo, Keith E. (Moscow, ID)

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix.

  9. Quasifission dynamics in TDHF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umar, A S; Simenel, C

    2015-01-01

    For light and medium mass systems the capture cross-section may be considered to be the same as that for complete fusion, whereas for heavy systems leading to superheavy formations the evaporation residue cross-section is dramatically reduced due to the quasifission (QF) and fusion-fission processes thus making the capture cross-section to be essentially the sum of these two cross-sections, with QF occurring at a much shorter time-scale. Consequently, quasifission is the primary reaction mechanism that limits the formation of superheavy nuclei. Within the last few years the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) approach has been utilized for studying the dynamics of quasifission. The study of quasifission is showing a great promise to provide insight based on very favorable comparisons with experimental data. In this article we will focus on the TDHF calculations of quasifission observables for the $^{48}$Ca+$^{249}$Bk system.

  10. Dynamical Yukawa Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Alonso

    2013-07-07

    The matter content of the Standard Model admits a global symmetry due to the generational structure of the spectrum respected by all interactions except for fermion couplings to the Higgs doublet. This symmetry is identified as the largest possible global symmetry of the free theory and extended to the case of massive neutrinos. The violation of such symmetry is then assumed dynamical and the value of the Yukawa couplings is fixed by a variational principle. This ansatz yields compelling results: Quark Yukawas naturally accommodate hierarchical masses and small mixing whereas Lepton Yukawas exhibit a hierarchical pattern for charged leptons and simultaneously degeneracy in the neutrino sector correlated with large mixing and Majorana phases. The difference in the mixing patterns of Quark and Leptons in this scheme stem from the Dirac vs Majorana nature of fermions.

  11. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Preferential Attachment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin Zuev; Fragkiskos Papadopoulos; Dmitri Krioukov

    2015-04-29

    Prediction and control of network dynamics are grand-challenge problems in network science. The lack of understanding of fundamental laws driving the dynamics of networks is among the reasons why many practical problems of great significance remain unsolved for decades. Here we study the dynamics of networks evolving according to preferential attachment, known to approximate well the large-scale growth dynamics of a variety of real networks. We show that this dynamics is Hamiltonian, thus casting the study of complex networks dynamics to the powerful canonical formalism, in which the time evolution of a dynamical system is described by Hamilton's equations. We derive the explicit form of the Hamiltonian that governs network growth in preferential attachment. This Hamiltonian turns out to be nearly identical to graph energy in the configuration model, which shows that the ensemble of random graphs generated by preferential attachment is nearly identical to the ensemble of random graphs with scale-free degree distributions. In other words, preferential attachment generates nothing but random graphs with power-law degree distribution. The extension of the developed canonical formalism for network analysis to richer geometric network models with non-degenerate groups of symmetries may eventually lead to a system of equations describing network dynamics at small scales.

  12. Dynamic Coupling Measurement for Object-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Dynamic Coupling Measurement for Object- Oriented Software Dynamic Coupling Measurement for Object- Oriented SoftwareErik Arisholm, Lionel C. Briand, Audun Foyen IEEE Transaction on Software Engineering/2)Introduction (1/2) Extensive research related to quality of OO software has performed Define structural metrics

  13. Status of dynamical ensemble generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chulwoo Jung

    2010-01-06

    I give an overview of current and future plans of dynamical QCD ensemble generation activities. A comparison of simulation cost between different discretizations is made. Recent developments in techniques and algorithms used in QCD dynamical simulations, especially mass reweighting, are also discussed.

  14. Dynamics and Equilibria Sergiu Hart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naor, Moni

    Dynamics and Equilibria Sergiu Hart Presidential Address, GAMES 2008 (July 2008) Revised and Expanded (November 2009) Revised (2010, 2011, 2012, 2013) SERGIU HART c 2008 ­ p. #12;DYNAMICS AND EQUILIBRIA Sergiu Hart Center for the Study of Rationality Dept of Economics Dept of Mathematics The Hebrew

  15. An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hilley, George E [STANFORD UNIV; Fildani, Andrea [CHEVRON ETC

    2009-01-01

    Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to establish the hydrodynamic conditions needed for sediment deposition along the margins of a density current which ultimately may evolve into confining levees. We suggest that erosion into a previously unchannelized substrate is the mostly likely source of this partial confinement.

  16. Real-time dynamics for interactive environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timchenko, Alexander Nikolai

    2009-05-15

    . Two primary dynamic behaviors are explored: rigid body dynamics and articulated dynamics. A generalized collision response model is built for rigid bodies and articulated structures which can be adapted to other types of behaviors. The framework...

  17. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Minerva Center and Department of Physics, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2007-05-15

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  18. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  19. Fractal dynamics of earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bak, P.; Chen, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-05-01

    Many objects in nature, from mountain landscapes to electrical breakdown and turbulence, have a self-similar fractal spatial structure. It seems obvious that to understand the origin of self-similar structures, one must understand the nature of the dynamical processes that created them: temporal and spatial properties must necessarily be completely interwoven. This is particularly true for earthquakes, which have a variety of fractal aspects. The distribution of energy released during earthquakes is given by the Gutenberg-Richter power law. The distribution of epicenters appears to be fractal with dimension D {approx} 1--1.3. The number of after shocks decay as a function of time according to the Omori power law. There have been several attempts to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law by starting from a fractal distribution of faults or stresses. But this is a hen-and-egg approach: to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law, one assumes the existence of another power-law--the fractal distribution. The authors present results of a simple stick slip model of earthquakes, which evolves to a self-organized critical state. Emphasis is on demonstrating that empirical power laws for earthquakes indicate that the Earth`s crust is at the critical state, with no typical time, space, or energy scale. Of course the model is tremendously oversimplified; however in analogy with equilibrium phenomena they do not expect criticality to depend on details of the model (universality).

  20. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  1. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Advanced diagnostics of experiments covering many orders of magnitude in strain...

  2. 16.07 Dynamics, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaume

    Dynamics starts with fundamentals of Newtonian mechanics. Further topics include kinematics, particle dynamics, motion relative to accelerated reference frames, work and energy, impulse and momentum, systems of particles ...

  3. Connecting curves for dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gilmore; Jean-Marc Ginoux; Timothy Jones; C. Letellier; U. S. Freitas

    2010-03-08

    We introduce one dimensional sets to help describe and constrain the integral curves of an $n$ dimensional dynamical system. These curves provide more information about the system than the zero-dimensional sets (fixed points) do. In fact, these curves pass through the fixed points. Connecting curves are introduced using two different but equivalent definitions, one from dynamical systems theory, the other from differential geometry. We describe how to compute these curves and illustrate their properties by showing the connecting curves for a number of dynamical systems.

  4. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  5. Essays in dynamic general equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Dân (Dân Vu?)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis consists of three chapters studying dynamic economies in general equilibrium. The first chapter considers an economy in business cycles with potentially imperfect financial markets. The second chapter investigates ...

  6. Abstract Machines for Dynamic Computation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Christopher D

    In this thesis we address the challenges associated with the provision of dynamic software architectures. These are systems in which programs are constructed from separately compiled units with a facility for the replacement ...

  7. Mantle dynamics in the Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faccenna, Claudio

    The Mediterranean offers a unique opportunity to study the driving forces of tectonic deformation within a complex mobile belt. Lithospheric dynamics are affected by slab rollback and collision of two large, slowly moving ...

  8. Dynamical Mutation of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. R. Abramo; R. C. Batista; L. Liberato; R. Rosenfeld

    2008-01-03

    We discuss the intriguing possibility that dark energy may change its equation of state in situations where large dark energy fluctuations are present. We show indications of this dynamical mutation in some generic models of dark energy.

  9. Dynamical mutation of dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramo, L. R.; Batista, R. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Liberato, L.; Rosenfeld, R. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Pamplona 145, 01405-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-03-15

    We discuss the intriguing possibility that dark energy may change its equation of state in situations where large dark energy fluctuations are present. We show indications of this dynamical mutation in some generic models of dark energy.

  10. Qubit dynamics under alternating controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiello, Clarice Demarchi

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss two problems of quantum dynamics in the presence of alternating controls. Alternating controls arise in many protocols designed to extend the duration over which a qubit is a useful computational ...

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of hysteretic oscillators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shekhawat, Ashivni

    2009-05-15

    The dynamic response and bifurcations of a harmonic oscillator with a hysteretic restoring force and sinusoidal excitation are investigated. A multilinear model of hysteresis is presented. A hybrid system approach is used to formulate and study...

  12. Dynamical symmetries in nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years the concept of dynamical symmetries in nuclei has witnessed a renaissance of interest and activity. Much of this work has been developed in the context of the Interacting Boson Approximation (or IBA) model. The appearance and properties of dynamical symmetries in nuclei will be reviewed, with emphasis on their characteristic signatures and on the role of the proton-neutron interaction in their formation, systematics and evolution. 36 refs., 20 figs.

  13. Peak mass and dynamical friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; M. Gambera

    1995-06-09

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock \\& Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  14. Dynamical Crossover in Supercritical Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. D. Fomin; V. N. Ryzhov; E. N. Tsiok; V. V. Brazhkin

    2015-02-10

    Dynamical crossover in water is studied by means of computer simulation. The crossover temperature is calculated from the behavior of velocity autocorrelation functions. The results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the qualitative behavior of the dynamical crossover line is similar to the melting curve behavior. Importantly, the crossover line belongs to experimentally achievable $(P,T)$ region which stimulates the experimental investigation in this field.

  15. Dynamic Tides in Close Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Willems

    2005-11-10

    The basic theory of dynamic tides in close binaries is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to resonances between dynamic tides and free oscillation modes and to the role of the apsidal-motion rate in probing the internal structure of binary components. The discussed effects are generally applicable to stars across the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, including the binary OB-stars discussed at this meeting.

  16. Event-driven multithreaded dynamic optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Weifeng

    2006-01-01

    Speci?c Optimizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.3. Trace Optimization Overhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dynamic Optimization . . . . . . .B. Optimizations with the

  17. Dynamic models for nonstationary signal segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Dynamic models for nonstationary signal segmentation William D. Penny and Stephen J. Roberts w.penny

  18. Simple Dynamic Gasifier Model That Runs in Aspen Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, P.J.; Luyben, W.L. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-10-15

    Gasification (or partial oxidation) is a vital component of 'clean coal' technology. Sulfur and nitrogen emissions can be reduced, overall energy efficiency is increased, and carbon dioxide recovery and sequestration are facilitated. Gasification units in an electric power generation plant produce a fuel for driving combustion turbines. Gasification units in a chemical plant generate gas, which can be used to produce a wide spectrum of chemical products. Future plants are predicted to be hybrid power/chemical plants with gasification as the key unit operation. The widely used process simulator Aspen Plus provides a library of models that can be used to develop an overall gasifier model that handles solids. So steady-state design and optimization studies of processes with gasifiers can be undertaken. This paper presents a simple approximate method for achieving the objective of having a gasifier model that can be exported into Aspen Dynamics. The basic idea is to use a high molecular weight hydrocarbon that is present in the Aspen library as a pseudofuel. This component should have the same 1:1 hydrogen-to-carbon ratio that is found in coal and biomass. For many plantwide dynamic studies, a rigorous high-fidelity dynamic model of the gasifier is not needed because its dynamics are very fast and the gasifier gas volume is a relatively small fraction of the total volume of the entire plant. The proposed approximate model captures the essential macroscale thermal, flow, composition, and pressure dynamics. This paper does not attempt to optimize the design or control of gasifiers but merely presents an idea of how to dynamically simulate coal gasification in an approximate way.

  19. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Kühne

    2013-03-26

    Computer simulation methods, such as Monte Carlo or Molecular Dynamics, are very powerful computational techniques that provide detailed and essentially exact information on classical many-body problems. With the advent of ab-initio molecular dynamics, where the forces are computed on-the-fly by accurate electronic structure calculations, the scope of either method has been greatly extended. This new approach, which unifies Newton's and Schr\\"odinger's equations, allows for complex simulations without relying on any adjustable parameter. This review is intended to outline the basic principles as well as a survey of the field. Beginning with the derivation of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, the Car-Parrinello method and the recently devised efficient and accurate Car-Parrinello-like approach to Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, which unifies best of both schemes are discussed. The predictive power of this novel second-generation Car-Parrinello approach is demonstrated by a series of applications ranging from liquid metals, to semiconductors and water. This development allows for ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations on much larger length and time scales than previously thought feasible.

  20. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühne, Thomas D

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations and molecular dynamics in particular, is a very powerful method to provide detailed and essentially exact informations of classical many-body problems. With the advent of \\textit{ab-initio} molecular dynamics, where the forces are computed on-the-fly by accurate electronic structure calculations, the scope of either method has been greatly extended. This new approach, which unifies Newton's and Schr\\"odinger's equations, allows for complex simulations without relying on any adjustable parameter. This review is intended to outline the basic principles as well as a survey of the field. Beginning with the derivation of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, the Car-Parrinello method as well as novel hybrid scheme that unifies best of either approach are discussed. The predictive power is demonstrated by a series of applications ranging from insulators to semiconductors and even metals in condensed phases.

  1. Natural Dynamics for Combinatorial Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic and or natural dynamical systems (DSs) are dominated by sudden nonlinear processes such as neuroavalanches, gamma-ray bursts, solar flares, earthquakes etc. that exhibit scale-free statistics. These behaviors also occur in many nanosystems. On phase diagrams, these DSs belong to a finite-width phase that separates the phases of thermodynamic equilibrium and ordinary chaotic dynamics, and that is known under such names as intermittency, noise-induced chaos, and self-organized criticality. Within the recently formulated approximation-free cohomological theory of stochastic differential equations, the noise-induced chaos can be roughly interpreted as a noise-induced overlap between regular (integrable) and chaotic (non-integrable) deterministic dynamics so that DSs in this phase inherit the properties of the both. Here, we analyze this unique set of properties and conclude that such DSs must be the most efficient natural optimizers. Based on this understanding, we propose the method of the natural dyn...

  2. Dynamics of Triaxial Stellar Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1996-11-11

    Recent work on the dynamics of triaxial stellar systems is reviewed. The motion of boxlike orbits in realistic triaxial potentials is generically stochastic. The degree to which the stochasticity manifests itself in the dynamics depends on the chaotic mixing timescale, which is a small multiple of the crossing time in triaxial models with steep cusps or massive central singularities. Low-luminosity ellipticals, which have the steepest cusps and the shortest dynamical times, are less likely than bright ellipticals to have strongly triaxial shapes. The observational evidence for triaxiality is reviewed; departures from axisymmetry in early-type galaxies are often found to be associated with evidence of recent interactions or with the presence of a bar.

  3. Plasticity of metal wires in torsion: molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    Plasticity of metal wires in torsion: molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations-4040 Abstract The orientation dependent plasticity in metal nanowires is investigated using molecular dynamics metal wires controls the mechanisms of plastic deformation. For wires oriented along 110 , dislocations

  4. Dynamics of Block Copolymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochrie, Simon G. J.

    2014-09-09

    A detailed study of the dynamics of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles suspended in polystyrene homopolymer matrices was carried out using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy for temperatures between 120 and 180 °C. For low molecular weight polystyrene homopolymers, the observed dynamics show a crossover from diffusive to hyper-diffusive behavior with decreasing temperatures. For higher molecular weight polystyrene, the nanoparticle dynamics appear hyper-diffusive at all temperatures studied. The relaxation time and characteristic velocity determined from the measured hyper-diffusive dynamics reveal that the activation energy and underlying forces determined are on the order of 2.14 × 10?19 J and 87 pN, respectively. We also carried out a detailed X-ray scattering study of the static and dynamic behavior of a styrene– isoprene diblock copolymer melt with a styrene volume fraction of 0.3468. At 115 and 120 °C, we observe splitting of the principal Bragg peak, which we attribute to phase coexistence of hexagonal cylindrical and cubic double- gyroid structure. In the disordered phase, above 130 °C, we have characterized the dynamics of composition fluctuations via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Near the peak of the static structure factor, these fluctuations show stretched-exponential relaxations, characterized by a stretching exponent of about 0.36 for a range of temperatures immediately above the MST. The corresponding characteristic relaxation times vary exponentially with temperature, changing by a factor of 2 for each 2 °C change in temperature. At low wavevectors, the measured relaxations are diffusive with relaxation times that change by a factor of 2 for each 8 °C change in temperature.

  5. Theoretical studies of combustion dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, J.M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The basic objectives of this research program are to develop and apply theoretical techniques to fundamental dynamical processes of importance in gas-phase combustion. There are two major areas currently supported by this grant. One is reactive scattering of diatom-diatom systems, and the other is the dynamics of complex formation and decay based on L{sup 2} methods. In all of these studies, the authors focus on systems that are of interest experimentally, and for which potential energy surfaces based, at least in part, on ab initio calculations are available.

  6. Statistics as a dynamical attractor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michail Zak

    2012-08-30

    It is demonstrated that any statistics can be represented by an attractor of the solution to a corresponding systen of ODE coupled with its Liouville equation. Such a non-Newtonian representation allows one to reduce foundations of statistics to better established foundations of ODE. In addition to that, evolution to the attractor reveals possible micro-mechanisms driving random events to the final distribution of the corresponding statistical law. Special attention is concentrated upon the power law and its dynamical interpretation: it is demonstrated that the underlying dynamics supports a " violent reputation" of the power law statistics.

  7. Dynamics of Protein Hydration Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wolf; S. Emmert; R. Gulich; P. Lunkenheimer; A. Loidl

    2014-12-08

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range including the so-called No Man's Land (160 - 235 K). The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics and are discussed in the context of the highly-debated fragile-to-strong transition of water.

  8. Fairness and dynamic pricing: comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, William W.

    2010-07-15

    In ''The Ethics of Dynamic Pricing,'' Ahmad Faruqui lays out a case for improved efficiency in using dynamic prices for retail electricity tariffs and addresses various issues about the distributional effects of alternative pricing mechanisms. The principal contrast is between flat or nearly constant energy prices and time-varying prices that reflect more closely the marginal costs of energy and capacity. The related issues of fairness criteria, contracts, risk allocation, cost allocation, means testing, real-time pricing, and ethical policies of electricity market design also must be considered. (author)

  9. Accelerator dynamics and beam aperture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z.

    1986-10-01

    We present an analytical method for analyzing accelerator dynamics, including higher order effects of multipoles on the beam. This formalism provides a faster alternative to particle tracking. Simplectic expressions for the emittance and phase describing the dynamical behavior of a particle in a circular accelerator are derived using second order perturbation theory (in the presence of nonlinear elements, e.g., sextupoles, octupoles). These expressions are successfully used to calculate the emittance growth, smear and linear aperture. Our findings compare well with results obtained from tracking programs. In addition perturbation to betatron tune; resonance strengths; stop bandwidth; fixed points; island width; and Chirikov criteria are calculated.

  10. Dynamic Transfer Capability Analysis with Wind Farms and Dynamic Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    . An investigation on the effect of dynamics loads, wind farms and flexible AC transmission system (FACTS) devices capability unnecessarily limits the power transfers and is a costly and inefficient use of a network with increasing loads, the need to transfer power over long transmission lines increases. Deregulation

  11. Error Dynamics: The Dynamic Emergence of Error Avoidance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickhard, Mark H.

    . Standard such notions are, however, arguably limited and bad notions, being based on untenable models of learning about error and of handling error knowledge constitute a complex major theme in evolution VICARIANTS Avoiding Error. The central theme is a progressive elaboration of kinds of dynamics that manage

  12. BFKL dynamics at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Ewerz; Lynne H. Orr; W. James Stirling; Bryan R. Webber

    1999-12-22

    Hadron colliders can provide important tests of BFKL `small-x' dynamics. We discuss two examples of such tests, the inclusive dijet jet cross section at large rapidity separation and the number of associated `mini-jets' in Higgs boson production.

  13. Mesoscale Dynamics Spring Semester 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ATS 735 Mesoscale Dynamics (3 cr) Spring Semester 2014 Instructor: Richard H. Johnson, Room ATS 305: There are no required texts. The recent book Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes by Markowski and Richardson covers with mesoscale-related research. A set of notes will be made available for the course, although we will not cover

  14. Water Dynamics at Rough Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Rosenstihl; Kerstin Kämpf; Felix Klameth; Matthias Sattig; Michael Vogel

    2014-07-21

    We use molecular dynamics computer simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to investigate the dynamics of water at interfaces of molecular roughness and low mobility. We find that, when approaching such interfaces, the structural relaxation of water, i.e., the $\\alpha$ process, slows down even when specific attractive interactions are absent. This prominent effect is accompanied by a smooth transition from Vogel to Arrhenius temperature dependence and by a growing importance of jump events. Consistently, at protein surfaces, deviations from Arrhenius behavior are weak when free water does not exist. Furthermore, in nanoporous silica, a dynamic crossover of liquid water occurs when a fraction of solid water forms near 225 K and, hence, the liquid dynamics changes from bulk-like to interface-dominated. At sufficiently low temperatures, water exhibits a quasi-universal $\\beta$ process, which is characterized by an activation energy of $E_a\\!=\\!0.5$ eV and involves anisotropic reorientation about large angles. As a consequence of its large amplitude, the faster $\\beta$ process destroys essentially all orientational correlation, rendering observation of a possible slower $\\alpha$ process difficult in standard experiments. Nevertheless, we find indications for the existence of structural relaxation down to a glass transition of interfacial water near 185 K. Hydrated proteins show a highly restricted backbone motion with an amplitude, which decreases upon cooling and vanishes at comparable temperatures, providing evidence for a high relevance of water rearrangements in the hydration shell for secondary protein relaxations.

  15. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  16. Modeling Blog Dynamics Michaela Gotz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leskovec, Jure

    Modeling Blog Dynamics Michaela G¨otz Cornell University goetz@cs.cornell.edu Jure Leskovec@cs.cmu.edu Christos Faloutsos Carnegie Mellon University christos@cs.cmu.edu Abstract How do blogs produce posts? What local, underlying mech- anisms lead to the bursty temporal behaviors observed in blog networks? Earlier

  17. Partial Dynamical Symmetries in Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Leviatan

    2000-07-26

    Partial dynamical symmetries (PDS) are shown to be relevant to the interpretation of the $K=0_2$ band and to the occurrence of F-spin multiplets of ground and scissors bands in deformed nuclei. Hamiltonians with bosonic and fermionic PDS are presented.

  18. Critical phenomena in evolutionary dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manapat, Michael L. (Michael Linn)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis consists of five essays on evolutionary dynamics. In Chapters 1 and 2, we study the evolution of trust from the perspective of game theory. In the trust game, two players have a chance to win a sum of money. ...

  19. Pedestrian, Crowd, and Evacuation Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    This contribution describes efforts to model the behavior of individual pedestrians and their interactions in crowds, which generate certain kinds of self-organized patterns of motion. Moreover, this article focusses on the dynamics of crowds in panic or evacuation situations, methods to optimize building designs for egress, and factors potentially causing the breakdown of orderly motion.

  20. Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Lattice Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Non­equilibrium Dynamics in Lattice Systems: Epitaxial Growth and Time dependent Density Functional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.3.1 Island densities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.3.2 Island size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3.2 Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.2.1 Multi-island

  1. Mesoscale Dynamics Spring Semester 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birner, Thomas

    ATS 735 Mesoscale Dynamics (3 cr) Spring Semester 2012 Instructor: Richard H. Johnson, Room ATS 305: There are no required texts. The recent book Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes by Markowski and Richardson covers with mesoscale-related research. A set of notes will be made available for the course, although we will not cover

  2. DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge...

  3. Parameter and state estimation in nonlinear dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creveling, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    and J. Kurths. Nonlinear dynamical system identi?ca- tionEstimation In Nonlinear Dynamical Systems A dissertationState Estimation In Nonlinear Dynamical Systems by Daniel R.

  4. Dynamic Operational Risk Assessment with Bayesian Network 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Shubharthi

    2012-10-19

    dependencies of equipment/components and timing of safety system operations, all of which are time dependent criteria that can influence dynamic processes. The conventional risk assessment methodologies can quantify dynamic changes in processes with limited...

  5. Mathematics 658 Nonlinear Dynamics and Geometic Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloch, Anthony

    Mathematics 658 Nonlinear Dynamics and Geometic Mechanics Instructor: Anthony M. Bloch. Office of ordinary differential equations and dynamical systems, with applications to various mechanical and physical geometry, nonlinear stability theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, integrable systems, reduction

  6. Mapping molecular dynamics computations to hypercubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakamsani, Vamsee Krishna

    1993-01-01

    This thesis proposes an approach for systematic modeling, mapping and performance analysis of a Grand Challenge application problem in computational biology called Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Proteins. Molecular Dynamics (MD) is an important...

  7. Lab experiences for teaching undergraduate dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilienkamp, Katherine A. (Katherine Ann), 1969-

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes several projects developed to teach undergraduate dynamics and controls. The materials were developed primarily for the class 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I. These include (1) a set of ActivLab ...

  8. Protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Venugopal T.

    2011-11-23

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a novel approach to medicinal chemistry which integrates the synthesis and screening of small molecule libraries into a single step. The concept uses reversible chemical reactions to present a dynamic library...

  9. Finding Bugs In Dynamic Web Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artzi, Shay

    2008-02-06

    Web script crashes and malformed dynamically-generated web pages are common errors, and they seriously impact usability of web applications. Currenttools for web-page validation cannot handle the dynamically-generatedpages ...

  10. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    2013-01-01

    a simulant fluid to match the dynamics of fuel pebbles andfuel pebbles through reactor cores with and without coupled fluid

  11. Dynamic Screening and Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei V. Gruzinov

    1997-02-06

    We show that there are no dynamic screening corrections to the Salpeter's enhancement factor in the weak-screening limit.

  12. Insight Gained from Simplified Dynamic Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insight Gained from Simplified Dynamic Analysis ... or Everything Old is New Again October 21, 2014 Greg Mertz Consultant

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of electrolytes andelectrolyte...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    studies of electrolytes and electrolyteelectrode interfaces Molecular dynamics simulation studies of electrolytes and electrolyteelectrode interfaces 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

  14. Composition of Dynamic Analysis Aspects Eric Tanter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binder, Walter

    Composition of Dynamic Analysis Aspects ´Eric Tanter PLEIAD Laboratory Computer Science Department thanks to recent advances in exhaustive weaving in core libraries. Casting dynamic analyses as aspects, simultaneously. However, even if dynamic analysis as- pects are mutually independent, their mere presence

  15. An Infrastructure for Adaptive Dynamic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarasinghe, Saman

    An Infrastructure for Adaptive Dynamic Optimization Derek Bruening, Timothy Garnett, and Saman,timothyg,saman}@lcs.mit.edu Abstract Dynamic optimization is emerging as a promising ap- proach to overcome many of the obstacles static optimizations, there are very few for developing dynamic optimizations. We present a framework

  16. September 2015 MSME in Dynamics and Vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    Arrival Spring Semester: 9cr ME 861 Advanced Dynamics 3 cr ME 814 Convective Heat Transfer (Breadth course and Research Topics Dynamics: Kinematics in two and three dimensions, Newton's equations of motion, energy body dynamics. (Mukherjee, Feeny) Vibration: Mathematical modeling of vibration systems using

  17. Computability and Dynamical Systems: a Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graça, Daniel S.

    Computability and Dynamical Systems: a Perspective Daniel S. Gra¸ca SQIG - IT and DM In this paper we look at dynamical systems from a computability per- spective. We survey some topics and themes of research for dynamical systems and then see how they can be fitted in a computational frame- work. We

  18. Geometric control and dynamical systems Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Geometric control and dynamical systems Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Equations and Applications Ludovic Rifford Geometric control and dynamical systems #12;Control of an inverted pendulum Ludovic Rifford Geometric control and dynamical systems #12;Control systems A general

  19. LANGUAGE LEARNING AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Mark W.

    LANGUAGE LEARNING AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty LEARNING AND NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS Mark William Andrews, Ph.D. Cornell University 2003 The thesis be provided by an better appreciation of the capacities of nonlinear dynamical systems to learn, rep- resent

  20. Resource Management for Dynamic Reconfigurable Hardware Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huss, Sorin A.

    Resource Management for Dynamic Reconfigurable Hardware Structures Andreas K¨uhn, Felix Madlener|madlener|huss}@iss.tu-darmstadt.de Abstract-- Garbage-Collection for reconfigurable hardware systems is another step to make dynamic reconfigurable hardware usable. By now, dynamic reconfiguration of FPGAs is still based on common hardware design

  1. Control algorithms for dynamic attenuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Scott S., E-mail: sshsieh@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pelc, Norbert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors describe algorithms to control dynamic attenuators in CT and compare their performance using simulated scans. Dynamic attenuators are prepatient beam shaping filters that modulate the distribution of x-ray fluence incident on the patient on a view-by-view basis. These attenuators can reduce dose while improving key image quality metrics such as peak or mean variance. In each view, the attenuator presents several degrees of freedom which may be individually adjusted. The total number of degrees of freedom across all views is very large, making many optimization techniques impractical. The authors develop a theory for optimally controlling these attenuators. Special attention is paid to a theoretically perfect attenuator which controls the fluence for each ray individually, but the authors also investigate and compare three other, practical attenuator designs which have been previously proposed: the piecewise-linear attenuator, the translating attenuator, and the double wedge attenuator. Methods: The authors pose and solve the optimization problems of minimizing the mean and peak variance subject to a fixed dose limit. For a perfect attenuator and mean variance minimization, this problem can be solved in simple, closed form. For other attenuator designs, the problem can be decomposed into separate problems for each view to greatly reduce the computational complexity. Peak variance minimization can be approximately solved using iterated, weighted mean variance (WMV) minimization. Also, the authors develop heuristics for the perfect and piecewise-linear attenuators which do not requirea priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. The authors compare these control algorithms on different types of dynamic attenuators using simulated raw data from forward projected DICOM files of a thorax and an abdomen. Results: The translating and double wedge attenuators reduce dose by an average of 30% relative to current techniques (bowtie filter with tube current modulation) without increasing peak variance. The 15-element piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces dose by an average of 42%, and the perfect attenuator reduces dose by an average of 50%. Improvements in peak variance are several times larger than improvements in mean variance. Heuristic control eliminates the need for a prescan. For the piecewise-linear attenuator, the cost of heuristic control is an increase in dose of 9%. The proposed iterated WMV minimization produces results that are within a few percent of the true solution. Conclusions: Dynamic attenuators show potential for significant dose reduction. A wide class of dynamic attenuators can be accurately controlled using the described methods.

  2. Dynamic Logics of Dynamical Systems ANDR E PLATZER, Carnegie Mellon University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platzer, André

    . Dynamical systems are mathematical models describing how the state of a system evolves over time. They are important for modeling and understanding many applications, including embedded systems and cyber of differential equations. We explain the dynamical system models, dynamic logics of dynamical systems

  3. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 175101 (2013) Dynamic neutron scattering from conformational dynamics. I. Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    #12;THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 175101 (2013) Dynamic neutron scattering from, a conformational dynamics theory of dynamical neutron and X-ray scattering is developed, follow- ing our previous spectroscopy (dynamic neutron scattering) probes time correlations on the sub pico- to microsec- ond timescales

  4. Dynamical Systems and Applications of Nonlinear Functional Analysis to Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Meirong

    Dynamical Systems and Applications of Nonlinear Functional Analysis to Dynamical Systems Meirong consists of three parts. In Part 1 we introduce some basic concepts in dynamical systems, including limit sets, nonwandering sets, topological conjugacy, clas- sification of discrete dynamical systems under

  5. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  6. Predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, H; Stienkemeier, F; Bogomolov, A S; Baklanov, A V; Reich, D M; Skomorowski, W; Koch, C P; Mudrich, M

    2015-01-01

    The predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide (LiI) in the first excited A-state is investigated for molecules in the gas phase and embedded in helium nanodroplets, using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. In the gas phase, the transient Li+ and LiI+ ion signals feature damped oscillations due to the excitation and decay of a vibrational wave packet. Based on high-level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of LiI and simulations of the wave packet dynamics, the exponential signal decay is found to result from predissociation predominantly at the lowest avoided X-A potential curve crossing, for which we infer a coupling constant V=650(20) reciprocal cm. The lack of a pump-probe delay dependence for the case of LiI embedded in helium nanodroplets indicates fast droplet-induced relaxation of the vibrational excitation.

  7. Color Dynamics On Phase Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bonasera

    2000-03-09

    We describe the properties of quark matter at zero temperature and finite baryon densities within microscopic Vlasov/molecular dynamics approaches. We use an inter-quark Richardson's potential consistent with the indications of Lattice QCD calculations. The color degrees of freedom are explicitly taken into account. We explicitly demonstrate that the Vlasov approach alone is insufficient in the hadronization region. In order to overcome this problem we prepare the initial condition for many events using molecular dynamics with frictional cooling and a Thomas-Fermi approximation to the Fermi motion. These events are averaged and propagated in time using the Vlasov approach. We find some evidence for a second order phase transition from nuclear to quark matter at high baryon densities. An order parameter suitable to describe the phase transition is discussed. At low densities the quark condensate into approximately color white clusters (nucleon).

  8. Learning Dynamics in Economic Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spanknebel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    When playing games human decision behaviour is often found to be diverse. For instance, in repeated prisoner dilemma games humans exhibit broad distributions of cooperativity and on average do not optimize their mean payoff. Deviations from optimal behaviour have been attributed to auxiliary causes including randomness of decisions, mis-estimations of probabilities, accessory objectives, or emotional biases. Here we show that also the dynamics resulting from of a general tendency to shift preferences towards previously rewarding choices in interaction with the strategy of the opponent can contribute substantially to observed lacks of 'rationality'. As a representative example we investigate the dynamics of choice preferences in prisoner dilemma games with opponents exhibiting different degrees of extortion and generosity. We find that already a very simple model for human learning can account for a surprisingly wide range of human decision behaviours. In particular, the theory can reproduce reduced cooperatio...

  9. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheat, S.R.

    1997-05-13

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers is disclosed. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated. 13 figs.

  10. Gate complexity using Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivas Sridharan; Mile Gu; Matthew R. James

    2008-07-03

    The relationship between efficient quantum gate synthesis and control theory has been a topic of interest in the quantum control literature. Motivated by this work, we describe in the present article how the dynamic programming technique from optimal control may be used for the optimal synthesis of quantum circuits. We demonstrate simulation results on an example system on SU(2), to obtain plots related to the gate complexity and sample paths for different logic gates.

  11. Exact Dynamical and Partial Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Leviatan

    2010-12-15

    We discuss a hierarchy of broken symmetries with special emphasis on partial dynamical symmetries (PDS). The latter correspond to a situation in which a non-invariant Hamiltonian accommodates a subset of solvable eigenstates with good symmetry, while other eigenstates are mixed. We present an algorithm for constructing Hamiltonians with this property and demonstrate the relevance of the PDS notion to nuclear spectroscopy, to quantum phase transitions and to mixed systems with coexisting regularity and chaos.

  12. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheat, Stephen R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated.

  13. Dynamical 3-Space: Emergent Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2011-02-16

    The laws of gravitation devised by Newton, and by Hilbert and Einstein, have failed many experimental and observational tests, namely the bore hole g anomaly, flat rotation curves for spiral galaxies, supermassive black hole mass spectrum, uniformly expanding universe, cosmic filaments, laboratory G measurements, galactic EM bending, precocious galaxy formation,.. The response has been the introduction of the new epicycles: ``dark matter", ``dark energy", and others. To understand gravity we must restart with the experimental discoveries by Galileo, and following a heuristic argument we are led to a uniquely determined theory of a dynamical 3-space. That 3-space exists has been missed from the beginning of physics, although it was 1st directly detected by Michelson and Morley in 1887. Uniquely generalising the quantum theory to include this dynamical 3-space we deduce the response of quantum matter and show that it results in a new account of gravity, and explains the above anomalies and others. The dynamical theory for this 3-space involves G, which determines the dissipation rate of space by matter, and alpha, which experiments and observation reveal to be the fine structure constant. For the 1st time we have a comprehensive account of space and matter and their interaction - gravity.

  14. Integrability in the mesoscopic dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artur Sowa

    2004-09-12

    The Mesoscopic Mechanics (MeM), which has been introduced in a previous paper, is relevant to the electron gas confined to two spatial dimensions. It predicts a special way of collective response of correlated electrons to the external magnetic field. The dynamic variable of this theory is a finite-dimensional operator, which is required to satisfy the mesoscopic Schr\\"{o}dinger equation (cf. text). In this article, we describe general solutions of the mesoscopic Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. Our approach is specific to the problem at hand. It relies on the unique structure of the equation and makes no reference to any other techniques, with the exception of the geometry of unitary groups. In conclusion, a surprising fact comes to light. Namely, the mesoscopic dynamics "filters" through the (microscopic) Schr\\"odinger dynamics as the latter turns out to be a clearly separable part, in fact an autonomous factor, of the evolution. This is a desirable result also from the physical standpoint.

  15. Reputational Learning and Network Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Simpson

    2015-01-01

    In many real world networks agents are initially unsure of each other's qualities and learn about each other over time via repeated interactions. This paper is the first to provide a methodology for studying the formation of such networks, taking into account that agents differ from each other, that they begin with incomplete information, and that they must learn through observations which connections/links to form and which to break. The network dynamics in our model vary drastically from the dynamics emerging in models of complete information. With incomplete information and learning, agents who provide high benefits will develop high reputations and remain in the network, while agents who provide low benefits will drop in reputation and become ostracized. We show, among many other things, that the information to which agents have access and the speed at which they learn and act can have tremendous impact on the resulting network dynamics. Using our model, we can also compute the \\textit{ex ante} social wel...

  16. Simulation and sequential dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    Computer simulations have a generic structure. Motivated by this the authors present a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {yields} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper), which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes.

  17. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  18. Brownian dynamics without Green's functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delong, Steven; Donev, Aleksandar; Usabiaga, Florencio Balboa; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Griffith, Boyce E.; Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016

    2014-04-07

    We develop a Fluctuating Immersed Boundary (FIB) method for performing Brownian dynamics simulations of confined particle suspensions. Unlike traditional methods which employ analytical Green's functions for Stokes flow in the confined geometry, the FIB method uses a fluctuating finite-volume Stokes solver to generate the action of the response functions “on the fly.” Importantly, we demonstrate that both the deterministic terms necessary to capture the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles, as well as the stochastic terms necessary to generate the hydrodynamically correlated Brownian motion, can be generated by solving the steady Stokes equations numerically only once per time step. This is accomplished by including a stochastic contribution to the stress tensor in the fluid equations consistent with fluctuating hydrodynamics. We develop novel temporal integrators that account for the multiplicative nature of the noise in the equations of Brownian dynamics and the strong dependence of the mobility on the configuration for confined systems. Notably, we propose a random finite difference approach to approximating the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. Through comparisons with analytical and existing computational results, we numerically demonstrate the ability of the FIB method to accurately capture both the static (equilibrium) and dynamic properties of interacting particles in flow.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of Electrolytes and ElectrolyteElectrode Interfaces Molecular dynamics simulation studies of electrolytes and electrolyteelectrode...

  20. Dynamic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev.Metals CaseEVALUATION

  1. H.M.S. Solebay and Maritime Archaeological Heritage Preservation in Nevis, West Indies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartellone, Chris

    2015-05-04

    site formation, onto a volcanic seafloor in dynamic tropical waters, has largely precluded the survival of ship timbers or other organic materials. However, metal artifacts and six iron guns have been documented and the microenvironment has afforded...

  2. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Protein Solutions: Structural and Dynamical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Gabdoulline, Razif; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2010-12-01

    The study of solutions of biomacromolecules provides an important basis for understanding the behavior of many fundamental cellular processes, such as protein folding, self-assembly, biochemical reactions, and signal transduction. Here, we describe a Brownian dynamics simulation procedure and its validation for the study of the dynamic and structural properties of protein solutions. In the model used, the proteins are treated as atomically detailed rigid bodies moving in a continuum solvent. The protein-protein interaction forces are described by the sum of electrostatic interaction, electrostatic desolvation, nonpolar desolvation, and soft-core repulsion terms. The linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved to compute electrostatic terms. Simulations of homogeneous solutions of three different proteins with varying concentrations, pH, and ionic strength were performed. The results were compared to experimental data and theoretical values in terms of long-time self-diffusion coefficients, second virial coefficients, and structure factors. The results agree with the experimental trends and, in many cases, experimental values are reproduced quantitatively. There are no parameters specific to certain protein types in the interaction model, and hence the model should be applicable to the simulation of the behavior of mixtures of macromolecules in cell-like crowded environments.

  3. Why quantum dynamics is linear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Jordan

    2007-02-16

    Quantum dynamics is linear. How do we know? From theory or experiment? The history of this question is reviewed. Nonlinear generalizations of quantum mechanics have been proposed. They predict small but clear nonlinear effects, which very accurate experiments have not seen. Is there a reason in principle why nonlinearity is not found? Is it impossible? Does quantum dynamics have to be linear? Attempts to prove this have not been decisive, because either their assumptions are not compelling or their arguments are not conclusive. The question has been left unsettled. There is a simple answer, based on a simple assumption. It was found in two steps separated by 44 years. They are steps back to simpler and more compelling assumptions. A proof of the assumptions of the Wigner-Bargmann proof has been known since 1962. It assumes that the maps of density matrices in time are linear. For this step, it is also assumed that density matrices are mapped one-to-one onto density matrices. An alternative is to assume that pure states are mapped one-to-one onto pure states and that entropy does not decrease. In a step taken in 2006, it is proved that the maps of density matrices in time are linear. It is assumed, as in the earlier step, that at each time the physical quantities and states are described by the usual linear structures of quantum mechanics, so the question is only about how things change in time. Beyond that, the proof assumes only that the dynamics does not depend on anything outside the system, but must allow the system to be described as part of a larger system.

  4. A Relativistic Dynamical Collapse Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Pearle

    2014-12-21

    A model is discussed where all operators are constructed from a quantum scalar field whose energy spectrum takes on all real values. The Schr\\"odinger picture wave function depends upon space and time coordinates for each particle, as well as an inexorably increasing evolution parameter $s$ which labels a foliation of space-like hypersurfaces. The model is constructed to be manifestly Lorentz invariant in the interaction picture. Free particle states and interactions are discussed in this framework. Then, the formalism of the CSL (Continuous Spontaneous Localization) theory of dynamical collapse is applied. The collapse-generating operator is chosen to to be the particle number space-time density. Unlike previous relativistically invariant models, the vacuum state is not excited. The collapse dynamics depends upon two parameters, a parameter $\\Lambda$ which represents the collapse rate/volume and a scale factor $\\ell$. A common example of collapse dynamics, involving a clump of matter in a superposition of two locations, is analyzed. The collapse rate is shown to be identical to that of non-relativistic CSL when the GRW-CSL choice of $\\ell=a=10^{-5}$cm, is made, along with $\\Lambda=\\lambda/a^{3}$ (GRW-CSL choice $\\lambda=10^{-16}s^{-1}$). However, it is also shown that the change of mass of a nucleon over the age of the universe is then unacceptably large. The case where $\\ell$ is the size of the universe is then considered. It is shown that the collapse behavior is satisfactory and the change of mass over the age of the universe is acceptably small, when $\\Lambda= \\lambda/\\ell a^{2}$.

  5. Lagrangian continuum dynamics in ALEGRA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Michael K. W.; Love, Edward

    2007-12-01

    Alegra is an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) multi-material finite element code that emphasizes large deformations and strong shock physics. The Lagrangian continuum dynamics package in Alegra uses a Galerkin finite element spatial discretization and an explicit central-difference stepping method in time. The goal of this report is to describe in detail the characteristics of this algorithm, including the conservation and stability properties. The details provided should help both researchers and analysts understand the underlying theory and numerical implementation of the Alegra continuum hydrodynamics algorithm.

  6. Viral BLIP dynamics during HAART.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, M.; Louie, M. (Michael); Hurley, A. (Arlene); Ho, David D.; Perelson, Alan S.,; Di Mascio, M. (Michele)

    2001-01-01

    Intermittent episodes of low-level viremia (blips) are often observed in well-suppressed, HAART-treated patients. It has been reported that viral blips do not correlate with the emergence of new HAART-related mutations; however, increased frequency of blips correlates with slower decay of latently infected cells. Since blips are transient and unpredictable, detailed knowledge about them is difficult to obtain. We present an analysis of the dynamics of viral blips from viral load (VL) measurements on 123 patients for a period of 809k480d (21-1817d) and sampled every 31{+-}12d for a total of 26{+-}15 samples per patient.

  7. Simulations with dynamical HISQ quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bazavov; C. Bernard; C. DeTar; W. Freeman; Steven Gottlieb; U. M. Heller; J. E. Hetrick; J. Laiho; L. Levkova; M. Oktay; J. Osborn; R. L. Sugar; D. Toussaint; R. S. Van de Water

    2010-12-06

    We report on the status of a program of generating and using configurations with four flavors of dynamical quarks, using the HISQ action. We study the lattice spacing dependence of physical quantities in these simulations, using runs at several lattice spacings, but with the light quark mass held fixed at two tenths of the strange quark mass. We find that the lattice artifacts in the HISQ simulations are much smaller than those in the asqtad simulations at the same lattice spacings and quark masses. We also discuss methods for setting the scale, or assigning a lattice spacing to ensembles run at unphysical parameters.

  8. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCenter (LMI-EFRC)LodgingSchool » Los Alamos Dynamics Summer

  9. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCenter (LMI-EFRC)LodgingSchool » Los Alamos Dynamics

  10. Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |FinalIndustrial Technologies Industrial3 Fluid Dynamics

  11. Ultrafast studies of solution dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Dyer, R.B.; Callender, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fast chemical dynamics generally must be initiated photochemically. This limits the applicability of modern laser methods for following the structural changes that occur during chemical and biological reactions to those systems that have an electronic chromophore that has a significant yield of photoproduct when excited. This project has developed a new and entirely general approach to ultrafast initiation of reactions in solution: laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump). The results open entire new fields of study of ultrafast molecular dynamics in solution. The authors have demonstrated the T-jump technique on time scales of 50 ps and longer, and have applied it to study of the fast events in protein folding. They find that a general lifetime of alpha-helix formation is ca 100 ns, and that tertiary folds (in apomyoglobin) form in ca 100 {mu}s.

  12. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Mann; Devdutt Shukla; John P. Hurley

    2003-09-27

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) is being utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. Shakedown testing of the CADCAF is in progress. Samples of slag and refractory from the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station have been obtained for testing in the CADCAF. The slag has been dried and sieved to the size needed for our flowing slag corrosion tests. Testing is expected to begin in October.

  13. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Mann; Devdutt Shukla; Xi Hong; John P. Hurley

    2004-09-27

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) is being utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. Shakedown testing of the CADCAF has been completed. Samples of slag and refractory from the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station have been obtained for testing in the CADCAF. The slag has been dried and sieved to the size needed for our flowing slag corrosion tests. Screening tests are in currently in progress. Detailed analysis of corrosion rates from the first tests is in progress.

  14. Dynamics of Electrostatic MEMS Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yisong; Zhao, Le

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic actuators are simple but important switching devices for MEMS applications. Due to the difficulties associated with the electrostatic nonlinearity, precise mathematical description is often hard to obtain for the dynamics of these actuators. Here we present two sharp theorems concerning the dynamics of an undamped electrostatic actuator with one-degree of freedom, subject to linear and nonlinear elastic forces, respectively. We prove that both situations are characterized by the onset of one-stagnation-point periodic response below a well-defined pull-in voltage and a finite-time touch-down or collapse of the actuator above this pull-in voltage. In the linear-force situation, the stagnation level, pull-in voltage, and pull-in coordinate of the movable electrode may all be determined explicitly, following the recent work of Leus and Elata based on numerics. Furthermore, in the nonlinear-force situation, the stagnation level, pull-in voltage, and pull-in coordinate may be described completely in t...

  15. Autosub missions beneath Polar Ice: Preparation and Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    events implemented (up from 1); ordered sequences of events to trigger next mission element added. J and shelf ice. 4 - 12 kHz chirp sub-bottom profiler to obtain the stratigraphy within sediments Water

  16. Frequency-magnitude distribution of microearthquakes beneath the 9500

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne

    at shallow depths and relatively high stress levels (or low pore pressures) observed away from the axial zone there also exists significant spatial variability. This indicates that stress conditions and/or structural. As a byproduct of this b value analysis, the detection capabilities of the array are assessed empirically

  17. Evidence for Deep Magma Injection Beneath Lake Tahoe,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    , and the consequent eastward collapse of the competent Sierra Nevada block. Paleozoic and Mesozoic roof pendants ( 1 and 2) compressive stresses (4, 5). The base of the seismogenic zone in the region varies locally from about 15 to 18 km (6). In the Lake Tahoe area, no crustal earth- quakes deeper than 20 km can

  18. Crustal and upper mantle structure beneath Antarctica and surrounding oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    that Antarctic ice sheets insulate geologists from direct crustal observation, but it is also related to the difficulty and expense of acquiring high-quality well- distributed seismic information across the continent. Controlled source seismic experiments (long baseline refraction and reflection profiles) have provided fairly

  19. Understanding what lies beneath: Groundwater critical to Texas water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    of organizations and programs associated with groundwater in Texas: Aquifers: Geological formations that can store, transmit, and yield groundwater to a well or spring. Groundwater comes from nine major and 21 minor aquifers in Texas. Confined aquifer: Layer... of water that is held between two layers of clay. The recharge area is limited to land surface where the aquifer?s geologic material is exposed to the land surface. Unconfined aquifer: Layer of water that has a confining layer on bottom and a layer...

  20. Connotation Lexicon: A Dash of Sentiment Beneath the Surface Meaning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    of sentiment beyond denotative or surface meaning of text. For instance, consider the following: Geothermal toward "geothermal". In order to sense the subtle overtone of sentiments, one needs to know that the word "emissions" has generally negative connota- tion, which geothermal reduces. In fact, depend- ing

  1. Beneath the Surface of Giant Planets: Evolution, Structure, and Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly Miller, Neil L.

    2013-01-01

    larger. 2. Tidal evolution deposits energy into the planetin combination with tidal dissipation to deposit energy intothe tidal-thermal evolution model, including energy-limited

  2. Temperatures at the Base of the Seismogenic Crust Beneath Long...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow for a given rock type, and it varies with both strain rate and water content. Earthquake activity and deformation accompanying recent unrest in Long Valley caldera,...

  3. Lithosphere structure beneath the Phanerozoic intracratonic basins of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    for vertical heat transport, each basin requires a different lithosphere thickness or a different boundary American craton, the lithosphere is too thick for the assumption of purely vertical heat transfer, the downward extrapolation of crustal geotherms deal with the upper part where heat transport occurs

  4. Beneath the Surface of Giant Planets: Evolution, Structure, and Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly Miller, Neil L.

    2013-01-01

    panel: ratio between tidal power injected into the planetpanel: ratio between tidal power injected into the planet2001) calculated the tidal power required to maintain the

  5. The 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Abstract Mammoth Mountain is a 50,000- to 200,000-year-old cumulovolcano standing on the southwestern rim of Long Valley in eastern California. On 4 May 1989, two M ...

  6. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    around 1980 and has included periods of intense seismicity and ground deformation. Uplift totaling more than 0.7 m has been centered on the caldera's resurgent dome, and is...

  7. Beneath the Surface of Giant Planets: Evolution, Structure, and Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly Miller, Neil L.

    2013-01-01

    The power ratio, tidal power to luminosity, describes howThe ratio of input tidal power to net radiated power is

  8. On isolated vorticity regions beneath the water surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Octavian G. Mustafa

    2011-03-12

    We present a class of vorticity functions that will allow for isolated, circular vorticity regions in the background of still water preceding the arrival of a tsunami wave at the shoreline.

  9. Slab plume interaction beneath the Pacific Northwest Mathias Obrebski,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    the Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) and second, that the subducting Juan de Fuca (JdF) slab is fragmented- canic outpouring that occurred 17 Ma. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) hosts a bimodal volcanic volcanic provinces. The Columbia River Basalts (CRB, Figure 1) is the product of a phase of massive vol

  10. Beneath the Surface of Giant Planets: Evolution, Structure, and Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly Miller, Neil L.

    2013-01-01

    evolution allows the planet to cool more efficiently attimes, which allows the planet to cool more efficiently andof these cases, the planet will later cool off before the

  11. A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and in investigating the behaviors of magma and volcanic fluids. We carried out audio-frequency magnetotelluric surveys around the craters of Naka-dake in 2004 and 2005 to...

  12. Mapping the Hydrothermal System Beneath the Western Moat of Long...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under the Magma Energy Program, and by the DOE Office of Energy Research, Division of Engineering and Geosciences (DEG), along with the USGS and NSE, under the Continental...

  13. Magmatichydrothermal evolution and devolatilization beneath Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a supercritical fluid and that it subsequently exsolved into a H2O­Cl­F-rich brine and CO2­S-rich vapor. According °C fluid, although the presence of H2S, SO2 and CO2 may cause the supercritical fluid to unmix inclusions Volcanic gases Vapor-brine exsolution CO2­H2O barometry At Merapi volcano, Indonesia, explosive

  14. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  15. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  16. Investigating the changing deformation mechanism beneath shallow foundations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madabhushi, Srikanth Satyanarayana Chakrapani; Haigh, Stuart Kenneth

    2015-06-02

    as the settlement increased. It was also shown the upper bound based load settlement predictions matched well with the finite element analyses of Gourvenec and Randolph (2003) and Taiebat and Carter (2000). McMahon et al (2013a) proposed a single design line... mechanism. E-grade Kaolin clay was consolidated from slurry to avoid soil strength and stiffness anisotropy. A consolidometer was used that applied a uniform stress via a hydraulic piston with the stress being applied increased in increasing stages...

  17. The 1989 Earthquake Swarm Beneath Mammoth Mountain, California: An Initial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |Information 5th congressionalNIESLook at the 4 May Through

  18. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative Coolers Jump to:WindEverguard

  19. Structure and Stratigraphy Beneath a Young Phreatic Vent: South Inyo

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPageBeforeCreek WindInsulatedCrater, Long Valley

  20. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSet RenewableFuelStandard Jump to:using Seismic

  1. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  2. A Dynamical Systems Approach to Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This talk will discuss a general software framework for the computation of periodic orbits of high-dimensional dynamical systems, that is based on a matrix-

  3. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Summer School Projects and Resources Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email...

  4. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  5. A Dynamic Platform for Runtime Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Hubert

    We present a middleware platform for assembling pervasive applications that demand fault-tolerance and adaptivity in distributed, dynamic environments. Unlike typical adaptive middleware approaches, in which sophisticated ...

  6. The Dynamics of Moonlighting in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyder, Asma; Ahmed, Ather Maqsood

    2011-01-01

    of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan January 2011 10945 LeDynamics of Moonlighting in Pakistan Asma Hyder and Ather18 March, 2010 Islamabad, Pakistan Institute of Development

  7. Dynamical ensembles equivalence in fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Gallavotti

    1996-05-09

    Dissipative Euler and Navier Stokes equations are discussed with the aim of proposing several experiments apt to test the equivalence of dynamical ensembles and the chaotic hypothesis.

  8. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Granados...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Granados, Carlos G. Uppsala University (Sweden); Weiss, Christian JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States) 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY...

  9. Dynamics in Polymer | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron scattering characterizes dynamics in polymer family Agatha Bardoel - December 01, 2012 Interior of BASIS. Research Contact: Christine Gerstl Understanding the interplay...

  10. Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties, in particular of single crystals, ceramics, and nuclear fuels; Measures static and dynamic mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, polymers and energetic...

  11. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Communication:...

  12. Generalized Partial Dynamical Symmetries in Nuclear Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Leviatan

    2002-10-23

    Explicit forms of IBM Hamiltonians with a generalized partial dynamical O(6) symmetry are presented and compared with empirical data in $^{162}$Dy.

  13. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Coatings Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is used to clean test substrates for window coatings. Image: Pacific Northwest...

  14. LASER PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTION DYNAMICS IN FORMALDEHYDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zughul, Muhammad B.

    2011-01-01

    Results . . . . . A. Formaldehyde H co (354.7 nm) . • H co +Photopredissociation in Formaldehyde A. Spectroscopy . . . .REACTION DYNAMICS IN FORMALDEHYDE Muhammad Bari Ahmad Zughul

  15. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of Polypeptides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragavan, Mukundan

    2014-06-27

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides remarkable site resolution, but often requires signal averaging because of low sensitivity. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which offers large signal ...

  16. On the Dynamic Stability of Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-09

    been used to analyze the effect of dynamic disturbances such as wind on prices under ...... The operation of large steam turbines to limit cyclic thermal cracking.

  17. Dynamic Portfolio Optimization with Transaction Costs: Heuristics ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-03

    Aug 10, 2010 ... Dynamic Portfolio Optimization with Transaction. Costs: Heuristics and Dual Bounds. David B. Brown and James E. Smith?. Fuqua School of ...

  18. Dissipative Particle Dynamics with Energy Conservation: Dynamic and Transport Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josep Bonet Avalos; Allan D. Mackie

    2000-02-16

    Simulation results of the thermal conductivity ${\\cal L}$ of Dissipative Particle Dynamics model with Energy Conservation (DPDE) are reported. We also present an analysis of the transport equations and the transport coefficients for DPDE based on a local equilibrium approximation. This approach is valid when the particle-particle thermal conductivity $\\lambda$ and the friction coefficient $\\zeta$ are large. A qualitative derivation of the scaling form of the kinetic contribution of the transport of energy is derived, yielding two different forms for the kinetic contribution to the heat transport, depending on the value of $\\lambda$. We find agreement between the theoretically predicted value for ${\\cal L}$ and the simulation results, for large $\\lambda$ and many particles interacting at one time. Significant differences are found for small number of interacting particles, even with large $\\lambda$. For smaller values of $\\lambda$, the obtained macroscopic thermal conductivity is dominated by diffusive transport, in agreement with the proposed scaling form.

  19. Dynamically orthogonal field equations for stochastic fluid flows and particle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapsis, Themistoklis P

    2011-01-01

    In the past decades an increasing number of problems in continuum theory have been treated using stochastic dynamical theories. This is because dynamical systems governing real processes always contain some elements ...

  20. BEAM DYNAMICS IN NS-FFAG EMMAWITH DYNAMICAL MAPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giboudot, Y; Edgecock, R; Wolski, A

    2010-01-01

    The Non Scal­ing Fixed Field Al­ter­nat­ing Gra­di­ent EMMA has a com­pact lin­ear lat­tice. Ef­fect of Fringe Field on the beam has to be stud­ied care­ful­ly. A nu­mer­i­cal mag­net­ic field map is gen­er­at­ed by mag­net mea­sure­ments or mag­net de­sign soft­wares. We de­vel­oped a tech­nique that pro­duces from the nu­mer­i­cal field map, a dy­nam­i­cal map for a par­ti­cle trav­el­ling in the en­tire EMMA cell for a ref­er­ence en­er­gy with­out ac­cel­er­a­tion. Since the beam dy­nam­ics change with en­er­gy, a set of maps have been pro­duce with dif­fer­ent ref­er­ence en­er­gies be­tween 10 and 20MeV. For each ref­er­ence en­er­gy, sim­u­lat­ed tune and time of flight (TOF) have been com­pared with re­sults in Zgoubi - track­ing di­rect­ly through nu­mer­i­cal field map. The range of va­lid­i­ty of a sin­gle map has been in­ves­ti­gat­ed by track­ing par­ti­cle with large en­er­gy de­vi­a­tion. From that, a ...

  1. ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control Chapter 1: Introduction to System Dynamics CChhaapptteerr 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Qahtani, Hussain M.

    heat) when excited by temperature or heat flow. A heating system warming a house has a dynamic response

  2. Dynamic System Response of Truss Panels under High Dynamic Loading through Experimental & Computation Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    to investigate the dynamic performance of truss panel systems. Two configurations were computer simulated to correlate experimental system failure limits under dynamic load. The computer code matched the experimental was the only trusted metric of dynamic performance of system. Computer codes were too inaccurate

  3. Phenol-benzene complexation dynamics: Quantum chemistry calculation, molecular dynamics simulations, and two dimensional IR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Phenol-benzene complexation dynamics: Quantum chemistry calculation, molecular dynamics simulations the nature and dynamics of the phenol-benzene complex in the mixed solvent, benzene/CCl4. Under thermal used for the phenol-benzene interaction in the MD simulations is in good accord with the highest level

  4. Plasticity of metal wires in torsion: Molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    Plasticity of metal wires in torsion: Molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations t The orientation dependent plasticity in metal nanowires is investigated using molecular dynamics and dislocation wires controls the mechanisms of plastic deformation. For wires oriented along /1 1 0S, dislocations

  5. Approximate Dynamic Programming for Dynamic Capacity Allocation with Multiple Priority Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topaloglu, Huseyin

    Approximate Dynamic Programming for Dynamic Capacity Allocation with Multiple Priority Levels In this paper, we consider a quite general dynamic capacity allocation problem. There is a fixed amount of daily to construct separable approximations to the value functions. We use the value function approximations for two

  6. FOCUS ISSUE: Nonlinear dynamics related to polymeric systems Overview: Nonlinear dynamics related to polymeric systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    FOCUS ISSUE: Nonlinear dynamics related to polymeric systems Overview: Nonlinear dynamics related is another promising practical application of nonlinear chemical dynamics. In this issue we focus on non is known about nonlinear phenom- ena in polymeric systems. One reason for the lack of interest in nonlinear

  7. STATIC SECTORIZATION APPROACH TO DYNAMIC AIRSPACE CONFIGURATION USING APPROXIMATE DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 STATIC SECTORIZATION APPROACH TO DYNAMIC AIRSPACE CONFIGURATION USING APPROXIMATE DYNAMIC to Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) by static sectorization. The objective of this paper is to address the issue of static sectorization by partitioning airspace based on controller workload i.e. airspace

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of a Dynamic Fleet Management Model Using Approximate Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topaloglu, Huseyin

    of fleet management models is to make the vehicle repositioning and vehicle-to-load assignment decisions soSensitivity Analysis of a Dynamic Fleet Management Model Using Approximate Dynamic Programming present tractable algorithms to assess the sensitivity of a stochastic dynamic fleet management model

  9. Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships Tor A. Johansen in order to implement energy storage in the kinetic and potential energy of the ship motion using the DP in order to relate the dynamic energy storage capacity to the maximum allowed ship position deviation

  10. Transport in Transitory Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Mosovsky; J. D. Meiss

    2010-08-10

    We introduce the concept of a "transitory" dynamical system---one whose time-dependence is confined to a compact interval---and show how to quantify transport between two-dimensional Lagrangian coherent structures for the Hamiltonian case. This requires knowing only the "action" of relevant heteroclinic orbits at the intersection of invariant manifolds of "forward" and "backward" hyperbolic orbits. These manifolds can be easily computed by leveraging the autonomous nature of the vector fields on either side of the time-dependent transition. As illustrative examples we consider a two-dimensional fluid flow in a rotating double-gyre configuration and a simple one-and-a-half degree of freedom model of a resonant particle accelerator. We compare our results to those obtained using finite-time Lyapunov exponents and to adiabatic theory, discussing the benefits and limitations of each method.

  11. Dynamical Friction on extended perturbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Esquivel; B. Fuchs

    2008-04-01

    Following a wave-mechanical treatment we calculate the drag force exerted by an infinite homogeneous background of stars on a perturber as this makes its way through the system. We recover Chandrasekhar's classical dynamical friction (DF) law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. We take into account a range of models that encompasses all plausible density distributions for satellite galaxies by considering the DF exerted on a Plummer sphere and a perturber having a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

  12. Dynamical Friction on extended perturbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Following a wave-mechanical treatment we calculate the drag force exerted by an infinite homogeneous background of stars on a perturber as this makes its way through the system. We recover Chandrasekhar's classical dynamical friction (DF) law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. We take into account a range of models that encompasses all plausible density distributions for satellite galaxies by considering the DF exerted on a Plummer sphere and a perturber having a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

  13. Chaotic Dynamics of Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-25

    In the thermodynamic limit, a probabilistic cellular automaton can be approximated by a deterministic nonlinear map. Here we construct such a map for the forest fire problem. The construction is based on the results of the Monte Carlo simulation, performed on a square lattice of million cells. The results of the calculation are analyzed by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm (HKA). The only parameter of the map describes the probability that a tree appears at an empty cell during one time step. The obtained map seems to be non-differentiable at the percolation threshold. The Lyapunov exponent for the map is positive. Also, we found the cycle of length three by means of the method of symbolic dynamics. The results are illustrated by the experimental data on the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000. Although these data are fortunately far from thermodynamic limit, their qualitative character is reproduced for smaller lattices.

  14. Dynamics of assembly production flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distr...

  15. Thermal Dynamics in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. Lopez-Monsalvo; N. Andersson

    2010-06-15

    We discuss a relativistic model for heat conduction, building on a convective variational approach to multi-fluid systems where the entropy is treated as a distinct dynamical entity. We demonstrate how this approach leads to a relativistic version of the Cattaneo equation, encoding the finite thermal relaxation time that is required to satisfy causality. We also show that the model naturally includes the non-equilibrium Gibbs relation that is a key ingredient in most approaches to extended thermodynamics. Focussing on the pure heat conduction problem, we compare the variational results to the second-order model developed by Israel and Stewart. The comparison shows that, despite the very different philosophies behind the two approaches, the two models are equivalent at first order deviations from thermal equilibrium. Finally, we complete the picture by working out the non-relativistic limit of our results, making contact with recent work in that regime.

  16. Project Dynamics and Emergent Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlick, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    The present paper presents theoretical and empirical analyses of project dynamics and emergent complexity in new product development (NPD) projects. A model-driven approach was taken and a vector autoregression (VAR) model of cooperative task processing was formulated. The model is explained and validated based on an empirical study carried out in a industrial company. Furthermore, concepts and measures of complex systems science were reviewed and applied to project management. To evaluate emergent complexity in NPD projects, an information-theory quantity -termed "effective measure complexity" (EMC)- was selected, because it can be derived from first principles and therefore has high construct validity. Furthermore, EMC can be calculated efficiently from generative models of task processing or purely from historical data, without intervening models. EMC measures the mutual information between the infinite past and future histories of a stochastic process. According to this principle, it is particularly inter...

  17. Black Holes and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2006-02-17

    Supermassive black holes inhabit galactic nuclei, and their presence influences in crucial ways the evolution of the stellar distribution. The low-density cores observed in bright galaxies are probably a result of black hole infall, while steep density cusps like those at the Galactic center are a result of energy exchange between stars moving in the gravitational field of the single black hole. Loss-cone dynamics are substantially more complex in galactic nuclei than in collisionally-relaxed systems like globular clusters due to the wider variety of possible geometries and orbital populations. The rate of star-black hole interactions has begun to be constrained through observations of energetic events associated with stellar tidal disruptions.

  18. Dynamical modeling of tidal streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovy, Jo, E-mail: bovy@ias.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    I present a new framework for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams. The framework consists of simple models for the initial action-angle distribution of tidal debris, which can be straightforwardly evolved forward in time. Taking advantage of the essentially one-dimensional nature of tidal streams, the transformation to position-velocity coordinates can be linearized and interpolated near a small number of points along the stream, thus allowing for efficient computations of a stream's properties in observable quantities. I illustrate how to calculate the stream's average location (its 'track') in different coordinate systems, how to quickly estimate the dispersion around its track, and how to draw mock stream data. As a generative model, this framework allows one to compute the full probability distribution function and marginalize over or condition it on certain phase-space dimensions as well as convolve it with observational uncertainties. This will be instrumental in proper data analysis of stream data. In addition to providing a computationally efficient practical tool for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams, the action-angle nature of the framework helps elucidate how the observed width of the stream relates to the velocity dispersion or mass of the progenitor, and how the progenitors of 'orphan' streams could be located. The practical usefulness of the proposed framework crucially depends on the ability to calculate action-angle variables for any orbit in any gravitational potential. A novel method for calculating actions, frequencies, and angles in any static potential using a single orbit integration is described in the Appendix.

  19. Curving Dynamics in High Speed PUBLIC VERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curving Dynamics in High Speed Trains PUBLIC VERSION Daniele Bigoni Kongens Lyngby 2011 IMM forces on the dynamics, due to the high speed spinning of the wheel sets, has been highlighted. The wheel-rail interaction is modeled using the Hertz's static contact theory, corrected with the Kalker

  20. DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION VIA POLYHEDRAL RISK FUNCTIONALS the dynamic decision structure appropriately. In energy risk management, which is typically carried out ex, for integrating risk management into a stochastic optimization framework, risk has to be quantified in a definite

  1. Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

  2. Planar Multicontact Locomotion Using Hybrid Zero Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lack, Jordan Thomas

    2013-11-26

    the dynamics during the impacts are modeled assuming perfectly plastic impacts in which the ground imparts an impulsive force on the impacting link. Using the dynamic model of the planar bipedal robot Amber 2, a seven link biped, a human-inspired optimization...

  3. Research Group: Finance "Dynamic risk management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    its operating cash ow exposure, due to the convexity in its cost of capital. When leverage exceeds 12-330 Research Group: Finance April 2012 "Dynamic risk management: investment, capital-Olivier Léautier #12;Dynamic risk management: investment, capital structure, and hedging in the presence

  4. Engineering mesoscale structures with distinct dynamical implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering mesoscale structures with distinct dynamical implications Anne-Ly Do1 , Johannes H that there are certain mesoscale subgraphs that have precise and distinct consequences for the system-level dynamics. In particular, if mesoscale symmetries are present then eigenvectors of the Jacobian localise on the symmetric

  5. Modelling and Dynamic Simulation for Process Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    principles for model development are outlined, and these principles are applied to a simple ash tank (which. In this paper we consider dynamic process models obtained using fundamental principles (eg. based reactor, a simple trend analysis using temperature measurements may be suÆcient. Dynamic models

  6. Dynamics of Clouds Fall Semester 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    -2pm Course Description: This class focuses on the general dynamics of cloud systems. Models of fog, vertical velocities, and liquid water contents 1 1 Fogs and Stratocumulus Clouds · Types of fog and formation mechanisms · Radiation fog and physics and dynamics · Valley fog · Marine fog · Stratocumulus

  7. The cognitive dynamics underlying decision-making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jaeseung

    )Temporal dynamics 2)Sequential dynamics #12;How does the brain make effective real-world decisions dependent A B C D 0 25 50 75 100 Choicepercentage(%) Options A B C D 0 25 50 75 100 Choicepercentage(%) Options A B C D 0 25 50 75 100 Choicepercentage(%) Options B-Index 0

  8. Stochastic-Based Robust Dynamic Resource Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    Stochastic-Based Robust Dynamic Resource Allocation in a Heterogeneous Computing System Jay Smith--This research investigates the problem of ro- bust dynamic resource allocation for heterogeneous dis- tributed computing systems operating under imposed con- straints. Often, such systems are expected to function

  9. WebGL for Dynamic Virtual Globes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    WebGL for Dynamic Virtual Globes Patrick Cozzi Analytical Graphics, Inc. pcozzi@agi.com @pjcozzi #12;No anisotropic filtering Overview Cesium A WebGL virtual globe for visualizing dynamic data-side #12;Cesium Architecture - Renderer Scene Renderer Core Renderer - a thin abstraction over Web

  10. On the dynamic behavior of mineralized tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulin, Robb Michael

    2010-01-01

    Static and Dynamic Loading. Engineering Fracture Mechanics,static fracture behavior (mode I, mode II and mode III fracture tests), including experiments on the fracture mechanicsstatic and dynamic fracture. 4.2.2 Introduction Improving our understanding of the fracture mechanics

  11. Brain dynamics promotes function Carlos Lourenco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    Brain dynamics promotes function Carlos Louren¸co 1 Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisboa - Portugal Abstract. Dynamical structure in the brain promotes biological func- tion. Computational scientists have new opportunities to receive 'algorithmic' inspiration from brain processes

  12. Nash Equilibrium and Dynamics Sergiu Hart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Sergiu

    Nash Equilibrium and Dynamics Sergiu Hart June 2008 Conference in Honor of John Nash's 80th Birthday Opening Panel SERGIU HART c 2008 ­ p. #12;NASH EQUILIBRIUM AND DYNAMICS Sergiu Hart Center for the Study of Rationality Dept of Economics Dept of Mathematics The Hebrew University of Jerusalem hart

  13. Dynamic defense workshop : from research to practice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason J.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  14. Dynamic Mirrlees Taxation under Political Economy Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Mirrlees Taxation under Political Economy Constraints Daron Acemoglu MIT Michael Golosov incentive-compatible taxes, in a dynamic economy subject to political economy and commitment problems economy taxes are set by a self- interested politician, without any commitment power. This politician

  15. Actin Filament Segmentation Using Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiaolei

    Actin Filament Segmentation Using Dynamic Programming Hongsheng Li, Tian Shen, and Xiaolei Huang for actin filament segmen- tation in 2D TIRFM image sequences. This problem is difficult because actin filaments dynamically change shapes during their growth, and the TIRFM images are usually noisy. We ask

  16. Protein-Folding Dynamics: Overview of Molecular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Protein-Folding Dynamics: Overview of Molecular Simulation Techniques Harold A. Scheraga, Mey folding in silico. Although just a few years ago the dynamic be- havior of a protein molecule could models of proteins now make it possible to study protein- folding pathways from completely unfolded

  17. Dynamic FIB Aggregation without Update Churn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    Dynamic FIB Aggregation without Update Churn #12;Dynamic FIB Aggregation without Update Churn* to 1* to 0 0 1 1 0 1 represent as trie... ... and compress it! But: May introduce churn! Deaggregate introduce churn! Deaggregate upon route change. represent as trie... ... and compress it! BGP event! update

  18. TRACKING DYNAMIC BOUNDARIES BY EVOLVING Tingting Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingting Jiang

    TRACKING DYNAMIC BOUNDARIES BY EVOLVING CURVES by Tingting Jiang Department of Computer Science Duke University Date: Approved: Carlo Tomasi, Supervisor Ron Parr Scott C. Schmidler Xiaobai Sun in the Department of Computer Science in the Graduate School of Duke University 2007 #12;ABSTRACT TRACKING DYNAMIC

  19. DYNAMICS OF THE KUIPER BELT RENU MALHOTRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levison, Harold F.

    DYNAMICS OF THE KUIPER BELT RENU MALHOTRA Lunar and Planetary Institute MARTIN DUNCAN Queen of the Kuiper Belt is re­ viewed here. Numerical results on long term orbital evolution and dynamical mechanisms underlying the transport of objects out of the Kuiper Belt are discussed. Scenarios about the origin

  20. Roadmapbased Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Roadmap­based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments Jur P. van den Berg Mark H. Overmars.cs.uu.nl #12; Roadmap­based Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments Jur P. van den Berg Mark H. Overmars April obstacles. We propose a practical algorithm based on a roadmap that is created for the static part

  1. Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koon, Wang Sang

    Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems Michael Dellnitz, Oliver Junge, Wang Sang key dynamical features, including almost invariant sets, resonance regions as well as transport rates of these different numerical tools and their applicability. In particular, we compute transport rates between two

  2. World-Systems as Dynamic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    World-Systems as Dynamic Networks Christopher Chase-Dunn Institute for Research on World-Systems on comparative world-systems for the workshop on `analyzing complex macrosystems as dynamic networks" at the Santa Fe Institute, April 29- 30, 2004. (8341 words) v. 4-22-04 1 #12;The comparative world-systems

  3. Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Kolodrubetz; Emanuel Katz; Anatoli Polkovnikov

    2015-03-02

    The study of dynamics in closed quantum systems has recently been revitalized by the emergence of experimental systems that are well-isolated from their environment. In this paper, we consider the closed-system dynamics of an archetypal model: spins near a second order quantum critical point, which are traditionally described by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. Imbuing the driving field with Newtonian dynamics, we find that the full closed system exhibits a robust new phenomenon -- dynamic critical trapping -- in which the system is self-trapped near the critical point due to efficient absorption of field kinetic energy by heating the quantum spins. We quantify limits in which this phenomenon can be observed and generalize these results by developing a Kibble-Zurek scaling theory that incorporates the dynamic field. Our findings can potentially be interesting in the context of early universe physics, where the role of the driving field is played by the inflaton or a modulus.

  4. Optimal signal patterns for dynamical cellular communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cells transmit information via signaling pathways, using temporal dynamical patterns. As optimality with respect to environments is the universal principle in biological systems, organisms have acquired an optimal way of transmitting information. Here we obtain optimal dynamical signal patterns which can transmit information efficiently (low power) and reliably (high accuracy) using the optimal control theory. Adopting an activation-inactivation decoding network, we reproduced several dynamical patterns found in actual signals, such as steep, gradual and overshooting dynamics. Notably, when minimizing the power of the input signal, optimal signals exhibit the overshooting pattern, which is a biphasic pattern with transient and steady phases; this pattern is prevalent in actual dynamical patterns as it can be generated by an incoherent feed-forward loop (FFL), a common motif in biochemical networks. We also identified conditions when the three patterns, steep, gradual and overshooting, confer advantages.

  5. Capturing Dynamics in the Power Grid: Formulation of Dynamic State Estimation through Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Meng, Da; Elbert, Stephen T.; Wang, Shaobu; Diao, Ruisheng

    2014-03-31

    With the increasing complexity resulting from uncertainties and stochastic variations introduced by intermittent renewable energy sources, responsive loads, mobile consumption of plug-in vehicles, and new market designs, more and more dynamic behaviors are observed in everyday power system operation. To operate a power system efficiently and reliably, it is critical to adopt a dynamic paradigm so that effective control actions can be taken in time. The dynamic paradigm needs to include three fundamental components: dynamic state estimation; look-ahead dynamic simulation; and dynamic contingency analysis (Figure 1). These three components answer three basic questions: where the system is; where the system is going; and how secure the system is against accidents. The dynamic state estimation provides a solid cornerstone to support the other 2 components and is the focus of this study.

  6. SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in the Dynamics of Coupled Systems SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in...

  7. Scalable Support for Multithreaded Applications on Dynamic Binary Instrumentation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazelwood, Kim

    Scalable Support for Multithreaded Applications on Dynamic Binary Instrumentation Systems Kim Dynamic binary instrumentation systems are used to inject or mod- ify arbitrary instructions in existing for supporting large, multithreaded applications on JIT-based dynamic instrumentation systems. While implementing

  8. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. qAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation

  9. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics...

  10. Dynamics of galaxy cores and supermassive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2006-05-02

    Recent work on the dynamical evolution of galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes is reviewed. Topics include galaxy structural properties; collisionless and collisional equilibria; loss-cone dynamics; and dynamics of binary and multiple supermassive black holes.

  11. System Dynamics and Vibration Lab Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Steven W.

    System Dynamics and Vibration Lab Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Component Mode Synthesis Using #12;System Dynamics and Vibration Lab Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Outline · Motivation · Conclusions #12;System Dynamics and Vibration Lab Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Complex Structures

  12. Bayesian Nonparametric Inference of Switching Dynamic Linear Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Emily Beth

    Many complex dynamical phenomena can be effectively modeled by a system that switches among a set of conditionally linear dynamical modes. We consider two such models: the switching linear dynamical system (SLDS) and the ...

  13. New insights on the Dynamic Cellular Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ildefonso M. De la Fuente

    2015-01-09

    A large number of studies have shown the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by the DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes). Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in the self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by the specific input stimuli. The Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in the covalent post-translational modulation so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. Both the metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes) and the enzymatic covalent modifications of determined molecules (structural dynamic processes) seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory). Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory) and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory). The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell.

  14. Nonlinear Dynamics of Coiling in Viscoelastic Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trushant Majmudar; Matthieu Varagnat; William Hartt; Gareth McKinley

    2010-12-09

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain less well understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in great detail; buckling instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet that exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Very few experimental or theoretical studies exist for continuous viscoelastic jets beyond the onset of the first instability. Here, we present a systematic study of the effects of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of free surface continuous jets of surfactant solutions that form worm-like micelles. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet and uncover a transition from periodic to doubly-periodic or quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, possibly chaotic dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the "leaping shampoo effect" or the Kaye effect. This enables us to view seemingly disparate jetting dynamics as one coherent picture of successive instabilities and transitions between them. We identify the relevant scaling variables as the dimensionless height, flow rate, and the elasto-gravity number and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these parameters.

  15. Dynamical generation of hadronic resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Wolkanowski

    2014-10-26

    One type of dynamical generation consists in the formation of multiple hadronic resonances from single seed states by incorporating hadronic loop contributions on the level of $s$-wave propagators. Along this line, we study the propagator poles within two models of scalar resonances and report on the status of our work: (i) Using a simple quantum field theory describing the decay of $f_{0}(500)$ into two pions, we may obtain a second, additional pole on the first Riemann sheet below the pion-pion threshold (i.e., a stable state can emerge). (ii) We perform a numerical study of the pole(s) of $a_{0}(1450)$ by using as an input the results obtained in the extended Linear Sigma Model (eLSM). Here, we do not find any additional pole besides the original one, thus we cannot obtain $a_{0}(980)$ as an emerging state. (iii) We finally demonstrate that, although the coupling constants in typical effective models might be large, the next-to-leading-order contribution to the decay amplitude is usually small and can be neglected.

  16. Robustness of Controlled Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andy Koswara; Raj Chakrabarti

    2014-09-29

    Control of multi-level quantum systems is sensitive to implementation errors in the control field and uncertainties associated with system Hamiltonian parameters. A small variation in the control field spectrum or the system Hamiltonian can cause an otherwise optimal field to deviate from controlling desired quantum state transitions and reaching a particular objective. An accurate analysis of robustness is thus essential in understanding and achieving model-based quantum control, such as in control of chemical reactions based on ab initio or experimental estimates of the molecular Hamiltonian. In this paper, theoretical foundations for quantum control robustness analysis are presented from both a distributional perspective - in terms of moments of the transition amplitude, interferences, and transition probability - and a worst-case perspective. Based on this theory, analytical expressions and a computationally efficient method for determining the robustness of coherently controlled quantum dynamics are derived. The robustness analysis reveals that there generally exists a set of control pathways that are more resistant to destructive interferences in the presence of control field and system parameter uncertainty. These robust pathways interfere and combine to yield a relatively accurate transition amplitude and high transition probability when uncertainty is present.

  17. Efficient and Dynamic ? The BMW Group Roadmap for the Application...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Dynamic The BMW Group Roadmap for the Application of Thermoelectric Generators Efficient and Dynamic The BMW Group Roadmap for the Application of Thermoelectric...

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Techniques (Presentation) Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray...

  19. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Authors: Huang,...

  20. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics You are...

  1. Salt Dynamics in Non-Riparian Freshwater Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stacey, Mark T

    2007-01-01

    Resources Center Project “Salt Dynamics in Non-RiparianTechnical Completion Report “Salt Dynamics in Non-Riparianindicate that the flux of salt between the soil and water

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Dynamic Feasibility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamic Feasibility Study Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Dynamic Feasibility Study Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  3. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    novel measurements of chemical dynamics for clusters, Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at theUniversity of California Chemical Sciences Division,

  4. HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis Presentation by NREL's...

  5. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School-Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Software Research Projects Current Collaborations Past Collaborations NSEC Engineering Institute Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School...

  6. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols

  7. ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 cfdroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications 3-D Combustion...

  8. Locality Aware Dynamic Load Management for Massively Multiplayer Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amza, Cristiana

    Locality Aware Dynamic Load Management for Massively Multiplayer Games Jin Chen Department with a dynamic load management algorithm enables us to better handle transient crowding by adaptively dispersing

  9. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Photocatalytic CO2 Conversion ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Transfer Dynamics in Photocatalytic CO2 Conversion Electron Transfer Dynamics in Photocatalytic CO2 Conversion Coal is the workhorse of our power industry, responsible for...

  10. A Dynamic Traveling Salesman Problem with Stochastic Arc Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Toriello

    2012-08-31

    Aug 31, 2012 ... Abstract: We propose a dynamic traveling salesman problem (TSP) with stochastic arc costs motivated by applications, such as dynamic ...

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of Electrolytes andElectrolyte...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamics Simulation Studies of Electrolytes and ElectrolyteElectrode Interfaces Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of Electrolytes and ElectrolyteElectrode Interfaces 2010 DOE...

  12. SIAM conference on applications of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A conference (Oct.15--19, 1992, Snowbird, Utah; sponsored by SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Activity Group on Dynamical Systems) was held that highlighted recent developments in applied dynamical systems. The main lectures and minisymposia covered theory about chaotic motion, applications in high energy physics and heart fibrillations, turbulent motion, Henon map and attractor, integrable problems in classical physics, pattern formation in chemical reactions, etc. The conference fostered an exchange between mathematicians working on theoretical issues of modern dynamical systems and applied scientists. This two-part document contains abstracts, conference program, and an author index.

  13. Dynamics Modelling of Biolistic Gene Guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, M.; Tao, W.; Pianetta, P.A.

    2009-06-04

    The gene transfer process using biolistic gene guns is a highly dynamic process. To achieve good performance, the process needs to be well understood and controlled. Unfortunately, no dynamic model is available in the open literature for analysing and controlling the process. This paper proposes such a model. Relationships of the penetration depth with the helium pressure, the penetration depth with the acceleration distance, and the penetration depth with the micro-carrier radius are presented. Simulations have also been conducted. The results agree well with experimental results in the open literature. The contribution of this paper includes a dynamic model for improving and manipulating performance of the biolistic gene gun.

  14. Protein viscoelastic dynamics: a model system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig Fogle; Joseph Rudnick; David Jasnow

    2015-02-02

    A model system inspired by recent experiments on the dynamics of a folded protein under the influence of a sinusoidal force is investigated and found to replicate many of the response characteristics of such a system. The essence of the model is a strongly over-damped oscillator described by a harmonic restoring force for small displacements that reversibly yields to stress under sufficiently large displacement. This simple dynamical system also reveals unexpectedly rich behavior, exhibiting a series of dynamical transitions and analogies with equilibrium thermodynamic phase transitions. The effects of noise and of inertia are briefly considered and described.

  15. Parallel Implementation of Power System Dynamic Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Wu, Di; Chen, Yousu

    2013-07-21

    Dynamic simulation of power system transient stability is important for planning, monitoring, operation, and control of electrical power systems. However, modeling the system dynamics and network involves the computationally intensive time-domain solution of numerous differential and algebraic equations (DAE). This results in a transient stability implementation that may not maintain the real-time constraints of an online security assessment. This paper presents a parallel implementation of the dynamic simulation on a high-performance computing (HPC) platform using parallel simulation algorithms and computation architectures. It enables the simulation to run even faster than real time, enabling the “look-ahead” capability of upcoming stability problems in the power grid.

  16. TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

  17. QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2010-06-20

    Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to the bright prominence plasma in SOT images is negative and ranges from -10% for smaller flows to -50% for larger flows. Passive scalar 'cork movies' derived from NAVE measurements show that prominence plasma is entrained by the upflows, helping to counter the ubiquitous downflow streams in the prominence. Plume formation shows no clear temporal periodicity. However, it is common to find 'active cavities' beneath prominences that can spawn many upflows in succession before going dormant. The mean flow recurrence time in these active locations is roughly 300-500 s (5-8 minutes). Locations remain active on timescales of tens of minutes up to several hours. Using a column density ratio measurement and reasonable assumptions on plume and prominence geometries, we estimate that the mass density in the dark cavities is at most 20% of the visible prominence density, implying that a single large plume could supply up to 1% of the mass of a typical quiescent prominence. We hypothesize that the plumes are generated from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability taking place on the boundary between the buoyant cavities and the overlying prominence. Characteristics, such as plume size and frequency, may be modulated by the strength and direction of the cavity magnetic field relative to the prominence magnetic field. We conclude that buoyant plumes are a source of quiescent prominence mass as well as a mechanism by which prominence plasma is advected upward, countering constant gravitational drainage.

  18. Vegetation Dynamics in Seasonally Grazed Upland Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Meg L

    This thesis addresses the effects of seasonality of grazing on vegetation dynamics. Background to the thesis is provided by the Hill Sheep and Native Woodland (HSNW) project, a system-scale experiment with the long-term ...

  19. Dynamical Bounds for Sturmian Schrödinger Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Marin

    2009-06-10

    The Fibonacci Hamiltonian, that is a Schr\\"{o}dinger operator associated to a quasiperiodical sturmian potential with respect to the golden mean has been investigated intensively in recent years. Damanik and Tcheremchantsev developed a method and find a non trivial dynamical upper bound for this model. In this paper, we use this method to generalize to a large family of Sturmian operators dynamical upper bounds and show at sufficently large coupling anomalous transport for operators associated to irrational number with a generic diophantine condition. As a counter example, we exhibit a pathological irrational number which do not verify this condition and show its associated dynamic exponent only has ballistic bound. Moreover, we establish a global lower bound for the lower box counting dimension of the spectrum that is used to obtain a dynamical lower bound for bounded density irrational numbers.

  20. Transport on a Lattice with Dynamical Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Turci; Andrea Parmeggiani; Estelle Pitard; M. Carmen Romano; Luca Ciandrini

    2013-01-10

    Many transport processes in nature take place on substrates, often considered as unidimensional lanes. These unidimensional substrates are typically non-static: affected by a fluctuating environment, they can undergo conformational changes. This is particularly true in biological cells, where the state of the substrate is often coupled to the active motion of macromolecular complexes, such as motor proteins on microtubules or ribosomes on mRNAs, causing new interesting phenomena. Inspired by biological processes such as protein synthesis by ribosomes and motor protein transport, we introduce the concept of localized dynamical sites coupled to a driven lattice gas dynamics. We investigate the phenomenology of transport in the presence of dynamical defects and find a novel regime characterized by an intermittent current and subject to severe finite-size effects. Our results demonstrate the impact of the regulatory role of the dynamical defects in transport, not only in biology but also in more general contexts.

  1. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14

    The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion ...

  2. Correlated exciton dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Patrick, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The absorption and dissipation of energy in semiconductor nanostructures are often determined by excited electron dynamics. In semiconductors, one fundamentally important electronic state is an exciton, an excited electron ...

  3. Simulation Methodologies for Satellite Solar Array Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenizadeh, Navid

    2010-07-16

    The purpose of the present thesis is to furnish diverse studies on the dynamic response of satellite solar arrays. The term flexible structure or, briefly, structure has different interpretations and definitions, depending ...

  4. Plasticity of metallic nanostructures : molecular dynamics simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Con

    2014-11-27

    During high speed cutting processes, metals are subject to high strains and strain rates. The dynamic nature of the deformation during high speed cutting makes it difficult to detect atomic scale deformation mechanisms ...

  5. Dynamics and architectures of innovation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po Chia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Innovation processes are multifaceted. Different studies usually focus on different facets of innovations without being integrated into a complete innovation system. In this thesis, system dynamics and system architecture ...

  6. and Self-Organization for Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAD-Drawings: Udo Schminke Photos: Kai Bröking, Irene Böttcher-Gajewski, Will Brunner, Ragnar-Organization in the Visual Cortex 10 2.1.3.2 Self-Organized Criticality in the Activity Dynamics of Neural Networks 13 2

  7. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  8. Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker; J. A. Maruhn; P. -G. Reinhard

    2010-03-22

    We discuss possible avenues to study fission dynamics starting from a time-dependent mean-field approach. Previous attempts to study fission dynamics using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory are analyzed. We argue that different initial conditions may be needed to describe fission dynamics depending on the specifics of the fission phenomenon and propose various approaches towards this goal. In particular, we provide preliminary calculations for studying fission following a heavy-ion reaction using TDHF with a density contraint. Regarding prompt muon-induced fission, we also suggest a new approach for combining the time-evolution of the muonic wave function with a microscopic treatment of fission dynamics via TDHF.

  9. Superfluid dynamics of 258Fm fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Scamps; Cédric Simenel; Denis Lacroix

    2015-01-15

    Theoretical description of nuclear fission remains one of the major challenges of quantum many-body dynamics. The slow, mostly adiabatic motion through the fission barrier is followed by a fast, non-adiabatic descent of the potential between the fragments. The latter stage is essentially unexplored. However, it is crucial as it generates most of the excitation energy in the fragments. The superfluid dynamics in the latter stage of fission is obtained with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory including BCS dynamical pairing correlations. The fission modes of the 258Fm nucleus are studied. The resulting fission fragment characteristics show a good agreement with experimental data. Quantum shell effects are shown to play a crucial role in the dynamics and formation of the fragments. The importance of quantum fluctuations beyond the independent particle/quasi-particle picture is underlined and qualitatively studied.

  10. The Dynamics and Predictability of Tropical Cyclones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason A.

    2010-01-15

    Through methodology unique for tropical cyclones in peer-reviewed literature, this study explores how the dynamics of moist convection affects the predictability of tropical cyclogenesis. Mesoscale models are used to perform ...

  11. The dynamics of enzymatic switch cascades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherji, Shankar, 1982-

    2004-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) multi-step enzymatic switching cascade, a highly conserved architecture utilised in cellular signal transduction. In treating the equations of motion, ...

  12. Dynamic strategic interactions : analysis and mechanism design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candogan, Utku Ozan

    2013-01-01

    Modern systems, such as engineering systems with autonomous entities, markets, and financial networks, consist of self-interested agents with potentially conflicting objectives. These agents interact in a dynamic manner, ...

  13. Essays on dynamic games and mechanism design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Ruitian

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation considers three topics in dynamic games and mechanism design. In both problems, asymmetric information causes inefficiency in production and allocation. The first chapter considers the inefficiency from ...

  14. Nonlinear and Complex Dynamics in Real Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, William A.; Serletis, Apostolos; Serletis, Demitre

    2006-06-01

    In this article we provide a review of the literature with respect to fluctuations in real systems and chaos. In doing so, we contrast the order and organization hypothesis of real systems to nonlinear chaotic dynamics and discuss some techniques...

  15. Vortex driven flame dynamics and combustion instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altay, Hurrem Murat

    2005-01-01

    Combustion instability in premixed combustors mostly arises due to the coupling between heat release rate dynamics and system acoustics. It is crucial to understand the instability mechanisms to design reliable, high ...

  16. Dynamics of spectral algorithms for distributed routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maymounkov, Petar (Petar Borissov)

    2012-01-01

    In the past few decades distributed systems have evolved from man-made machines to organically changing social, economic and protein networks. This transition has been overwhelming in many ways at once. Dynamic, heterogeneous, ...

  17. Dynamic modeling issues for power system applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xuefeng

    2005-02-17

    Power system dynamics are commonly modeled by parameter dependent nonlinear differential-algebraic equations (DAE) x ???p y x f ) and 0 = p y x g ) . Due to (,, (,, the algebraic constraints, we cannot directly perform...

  18. Hierarchical Network Structure Promotes Dynamical Robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron Smith; Raymond S. Puzio; Aviv Bergman

    2015-06-16

    The relationship between network topology and system dynamics has significant implications for unifying our understanding of the interplay among metabolic, gene-regulatory, and ecosystem network architecures. Here we analyze the stability and robustness of a large class of dynamics on such networks. We determine the probability distribution of robustness as a function of network topology and show that robustness is classified by the number of links between modules of the network. We also demonstrate that permutation of these modules is a fundamental symmetry of dynamical robustness. Analysis of these findings leads to the conclusion that the most robust systems have the most hierarchical structure. This relationship provides a means by which evolutionary selection for a purely dynamical phenomenon may shape network architectures across scales of the biological hierarchy.

  19. Flexible dynamics of floating wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luypaert, Thomas (Thomas J.)

    2012-01-01

    This work presents Tower Flex, a structural dynamics model for a coupled analysis of offshore floating wind turbines consisting of a tower, a floating platform and a mooring system. In this multi-body, linear frequency-domain ...

  20. Curvature Dependence of Hydrophobic Hydration Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Gregor Weiß; Matthias Heyden; Joachim Dzubiella

    2015-04-08

    We investigate the curvature-dependence of water dynamics in the vicinity of hydrophobic spherical solutes using molecular dynamics simulations. For both, the lateral and perpendicular diffusivity as well as for H-bond kinetics of water in the first hydration shell, we find a non-monotonic solute-size dependence, exhibiting extrema close to the well-known structural crossover length scale for hydrophobic hydration. Additionally, we find an apparently anomalous diffusion for water moving parallel to the surface of small solutes, which, however, can be explained by topology effects. The intimate connection between solute curvature, water structure and dynamics has implications for our understanding of hydration dynamics at heterogeneous biomolecular surfaces.

  1. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons -vertical vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Boundary element/finite element formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.3.1 Boundary.2 Analysis methods for dynamic soil-structure interaction element formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.3.2 Coupling of FE and BE regions

  2. Dynamic workload characterization for energy efficient computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhiman, Gaurav

    2011-01-01

    1.1 Dynamic Energy Management . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1R. Rajamony. Power and energy management for server systems.al. Scheduler-based dram energy management. In Proc DAC’02,

  3. System dynamics, market microstructure and asset pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leika, Mindaugas

    2013-01-01

    Traditional asset pricing approaches are not able to explain extreme volatility and tail events that characterized financial markets in the past decade. System Dynamics theory, which is still underutilized in financial ...

  4. Conceptual aircraft dynamics from inverse aircraft modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Gregory E

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents a method of construe' ting a nonlinear dynamics model of a theoretical aircraft from the nonlinear batch simulation of an existing aircrew This method provides control law designers with a method of fabricating nonlinear models...

  5. Capturing skin properties from dynamic mechanical analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandford, Erika J. (Erika Jaye)

    2012-01-01

    Existing skin mechanical testing devices focus on measuring skin elasticity and are not tailored to assess the dynamic behavior of skin. The mathematical techniques used to analyze data collected using these devices are ...

  6. Intercalation dynamics in lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burch, Damian

    2009-01-01

    A new continuum model has been proposed by Singh, Ceder, and Bazant for the ion intercalation dynamics in a single crystal of rechargeable-battery electrode materials. It is based on the Cahn-Hilliard equation coupled to ...

  7. Compressing measurements in quantum dynamic parameter estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magesan, Easwar

    We present methods that can provide an exponential savings in the resources required to perform dynamic parameter estimation using quantum systems. The key idea is to merge classical compressive sensing techniques with ...

  8. A Dynamic Theory of Resource Wars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acemoglu, Daron

    We develop a dynamic theory of resource wars and study the conditions under which such wars can be prevented. Our focus is on the interaction between the scarcity of resources and the incentives for war in the presence of ...

  9. Transportation Science and the Dynamics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    water or electricity? 1952 - Samuelson gave a rigorous mathematical formulation of spatial price: Unification of Evolutionary Variational Inequalities and Projected Dynamical Systems #12;Components of Common Stations, Plants Pipelines, Transmission Lines Water, Gas, Oil, Electricity #12;US Railroad Freight Flows

  10. Dynamic Networks: Recent Results and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    water or electricity? 1952 - Samuelson gave a rigorous mathematical formulation of spatial price: Unification of Evolutionary Variational Inequalities and Projected Dynamical Systems #12;Components of Common Stations, Plants Pipelines, Transmission Lines Water, Gas, Oil, Electricity #12;US Railroad Freight Flows

  11. Bayesian nonparametric learning of complex dynamical phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Emily Beth

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of many dynamical phenomena precludes the use of linear models for which exact analytic techniques are available. However, inference on standard nonlinear models quickly becomes intractable. In some cases, ...

  12. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

    2009-08-08

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

  13. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryutov, D.

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results ...

  14. DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichhorn, Andreas

    DYNAMIC RISK MANAGEMENT IN ELECTRICITY PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION VIA POLYHEDRAL RISK FUNCTIONALS production and trading based on probabilistic knowledge about future uncertainties such as demands and spot- called polyhedral risk functionals which, though being non-linear mappings, preserve linearity structures

  15. Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment Dynamic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    II I! Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment Dynamic Analysis CONTENTS Section 1. 0 Assumptions Section. The solid curve is a plot of the specification data for the Design and Qualification of the explosive

  16. Inertial Particle Dynamics in a Hurricane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapsis, Themistoklis

    The motion of inertial (i.e., finite-size) particles is analyzed in a three-dimensional unsteady simulation of Hurricane Isabel. As established recently, the long-term dynamics of inertial particles in a fluid is governed ...

  17. Black Holes and Galaxy Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1999-06-02

    The consequences of nuclear black holes for the structure and dynamics of stellar spheroids are reviewed. Slow growth of a black hole in a pre-existing core produces a steep power-law density profile similar to the cusps seen in faint elliptical galaxies. The weaker cusps in bright ellipticals may result from ejection of stars by a coalescing black-hole binary; there is marginal kinematical evidence for such a process having occurred in M87. Stellar orbits in a triaxial nucleus are mostly regular at radii where the gravitational force is dominated by the black hole; however the orbital shapes are not conducive to reinforcing the triaxial figure, hence nuclei are likely to be approximately axisymmetric. In triaxial potentials, a ``zone of chaos'' extends outward to a radius where the enclosed stellar mass is roughly 100 times the mass of the black hole; in this chaotic zone, no regular, box-like orbits exist. At larger radii, the phase space in triaxial potentials is complex, consisting of stochastic orbits as well as regular orbits associated with stable resonances. Figure rotation tends to increase the degree of stochasticity. Both test-particle integrations and N-body simulations suggest that a triaxial galaxy responds globally to the presence of a central mass concentration by evolving toward more axisymmetric shapes; the evolution occurs rapidly when the mass of the central object exceeds roughly 2% of the mass in stars. The lack of significant triaxiality in most early-type galaxies may be a consequence of orbital evolution induced by nuclear black holes.

  18. Heterophase liquid states: Thermodynamics, structure, dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Bakai

    2015-01-12

    An overview of theoretical results and experimental data on the thermodynamics, structure and dynamics of the heterophase glass-forming liquids is presented. The theoretical approach is based on the mesoscopic heterophase fluctuations model (HPFM) developed within the framework of the bounded partition function approach. The Fischer cluster phenomenon, glass transition, liquid-liquid transformations, parametric phase diagram, cooperative dynamics and fragility of the glass-forming liquids is considered.

  19. Dynamics of skyrmions in chiral magnets: Dynamic phase transitions and equation of motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng, E-mail: szl@lanl.gov; Reichhardt, Charles; Batista, Cristian D.; Saxena, Avadh [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    We study the dynamics of skyrmions in a metallic chiral magnet. First, we show that skyrmions can be created dynamically by destabilizing the ferromagnetic background state through a spin polarized current. We then treat skyrmions as rigid particles and derive the corresponding equation of motion. The dynamics of skyrmions is dominated by the Magnus force, which accounts for the weak pinning of skyrmions observed in experiments. Finally, we discuss the quantum motion of skyrmions.

  20. From quantum to classical dynamics: Dynamic crossover in the relativistic $O(N)$ model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesterházy, David; Tanizaki, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the transition from quantum to classical dynamics in the relativistic $O(N)$ vector model using the nonperturbative functional renormalization group in the real-time formalism. In thermal equilibrium, the theory is characterized by two scales, the interaction range for coherent scattering of particles and the mean free path determined by the rate of incoherent collision with excitations in the thermal medium. Their competition determines the renormalization group flow and the effective dynamics of the model. Here we quantify the dynamic properties of the model in terms of the scale-dependent dynamic critical exponent $z$ for arbitrary temperatures and in $2 \\leq d \\leq 4$ spatial dimensions.

  1. Identification of Hybrid Dynamical Models of Human Movement via Switched System Optimal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Ramanarayan

    2012-01-01

    of constrained nonlinear switched dynamical systems. Inconstrained nonlinear switched dynamical systems is devised.

  2. Transactions in GIS Dynamic Modelling and Visualization on the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worboys, Mike

    1 Transactions in GIS Dynamic Modelling and Visualization on the Internet Bo Huang* and Michael F for GIS to incorporate dynamic analytic models. At the same time, there is a need to distribute results of dynamic GIS using the Internet. Therefore, this paper sets out to explore the implementation of dynamic

  3. Staging Dynamic Programming Algorithms Kedar Swadi Walid Taha Oleg Kiselyov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taha, Walid

    Applications of dynamic programming (DP) algorithms are numerous, and include g* *enetic engineering

  4. Learning Nonlinear Dynamical Systems using an EM Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Learning Nonlinear Dynamical Systems using an EM Algorithm Zoubin Ghahramani and Sam T. Roweis present a generalization of the EM algorithm for parameter estimation in nonlinear dynamical systems Nonlinear Dynamical Systems We examine inference and learning in discrete-time dynamical systems with hidden

  5. Chaos in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems Helicopter Flight-data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, James H.

    Chaos in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems ­ Helicopter Flight-data Analysis James H. Taylor1 and S of chaos in nonlinear dynamical systems is discussed, and approaches for the identification of chaos can only occur in systems with nonlinear dynamics. The recognition of chaos in a complex dynamical

  6. North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change Julien Cattiaux1 with Christophe Cassou2 weather and global warming J. Cattiaux - North-Atlantic atmospheric dynamics and climate change AMA & LEFE the climate change affect the dynamics? The midlatitude dynamics is driven by the equator-to-pole T gradient

  7. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turcotte, Melissa

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the communication counts. In a sequential analysis, anomalous behavior is then identified from outlying behavior with respect to the fitted predictive probability models. Seasonality is again incorporated into the model and is treated as a changepoint model on the transition probabilities of a discrete time Markov process. Second stage analytics are then developed which combine anomalous edges to identify anomalous substructures in the network.

  8. Regional Analysis of Seafloor Characteristics at Reef Fish Spawning Aggregation Sites in the Caribbean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobara, Shinichi

    2011-02-22

    to the development of effective strategies for marine resource management. In the Caribbean, one of the critical science gaps hindering effective management is the lack of information on how environmental factors may make fish spawning aggregation (FSA) sites optimal...

  9. Kinetics of Pyrrhotite Oxidation in Seawater: Implications for Mining Seafloor Hotsprings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Gina Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    ago, but with the demand for copper and gold prices risingto the demand and high price of copper and gold currently,

  10. Using seafloor geodesy to monitor volcanic collapse on the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Kathleen A.

    2006-01-01

    around Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Island of Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure showing1779-1991. University of Hawaii Press. Wyss, M. , and

  11. Global estimates of seafloor slope from single-beam ship soundings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    that tidal dissipation was a power source of mixing and mixing preferentially occurred when internal tides research on the production of internal waves by the inter- action of tidal currents with variable topography [cf. Garrett and Kunze, 2007]. Baines [1982] examined the simple case of horizontal tidal

  12. A reusable implosive seismic source for midwater or seafloor use LeRoy M. Dorman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorman, LeRoy M.

    of the effects of loud sounds in the sea upon animal life. Today, air guns and water guns are the most commonly used marine seismic sources. To make an equivalent source safer for animals at the surface, to gen; Bibee and Dorman, 1991; Nolet and Dorman, 1996; Dorman, 1997 . The explosives that served as the energy

  13. Seismic Structure of Shallow Lithosphere at Locations of Distinctive Seafloor Spreading /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henig, Ashlee Shae

    2013-01-01

    Lithologic interpretations of our seismic results are guidedx and z. Interpretation of the 2D seismic velocity models (to aid in interpretation of rock type from seismic velocity.

  14. Using seafloor geodesy to monitor volcanic collapse on the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Kathleen A.

    2006-01-01

    seismic interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Figure I.16 shows the seismic interpretation from Morgan etMorgan et al. seismic interpretation. Figure from (Morgan et

  15. Blue and fin whales observed on a seafloor array in the Northeast Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Mark A.; Hildebrand, John A; Webb, Spahr C.

    1995-01-01

    de J. Acoust.Soc. Am. 98 (2), Pt. 1, August1995 drophones.p. J. Acoust.Soc. Am. , Vol. 98, No. 2, Pt. 1, August1•95J. Acoust.Soc. Am. , Vol. 98, No. 2, Pt. 1, August1995

  16. Feasibility of Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) of Atlantic Cod with Seafloor Scattering Limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignisca, Anamaria

    Recently reported declines in the population of Atlantic cod have led to calls for additional survey methods for stock assessments. In combination with conventional line-transect methods that may have ambiguities in sampling ...

  17. Seafloor ripples created by waves from hurricane Ivan on the west Florida shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Colleen Marie

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the presence of sand ripples on the seabed improves sonar detection of buried mines at sub-critical angles. Sidescan sonar data of ripples off on the west Florida shelf were collected as part ...

  18. Adapting a Survey-Class AUV for High Resolution Seafloor Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morash, James

    2005-01-01

    Over the past four years, development work at the MIT AUV Lab focused on a vehicle that is now almost a decade old. “Xanthos,” one of the last surviving examples of the venerable Odyssey II series of AUVs (developed at MIT ...

  19. NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Seafloor Mapping, Little Hercules ROV, and Sentry AUV Data Use in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , and various insitu sensors to characterize the local environment. 3. Public Data Archives Okeanos Explorer to 90 days of data collection, in useable formats and with associated metadata records. Additionally

  20. Seismic Structure of Shallow Lithosphere at Locations of Distinctive Seafloor Spreading /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henig, Ashlee Shae

    2013-01-01

    et al. , 2011) to process the seismic data. The downwardSeismic constraints on shallow crustal emplacement processesemplacement processes from the variation in seismic layer 2a

  1. Hawaiian Hot-spot Swell Structure from Seafloor MT Sounding Steven Constable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    on the hotspot (Cough, 1979; Detrick and Crough, 1978); (ii) compositional underplating of depleted mantle

  2. GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

    2004-11-01

    The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically and thermally; (7) Design, construction, and successful deployment of an in situ pore-water sampling device; (8) Improvements to the original Raman spectrometer (methane sensor); (9) Laboratory demonstration of the impact of bacterially-produced surfactants' rates of hydrate formation; (10) Construction and sea floor emplacement and testing--with both watergun and ship noise sources--of the prototypal vertical line array (VLA); (11) Initiation of studies of spatial controls on hydrates; (12) Compilation and analyses of seismic data, including mapping of surface anomalies; (13) Additional field verification (bottom samples recovered), in support of the site selection effort; (14) Collection and preliminary analyses of gas hydrates from new sites that exhibit variant structures; (15) Initial shear wave tests carried out in shallow water; (16) Isolation of microbes for potential medicinal products development; (17) Preliminary modeling of occurrences of gas hydrates.

  3. Kinetics of Pyrrhotite Oxidation in Seawater: Implications for Mining Seafloor Hotsprings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Gina Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    K.B. , 2005, Acid mine drainage remediation options: aDeul, M. , 1982, Acid Mine Drainage: Control and Abatementcould result in acid mine drainage (Belzile, 2004; Janzen,

  4. Automated artifact-free seafloor surface reconstruction with two-step ODETLAP (Ph.D. Showcase)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    , represents the depth and features of the ocean floor. This piece of data helps solve not only applications water which masks the penetration of electromagnetic waves. The altimeter method is an attempt for wide-area coverage. The method exploits the fact that the ocean surface has broad bumps and dips that mimic

  5. Seismic Structure of Shallow Lithosphere at Locations of Distinctive Seafloor Spreading /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henig, Ashlee Shae

    2013-01-01

    ma: Results of a vertical seismic profile at ocean drillingma: Results of a vertical seismic profile at ocean drilling

  6. Seismic Structure of Shallow Lithosphere at Locations of Distinctive Seafloor Spreading /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henig, Ashlee Shae

    2013-01-01

    Geographic Locations of Seismic Lines . . . . . . . . . .Center from MultiChannel Seismic Data . . . . . . . . .Continued Multi-Channel Seismic Refraction Anal- ysis of

  7. Converted wave imaging in anisotropic media using sea-floor seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Fabio

    velocity ratio is derived conventionally by event matching in the P-wave and converted wave stacks. I present an attempt to use well-log derived velocity ratios to avoid this interpretative step. The velocity ratio derived from 4C seismic data is about 30...

  8. Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

    2013-09-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

  9. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 175102 (2013) Dynamic neutron scattering from conformational dynamics. II. Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    #12;THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 175102 (2013) Dynamic neutron scattering from; accepted 12 September 2013; published online 1 November 2013) Neutron scattering experiments directly probe.1063/1.4824071] I. INTRODUCTION Dynamic neutron scattering is a direct probe of the inter- nal, conformational

  10. Reaction ensemble molecular dynamics: Direct simulation of the dynamic equilibrium properties of chemically reacting mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisal, Martin

    diffusion) as well as reaction equilibria for chemically reacting mixtures. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.70.) on chemical reaction equilibria is critical in many fields of science including mixture separationReaction ensemble molecular dynamics: Direct simulation of the dynamic equilibrium properties

  11. A Parallelizable and Approximate Dynamic Programming-Based Dynamic Fleet Management Model with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topaloglu, Huseyin

    -based dynamic fleet management model that can handle random load arrivals, random travel times and multiple-based model for the dynamic fleet management problem with random load arrivals, random travel times-based models for fleet management problems with random load arrivals, deterministic travel times and a single

  12. Water network dynamics at the critical moment of a peptide's -turn formation: A molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerukh, Dmitry

    Water network dynamics at the critical moment of a peptide's -turn formation: A molecular dynamics-Enkephalin in aqueous solution have been used to study the role of the water network during the formation of -turns. We give a detailed account of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding, the water-peptide hydrogen bonding

  13. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 -rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz Introduction to Computational Fluid to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz maj 2015 Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering - Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2 / 68 1.0 Course content / Time table #12;Introduction to Computational Fluid

  14. Current scaling of axially radiated power in dynamic hohlraums and dynamic hohlraum load design for ZR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mock, Raymond Cecil; Nash, Thomas J.; Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-03-01

    We present designs for dynamic hohlraum z-pinch loads on the 28 MA, 140 ns driver ZR. The scaling of axially radiated power with current in dynamic hohlraums is reviewed. With adequate stability on ZR this scaling indicates that 30 TW of axially radiated power should be possible. The performance of the dynamic hohlraum load on the 20 MA, 100 ns driver Z is extensively reviewed. The baseline z-pinch load on Z is a nested tungsten wire array imploding onto on-axis foam. Data from a variety of x-ray diagnostics fielded on Z are presented. These diagnostics include x-ray diodes, bolometers, fast x-ray imaging cameras, and crystal spectrometers. Analysis of these data indicates that the peak dynamic radiation temperature on Z is between 250 and 300 eV from a diameter less than 1 mm. Radiation from the dynamic hohlraum itself or from a radiatively driven pellet within the dynamic hohlraum has been used to probe a variety of matter associated with the dynamic hohlraum: the tungsten z-pinch itself, tungsten sliding across the end-on apertures, a titanium foil over the end aperture, and a silicon aerogel end cap. Data showing the existence of asymmetry in radiation emanating from the two ends of the dynamic hohlraum is presented, along with data showing load configurations that mitigate this asymmetry. 1D simulations of the dynamic hohlraum implosion are presented and compared to experimental data. The simulations provide insight into the dynamic hohlraum behavior but are not necessarily a reliable design tool because of the inherently 3D behavior of the imploding nested tungsten wire arrays.

  15. Exact decoherence dynamics of $1/f$ noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Md. Manirul Ali; Ping-Yuan Lo; Wei-Min Zhang

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, we investigate the exact decoherence dynamics of a superconducting resonator coupled to an electromagnetic reservoir characterized by the $1/f$ noise at finite temperature, where a full quantum description of the environment with $1/f^{x}$ noise (with $x \\approx 1$) is presented. The exact master equation and the associated non-equilibrium Green's functions are solved exactly for such an open system. We show a clear signal of non-Markovian dynamics induced purely by $1/f$ noise. Our analysis is also applicable to another nano/micro mechanical oscillators. Finally, we demonstrate the non-Markovian decoherence dynamics of photon number superposition states using Wigner distribution that could be measured in experiments.

  16. Diffusion in randomly perturbed dissipative dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian S. Rodrigues; Aleksei V. Chechkin; Alessandro P. S. de Moura; Celso Grebogi; Rainer Klages

    2014-11-13

    Dynamical systems having many coexisting attractors present interesting properties from both fundamental theoretical and modelling points of view. When such dynamics is under bounded random perturbations, the basins of attraction are no longer invariant and there is the possibility of transport among them. Here we introduce a basic theoretical setting which enables us to study this hopping process from the perspective of anomalous transport using the concept of a random dynamical system with holes. We apply it to a simple model by investigating the role of hyperbolicity for the transport among basins. We show numerically that our system exhibits non-Gaussian position distributions, power-law escape times, and subdiffusion. Our simulation results are reproduced consistently from stochastic Continuous Time Random Walk theory.

  17. Dynamical Topological Order Parameters far from Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Carl Budich; Markus Heyl

    2015-09-21

    We report the discovery of a novel topological quantum number, represented by a momentum space winding number of the Pancharatnam geometric phase, that is dynamically defined and can change its integer value at discrete times where so called dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) occur. By contrast, straightforward non-equilibrium generalizations of conventional topological invariants are well known to be constants of motion under coherent time evolution. DQPTs have been recently introduced as a non-equilibrium analog in quantum real-time evolution of conventional phase transitions, where increasing time replaces the notion of conventional control parameters such as temperature. Here, studying quantum quenches in two-banded Bogoliubov de Gennes models, we identify for the first time a quantity that can be seen as the dynamical analog of an order parameter which changes its topologically quantized value at DQPTs.

  18. Maximizing a psychological uplift in love dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Malay; Inoue, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamical properties of a psychological uplift in lovers. We first evaluate extensively the dynamical equations which were recently given by Rinaldi et. al., Physica A 392, pp.3231-3239 (2013). Then, the dependences of the equations on several parameters are numerically examined. From the view point of lasting partnership for lovers, especially, for married couples, one should optimize the parameters appearing in the dynamical equations to maintain the love for their respective partners. To achieve this optimization, we propose a new idea where the parameters are stochastic variables and the parameters in the next time step are given as expectations over a Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution at a finite temperature. This idea is very general and might be applicable to other models dealing with human relationships.

  19. Kuiper Belt evolution due to dynamical friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; E. Spedicato; M. Gambera

    1999-05-04

    In this paper we study the role of dynamical friction on the evolution of a population of large objects ($m>10^{22}$ g) at heliocentric distances $>70$ AU in the Kuiper Belt. We show that the already flat distribution of these objects must flatten further due to non-spherically symmetric distribution of matter in the Kuiper Belt. Moreover the dynamical drag, produced by dynamical friction, causes objects of masses $\\geq 10^{24} g$ to lose angular momentum and to fall through more central regions in a timescale $\\approx 10^9 yr$. This mechanism is able to transport inwards objects of the size of Pluto, supposing it was created beyond 50 AU, according to a Stern & Colwell's (1997b) suggestion.

  20. Interface dynamics of microscopic cavities in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Dzubiella

    2007-04-02

    An analytical description of the interface motion of a collapsing nanometer-sized spherical cavity in water is presented by a modification of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation in conjunction with explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. Quantitative agreement is found between the two approaches for the time-dependent cavity radius $R(t)$ at different solvent conditions while in the continuum picture the solvent viscosity has to be corrected for curvature effects. The typical magnitude of the interface or collapse velocity is found to be given by the ratio of surface tension and fluid viscosity, $v\\simeq\\gamma/\\eta$, while the curvature correction accelerates collapse dynamics on length scales below the equilibrium crossover scales ($\\sim$1nm). The study offers a starting point for an efficient implicit modeling of water dynamics in aqueous nanoassembly and protein systems in nonequilibrium.