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1

Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near-surface NO{sub x} concentrations by a factor of 2-5. These results suggest the importance of using the more accurate hybrid dynamical method in the estimates of both aerosol forcing and tropospheric ozone chemistry.

Joyce E. Penner

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

2

Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass...

3

Modal aerosol dynamics modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and Aerosol...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and Aerosol Phase at a Sub-Urban Site Near Mexico City in March 2006 During Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and...

5

CADS:Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual describes a library for aerosol kinetics and transport, called CADS (Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator), which employs a section-based approach for describing the particle size distributions. CADS is based upon Cantera, a set of C++ libraries and applications that handles gas phase species transport and reactions. The method uses a discontinuous Galerkin formulation to represent the particle distributions within each section and to solve for changes to the aerosol particle distributions due to condensation, coagulation, and nucleation processes. CADS conserves particles, elements, and total enthalpy up to numerical round-off error, in all of its formulations. Both 0-D time dependent and 1-D steady state applications (an opposing-flow flame application) have been developed with CADS, with the initial emphasis on developing fundamental mechanisms for soot formation within fires. This report also describes the 0-D application, TDcads, which models a time-dependent perfectly stirred reactor.

Moffat, Harry K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Application of computational fluid dynamics to aerosol sampling and concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An understanding of gas-liquid two-phase interactions, aerosol particle deposition, and heat transfer is needed. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is becoming a powerful tool to predict aerosol behavior for related design work. In this study...

Hu, Shishan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Computational Approach to Understanding Aerosol Formation and Oxidant Chemistry in the Troposphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of aerosol formation and ozone production in the troposphere is currently a high priority because these phenomena are recognized as two major effects of energy-related air pollution. Atmospheric aerosols are of concern because of their effect on visibility, climate, and human health. Equally important, aerosols can change the chemistry of the atmosphere, in dramatic fashion, by providing new chemical pathways (in the condensed phase) unavailable in the gas phase. The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and inorganic compounds (e.g., sulfuric acid, ammonia, nitric acid, ions, and mineral) can produce precursor molecules that act as nucleation seeds. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) has identified the need to evaluate the causes of variations in tropospheric aerosol chemical composition and concentrations, including determining the sources of aerosol particles and the fraction of such that are of primary and secondary origin. In particular, the ACP has called for a deeper understanding into aerosol formation because nucleation creates substantial concentrations of fresh particles that, via growth and coagulation, influence the Earth's radiation budget. Tropospheric ozone is also of concern primarily because of its impact on human health. Ozone levels are controlled by NOx and by VOCs in the lower troposphere. The VOCs can be either from natural emissions from such sources as vegetation and phytoplankton or from anthropogenic sources such as automobiles and oil-fueled power production plants. The major oxidant for VOCs in the atmosphere is the OH radical. With the increase in VOC emissions, there is rising concern regarding the available abundance of HOx species needed to initiate oxidation. Over the last five years, there have been four field studies aimed at initial measurements of HOx species (OH and HO? radicals). These measurements revealed HOx levels that are two to four times higher than expected from the commonly assumed primary sources. Such elevated abundances of HOx imply a more photochemically active troposphere than previously thought. This implies that rates of ozone formation in the lower region of the atmosphere and the oxidation of SO? can be enhanced, thus promoting the formation of new aerosol properties. Central to unraveling this chemistry is the ability to assess the photochemical product distributions resulting from the photodissociation of by-products of VOC oxidation. We propose to use state-of-the-art theoretical techniques to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of aerosol formation in multicomponent (mixed chemical) systems and the photochemistry of atmospheric organic species. The aerosol studies involve an approach that determines homogeneous gas-particle nucleation rates from knowledge of the molecular interactions that are used to define properties of molecular clusters. Over the past several years we developed Dynamical Nucleation Theory (DNT), a novel advance in the theoretical description of homogeneous gas-liquid nucleation, and applied it to gas-liquid nucleation of a single component system (e.g., water). The goal of the present research is to build upon these advances by extending the theory to multicomponent systems important in the atmosphere (such as clusters containing sulfuric acid, water, ions, ammonia, and organics). In addition, high-level ab initio electronic structure calculations will be used to unravel the chemical reactivity of the OH radical and water clusters.

Francisco, Joseph S.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Dang, Liem X.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Du, Shiyu; Dixon, David A.; Bianco, Roberto; Wang, Shuzhi; Hynes, James T.; Morita, Akihiro; Peterson, Kirk A.

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

8

Soot particle aerosol dynamics at high pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have used detailed calculations to analyze the coagulation dynamics of a soot aerosol at high pressures (20 and 50 atm). They find that the soot size distribution is altered compared to lower-pressure conditions because the mean free path at high pressures is reduced to the point that the particles are similar in size to the mean free path. At lower pressures the form of the size distribution becomes constant (self-preserving) in time, allowing optical measurements to be easily interpreted. However, the authors find that at pressures above about 5 atm the shape of the size distribution continually changes. As a result, proper and accurate interpretation of optical data at high pressures is more difficult than at lower pressures.

Harris, S.J. (General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (USA). Physics Dept.); Kennedy, I.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Multicomponent aerosol dynamic of the Pb-O[sub 2] system in a bench scale flame incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article gives results of a study to understand the formation and growth of lead particles in a flame incinerator. A bench scale flame incinerator was used to perform controlled experiments with lead acetate as a test compound. A dilution probe (in conjunction with real-time aerosol instruments) was used to measure the evolution of the particle size distribution at different locations in the flame region. A multicomponent lognormal aerosol model was developed accounting for the chemistry of the lead-oxygen system, and for such aerosol dynamic phenomena as nucleation, coagulation, and condensation. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the predictions of the model using appropriate kinetic parameters and the experimental results.

Lin, W.Y.; Sethi, V.; Biswas, P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Study of Heterogeneouse Processes Related to the Chemistry of Tropospheric Oxidants and Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the studies was to elucidate the heterogeneous chemistry of tropospheric aerosols. Experiments were designed to measure both specifically needed parameters, and to obtain systematic data required to build a fundamental understanding of the nature of gas-surface physical and chemical interactions

Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, D R; Jayne, J T; Colb, C E

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Aerosol Transport and Deposition Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, various aerosol particle transport and deposition mechanisms were studied through the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, including inertial impaction, gravitational effect, lift force, interception, and turbophoresis, within...

Tang, Yingjie

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

AT772, Fall 2007 Aerosol Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relevant program August 22 W 1 Introduction Aerosol size distributions Properties of lognormal distributions Fitting model size distribution functions to data [Other functions (e.g., gamma, power law)] 8 distribution 29 W Extra 1/2 31 3b 4 Overview, continued Time scales for diffusion, coagulation, condensational

13

Use of a continuous stirred tank reactor for the study of aqueous aerosol chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosol chemistry is important in areas ranging from urban air pollution to cloud formation. It has long been supposed that droplet-phase reactions account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric conversion of SO/sub 2/ to sulfate. In this thesis a reactor system is developed to carry out gas-aerosol reactions under humid, ambient-like conditions. The apparatus consists of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) in which the growth of the aqueous aerosol is measured. Absence of mass transfer limitation, coagulation, and nucleation ensure that particle growth is direct evidence of reaction. Special care is taken to minimize size biasing of the aqueous aerosol in the electrostatics classifier used to measure the reactor feed and effluent distributions. Aerosol behavior in the reactor is modeled assuming an ideal CSTR and, given the solution thermodynamics and equilibrium chemistry, the effluent distribution can be predicted using one of the proposed reaction rate mechanisms. Experiments were performed using a pure MnSO/sub 4/ or a MnSO/sub 4/minus// Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixture feed aerosol. The relative humidity ranged from 86 to 94% and 0.1 ppm < p/sub SO/sub 2// < 50 ppm. The various rate expressions proposed for this system in the literature resulted in varying estimates of growth. When reactor conditions were similar to those at which the rate expression was determined, the agreement between the predicted and observed distributions improved. This indicates that use of a rate expressions beyond its specified range may result in erroneous predictions.

Adkins, C.L.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The modeling of aerosol dynamics during degraded core events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is substantial interest in developing simple, yet accurate, models for the prediction of aerosol dynamics during degraded core events. The exact aerosol transport equation is given by {partial derivative}n(v,t)/{partial derivative}t = 1/2 {integral}{sub 0}{sup {infinity}} K(u,v {minus} u)n(u,t)n(v {minus} u,t)du {minus} {integral}{sub 0}{sup {infinity}} K(u,v)n(v,t)n(u,t)du {minus} n(v,t)c(v)/h + n{sub p}(v), where n(v,t) is the particle size density distribution function. The kernel, K(v,u), is related to the frequency of coagulation between aerosol particles of volume u and v, and the quantity c(v) is the deposition velocity. The quantity h is the effective height for deposition of aerosol; it is the volume of the aerosol cloud divided by the projected horizontal area A. Finally, the term n{sub p} (v) is the source rate of aerosol. Evaluation of the above equation is discussed.

Clausse, A.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Atmospheric Chemistry, Carbon Cycle, and Climate (AC4): Observational Constraints on Sources and Sinks of Aerosols and Greenhouse Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gas extraction can also inform future energy choices. In FY 2014, Atmospheric Chemistry, Carbon Cycle anthropogenic-biogenic emission intense regions 3. Deposition processes controlling atmospheric concentrations of aerosols and greenhouse gases Projects that quantify sources and sinks via new measurements and/or modeling

17

Numerical solutions of the aerosol general dynamic equation for nuclear reactor safety studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods and approximations inherent in modeling of aerosol dynamics and evolution for nuclear reactor source term estimation have been investigated. Several aerosol evolution problems are considered to assess numerical methods of solving the aerosol dynamic equation. A new condensational growth model is constructed by generalizing Mason's formula to arbitrary particle sizes, and arbitrary accommodation of the condensing vapor and background gas at particle surface. Analytical solution is developed for the aerosol growth equation employing the new condensation model. The space-dependent aerosol dynamic equation is solved to assess implications of spatial homogenization of aerosol distributions. The results of our findings are as follows. The sectional method solving the aerosol dynamic equation is quite efficient in modeling of coagulation problems, but should be improved for simulation of strong condensation problems. The J-space transform method is accurate in modeling of condensation problems, but is very slow. For the situation considered, the new condensation model predicts slower aerosol growth than the corresponding isothermal model as well as Mason's model, the effect of partial accommodation is considerable on the particle evolution, and the effect of the energy accommodation coefficient is more pronounced than that of the mass accommodation coefficient. For the initial conditions considered, the space-dependent aerosol dynamics leads to results that are substantially different from those based on the spatially homogeneous aerosol dynamic equation.

Park, J.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Themes Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems...

19

Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis, structure, and solution dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis considers three aspects of organoactinide chemistry. In chapter one, a bidentate phosphine ligand was used to kinetically stabilize complexes of the type Cp/sub 2/MX/sub 2/. Ligand redistribution processes are present throughout the synthetic work, as has often been observed in uranium cyclopentadienyl chemistry. The effects of covalent M-L bonding on the solution and solid state properties of U(III) coordination complexes are considered. In particular, the nature of the more subtle interaction between the metal and the neutral ligand are examined. Using relative basicity data obtained in solution, and solid state structural data (and supplemented by gas phase photoelectron measurements), it is demonstrated that the more electron rich U(III) centers engage in significant U ..-->.. L ..pi..-donation. Trivalent uranium is shown to be capable of acting either as a one- or two-electron reducing agent toward a wide variety of unsaturated organic and inorganic molecules, generating molecular classes unobtainable via traditional synthetic approaches, as well as offering an alternative synthetic approach to molecules accessible via metathesis reactions. Ligand redistribution processes are again observed, but given the information concerning ligand lability, this reactivity pattern is applied to the synthesis of pure materials inaccessible from redox chemistry. 214 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs.

Brennan, J.G.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; McFiggans, Gordon

2014-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS/CEE 6790 Fall 2010 Aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-3 ). 4 (a). For each bin in the size distribution of part 1, assuming monodisperse coagulation, is coagulation important for this aerosol distribution given the typical lifetime of tropospheric aerosols? #12; by 1/2, then determine the average for the whole size distribution. Note, that this is a size

Weber, Rodney

22

Chemistry of carbonaceous aerosols : studies of atmospheric processing and OH-initiated oxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonaceous aerosols are among the most prevalent yet least understood constituents of the atmosphere, particularly in urban environments. We have performed analyses of field samples and laboratory studies to probe the ...

Johnson, Kirsten S. (Kirsten Sue)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A one-dimensional sectional model to simulate multicomponent aerosol dynamics in the marine boundary layer 1. Model description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional, multicomponent sectional model has been developed to simulate the temporal and vertical variations of the aerosol size distribution and composition in the marine boundary layer (MBL). An important aspect of the model is its ability to handle the transport of aerosols in an atmosphere with humidity gradients with no numerical diffusion caused by the swelling and shrinking of the particles as they move through the humidity gradients. This is achieved by rewriting the aerosol general dynamical equation (GDE) in terms of dry radius thus transferring all variations in radius caused by temporal and spatial humidity variations to the rate coefficients appearing in the equations. The model then solves the new GDE in fixed dry size sections, with the humidity dependence of the processes now included in variable coefficients. This procedure also results in correct gradient transport. A limiting assumption is that the particles equilibrate instantaneously with the ambient water vapor. This assumption limits the maximum particle size which can be treated in the model to ambient (wet) radii less than about 30 {mu}m. All processes currently believed to be important in shaping the MBL size distribution are included in the current version of the model. These include generation of sea-salt aerosol at the ocean surface, nucleation of new particles, coagulation, growth due to condensation of gas-phase reaction products, growth due to sulfate formation during cloud processing, precipitation scavenging, surface deposition, turbulent mixing, gravitational settling, and exchange with the free troposphere. Simple gas-phase chemistry which includes the oxidation of dimethylsulfide and SO{sub 2} to sulfate is incorporated in the current version of the model. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

Fitzgerald, J.W.; Hoppel, W.A. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)] [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Gelbard, F. [Modeling and Analysis Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)] [Modeling and Analysis Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Simulation of aerosol dynamics: a comparative review of mathematical models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three modeling approaches used are based-continuous, discrete (sectional), and parameterized representations of the aerosol size distribution. Simulations of coagulation and condensation are performed with the three models for clear, hazy, and urban atmospheric conditions. Relative accuracies and computational costs are compared. Reference for the comparison is the continuous approach. The results of the study provide useful information for the selection of an aerosol model, depending on the accuracy requirements and computational constraints associated with a specific application.

Seigneur, C.; Hudischewskyj, A.B.; Seinfeld, J.H.; Whitby, K.T.; Whitby, E.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields, which need to be quantified for the successful use under radiolytic conditions. Electron solvation dynamics in ILs are measured directly when possible and estimated using proxies (e.g. coumarin-153 dynamic emission Stokes shifts or benzophenone anion solvation) in other cases. Electron reactivity is measured using ultrafast kinetics techniques for comparison with the solvation process.

Wishart, J.F.

2011-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

Aerosol composition, chemistry, and source characterization during the 2008 VOCALS Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical composition of fine aerosol particles over the northern Chilean coastal waters was determined onboard the U.S. DOE G-1 aircraft during the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) field campaign between October 16 and November 15, 2008. SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and total organics (Org) were determined using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, and SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, Na+, Cl-, CH3SO3-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ were determined using a particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique. The results show the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non- sea-salt SO42- followed by Na+, Cl-, Org, NO3-, and NH4+, in decreasing importance; CH3SO3-, Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their respective limits of detection. The SO42- aerosols were strongly acidic as the equivalent NH4+ to SO42- ratio was only {approx}0.25 on average. NaCl particles, presumably of sea-salt origin, showed chloride deficits but retained Cl- typically more than half the equivalency of Na+, and are externally mixed with the acidic sulfate aerosols. Nitrate was observed only on sea-salt particles, consistent with adsorption of HNO3 on sea-salt aerosols, responsible for the Cl- deficit. Dust particles appeared to play a minor role, judging from the small volume differences between that derived from the observed mass concentrations and that calculated based on particle size distributions. Because SO42- concentrations were substantial ({approx}0.5 - {approx}3 {micro}g/m3) with a strong gradient (highest near the shore), and the ocean-emitted dimethylsulfide and its unique oxidation product, CH3SO3-, were very low (i.e., {le} 40 parts per trillion and <0.05 {micro}g/m3, respectively), the observed SO42- aerosols are believed to be primarily of terrestrial origin. Back trajectory calculations indicate sulfur emissions from smelters and power plants along coastal regions of Peru and Chile are the main sources of these SO4- aerosols. However, compared to observations, model calculations appeared to underestimate sulfate concentrations based on an existing emission inventory. The agreement between observations and model predictions of CO as well as total sulfur is reexamined in this work with a new emission inventory made available recently.

Lee, Y.; Springston, S.; Jayne, J.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Hubbe, J.; Alexander, L.; Brioude, J.; Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Kleinman, L.; Daum, P.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modeling particle formation during low-pressure silane oxidation: Detailed chemical kinetics and aerosol dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the generation of SiOHx species from fast gas- phase reactions can significantly degrade film quality. Based conservation equations and a moment-type aerosol dynamics model were formulated for a batch reactor undergoing to impurity diffusion.1 During LPCVD film deposition rates are limited by the gas-phase nucleation

Zachariah, Michael R.

29

Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew...

30

Simulation of aerosol dynamics: A comparative review of algorithms used in air quality models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative review of algorithms currently used in air quality models to simulate aerosol dynamics is presented. This review addresses coagulation, condensational growth, nucleation, and gas/particle mass transfer. Two major approaches are used in air quality models to represent the particle size distribution: (1) the sectional approach in which the size distribution is discretized into sections and particle properties are assumed to be constant over particle size sections and (2) the modal approach in which the size distribution is approximated by several modes and particle properties are assumed to be uniform in each mode. The results of this study provide useful information to select algorithms to simulate aerosol dynamics in air quality models and to improve the accuracy of existing algorithms.

Zhang, Y.; Seigneur, C.; Seinfeld, J.H.; Jacobson, M.Z.; Binkowski, F.S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The coupling of dynamics and molecular chemistry in galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the best tracer of the molecular component and its dynamics in galaxies is the CO molecule, which excitation is revealed by its isotopic and (2-1)/(1-0) ratios, the denser gas is revealed by molecules such as HCN, HNC, HCO+ or CN, which are now widely used to probe star formation regions, or to quantify the impact of the nuclear activity on the interstellar medium. This paper reviews recent observations in nearby galaxies, where these molecular line ratios serve as diagnostic tools of the physical conditions of the gas and also of its chemical properties. Those differ significantly according to the proximity of an AGN or of a starburst. The origin of the differences is not yet well known and could be due to different densities, temperatures, chemical abundances or non-collisional excitation of the gas (e.g. Aalto et al 2007, Krips et al 2007). HCN or HNC line enhancements can be caused not only by higher gas densities/temperatures, but also UV/X-ray radiation, and global IR pumping. The chemistry can be dominated by PDR regions near a starburst, or X-ray dominated in a molecular torus surrounding an AGN (XDR regions). The molecular line ratios expected in those regions vary according to the different models (Meijerink et al. 2007).

F. Combes

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Discovery of An Aurora Kinase Inhibitor Through Site-Specific Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a fragment-based lead discovery method that combines site-directed ligand discovery with dynamic combinatorial chemistry. Our technique targets dynamic combinatorial screening to a specified region of a protein by using reversible disulfide chemistry. We have used this technology to rapidly identify inhibitors of the drug target Aurora A that span the purine-binding site and the adaptive pocket of the kinase. The binding mode of a noncovalent inhibitor has been further characterized through crystallography.

Cancilla, M.T.; He, M.M.; Viswanathan, N.; Simmons, R.L.; Taylor, M.; Fung, A.D.; Cao, K.; Erlanson, D.A.

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

Sensitivity of Tropospheric Chemical Composition to Halogen-Radical Chemistry Using a Fully Coupled Size-Resolved Multiphase Chemistry-Global Climate System: Halogen Distributions, Aerosol Composition, and Sensitivity of Climate-Relevant Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations and model studies suggest a significant but highly non-linear role for halogens, primarily Cl and Br, in multiphase atmospheric processes relevant to tropospheric chemistry and composition, aerosol evolution, radiative transfer, weather, and climate. The sensitivity of global atmospheric chemistry to the production of marine aerosol and the associated activation and cycling of inorganic Cl and Br was tested using a size-resolved multiphase coupled chemistry/global climate model (National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM); v3.6.33). Simulation results showed strong meridional and vertical gradients in Cl and Br species. The simulation reproduced most available observations with reasonable confidence permitting the formulation of potential mechanisms for several previously unexplained halogen phenomena including the enrichment of Br- in submicron aerosol, and the presence of a BrO maximum in the polar free troposphere. However, simulated total volatile Br mixing ratios were generally high in the troposphere. Br in the stratosphere was lower than observed due to the lack of long-lived organobromine species in the simulation. Comparing simulations using chemical mechanisms with and without reactive Cl and Br species demonstrated a significant temporal and spatial sensitivity of primary atmospheric oxidants (O3, HOx, NOx), CH4, and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC’s) to halogen cycling. Simulated O3 and NOx were globally lower (65% and 35%, respectively, less in the planetary boundary layer based on median values) in simulations that included halogens. Globally, little impact was seen in SO2 and non-sea-salt SO42- processing due to halogens. Significant regional differences were evident: The lifetime of nss-SO42- was extended downwind of large sources of SO2. The burden and lifetime of DMS (and its oxidation products) were lower by a factor of 5 in simulations that included halogens, versus those without, leading to a 20% reduction in nss-SO42- in the southern hemisphere planetary boundary layer based on median values.

Long, M.; Keene, W. C.; Easter, Richard C.; Sander, Rolf; Liu, Xiaohong; Kerkweg, A.; Erickson, D.

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry

35

Green Chemistry Dynamic Article Links Cite this: Green Chem., 2011, 13, 91  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Chemistry Dynamic Article Links Cite this: Green Chem., 2011, 13, 91 www.rsc.org/greenchem PAPER Renewable gasoline from aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of aqueous sugar solutions prepared In this paper we demonstrate an integrated process for the production of high octane gasoline from maple wood

California at Riverside, University of

36

Using Chemistry and Microfluidics To Understand the Spatial Dynamics of Complex Biological Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Chemistry and Microfluidics To Understand the Spatial Dynamics of Complex Biological Networks of a network are simultaneously considered. Here, we describe chemical concepts and microfluidic tools or computational models can be created by replacing each module with a single reaction. Microfluidics can be used

Ismagilov, Rustem F.

37

5, 79658026, 2005 Simulating aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and sizeACPD 5, 7965­8026, 2005 Simulating aerosol microphysics with ECHAM/MADE A. Lauer et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of the key processes that govern the aerosol size distribution: · Gas-to-particle conversion--conversion, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi- phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes

39

Dynamical and radiative response to the massive injection of aerosol from Kuwait oil burning fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the injection of large amount of soot comparable to that produced in the burning of oil wells in Kuwait were studied using a 2-D mesoscale model. During the three day numerical simulation the ground-atmosphere system appears to be strongly perturbed. A surface cooling is produced in the first two days above and downwind of the sources. The cooling, between -10 C over the desert and -0.5 C over the sea is dependent on the surface characteristics. The temperature decrease at the ground results in a stratified troposphere which inhibits convection and perturbs the normal diurnal variability of the boundary layer while the upper levels are driven by the radiative warming of the aerosol layer. In this region after few hours the simulation produces a warming of 0.8 C reaching a maximum of 6 C is after 60 hours. During the last 2 days of simulation the long wave radiation emitted by the low altitude atmospheric layers contribute to mitigate the surface cooling. A detailed discussion of the radiative and the dynamical interactions is given and it is shown that beside the specific interest in the short term effects these results may be useful to parameterize the smoke source for a General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation.

Ferretti, R.; Visconti, G. [Univ. L`Aquila (Italy)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.; MCGRAW,R.; BENKOVITZ,C.M.; WRIGHT,D.L.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 2: User's Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III contains some of the assessments performed by LANL and FzK.

B. D. Nichols; C. Müller; G. A. Necker; J. R. Travis; J. W. Spore; K. L. Lam; P. Royl; T. L. Wilson

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 3: Assessment Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best- estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III contains some of the assessments performed by LANL and FzK

C. Müller; E. D. Hughes; G. F. Niederauer; H. Wilkening; J. R. Travis; J. W. Spore; P. Royl; W. Baumann

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

SAGE II long-term measurements of stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II solar occultation instrument has been making measurements on stratospheric aerosols and gases continually since October 1984. Observations from the SAGE II instrument provide a valuable long-term data set for study of the aerosol in the stratosphere and aerosol and cloud in the upper troposphere. The period of observation covers the decay phase of material injected by the El Chichon volcanic eruption in 1982, the years 1988--1990 when stratospheric aerosol levels approached background levels, and the period after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. The Mount Pinatubo eruption caused the largest perturbation in stratospheric aerosol loading in this century, with effects on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry. The SAGE II data sequence shows the global dispersion of aerosols following the Mount Pinatubo eruption, as well as the changes occurring in stratospheric aerosol mass and surface area. The downward transfer of stratospheric aerosols into the upper troposphere following the earlier eruption of El Chichon is clearly visible. Estimates have been made of the amount of volcanic material lying in the upper troposphere and the way in which this varies with latitude and season.

Wang, P.H.; Kent, G.S. [Science and Technology Corp., Hampton, VA (United States); McCormick, M.P.; Thomason, L.W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

CIRRICULUM VITAE: TOM BREIDER Atmospheric Chemistry Post-Doctoral Research Fellow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to changing anthropogenic and dynamic biogenic emissions of trace gases and aerosols. These chemistry and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp=50 nm) particles. Discuss., 3, 1185-1221, 2010 4) Hossani, R., M. P. Chipperfield, W. Feng, T. J. Breider, E. Atlas, S. A

Jacob, Daniel J.

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic aerosol burden Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and surface... generally exhibits low aerosol ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Atmopsheric Chemistry and...

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol sellest rgivad Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 4, 2004 Abstract Atmospheric aerosol particles scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation and Source: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry...

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol biokinetics concentrations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 4, 2004 Abstract Atmospheric aerosol particles scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation and Source: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry...

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosols Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 4, 2004 Abstract Atmospheric aerosol particles scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation and Source: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry...

50

Biosystem Dynamics & Design | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biosystem Dynamics & Design Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Biosystem Dynamics &...

51

aerosols | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosols aerosols Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate material for...

52

The use of dynamic adaptive chemistry in combustion simulation of gasoline surrogate fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computationally efficient dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) scheme is described that permits on-the-fly mechanism reduction during reactive flow calculations. The scheme reduces a globally valid full mechanism to a locally, instantaneously applicable smaller mechanism. Previously we demonstrated its applicability to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) problems with n-heptane [L. Liang, J.G. Stevens, J.T. Farrell, Proc. Combust. Inst. 32 (2009) 527-534]. In this work we demonstrate the broader utility of the DAC scheme through the simulation of HCCI and shock tube ignition delay times (IDT) for three gasoline surrogates, including two- and three-component blends of primary reference fuels (PRF) and toluene reference fuels (TRF). Both a detailed 1099-species mechanism and a skeletal 150-species mechanism are investigated as the full mechanism to explore the impact of fuel complexity on the DAC scheme. For all conditions studied, pressure and key species profiles calculated using the DAC scheme are in excellent agreement with the results obtained using the full mechanisms. For the HCCI calculations using the 1099- and 150-species mechanisms, the DAC scheme achieves 70- and 15-fold CPU time reductions, respectively. For the IDT problems, corresponding speed-up factors of 10 and two are obtained. Practical guidance is provided for choosing the search-initiating species set, selecting the threshold, and implementing the DAC scheme in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) framework. (author)

Liang, Long; Raman, Sumathy; Farrell, John T. [Corporate Strategic Research Laboratories, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, 1545 Route 22 East, Annandale, NJ 08801 (United States); Stevens, John G. [Corporate Strategic Research Laboratories, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, 1545 Route 22 East, Annandale, NJ 08801 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ 07043 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

aerosol characteristic researching: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as they have significant impacts both on localregional air pollution and global climate. Recent for Aerosol and Cloud Chemistry, Aerodyne Research, Incorporated, Billerica,...

54

Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning: 1. Lagrangian parcel studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a new model of the gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry of biomass burning smoke plumes called Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP). Here we use ASP combined with a Lagrangian parcel model to simulate the chemistry ...

Alvarado, Matthew James

55

Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and Aerosol Phase at a Sub-Urban Site Near Mexico City in March 2006 During the MILAGRO Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonaceous aerosol were measured at a sub-urban site near Mexico City in March of 2006 during the MILAGRO study (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Objectives). Diurnal variations of hydrocarbons, elemental carbon (EC) and hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) were dominated by a high peak in the early morning when local emissions accumulated in a shallow boundary layer, and a minimum in the afternoon when the emissions were diluted in a significantly expanded boundary layer and, in case of the reactive gases, removed by OH. In comparison, diurnal variations of species with secondary sources such as the aldehydes, ketones, oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) stayed relatively high in the afternoon indicating strong photochemical formation. Emission ratios of many hydrocarbon species relative to CO were higher in Mexico City than in the U.S., but we found similar emission ratios for most oxygenated VOCs and organic aerosol. Secondary formation of acetone may be more efficient in Mexico City than in the U.S., due to higher emissions of alkane precursors from the use of liquefied petroleum gas. Secondary formation of organic aerosol was similar between Mexico City and the U.S. Combining the data for all measured gas and aerosol species, we describe the budget of total observed organic carbon (TOOC), and find that the enhancement ratio of TOOC relative to CO is conserved between the early morning and mid afternoon despite large compositional changes. Finally, the influence of biomass burning is investigated using the measurements of acetonitrile, which was found to correlate with levoglucosan in the particle phase. Diurnal variations of acetonitrile indicate a contribution from local burning sources. Scatter plots of acetonitrile versus CO suggest that the contribution of biomass burning to the enhancement of most gas and aerosol species was not dominant and perhaps not dissimilar from observations in the U.S.

de Gouw, Joost A.; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; Warneke, Carsten; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, Angela K.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Blake, D. R.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Celada, A. T.; Huey, L. G.; Junkermann, W.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Salcido, A.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Sullivan, Amy; Tanner, David J.; Vargas-Ortiz, Leroy; Weber, R. J.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Aerosol engineering: design and stability of aerosol reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical study of the performance of aerosol reactors is presented. The goals of this study are (1) to identify the appropriate reactor types (batch, CSTR, and tubular) for production of aerosol with specific properties (for example, uniform size particles, high aerosol surface area, etc.) and (2) to investigate the effect of various process parameters on product aerosol characteristics and on the stability of operation of aerosol reactors. In all the reactors considered, the aerosol dynamics were detemined by chemical reaction, nucleation, and aerosol growth in the free molecule regime in the absence of coagulation at isothermal conditions. Formulation of the aerosol dynamics in terms of moments of the aerosol size distribution facilitated the numerical solution of the resulting systems of ordinary or partial differential equations. The stability characteristics of a continuous stirred tank aerosol reactor (CSTAR) were investigated since experimental data in the literature indicate that under certain conditions this reactor exhibits oscillatory behavior with respect to product aerosol concentration and size distribution.

Pratsinis, S.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Where do particulate toxins reside? An improved paradigm for the structure and dynamics of the urban mid-Atlantic aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discussions of excess mortality and morbidity from exposure to urban aerosol particles typically invoke the now 20-year-old trimodal aerosol paradigm proposed by Whitby to explain the structure and behavior of ambient aerosol volume and its major constituent, sulfate. However, this paradigm largely ignores the primary high-temperature combustion (HTC) components of the urban aerosol, which contribute minor amounts of the aerosol mass, but carry the bulk of the particulate toxins and numbers of aerosol particles. Studies encompassing the analyses of >100 size distributions of important intrinsic tracers of primary particles from HTC sources collected over the past decade in various environments show that urban aerosol contains a complex mixture of physically-discrete fresh and aged, primary particle populations from a variety of sources. Furthermore, whereas the behavior of fine-particulate aerosol mass and sulfate was described in terms of coagulation and accumulation aerosol scavenging of new secondary sulfate nuclei, studies reviewed herein suggest that the behavior of primary aerosol is mediated more by hygroscopic growth and cloud processing, accompanied by oxidation of SO{sub 2} on wet particles and droplets. The authors conclude that the distribution of airborne particulate toxins and their atmospheric behavior is far more complex than commonly conceptualized on the basis of the classical trimodal model, and they develop an extended paradigm in which the focus is on the primary accumulation aerosol.

Ondov, J.M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry] [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Wexler, A.S. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Assessment of the Upper Particle Size Limit for Quantitative Analysis of Aerosols Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the vaporization dynamics of individual aerosol particles, such as thermophoretic forces and vapor expulsion. Since

Hahn, David W.

59

147Chemistry Chemistry (Chem)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

147Chemistry Chemistry (Chem) Bayly Foundation PROFESSORS FRANCE, PLEVA ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS ALty A student may complete only one of the majors listed in the Department of Chemistry. The major in chemistry leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of 44 credits as follows: 1. Chemistry 111, 112

Dresden, Gregory

60

6, 75197562, 2006 Simulating aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, particle number concentration and aerosol size-distribution. The model takes into account sulfate (SO4. This model system enables explicit simulations of the particle number concentration and size-distribution of aerosol dynamical processes (nucleation, condensation, coagulation) is evaluated by comparison

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

THERMO FLUID DYNAMICS AND CHAMBER AEROSOL BEHAVIOR FOR THIN LIQUID WALL UNDER IFE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal and injection control. Experimental and numerical studies have been con- ducted to examine beam propagation and focusing requirements, as well as the target thermal integrity and injection the fluid dynamic aspects of thin-liquid- film protection systems with either radial injection through

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol particle size Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of aerosol over many orders-of-magnitude of particle size range, from subcritical clusters on the molecular... to modeling aerosol dynamics under conditions of new...

63

The effects of volcanic aerosols on mid-latitude ozone recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, comparisons between the derived Chemistry Climate Model Initiative aerosol data set to balloon sonde measurements of aerosols made in Laramie, Wyoming are made between 1979- 2012. Using the derived CCMI ...

Haskins, Jessica D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science ...........................................................................................................................................4 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office..............................................................................................6 Majors in Chemistry & Biochemistry

Levine, Alex J.

65

EMSL - aerosols  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosols en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-defects-m...

66

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Nińo?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Transformation of Solid Atmospheric Particles into Liquid Droplets Through Heterogeneous Chemistry: Laboratory Insights into the Processing of Calcium Containing Mineral Dust Aerosol in the Troposphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

[1] Individual calcium carbonate particles reacted with gas- phase nitric acid at 293 K have been followed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) analysis as a function of time and relative humidity (RH). The rate of calcium carbonate to calcium nitrate conversion is significantly enhanced in the presence of water vapor. The SEM images clearly show that solid CaCO3 particles are converted to spherical droplets as the reaction proceeds. The process occurs through a two-step mechanism involving the conversion of calcium carbonate into calcium nitrate followed by the deliquescence of the calcium nitrate product. The change in phase of the particles and the significant reactivity of nitric acid and CaCO3 at low RH are a direct result of the deliquescence of the product at low RH. This is the first laboratory study to show the phase transformation of solid particles into liquid droplets through heterogeneous chemistry.

Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Laskin, Alexander; Cowin, James P.

2003-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Extended Lagrangian quantum molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry in hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of interatomic potentials for hydrocarbons that are based upon the self-consistent charge transfer tight-binding approximation to density functional theory have been developed and implemented into the quantum molecular dynamics code ''LATTE''. The interatomic potentials exhibit an outstanding level of transferability and have been applied in molecular dynamics simulations of tert-butylacetylene under thermodynamic conditions that correspond to its single-shock Hugoniot. We have achieved precise conservation of the total energy during microcanonical molecular dynamics trajectories under incomplete convergence via the extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism. In good agreement with the results of a series of flyer-plate impact experiments, our SCC-TB molecular dynamics simulations show that tert-butylactylene molecules polymerize at shock pressures around 6.1 GPa.

Sanville, Edward J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bock, Nicolas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacombe, William M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cawkwell, Marc J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Niklasson, Anders M N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sewell, Thomas D [UNIV OF MISSOURI

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

148 Chemistry/Chinese Chemistry 347 (3)--Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite: Chemistry 242,syntheticmethodology,mod- ernsyntheticreactions,protectinggroups,naturalprod- uctssynthesis,andcombinatorialchemistry.France. Spring Chemistry 350 (3)--Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisites: Chemistry 250, 252, and 262. Anintro

Dresden, Gregory

70

Combustion chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Uncertainties and Frontiers in Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Transport Power Industry Biomass burning Residential Human activity Perspective Aerosol Sources (rather than, Mixing, Chemistry, Climate) Climate Effects Resource: AeroCom, an international model intercomparison of fossil fuel (coal, oil, diesel, gasoline), domestic wood burning, forest fires #12;Natural sources

72

Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in our understanding of important chemistry and highlightedin our knowledge. In summary, the chemistry occurring in theBJ, Pitts JN, Jr (2000) Chemistry of the Upper and Lower

Finlayson-Pitts, B. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

CLUSTER CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley-Interscience, 2006AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols Tuesdays 9-9:50 AM, 212B ACRC Wednesdays, Lab, 1-4 PM, ACB 10 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 19 491

75

Interfacial Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interfacial Chemistry The organization's research focus, among other things, is to develop new analytical methods that advance the science of surface chemistry and contribute to...

76

Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate ChangeSYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S

Dibble, Theodore

77

Particulate matter chemistry and dynamics in the Twilight Zone at VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding particle dynamics in the 'Twilight Zone' is critical to prediction of the ocean's carbon cycle. As part of the VERTIGO (VERtical Transformations In the Global Ocean) project, this rarely sampled regime extending from the base of the euphotic layer to 1000 m, was characterized by double-paired day/night Multiple Unit Large Volume in-situ Filtration System (MULVFS) deployments and by {approx}100 high-frequency CTD/transmissometer/turbidity sensor profiles. VERTIGO studies lasting three weeks, contrasted oligotrophic station ALOHA (22.75{sup o}N 158{sup o}W), sampled in June-July 2004, with a biologically productive location (47{sup o}N 161{sup o}E) near station K2 in the Oyashio, occupied July-August 2005. Profiles of major and minor particulate components (C{sub org}, N, P, Ca, Si, Sr, Ba, Mn) in <1, 1-51, and >51 {micro}m size fractions, in-water optics, neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) fluxes, and zooplankton data were intercompared. MULVFS total C{sub org} and C-Star particle beam attenuation coefficient (C{sub P}) were consistently related at both sites with a 27 {micro}M m{sup -1} conversion factor. 26 At K2, C{sub P} profiles further showed a multitude of transient spikes throughout the water column and spike abundance profiles closely paralleled the double peaked abundance profiles of zooplankton. Also at K2, copepods contributed {approx}40% and 10%, night and day, respectively to >51 {micro}m C{sub org} of MULVFS samples in the mixed layer, but few copepods were collected in deeper waters; however, non-swimming radiolarians were quantitatively sampled. A recent hypothesis regarding POC differences between pumps and bottles is examined in light of these results. Particulate >51 {micro}m C{sub org}, N, and P at both ALOHA and K2 showed strong attenuation with depth at both sites. Notable at ALOHA were unusually high levels of >51 {micro}m Sr (up to 4 nM) in the mixed layer, a reflection of high abundances of SrSO{sub 4} precipitating Acantharia. Notable at K2 were major changes in water column inventories of many particulate components to 700 m over 10 days. Carbon mass balance, with the consideration of particle inventory changes included, indicated that over 98% and 96% of primary produced C{sub org} was remineralized shallower than 500 m at ALOHA and K2, respectively. Production of CaCO3 was estimated to be {approx}0.06, 0.89 and 0.02 mmols m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at ALOHA and at K2 during two separate week long study periods, respectively. Similarly, Si production was estimated to be {approx}0.08, 10.7, and 4.2 mols m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. An estimated 50% and 65% of produced Si was remineralized by 500m at ALOHA and K2, respectively. Little carbonate dissolution was seen in the upper 500 m at ALOHA, a reflection of 400% super saturation of surface waters and the 700 m deep saturation horizon. Over 92% of produced CaCO{sub 3} was dissolved shallower than 500 m at K2 and biological enhancement of dissolution was readily apparent in waters above the 200 m calcite saturation horizon.

Bishop, James K.B.; Wood, T.J.

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modeling kinetic partitioning of secondary organic aerosol and size distribution dynamics: representing effects of volatility, phase state, and particle-phase reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence is mounting that the majority of the climatically active aerosols are produced through the growth of smaller particles via secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gas-to-particle conversion of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The timescale of SOA partitioning and the associated size distribution dynamics are expected to depend on the gas-phase oxidation of the precursor VOCs and their products, volatility of these organic solutes, composition and phase state of the pre-existing particles, and diffusivity and reactivity of the solute within the particle phase. This paper describes a new framework for modeling kinetic gas-particle partitioning of SOA, with an analytical treatment for the diffusion-reaction process within the particle phase. The formulation is amenable for eventual use in regional and global climate models, although it currently awaits implementation of the actual particle-phase reactions that are important for SOA formation. In the present work, the model is applied to investigate the competitive growth dynamics of the Aitken and accumulation mode particles while the Kelvin effect and coagulation are neglected for simplicity. The timescale of SOA partitioning and evolution of number and composition size distributions are evaluated for a range of solute volatilities (C*), particle-phase bulk diffusivities (Db), and particle-phase reactivity, as exemplified by a pseudo-first-order rate constant (kc). Results show that irreversible condensation of non-volatile organic vapors (equivalent to ) produces significant narrowing of the size distribution. At the other extreme, non-reactive partitioning of semi-volatile organic vapors is volume-controlled in which the final (equilibrium) size distribution simply shifts to the right on the diameter axis while its shape remains unchanged. However, appreciable narrowing of the size distribution may occur when the pre-existing particles are highly viscous semi-solids such that small particles reach quasi-equilibrium much faster than the large ones. In the case of reactive partitioning (finite ), the size distribution experiences permanent narrowing, which is especially pronounced for Db < 10-13 cm2 s-1 and kc > 0.01 s-1. As a result, both number and composition size distributions are needed to effectively constrain and evaluate the next generation of SOA models that treat phase state thermodynamics, particle-phase diffusion and particle-phase chemical reactions.

Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Shilling, John E.; Seinfeld, J. H.

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

79

Aerosol and Aqueous Chemistry Equilibrium Partitioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that came into contact with it condensed into a fog bank, which the light winds pushed up into a layer to have been around pH 1.4 - 1.9, which is more acidic than lemon juice and almost as acidic car battery eastwards and out over the Dogger Bank. · The Times newspaper recorded the single loss of life during

Russell, Lynn

80

Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Speciation of Fe in ambient aerosol and cloudwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric iron (Fe) is thought to play an important role in cloudwater chemistry (e.g., S(IV) oxidation, oxidant production, etc.), and is also an important source of Fe to certain regions of the worlds oceans where Fe is believed to be a rate-limiting nutrient for primary productivity. This thesis focuses on understanding the chemistry, speciation and abundance of Fe in cloudwater and aerosol in the troposphere, through observations of Fe speciation in the cloudwater and aerosol samples collected over the continental United States and the Arabian Sea. Different chemical species of atmospheric Fe were measured in aerosol and cloudwater samples to help assess the role of Fe in cloudwater chemistry.

Siefert, L. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

The aging of organic aerosol in the atmosphere : chemical transformations by heterogeneous oxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The immense chemical complexity of atmospheric organic particulate matter ("aerosol") has left the general field of condensed-phase atmospheric organic chemistry relatively under-developed when compared with either gas-phase ...

Kessler, Sean Herbert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Formation of ozone and growth of aerosols in young smoke plumes from biomass burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The combustion of biomass is a major source of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Regional and global-scale models of atmospheric chemistry and climate take estimates for these emissions and arbitrarily "mix" them into ...

Alvarado, Matthew James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Direct Insertion of MODIS Radiances in a Global Aerosol Transport Model CLARK WEAVER,* ARLINDO DA SILVA, MIAN CHIN,# PAUL GINOUX,@ OLEG DUBOVIK,&,@@  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is directly inserted into the Goddard Chemistry and Aerosol Radiation Transport model (GOCART), which aerosol radiative forcing in the thermody- namic equation of GCMs, 3) to account for the reduc- tionDirect Insertion of MODIS Radiances in a Global Aerosol Transport Model CLARK WEAVER,* ARLINDO DA

Chin, Mian

85

Point and column aerosol radiative closure during ACE 1: Effects of particle shape and size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact the earth's climate and photo- chemistry by directly scattering and absorbing solar radia- tion these impacts [e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. Because of the short temporal and spatial scales of aerosol heterogeneity, numerical models of aerosol optical behavior are required to make

86

Jeremy Frey School of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Making Tea Jeremy Frey School of Chemistry University of Southampton, UK A human centred approach that will enable it.' `e-Science will change the dynamic of the way science is undertaken.' John Taylor, DG of UK

87

Organophosphorus chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2087 Organophosphorus chemistry Paul R. Hanson Editorial Open Access Address: Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582, USA Email: Paul R. Hanson - phanson@ku.edu. Keywords: organophosphorus... Beilstein J. Org. Chem. 2014, 10, 2087–2088. doi:10.3762/bjoc.10.217 Received: 28 July 2014 Accepted: 06 August 2014 Published: 04 September 2014 This article is part of the Thematic Series "Organophosphorus chemistry" Guest Editor: P. R. Hanson © 2014...

Hanson, Paul R.

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Improved solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Emerging Issues in Nanoparticle Aerosol Science and Technology Workshop report sponsored by: NSF, Southern California Particle Center and UCLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has responsibility for nuclear reactor safety which includes emissions of radioactive particles pollution sources, (2) industrial production of nanoparticle reinforcing fillers such as carbon black nanoparticle products by aerosol processes, (4) atmospheric dynamics of fractal-like nanoparticle aerosols (e

Jimenez, Jose-Luis

91

Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short-lived shallow cumuli.

Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol deposition method Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the ocean and the dynamic nature of aerosol inputs, this topic... alteration during transport). Before we can reliably model ... Source: Paytan, Adina - Department of Earth...

93

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY UCLA Organic Chemistry Faculty perform research in molecular machines, exotic CHEMISTRY FACULTY RESEARCH INTERESTS Anne M. Andrews, Professor-in-Residence: Understanding how areas of interest include cross- coupling reactions, green chemistry, heterocycle synthesis, and natural

Levine, Alex J.

94

Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

Dr. Timothy Onasch

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

95

Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry 190 (2007) 342351 Ab initio study of exciton transfer dynamics from a coreshell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and quantum dynamics approaches. The system harvests light in a broad energy range and can transfer Recent advances in the synthesis of nanostructures with con- trollable size, shape, and optical [2,3] and photovoltaics [4­10]. Quantum dots (QDs) form the foundation of many novel devices

96

MICS Asia Phase II - Sensitivity to the aerosol module  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the model inter-comparison study - Asia Phase II (MICS2), where eight models are compared over East Asia, this paper studies the influence of different parameterizations used in the aerosol module on the aerosol concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in PM10. An intracomparison of aerosol concentrations is done for March 2001 using different configurations of the aerosol module of one of the model used for the intercomparison. Single modifications of a reference setup for model configurations are performed and compared to a reference case. These modifications concern the size distribution, i.e. the number of sections, and physical processes, i.e. coagulation, condensation/evaporation, cloud chemistry, heterogeneous reactions and sea-salt emissions. Comparing monthly averaged concentrations at different stations, the importance of each parameterization is first assessed. It is found that sulfate concentrations are little sensitive to sea-salt emissions and to whether condensation is computed...

Sartelet, Karine; Sportisse, Bruno

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John Grey Position: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Email: jkgrey@unm.edu Phone: 505.277.1658; Fax: 505.277.2609 Office: Clark Hall B70 Homepage: http://chemistry.unm.edu/faculty_web/jgrey Education B.S. in Chemistry, 1999, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI Ph.D. in Chemistry

99

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of green chemistry and green engineering and by consideringResearch, Green Chemistry and Green Engineering Center, YaleOF GREEN CHEMISTRY AND GREEN ENGINEERING Julie Zimmerman By

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UCLA CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY ORIENTATION HANDBOOK 2012-2013 #12;Table of Contents Introduction .............................................................................................................................................2 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office ..................................................................................................3 Majors in Chemistry

Levine, Alex J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

Mccomiskey, Allison

103

Nanoscience and chemistry Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Chemistry**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoscience and chemistry Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Chemistry** George M. Whitesides* Keywords: · chemistry · devices · nanoscience · nanotechnology What is Nanoscience? "Nanoscience and electrical en- gineering, nanoscience is most often associated with quan- tum behavior, and the behavior

Prentiss, Mara

104

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Marketing, Consulting, Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Education, Chemical Engineering, ChemicalHANDBOOK for Undergraduate CHEMISTRY MAJORS DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY Fall 2010 #12;#12;TABLE OF CONTENTS A Career in Chemistry - What It Means ___________________________________________ 4 What do

Stuart, Steven J.

106

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

107

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

108

Aerosol Cans? -Aerosol cans use a pressurized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? - The waste generated in the processing of images/photos contains silver. Silver is a toxic heavy metal the product. Propellants are often flammable and/or toxic. Therefore, never store aerosol cans near ignition of this pamphlet. -Carefully transfer the old paint thinner from the one gallon closable can to the 30 gallon metal

Jia, Songtao

109

Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research mission. This workshop built on previous workshops and included three breakout sessions identifying scientific challenges in biology, biogeochemistry, catalysis, and materials science frontier areas of fundamental science that underpin energy and environmental science that would significantly benefit from ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM). In addition, the current status of time-resolved electron microscopy was examined, and the technologies that will enable future advances in spatio-temporal resolution were identified in a fourth breakout session.

Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment No. 2, Air Pollution Meteorology: Box Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2008 Home Work Assignment No. 2, Air Pollution to interpret measurements made in Mexico City. Focus mainly on the discussions relating to nitrate aerosol

Weber, Rodney

111

Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1123 Laboratory FAX (916) 752-4107 Standard Operating Procedures Technical Information Document TI 201A #12;TI 201.................................................................................................................................................. 3 1.0 Weekly Maintenance ProceduresIMPROVE Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual February 10, 1997 Air Quality Group Crocker Nuclear

Fischer, Emily V.

112

Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye Chemistry", 5th Edition, Freeman Press. Available at SU bookstore. The solution manual is optional. (Suggested for CHE611 Students pursuing Inorganic) Huheey, "Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure

Mather, Patrick T.

113

Chemistry 675 (CHE 675) Advanced Organic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 675 (CHE 675) Advanced Organic Chemistry Fall Semester 2011 Professor James Hougland675 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course that can be continued in the Spring semester as CHE685. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure

Mather, Patrick T.

114

Chemistry 106X -Fall 2010 General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 106X - Fall 2010 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 9 bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. by Kotz, Treichel, and Townsend-0-495-38703-9 Electronic Book - ISBN 978-0-495-68043-7 · OWL pin number for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1

Wagner, Diane

115

Chemistry 106X -Spring 2011 General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 106X - Spring 2011 General Chemistry Instructor: Christopher Iceman Class: MWF 1 and can be purchased in the UAF bookstore or elsewhere: · Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed for Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity 7th Ed. (1 or 2 semester) · TurningPoint Technologies ResponseCard RF

Wagner, Diane

116

Evaluation of the volatility basis-set approach for the simulation of organic aerosol formation in the Mexico City metropolitan area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New primary and secondary organic aerosol modules have been added to PMCAMx, a three dimensional chemical transport model (CTM), for use with the SAPRC99 chemistry mechanism based on recent smog chamber studies. The new ...

Tsimpidi, A. P.

117

Aerosols and Clouds: In Cahoots to Change Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key knowledge gaps persist despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. The Two-Column Aerosol Project, or TCAP, was designed to provide a detailed set of observations to tackle this area of unknowns. Led by PNNL atmospheric scientist Larry Berg, ARM's Climate Research Facility was deployed in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the 12-month duration of TCAP, which came to a close in June 2013. "We are developing new tools to look at particle chemistry, like our mass spectrometer used in TCAP that can tell us the individual chemical composition of an aerosol," said Berg. "Then, we'll run our models and compare it with the data that we have to make sure we're getting correct answers and make sure our climate models are reflecting the best information."

Berg, Larry

2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

Aerosols and Clouds: In Cahoots to Change Climate  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Key knowledge gaps persist despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. The Two-Column Aerosol Project, or TCAP, was designed to provide a detailed set of observations to tackle this area of unknowns. Led by PNNL atmospheric scientist Larry Berg, ARM's Climate Research Facility was deployed in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the 12-month duration of TCAP, which came to a close in June 2013. "We are developing new tools to look at particle chemistry, like our mass spectrometer used in TCAP that can tell us the individual chemical composition of an aerosol," said Berg. "Then, we'll run our models and compare it with the data that we have to make sure we're getting correct answers and make sure our climate models are reflecting the best information."

Berg, Larry

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level Tutorial Groups 2013/14 Name Programme Tutor Ahmed, Zacher Medicinal Chemistry Arif, Saboor Chemistry Bagnall, Samuel Chemistry Barbara, David Chemistry Beaumont, Nicholas Chemistry Quinn, Michael J Chemistry Bennett, Matthew Chemistry Booth, Natalie

Rzepa, Henry S.

120

CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM SEMESTER I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM SEMESTER ­ I Chemistry-I: Physical principles (2:1) Atomic structure-state approximation, Arrhenius equation and collision theory and catalysis. SEMESTER ­ II Chemistry-II: Structure orbital theory: polyatomic molecules - Walsh diagram; Main group chemistry: periodic properties, chemistry

Srinivasan, N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Chemistry Division: Annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is divided into the following sections: coal chemistry; aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures; geochemistry of crustal processes to high temperatures and pressures; chemistry of advanced inorganic materials; structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials; chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds; separations chemistry; reactions and catalysis in molten salts; surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis; electron spectroscopy; chemistry related to nuclear waste disposal; computational modeling of security document printing; and special topics. (DLC)

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Highly stable aerosol generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19. P. Anastas, J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory andto Advance New Science, Green Chemistry and EnvironmentalChronicle Extra: Guide to Green Jobs. Field with a Future.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2005), 131, pp. 26392663 doi: 10.1256/qj.04.62 Aerosol impact on the dynamics and microphysics of deep convective clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud dynamics Microphysics of cumulus clouds Precipitation efficiency 1. INTRODUCTION High in the concentration of small cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) leads to the formation of a large number of small of the diffusion droplet growth stage, increasing latent heat release by condensation. The additional water

Daniel, Rosenfeld

125

Chemistry 320N Organic Chemistry II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 320N Organic Chemistry II for Prehealth Professionals Unique number: 52365 Spring 2013 M students can access the information. #12;Required Text: Brown, Foote, Iverson, & Anslyn Organic Chemistry have the 6th Edition book, as many homework and exam questions will come directly from the 6th Edition

126

Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems: From Nanoassemblies Colloquium Friday, May 15, 2009 3:00 p.m. 502 Rieveschl #12;Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 2100 Adelbert Road, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA stuart

Mark, James E.

127

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry Syracuse University The Department of Chemistry at Syracuse University invites applications for a tenure track faculty position at the Assistant Professor level in inorganic chemistry with specialization in materials chemistry (broadly defined

Doyle, Robert

128

Electrostatics and radioactive aerosol behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive aerosols differ from their nonradioactive counterparts by their ability to charge themselves by emitting charged particles during the radioactive decay process. Evidence that electrostatics, including this charging process, can affect the transport of the aerosols was summarized previously. Charge distributions and the mean charge for a monodisperse radioactive aerosol have been considered in detail. The principal results of theory to calculate charge distributions on a aerosol with a size distribution, changes to Brownian coagulation rates for an aerosol in a reactor containment, and possible changes to aerosol deposition resulting from the charging will be presented. The main purpose of the work has been to improve calculations of aerosol behavior in reactor containments, but behavior in less ionizing environments will be affected more strongly, and some problems remain to be solved in performing reliable calculations.

Clement, C.F.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

aerosols and climate : uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

130

Supplement for "Secondary organic aerosol1 formation from idling gasoline passenger vehicle2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplement for "Secondary organic aerosol1 formation from idling gasoline passenger vehicle2.O. Box 503, FIN-00101 Helsinki, Finland}14 [5]{Department of Chemistry, Atmospheric Science, University experiment show a total concentration of light aromatics of less than 1 ppb.6 Vehicles7 In total six gasoline

Meskhidze, Nicholas

131

Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification and Application ofof a Coflow

132

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -GrownAn overhead viewAt-HomeR607

133

Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science that underlies many technology. A chemistry degree gives you the understanding to contribute to our future in very topical areas) in Chemistry BSc (Hons) in Chemistry MChem (Hons) in Chemistry (with an industrial placement year) MChem (Hons

Sussex, University of

134

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

135

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

136

Experimental study of nuclear workplace aerosol samplers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW Aerosol Losses in an Inlet . Aerosol Losses in a Transport System Aerosol Losses in CAMs Critical Flow Venturi 8 13 15 16 EXPERIMENT PROCEDURE 18 CAM Evaluation Consideration FAS Evaluation Consideration Test Protocol Mixing... Chamber Setup High Speed Aerosol Wind Tunnel Setup Low Speed Aerosol Wind Tunnel Setup Critical Flow Venturi 18 19 21 22 24 25 27 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Page 28 Aerosol Penetration through Transport Systems and CAM Areal Uniformity Deposits...

Parulian, Antony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

138

Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

139

Computational Chemistry Robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Chemistry Robots ACS Sep 2005 Computational Chemistry Robots J. A. Townsend, P. Murray-Rust, S. M. Tyrrell, Y. Zhang jat45@cam.ac.uk Can high-throughput computation provide a reliable “experimental” resource for molecular...

Townsend, Joseph A; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tyrrell, Simon M; Zhang, Yong

140

surface chemistry | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface chemistry surface chemistry Leads No leads are available at this time. FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMössbauer Spectroscopic Study....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Why chemistry? Chemistry is fundamental: it is the enabling science that underlies many technology. A chemistry degree allows you to understand and to contribute to our future. Chemistry is challenging: understanding the very fabric of matter is both stimulating and rewarding. Studying chemistry

Sussex, University of

142

Chemistry Division Department of Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chemistry Division Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Illinois Institute-13 Chemistry Division invites nominations for Kilpatrick Fellowship for the academic year 2012's Chemistry Department from 1947­1960. Mary Kilpatrick was a chemistry faculty member from 1947

Heller, Barbara

143

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact to Chemistry and Biochemistry entering graduate students who have asked for consideration to serve as research@chem.sc.edu Hiram and Lawanda Allen Scholarship for Excellence in Chemistry This award is given to a graduating

Almor, Amit

144

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact Endowment Fund To provide support for undergraduate biomedical research in the Department of Chemistry/or the purchase of supplies. Yes w/recommendation s from faculty Call goes out in February to all chemistry

Almor, Amit

145

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOKFOR STUDENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOKFOR STUDENTS Millersville University Millersville, Pennsylvania in the ChemistryDepartment. It brings together material not collected in other places and is not meant Resources 2 Programs in Chemistry and The General Education Curriculum Record Form 3 The Major Requirements

Hardy, Christopher R.

146

Adam Benoit Medicinal Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Adam Benoit Medicinal Chemistry Ph.D. Thesis Title: Synthesis and Evaluation of Acridine Country: United States #12;Amit Gangar Medicinal Chemistry Ph.D. Thesis Title: Design and Development Wagner Home Country: India #12;Dan Wang Medicinal Chemistry M.S. Thesis Title: Synthesis and Evaluation

Thomas, David D.

147

Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment: Science and Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ganges Valley region is one of the largest and most rapidly developing sections of the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River, which provides the region with water needed for sustaining life, is fed primarily by snow and rainfall associated with Indian summer monsoons. Impacts of changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, and the flow of the snow-fed rivers can be immense. Recent satellite-based measurements have indicated that the upper Ganges Valley has some of the highest persistently observed aerosol optical depth values. The aerosol layer covers a vast region, extending across the Indo-Gangetic Plain to the Bay of Bengal during the winter and early spring of each year. The persistent winter fog in the region is already a cause of much concern, and several studies have been proposed to understand the economic, scientific, and societal dimensions of this problem. During the INDian Ocean EXperiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from this region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. This is one of the few regions showing a trend toward increasing surface dimming and enhanced mid-tropospheric warming. Increasing air pollution over this region could modify the radiative balance through direct, indirect, and semi-indirect effects associated with aerosols. The consequences of aerosols and associated pollution for surface insolation over the Ganges Valley and monsoons, in particular, are not well understood. The proposed field study is designed for use of (1) the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure relevant radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol optical characteristics over mainland India during an extended period of 9–12 months and (2) the G-1 aircraft and surface sites to measure relevant aerosol chemical, physical, and optical characteristics in the Ganges Valley during a period of 6–12 weeks. The aerosols in this region have complex sources, including burning of coal, biomass, and biofuels; automobile emissions; and dust. The extended AMF deployment will enable measurements under different regimes of the climate and aerosol abundance—in the wet monsoon period with low aerosol loading; in the dry, hot summer with aerosols dispersed throughout the atmospheric column; and in the cool, dry winter with aerosols confined mostly to the boundary later and mid-troposphere. Each regime, in addition, has its own distinct radiative and atmospheric dynamic drivers. The aircraft operational phase will assist in characterizing the aerosols at times when they have been observed to be at the highest concentrations. A number of agencies in India will collaborate with the proposed field study and provide support in terms of planning, aircraft measurements, and surface sites. The high concentration of aerosols in the upper Ganges Valley, together with hypotheses involving several possible mechanisms with direct impacts on the hydrologic cycle of the region, gives us a unique opportunity to generate data sets that will be useful both in understanding the processes at work and in providing answers regarding the effects of aerosols on climate in a region where the perturbation is the highest.

Kotamarthi, VR

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Lognormal Size Distribution Theory for Deposition of Polydisperse Aerosol Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The moments method of the lognormal size distribution theory was applied to the deposition equation of a radioactive aerosol within a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor for analysis of postulated accidents. The deposition coefficient of Crump and Seinfeld was utilized to represent the Brownian and turbulent diffusions and the gravitational sedimentation. The deposition equation was converted into a set of three ordinary differential equations. This approach takes the view point that the size distribution of an aerosol is represented by a time-dependent lognormal size distribution function during the deposition process. Numerical calculations have been performed, and the results were found to be in good agreement with the exact solution. The derived model for aerosol deposition is convenient to use in a numerical general dynamic equation solution routine based on the moments method, where nucleation, condensation, coagulation, and deposition need to be solved simultaneously.

Park, S.H.; Lee, K.W. [Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

Chemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced chemistry laboratory I CHM 335 3 Advanced chemistry laboratory II Mat 33 3 Engineering materialsChemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core CHM 40, 41 (or CHM 30, 31) 8 Introductory chemistry CHM 110,111,112,113 8 Organic chemistry CHM 332 3 Analytical chemistry CHM 201*** 2 Technical writing CHM

Napier, Terrence

151

The Nearby Supernova Factory Ozone + Aerosol + Rayleigh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rayleigh + Aerosol Extinction monitor filter Auxiliary Camera CCD Spectrograph picko ff mirror Umbra

152

Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Kmetyk, L.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Organic Chemistry 51B -Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chemistry 51B Reactions(s). Chapter 7: Nucleophilic Substitution + + NaOH CH3O- #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013 Organic Chemistry Peer Tutoring Program Chapter 8: Elimination Reactions #12;Organic Chemistry 51B - Winter 2013

Rose, Michael R.

156

aerosol particles collected: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Saller 2002-05-07 6 Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles Materials Science Websites Summary: being clouds...

157

Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 2: Abstract: Submicron aerosol was analyzed during...

158

Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 1: Abstract: Submicron aerosol was analyzed during...

159

AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

160

TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

O'Mahony, Donal E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK) Requirements include 36 credits in chemistry core courses, 32 of which are taken in specific courses. Each student's course of study includes the following: 1.) Required Chemistry Core Courses CHE 106: General Chemistry Lecture I (3) CHE 116: General

Doyle, Robert

162

8, 68456901, 2008 Aerosol optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance, Germany 2 Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

Grazis, B.M. (ed.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

Grazis, B.M. [ed.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

SCHWARTZ, S.E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

EMSL - surface chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface-chemistry en FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMössbauer Spectroscopic Study. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

167

Advances in Physical Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in Physical Chemistry Volume 2011, Article ID 907129, 18 pages doi:10.11552011907129 Review Article Contrast and Synergy between...

168

Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics Architectural Engineering Architecture Architecture Electricity Markets Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Food Safety & Technology Architecture Information Technology & Management Integrated Building Delivery Landscape Architecture Management

Heller, Barbara

169

Climate effects of anthropogenic sulfate: Simulations from a coupled chemistry/climate model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we use a more comprehensive approach by coupling a climate model with a 3-D global chemistry model to investigate the forcing by anthropogenic aerosol sulfate. The chemistry model treats the global-scale transport, transformation, and removal of SO{sub 2}, DMS and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} species in the atmosphere. The mass concentration of anthropogenic sulfate from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning is calculated in the chemistry model and provided to the climate model where it affects the shortwave radiation. We also investigate the effect, with cloud nucleation parameterized in terms of local aerosol number, sulfate mass concentration and updraft velocity. Our simulations indicate that anthropogenic sulfate may result in important increases in reflected solar radiation, which would mask locally the radiative forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Uncertainties in these results will be discussed.

Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Walton, J.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Chemistry @ Imperial College 2007 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry @ Imperial College 2007 #12;2 Introduction Imperial College is a world leading University. As the central science Chemistry has been a major contributor to this success. The Chemistry Department is at the forefront of modern Chemistry research, both in our core discipline and at the interfaces of Chemistry

171

The effects of emission of anthropogenic chemical species on chemical and physical properties of aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical studies have been carried out to examine the effects of chemically reactive trace gases emitted into the atmosphere on the evolution of chemical species concentrations, on the chemical composition and size distribution of airborne particles, and on optical properties of aerosols. Argonne`s chemistry module has been modified by refining the treatment of gas-to-particle conversion. The changes in size distribution and chemical composition of aerosols are calculated with consideration of heteramolecular diffusion and coagulation. Results of the 24 h real-time simulation indicate that the maximum oxidation rate of sulfur dioxide is about 0.4% h{sup {minus}1}; that the total aerosol volume increases with the increase in relative humidity by as much as 36% (due mainly to the collection of sulfuric acid embryos by preexisting particles); and that the surface area, a measure of optical depth, increases with the increase in relative humidity by as much as 27%.

Lee, In Young

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Basic principles of electrolyte chemistry for microfluidic electrokinetics. Part I: Acidbase equilibria and pH buffersx  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic principles of electrolyte chemistry for microfluidic electrokinetics. Part I: Acid We review fundamental and applied acid­base equilibrium chemistry useful to microfluidic with electrolyte dynamics and electrochemistry in typical microfluidic electrokinetic systems. Introduction

Santiago, Juan G.

173

Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

Andrews, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY 450 Spring, 2009 Gautam Bhattacharyya, 363 Hunter Labs, phone: 656-1356 gautamb. This course does NOT have a separate laboratory meeting time. Course Goals CH 450 is the Chemistry Capstone to change. #12;CH 450 Spring, 2009 -2- Course Outline (Tentative) Journal due dates are designated each week

Stuart, Steven J.

175

TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY - STUDY GUIDE - H Rb Sr K Ca ...Mn Fe... ONC He P S Br Kr .................................................................................................22 FOOD CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: JUN.-Prof. Dr. M. Esselen...............................................................................24 FOOD CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: Prof. Dr. E. Richling

Madlener, Klaus

176

Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and GOES-10) are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October-16 November 2008) WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties), and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL) depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity) and aerosol quantities (e.g., underestimations of accumulation mode aerosol number) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the Southeastern Pacific, and require further investigation. The well-simulated timing and outflow patterns of polluted and clean episodes demonstrate the model's ability to capture daily/synoptic scale variations of aerosol and cloud properties, and suggest that the model is suitable for studying atmospheric processes associated with pollution outflow over the ocean. The overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale clouds and boundary layer properties is encouraging and suggests that reproducing gradients of aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and coupling cloud-aerosol-radiation processes are important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the Southeast Pacific.

Yang Q.; Lee Y.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

178

Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

X-ray Vision for Aerosol Scientists: LCLS Snapshots of Soot (Narrated)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This short conceptual animation depicts how scientists can now simultaneously capture fractal morphology (structure), chemical composition and nanoscale imagery of individual aerosol particles in flight. These particles, known as "PM2.5" because they are smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter, affect climate by interacting with sunlight and impact human health by entering the lungs. The single LCLS laser pulses travel to the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (AMO) laboratory in the Near Experimental Hall. As we zoom in, we see deep inside a simplified aerosol inlet, where the complex fractal structure of the soot particles, each one completely unique, is shown. Individual soot particles are then delivered into the pulses of the LCLS beam, which destroys them. X-rays are scattered to the detector before the particle is destroyed, giving information about the morphology of the particle. Ion fragments released in the explosion are sent into a mass spectrometer, which measures their mass-to-charge ratio -- giving scientists information about the chemical composition of the particle. Many different particles are analyzed in this manner, allowing scientists to probe variations in the particles due to changes in their environment before being sent through the aerosol inlet. The final visual of aerosols emitted from a factory is representative of the goal that such LCLS aerosol dynamics experiments can provide critical feedback into modeling and understanding combustion, aerosol processes in manufacturing or aerosol effects on climate change.

None

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source type and mechanism information for the four aerosol samples gathered from the Caribbean, the Sea of Japan, and New Jersey. One way to gauge an aerosol's ability to stay...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : model and implementation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report a model for simulating aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls is presented. The model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular (DEM) package within the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Modeling the interactions of small particles is relevant to a number of applications (e.g., soils, powders, colloidal suspensions, etc.). Modeling the behavior of aerosol particles during agglomeration and cluster dynamics upon impact with a wall is of particular interest. In this report we describe preliminary efforts to develop and implement physical models for aerosol particle interactions. Future work will consist of deploying these models to simulate aerosol cluster behavior upon impact with a rigid wall for the purpose of developing relationships for impact speed and probability of stick/bounce/break-up as well as to assess the distribution of cluster sizes if break-up occurs. These relationships will be developed consistent with the need for inputs into system-level codes. Section 2 gives background and details on the physical model as well as implementations issues. Section 3 presents some preliminary results which lead to discussion in Section 4 of future plans.

Lechman, Jeremy B.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

CHEMISTRY 1010 CHEMISTRY, HUMANITY AND ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

day to add classes, select C/NC option or to audit a class is Jan. 23. 3. The last day to withdraw. The University of Utah seeks to provide equal access to its programs, services and activities for people: Chemistry 1010 aims to promote understanding of the basic environmental ingredients, energy, atoms

Simons, Jack

183

Chemistry in Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F R O N T M A T T E R Chemistry in Bioinformatics Peter Murray?Rust,1 John B. O. Mitchell,1 and Henry S. Rzepa2 1 Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge. CB2... 1EW, UK. 2 Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, SW7 2AY, UK. Abstract Chemical information is now seen as critical for most areas of life sciences. But unlike Bioinformatics, where data is Openly available and freely re...

Murray-Rust, Peter; Mitchell, John B O; Rzepa, Henry S

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

Chemistry | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry Oxide InterfacesChemistryChemistry

185

I. Required core Chemistry Courses (1905 & 1925) Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advisor: Advisee: I. Required core Chemistry Courses (1905 & 1925) Chemistry CH 111 PY 211 _____ PY 212 _____ (or PY 242 _____ or PY 252 ______) II. Chemistry Options (one required) 1905 (Concentration in Chemistry) Option A (2 advanced CH courses, 401 or higher, only one may

186

National Chemistry Week Theme: "Candy: The Sweet Side of Chemistry"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Chemistry Week Theme: "Candy: The Sweet Side of Chemistry" Super Science Saturday Saturday-on chemistry and science demonstrations! All students & families are welcome! Fun & educational for all ages! Sponsored by: American Chemical Society LSU Department of Chemistry LSU Athletic Department Free admission

Stephens, Jacqueline

187

Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA E-mail: zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu Y. Li, S. Wei Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar

Guo, John Zhanhu

189

Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA E-mail: suying.wei@lamar.edu; zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu Q. He, Prof. S. Wei Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA

Guo, John Zhanhu

190

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

Rohs, Remo

191

Green Chemistry COMMUNICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Chemistry COMMUNICATION Cite this: Green Chem., 2013, 15, 2060 Received 8th April 2013 5042, Australia. E-mail: colin.raston@flinders.edu.au; Tel: +08 8021 7958 2060 | Green Chem., 2013, 15

192

WESTERN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WESTERN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY The Department of Chemistry invites applications for a probationary (tenure-track) faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in Inorganic Chemistry, externally funded research program, and to develop and teach innovative courses in chemistry

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

193

Review of models applicable to accident aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

Glissmeyer, J.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering ALAN ROBOCK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering ALAN ROBOCK ABSTRACT In response to global warming, one suggested geoengineering response involves creating a cloud of particles in the stratosphere to reflect some, the volcano analog also warns against geoengineering because of responses such as ozone depletion, regional

Robock, Alan

195

DO AEROSOLS CHANGE CLOUD COVER AND AFFECT CLIMATE?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter Schwartz, 1996, modified from;AEROSOL INFLUENCES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN Light scattering by aerosols decreases absorption of solar radiation. #12;AEROSOLS

Schwartz, Stephen E.

196

Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Student Handbook College of Science React. Science #12;Contents 2 Welcome to the Department of Chemistry 2 Course Advice 3 What is Chemistry? 4 Career Profiles in Chemistry 5 An Undergraduate Degree in Chemistry 6 Chemistry Streams 13 Chemistry Honours Programme 14 Research

Hickman, Mark

197

Investigation of multiple scattering effects in aerosols. Final report, Sep 1978 - Dec 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results are presented of investigations on the various aspects of multiple scattering effects on visible and infrared laser beams transversing dense fog oil aerosols contained in a chamber (4' x 4' x 9'). The report briefly describes: (1) the experimental details and measurements (2) analytical representation of the aerosol size distribution data by two analytical models (the regularized power law distribution and the inverse modified gamma distribution) (3) retrieval of aerosol size distributions from multispectral optical depth measurements by two methods (the two and three parameter fast table search methods and the nonlinear least squares method) (4) modeling of the effects of aerosol microphysical (coagulation and evaporation) and dynamical processes (gravitational settling) on the temporal behavior of aerosol size distribution, and hence on the extinction of four laser beams with wavelengths 0.44, 0.6328, 1.15, and 3.39 micrometers and (5) the exact and approximate formulations for four methods for computing the effects of multiple scattering on the transmittance of laser beams in dense aerosols, all of which are based on the solution of the radiative transfer equation under the small angle approximation.

Deepak, A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

Colson, S.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Chemistry at the Dirac Point of Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haddon, R. C. Covalent Chemistry for Graphene Electronics.P. K. ; Yang, J. X. The Chemistry of Graphene. J. Mater.R. C. Organometallic Chemistry of Extended Periodic ?-

Sarkar, Santanu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

“Greening Up” Cross-Coupling Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

today. Insofar as green chemistry is concerned, however,Handbook of organopalladium chemistry for organic synthesis.Hanefeld U (2007) Green chemistry and catalysis. Wiley-VCH,

Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Abela, Alexander R.; Boškovi?, Žarko V.; Nishikata, Takashi; Duplais, Christophe; Krasovskiy, Arkady

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR)...

204

Reaction chemistry of cerium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluating WRF-Chem aerosol indirect effects in Southeast Pacific marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluate a regional-scale simulation with the WRF-Chem model for the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), which sampled the Southeast Pacific's persistent stratocumulus deck. Evaluation of VOCALS-REx ship-based and aircraft observations focuses on analyzing how aerosol loading affects marine boundary layer (MBL) dynamics and cloud microphysics. We compare local time series and campaign averaged longitudinal gradients, and highlight differences in model simulations with (W) and without wet (NW) deposition processes. The higher aerosol loadings in the NW case produce considerable changes in MBL dynamics and cloud microphysics, in accordance with the established conceptual model of aerosol indirect effects. These include increase in cloud albedo, increase in MBL and cloud heights, drizzle suppression, increase in liquid water content, and increase in cloud lifetime. Moreover, better statistical representation of aerosol mass and number concentration improves model fidelity in reproducing observed spatial and temporal variability in cloud properties, including top and base height, droplet concentration, water content, rain rate, optical depth (COD) and liquid water path (LWP). Together, these help to quantify confidence in WRF-Chem's modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, while identifying structural and parametric uncertainties including: irreversibility in rain wet removal; overestimation of marine DMS and sea salt emissions and accelerated aqueous sulfate conversion. Our findings suggest that WRF-Chem simulates marine cloud-aerosol interactions at a level sufficient for applications in forecasting weather and air quality and studying aerosol climate forcing, including the reliability required for policy analysis and geo-engineering applications.

Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Carmichael, Gregory; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.; Yang, Qing; Howell, S. G.; Leon, Dolislager; Snider, Jefferson R.; Bandy, Alan R.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Benedict, K. B.; de Szoeke, S.; Hawkins, Lisa; Allen, Grant; Crawford, I.; Crosier, J.; Springston, S. R.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Chemistry | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistantChemistry andChemistry of Metal

207

Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

208

Hygroscopic growth of submicron and supermicron aerosols in the marine boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

balance and climate directly through absorption and scattering of the incoming solar radiation and indirectly through modification of cloud properties [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007 behaviors of the dynamic and complex atmospheric aerosol consisting of particles with a wide range of sizes

209

Aerosol Science 32 (2001) 14791504 www.elsevier.com/locate/jaerosci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlled internal phase segregation during aerosol coagulation H. Struchtrup 1 , M. Luskin, M. R. Zachariah a monodisperse particle size distribution. The dynamical behavior of such a system is presented. c 2001 Elsevier and space of the particle size distribution function, which can include all the driving forces

Zachariah, Michael R.

210

Aerosol Science 34 (2003) 189209 www.elsevier.com/locate/jaerosci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the size distribution. Thus the QMOM has become a viable candidate for modeling aerosols under very general dynamics; Moment methods; Coagulation; Self-preserving distributions 1. Introduction The accurate and e explicitly represent the particle size distribution using either discrete bins (the sectional approach

211

A Model for Kinetically Controlled Internal Phase Segregation During Aerosol Coagulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Model for Kinetically Controlled Internal Phase Segregation During Aerosol Coagulation H size distribution. The dynamical behavior of such a system is presented. 1 Introduction The evolution). The GDE has been employed to characterize the behavior in time and space of the particle size distribution

212

Optimization of aerosol penetration through transport lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be minimum and -' he penetration of aerosols through the transport system will be maximal. It is the purpose of the study reported herein to experimentally investigate the optimization of aerosol penetration through transport systems and to obtain a... numbers less than 869, bounded the use of this model to Reynolds numbers less than or equal to 1100. 19 IV. SUNNARY OF WORK AND EXPERINENTAL NETHODOLOGY The purpose of the study reported herein was to further analyze the optimization of aerosol...

Wong Luque, Fermin Samuel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

214

Effects of anthropogenic activities on the molecular composition of urban organic aerosols: an ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemistry, Aarhus University, Aarhus, DK-8000, Denmark 11 4Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S12, BE-9000 12 Ghent, Belgium 13 5Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, BE-14... ). 95 The objective of the current study is to apply nanoESI UHRMS to determine the molecular 96 composition of urban PM2.5 (particles with ?2.5µm). Aerosol samples were collected at the 97 industrial site in Cork Ireland during summer with the aim...

Kourtchev, I.; O'Connor, I. P.; Giorio, C.; Fuller, S.; Kristenen, K.; Maenhaut, W.; Wenger, J. C.; Sodeau, J. R.; Glasius, M.; Kalberer, M.

2014-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu,...

216

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October? 2. To what extent do the different properties of the Arctic aerosol during April produce differences in clouds? * Do the more polluted conditions during April in the...

218

Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

219

aerosol ratio program: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contribute a major portion of atmospheric aerosol mass loading 5. The estimated global annual Liou, K. N. 2 Studying Clouds and Aerosols with Lidar Depolarization Ratio and...

220

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidificat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

aerosol optical thickness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however,...

222

aerosol black carbon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however,...

223

aerosols iii morphologic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: of aerosols. Keywords: metal waste recycling; aerosols; fire hazard; explosion hazard. 1. OVERVIEW ProductsRisks generated by the treatment of...

224

The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

Ghan, Steve

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

225

ambient ultrafine aerosols: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 4 Ambient aerosol sampling using the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer...

226

The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

Ghan, Steve

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic...

228

acid aerosol exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nenes, Athanasios 8 Neutralization of soil aerosol and its impact on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia Geosciences Websites Summary: Neutralization of soil aerosol and...

229

Aerosol Composition and Source Apportionment in the Mexico City...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Composition and Source Apportionment in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area with PIXEPESASTIM and Multivariate Analysis. Aerosol Composition and Source Apportionment in the...

230

aerosol samples collected: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

elements analysis of aerosol samples from some CiteSeer Summary: Aerosols deposits on filters from ten Romanian towns with different kinds and levels of industrial development...

231

Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in 2008. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in...

232

aerosol particles emitted: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosols scatter and absorb solar, estimates of the impact of aerosols on visibility, the solar radiation balance, and crop production is presented. 1. INTRODUCTION The attenuation...

233

aerosolized pentamidine effect: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

234

aerosols radioactifs artificiels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

235

aerosol particle analysis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: data analysis algorithm is presented. Our earlier algorithm assumed a monomodal aerosol size distribution, while the new algorithm allows us to partition the aerosol...

236

aerosol research study: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in atmospheric thermal structure, burning, bio-sources changes? 12;Aerosol microphysics: size distribution, mixing state, morphology, shape 9 Aerosol Science and Technology,...

237

Building America Webinar: Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol Particles Building America Webinar: Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol Particles This webinar was presented by research team Building...

238

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol...

239

Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

Das, Suman

240

MAC 560 --Tropospheric Chemistry I Spring, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemistry · to learn the atmospheric chemistry behind well-known phenomena such as smog, acid rain.3. Sulfur chemistry and acid rain 5.4. Nitrogen chemistry 5.5. Organic acids 5.6. Ecological and structural

Miami, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Curriculum Vitae Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum Vitae Yi Lu Department of Chemistry University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Yi Lu Department of Chemistry University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 EDUCATION University of California Los Angeles, CA Ph.D. in Chemistry 1987 - 1992 Peking University Peking

Braun, Paul

242

Curriculum Vitae Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum Vitae Yi Lu Department of Chemistry University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Yi Lu Depfartment of Chemistry University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 EDUCATION University of California Los Angeles, CA Ph.D. in Chemistry 1987 - 1992 Peking University Peking

Braun, Paul

243

Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Department Colloquium: Spring, 2012 Friday, March 16; 3:30 Seminar Hall (room 1315 Chemistry) Lost in Translation: How Regulators Use Science and How Scientists Can Help Bridge Gaps Stephanie to combine her Chemistry background with a legal education to improve the use of science in environmental

Sheridan, Jennifer

244

THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result 7 ' 30 u 31 in metal carbide cluster chemistry willin metal chemistry. Oxidation of the iron carbide cluster

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ENCAPSULATION EFFECTS ON CARBONACEOUS AEROSOL LIGHT ABSORPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENCAPSULATION EFFECTS ON CARBONACEOUS AEROSOL LIGHT ABSORPTION Arthur Sedlacek, Brookhaven National of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry

247

2, 12871315, 2002 Aerosol sources and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in climate variability and climate change studies (IPCC, 2001). Radiative forcing of natural and their contribution to the chemical composition of aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea during summertime J aerosol sources in the Eastern Mediterranean5 Basin could be investigated at this location since the site

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

6, 1217912197, 2006 Aerosol formation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

troposphere and lower stratosphere. The model implements a first order scheme for resolving the aerosol size distribution within its geometric size10 sections, which efficiently suppresses numerical diffusion. We operate removes freshly nucleated particles by coagulation. The observation of high ultrafine aerosol

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

249

6, 32653319, 2006 Study aerosol with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 3265­3319, 2006 Study aerosol with two emission inventories and time factors A. de Meij et in Europe to two different emission inventories and temporal distribution of emissions A. de Meij 1 , M Study aerosol with two emission inventories and time factors A. de Meij et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

250

The role of size-dependent dry deposition of sulfate aerosol in a three-dimensional Eulerian air quality model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Regional Particulate Model, a three-dimensional Eulerian air quality model, was developed to investigate aerosol particle issues of important to the US EPA and to meet the demands of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990. In addition to aerosol dynamics such as growth and coagulation, the model includes photochemistry, transport, and deposition. A new formulation of dry deposition as a function of the aerosol size distribution has been incorporated into the model. This formulation allows for the representation of dry deposition of total particle number and total particle mass by deposition velocities specifically formulated for these two quantities as a function of particle size. Results for the dry deposition of sulfate mass from the new model will be compared with those from the Tagged Species Engineering Model for a variety of local conditions. The behavior of the aerosol size distribution responding to the new formulation will also be discussed.

Binkowski, F.S. [NOAA, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Shankar, U. [MCNC, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Archetypal energy landscapes: Dynamical diagnosis Florin Despa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Archetypal energy landscapes: Dynamical diagnosis Florin Despa Department of Chemistry, University studies have identified several motifs for potential energy surfaces corresponding to distinct dynamic and thermodynamic properties. The corresponding disconnectivity graphs were identified as ``palm tree,'' ``willow

Berry, R. Stephen

252

Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones: An Investigation Using Convection-permitting Model Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of aerosols effect on two tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal are investigated using a convection permitting model with two-moment mixed-phase bulk cloud microphysics scheme. The simulation results show the role of aerosol on the microphysical and dynamical properties of cloud and bring out the change in efficiency of the clouds in producing precipitation. The tracks of the TCs are hardly affected by the changing aerosol types, but the intensity exhibits significant sensitivity due to the change in aerosol contribution. It is also clearly seen from the analyses that higher heating in the middle troposphere within the cyclone center is in response to latent heat release as a consequence of greater graupel formation. Greater heating in the middle level is particularly noticeable for the clean aerosol regime which causes enhanced divergence in the upper level which, in turn, forces the lower level convergence. As a result, the cleaner aerosol perturbation is more unstable within the cyclone core and produces a more intense cyclone as compared to other two perturbations of aerosol. All these studies show the robustness of the concept of TC weakening by storm ingestion of high concentrations of CCN. The consistency of these model results gives us confidence in stating there is a high probability that ingestion of high CCN concentrations in a TC will lead to weakening of the storm but has little impact on storm direction. Moreover, as pollution is increasing over the Indian sub-continent, this study suggests pollution may be weakening TCs over the Bay of Bengal.

Hazra, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Taraphdar, Sourav; Chen, J. P.; Cotton, William R.

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

256

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010SeptemberInfrared SpectralgovCampaignsAerosol IOP

257

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

258

Effects of Aerosols on Autumn Precipitation over Mid-Eastern China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term observational data indicated a decreasing trend for the amount of autumn precipitation (i.e. 54.3 mm per decade) over Mid-Eastern China, especially after 1980s (~ 5.6% per decade). To examine the cause of the decreasing trend, the mechanisms associated with the change of autumn precipitation were investigated from the perspective of water vapor transportation, atmospheric stability and cloud microphysics. Results show that the decrease of convective available potential energy (i.e. 12.81 J kg-1/ decade) and change of cloud microphysics, which were closely related to the increase of aerosol loading during the past twenty years, were the two primary factors responsible for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Ours results showed that increased aerosol could enhance the atmospheric stability thus weaken the convection. Meanwhile, more aerosols also led to a significant decline of raindrop concentration and to a delay of raindrop formation because of smaller size of cloud droplets. Thus, increased aerosols produced by air pollution could be one of the major reasons for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Furthermore, we found that the aerosol effects on precipitation in autumn was more significant than in other seasons, partly due to the relatively more stable synoptic system in autumn. The impact of large-scale circulation dominated in autumn and the dynamic influence on precipitation was more important than the thermodynamic activity.

Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Qian, Yun; Ge, Jinming; Su, Jing

2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

Long-range forces and the collisions of free-molecular and transition regime aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An aerosol here is understood to be a two-component system comprised of gaseous and condensed phases with the characteristic that the condensed phase is not an equilibrium subsystem. In contrast to the usual definitions based upon geometrical or mechanical variables, this quasi-thermodynamic formulation is framed to emphasize the dynamical behavior of aerosols by allowing for coagulation and other aerosol evolutionary processes as natural consequences of the interactions and state variables appropriate to the system. As will become clear later, it also provides a point of departure for distinguishing aerosol particles from unstable gas-phase cluster systems. The question of accommodation in particle collisions must be addressed as a prelude to the discussion of the role of long-range forces. Microscopic reversibility is frequently assumed for molecular collisions with either molecules or solid surfaces. In the case of aerosol collisions, the implication of this assumption is that collisions are elastic, which is contrary to the evidence from coagulation experiments and the conventional operational assumption of sticking upon collision. Gay and Berne have performed computer simulations of the collision of two clusters consisting of a total of 135 molecules interacting via Lennard-Jones potentials. That work showed that complete accommodation, accompanied by overall heating of the unified cluster, occurred. Since heating represents an irreversible degradation of the kinetic energy of the collision, the hamiltonian of the two-cluster system should be considered as dissipative and therefore microscopic reversibility does not apply.

Marlow, W.H.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME the resulting time series, we use tropospheric NO2 data as a reference in the regions dominated by biomass sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

Tilstra, Gijsbert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract: A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic...

262

The behavior of constant rate aerosol reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An aerosol reactor is a gaseous system in which fine particles are formed by chemical reaction in either a batch or flow process. The particle sizes of interest range from less than 10 angstrom (molecular clusters) to 10 ..mu..m. Such reactors may be operated to study the aerosol formation process, as in a smog reactor, or to generate a product such as a pigment or a catalytic aerosol. Aerosol reactors can be characterized by three temporal or spatial zones or regions of operation for batch and flow reactors, respectively. In zone I, chemical reaction results in the formation of condensable molecular products which nucleate and form very high concentrations of small particles. The number density depends on the concentration of preexisting aerosol. Zone II is a transition region in which the aerosol number concentration levels off as a result of hetergeneous condensation by the stable aerosol. In zone III coagulation becomes sufficiently rapid to reduce the particle number concentration. There may be a zone IV in which agglomerates form.

Friedlander, S.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Black Hole Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mass of a black hole has traditionally been identified with its energy. We describe a new perspective on black hole thermodynamics, one that identifies the mass of a black hole with chemical enthalpy, and the cosmological constant as thermodynamic pressure. This leads to an understanding of black holes from the viewpoint of chemistry, in terms of concepts such as Van der Waals fluids, reentrant phase transitions, and triple points. Both charged and rotating black holes exhibit novel chemical-type phase behaviour, hitherto unseen.

David Kubiznak; Robert B. Mann

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

268

Sem. Chemistry Materials Science Electrical Engineering Miscellaneous CP Introduction to General Chemistry,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sem. Chemistry Materials Science Electrical Engineering Miscellaneous CP Introduction to General Chemistry, Laboratory Practice (Precourse) Physical Chemistry (4 CP) Introductory Engineering (5 CP) Organic & Inorganic Materials Chemistry (4 CP) Energy Science and Technology I (5 CP) Surfaces/Interfaces/ Heterogen

Pfeifer, Holger

269

Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Major and Minor At A Glance Major I ­ Pre-professional (Medicine, Dentistry, Business, Law, Engineering) Major II ­ ACS Certified e.g. Graduate Study or Entry Level Chemistry Employment. Major III ­ Forensic Chemistry Major IV** ­ Biochemistry Option Chemistry Minor General Chemistry I & II

Schmitt, William R.

270

College of Science Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Science Department of Chemistry CHEMISTRY MINOR CHECKSHEET For students graduating in calendar year 2015 I. Required Courses (19 hours) CHEM 1035 1 -10362 General Chemistry (3) ____ (3) ____ CHEM 1045 3 -10464 General Chemistry Labs (1) ____ (1) ____ CHEM 2535-2536 Organic Chemistry (3

Crawford, T. Daniel

271

College of Science Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Science Department of Chemistry CHEMISTRY MINOR CHECKSHEET For students graduating in calendar year 2013 I. Required Courses (19 hours) CHEM 1035 1 -10362 General Chemistry (3) ____ (3) ____ CHEM 1045 3 -10464 General Chemistry Labs (1) ____ (1) ____ CHEM 2535-2536 Organic Chemistry (3

Crawford, T. Daniel

272

College of Science Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Science Department of Chemistry CHEMISTRY MINOR CHECKSHEET For students graduating in calendar year 2014 I. Required Courses (19 hours) CHEM 1035 1 -10362 General Chemistry (3) ____ (3) ____ CHEM 1045 3 -10464 General Chemistry Labs (1) ____ (1) ____ CHEM 2535-2536 Organic Chemistry (3

Crawford, T. Daniel

273

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Spring 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Spring 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

274

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Summer 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Student Tutors Summer 2012 (All arrangements are solely between.axelrod@mail.utexas.edu Organic Chemistry Chris Bates chrismbates@gmail.com General Chemistry Lecture/Lab Organic Chemistry Amy Bonaparte abonaparte@mail.utexas.edu General and Organic Chemistry Shelly Casciato slcasciato

275

Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track Scholarship Rises. Freshman Year/ Fall Semester Cr) Honors Chemistry I 3 84.136 (H) Honors Chemistry II 3 84.123 (H) Honors Chemistry I Lab 1 84.124 (H) Honors Chemistry II Lab 1 92.131 Calculus I 4 92.132 Honors Calculus II 4 Hon 110 Honors FYSH (AH) 3 Gen

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

276

College of Science Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Science Department of Chemistry CHEMISTRY MINOR CHECKSHEET For students graduating in calendar year 2012 I. Required Courses (19 hours) CHEM 1035 1 -10362 General Chemistry (3) ____ (3) ____ CHEM 1045 3 -10464 General Chemistry Labs (1) ____ (1) ____ CHEM 2535-2536 Organic Chemistry (3

Crawford, T. Daniel

277

Semi-Continuous Measurements of Aerosol Chemical Composition During the Summer 2002 Yosemite National Park Special Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semi-continuous measurements of fine particle composition were made over a period of several weeks in summer 2002 in Yosemite National Park, California. These included measurement of aerosol ionic composition (by PILS- Particle-Into-Liquid System) and aerosol carbon (by dual wavelength aethalometer and an R&P particulate carbon monitor). The data reveal that aerosol composition at the site is highly :variable in time, with a strong diurnal cycle. Interestingly, however, different diurnal cycles were sometimes observed for different chemical constituents of the particles. Organic carbon was observed to dominate fine particle mass, with some periods apparently associated with influx of smoke from wildfires in the western U.S. Measurements of fine particle carbon isotopes revealed the fraction of carbon from biogenic sources to range from approximately 73 to 95%. The ionic fraction of the aerosol was usually dominated by ammoniated sulfate. During most periods, PM{sub 2.5} nitrate was found primarily in sea salt particles from which chloride had been displaced. Strong variations in the extent of ammonia neutralization of sulfate were also observed. The ability to observe rapid changes in aerosol composition using these semi-continuous aerosol composition measurements is helpful for understanding the dynamic chemical composition of fine particles responsible for regional haze.

Collette, J; Lee, T; Heath, J; Carrico, C; Herckes, P; Engling, G; McMeeking, G; Kreidenweis, S; Day, D; Malm, W; Cahill, T

2003-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

Southern hemisphere tropospheric aerosol microphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol particle size distribution data have been obtained in the southern hemisphere from approximately 4{degree}S to 44{degree}S and between ground level and 6 km, in the vicinity of eastern Australia. The relative shape of the free-tropospheric size distribution for particles with radii larger than approximately 0.04 {mu}m was found to be remarkably stable with time, altitude, and location for the autumn-winter periods considered. This was despite some large concentration changes which were found to be typical of the southeastern Australian coastal region. The majority of free-troposphere large particles were found to have sulfuric acid or lightly ammoniated sulfate morphology. Large particles in the boundary layer almost exclusively had a sea-salt morphology.

Gras, J.L. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Aspendale (Australia))

1991-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incident radiation are distinguished, and albedos for oceanOceans using multiple satellite datasets in conjunction with MACR (Monte Carlo Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation)ocean temperature is coupled with the rest of the climate system, the dimming of surface radiation

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ĺngström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ĺlesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Stohl, A.; Mazzola, M.; Lanconelli, C.; Vitale, V.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; de Leeuw, G.; Rodriguez, E.; Herber, A. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Xue, Y.; Mei, L.; Istomina, L.; Wagener, R.; McArthur, B.; Sobolewski, P. S.; Kivi, R.; Courcoux, Y.; Larouche, P.; Broccardo, S.; Piketh, S. J.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken for graduation. Complete the following: Chem 111* Honors Principles of Chemistry Chem 112 Principles of Chemistry

Seamons, Kent E.

282

http://chemistry.usc.edu/ Tel: (213) 7407036 UndergraduateProgramsDepartment of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://chemistry.usc.edu/ Tel: (213) 7407036 UndergraduateProgramsDepartment of Chemistry Chemistry NanoscienceChemical BiologyBiochemistryResearch Five Majors, One Vision #12;Department of Chemistry, Undergraduate Programs Information about the programs B.S. degree in Chemistry: The B.S. degree in Chemistry

Rohs, Remo

283

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCHUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCHUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry - ACS Certified Major of the following courses Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4110 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug Action 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4120 Pharmaceutical Chemistry: Drug

284

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH1UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Polymers -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH1UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Polymers - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4610 Intro to Polymer Science 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4620 Polymer Chemistry 3 CH1153 University Chemistry

285

Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OP A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Approved as to style and content by: A. R. McFarland (Chair of Committee) N. K. Anand (Mer toer) (', & C. B...

Mekala, Malla R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

WRF-Chem Simulations of Aerosols and Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at different sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korean, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 um or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan due to the pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter, spring and autumn and over North China in summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. The model also captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over ocean at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5 to 30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO4 2-, NO3 - and NH4+. Positive BC RF at TOA compensates 40~50% of the TOA cooling associated with anthropogenic aerosol.

Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course Syllabus: Chemistry 3AL Course Information Course Name Chemistry 3AL Course Instructor are online. Chemistry 3AL Syllabus https://elearning.berkeley.edu/AngelUploads/Content/2013SUC... 1 of 5 5

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol chemical vapor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical and microphysical properties influence aerosol optical properties and radiative effects... distribution of aerosol extensive and intensive properties will aid ......

291

AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL SPECIATION MONITOR Yin-Nan Lee1 , Fan Mei1 , Stephanie DeJong1 , Anne Jefferson2 1 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

292

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

294

Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical...

295

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

296

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the...

297

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels...

298

Coordination Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how ligands affect their performance. Coordination Chemistry in magnesium battery electrolytes: how ligands affect their performance....

299

Model analysis of the anthropogenic aerosol effect on clouds over East Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecast model coupled with Chemistry) was used to conduct a pair of simulations with present-day (PD) and preindustrial (PI) emissions over East Asia to examine the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. As a result of an increase in aerosols in January, the cloud droplet number increased by 650 cm{sup -3} over the ocean and East China, 400 cm{sup -3} over Central and Southwest China, and less than 200 cm{sup -3} over North China. The cloud liquid water path (LWP) increased by 40-60 g m{sup -2} over the ocean and Southeast China and 30 g m{sup -2} over Central China; the LWP increased less than 5 g m{sup -2} or decreased by 5 g m{sup -2} over North China. The effective radius (Re) decreased by more than 4 {mu}m over Southwest, Central, and Southeast China and 2 {mu}m over North China. In July, variations in cloud properties were more uniform; the cloud droplet number increased by approximately 250-400 cm{sup -3}, the LWP increased by approximately 30-50 g m{sup -2}, and Re decreased by approximately 3 {mu}m over most regions of China. In response to cloud property changes from PI to PD, shortwave (SW) cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 30 W m{sup -2} over the ocean and 10 W m{sup -2} over Southeast China, and it weakened slightly by approximately 2-10 W m{sup -2} over Central and Southwest China in January. In July, SW cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 15 W m{sup -2} over Southeast and North China and weakened by 10 W m{sup -2} over Central China. The different responses of SW cloud radiative forcing in different regions was related to cloud feedbacks and natural variability.

Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scientific scope of the project was to exploit the unique location of the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO) located in the summit caldera of the Pico Volcano in Pico Island in the Azores, for atmospheric studies. The observatory, located at 2225m a.s.l., typically samples free tropospheric aerosols laying above the marine low-level clouds and long-range transported from North America. The broad purpose of this research was to provide the scientific community with a better understanding of fundamental physical processes governing the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and climate; with the ultimate goal of improving our abilities to understand past climate and to predict future changes through numerical models. The project was 'exploratory' in nature, with the plan to demonstrate the feasibility of deploying for the first time, an extensive aerosol research package at PMO. One of the primary activities was to test the deployment of these instruments at the site, to collect data during the 2012 summer season, and to further develop the infrastructure and the knowledge for performing novel research at PMO in follow-up longer-term aerosol-cloud studies. In the future, PMO could provide an elevated research outpost to support the renewed DOE effort in the Azores that was intensified in 2013 with the opening of the new sea-level ARM-DOE Eastern North Atlantic permanent facility at Graciosa Island. During the project period, extensive new data sets were collected for the planned 2012 season. Thanks to other synergistic activities and opportunities, data collection was then successfully extended to 2013 and 2014. Highlights of the scientific findings during this project include: a) biomass burning contribute significantly to the aerosol loading in the North Atlantic free troposphere; however, long-range transported black carbon concentrations decreased substantially in the last decade. b) Single black carbon particles – analyzed off-line at the electron microscope – were often very compacted, suggesting cloud processing and exhibiting different optical properties from fresh emissions. In addition, black carbon was found to be sometimes mixed with mineral dust, affecting its optical properties and potential forcing. c) Some aerosols collected at PMO acted as ice nuclei, potentially contributing to cirrus cloud formation during their transport in the upper free troposphere. Identified good ice nuclei were often mineral dust particles. d) The free tropospheric aerosols studied at PMO have relevance to low level marine clouds due, for example, to synoptic subsidence entraining free tropospheric aerosols into the marine boundary layer. This has potentially large consequences on cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and compositions in the marine boundary layer; therefore, having an effect on the marine stratus clouds, with potentially important repercussions on the radiative forcing. The scientific products of this project currently include contributions to two papers published in the Nature Publishing group (Nature Communications and Scientific Reports), one paper under revision for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, one in review in Geophysical Research Letters and one recently submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion. In addition, four manuscripts are in advanced state of preparation. Finally, twenty-eight presentations were given at international conferences, workshops and seminars.

Mazzoleni, Claudio [Michigan Technological University; Kumar, Sumit [Michigan Technological University; Wright, Kendra [Michigan Technological University; Kramer, Louisa [Michigan Technological University; Mazzoleni, Lynn [Michigan Technological University; Owen, Robert [Michigan Technological University; Helmig, Detlev [University of Colorado at Boulder

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

aerosol particle penetration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the subsequent aerosol penetration performance through these tubes were conducted for a aerosol particle size range of 5 nm to 20 nm and a flow rate range of 28 Lmin to 169.9...

303

Effects of operating conditions on a heat transfer fluid aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of heat transfer fluid aerosols from process leaks. To simulate industrial leaks, aerosol formation from a plain orifice into ambient air is studied by measuring liquid drop sizes and size distributions at various distances from an orifice. Measurements...

Sukmarg, Passaporn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Atmospheric aerosol microphysics: Formation, characterization, and interaction. Progress report, September 1, 1991--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project conducts theoretical and computational studies of the physical transformation processes of aerosols which underlie their atmospheric formation, interaction, transport, and removal and derives results that contribute to improved capabilities for modelling aerosol physical and chemical evolution in support of the environmental component of the National Energy Strategy. The subject of study is submicrometer aerosol particles with primary focus upon the ultrafine fraction. This report summarizes technical progress during the first two and one-half years of the project. Results of calculations of equilibrium vapor pressures over adhering pairs of 50, 100, and 200 nm particles are reported showing substantial depression of equilibrium vapor pressure relative to isolated spheres. Calculations are given of collective, long-range intermolecular energies for irregular particles to be used for growth rate calculations for realistic particles. Molecular dynamic simulations of thermal collisions of small clusters with each other and with single atoms are presented as a function of cluster size in the range from 1 to 8 atoms. Calculations of aerosol condensation in which vapor depletion and heating effects are taken into account for atmospheric cloud nucleation modelling are reported.

Marlow, W.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

306

National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding is provided by the US Department of Energy.

307

Observations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production and Soot Aging under Atmospheric Conditions Using a Novel Environmental Aerosol Chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the processes leading to SOA production under ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations as well as the impact these aerosol types have on climate is poorly understood. Although the majority of atmospheric aerosols scatter radiation either directly...

Glen, Crystal

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

Supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering ASHWINI NANGIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering ASHWINI NANGIA School of Chemistry, University. This article traces the evolution of supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering starting from the early of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, India. e-mail: ashwini.nangia@gmail.com Advances in supramolecular chemistry

Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

309

Environmental Chemistry 2.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I CHAPTER 2 Environmental Chemistry 2.1 INTRODUCTION 2.2 STOICHIOMETRY 2.3 ENTHALPY IN CHEMICAL SYSTEMS 2.4 CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIA 2.S ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2.6 NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY PROBLEMS REFERENCES It often #12;40 Chapter 2 Environmental Chemistry TABLE 2.1 Atomic Numbers andAtomic Weights Atomic Atomic

Kammen, Daniel M.

310

Project of Aerosol Optical Depth Change in South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Suriname Guyana Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Peru Chile Argentina Paraguay Uruguay #12;Statistics of Aerosol M ean D ec 01 to 06 Mean Month AerosolDepth Brazil Bolivia French Guiana Suriname Guyana Venezuela

Frank, Thomas D.

311

Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aerosols can potentially result in an increase in acid deposition. [4] Acid rain has been studiedSulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols Ben Kravitz,1 Alan limit of hydration of all sulfate aerosols into sulfuric acid. For annual injection of 5 Tg of SO2

Robock, Alan

312

Organic and Inorganic Aerosol Below-Cloud Scavenging by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations, with an average gravimetric PM1.0 of 8.2 ( 1.6 µg m-3 and an average Fourier transform infrared-rinsing behavior was unaffected by source type. The aerosol OM was hydrophilic throughout the sampling period the description of aerosol lifetimes in global models. Introduction Wet and dry deposition of aerosol particles

Russell, Lynn

313

Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry Faculty Position in Theoretical/Computational Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry Faculty Position in Theoretical/Computational Chemistry The Department of Chemistry announces a tenure-track opening in the area of Theoretical/Computational Chemistry have a Ph.D. in chemistry or a related field by time of appointment and 1 year of postdoctoral

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

314

Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2010 Home Work Assignment Ozone Chemistry 2 and Chemistry EAS 6790 Fall 2006 Home Work Assignment No. 4, Ozone Chemistry Problems 11.8 and 11.9 (sub-part 1 and 2 only). Daniel Jacob, Atmospheric Chemistry #12;2 Problem 2: 2 2. Consider an air parcel ventilated

Weber, Rodney

315

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM) Page 271Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog Chemistry (CHEM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM) Page 271Sonoma State University 2011-2012 Catalog Chemistry (CHEM) CheM 102 CheMiStry And SOCiety (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. An introductory course in chemistry for non- majors. Covers the basics of chemistry in an effort to better understand current

Ravikumar, B.

316

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH2UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Biochemistry -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH2UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Biochemistry - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 BL1040 Principles of Biology 4 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 BL4820 Biochem Techniques I 2 CH1153 University Chemistry

317

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 685 (CHE 685) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Organic Reaction Mechanisms and Molecular and physical chemistry Course description and rationale CHE685 is a graduate-level organic chemistry course. These two courses focus on physical organic chemistry, which deals with the structure and reactivity

Mather, Patrick T.

318

CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry 2011 1. Framework) in Chemistry. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry students a basic introduction to the Chemistry disciplines. In addition, the Bachelor's degree programme

319

Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

Tang, I.N.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

Ghan, Steven J.

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Aerosol-measurement techniques developed for nuclear-reactor-accident simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop techniques for sampling aerosols from a high temperature, high pressure environment. As such, much of this research can be applied to any high temperature, high pressure sampling problem. There are four parts that must be considered in any reactor sampling system: First, the sampling tip is important from the standpoint of (1) representatively sampling the ambient particles, (2) withstanding the high temperatures in the near core region, (3) rapidly reducing the temperature of the sampled gas without causing severe thermophoretic losses or condensing gases onto existing aerosols. The second part of the system is the aerosol transport. The dynamics that must be considered include diffusion, thermophoresis, setting and impaction. The third part involves the collection or analysis of the aerosols. Finally, the ability to control the flow rate through the sampling system affects the first three parts. All four areas are analyzed theoretically for general applications. Experiments were performed on various aspects of the problem that were not dealt with by other researchers or were specific to the experiments performed in the Loss of Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor and the Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor. Specifically this work includes (1) sampling tip analysis, (2) experimental and theoretical aerosol transport analysis, (3) the development and testing of a new multistage virtual impactor, (4) the analysis and development of a new method of measuring particle concentration using series light extinction cells, and (5) analysis and experimentally determined capabilities and usefulness of a flow control system for experimentally decreasing pressures and changing argon-steam-hydrogen gas compositions.

Novick, V.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Aerosol Science and Technology, 41:202216, 2007 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes, such as con- densation, coagulation, gas-to-particle conversion (Reid et al. 1998), and particle Aerosol size distribution is, along with particle refractive in- dex and shape, one of important

328

Organic aerosol components observed in Northern Hemispheric datasets from Aerosol Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study we compile and present results from the factor analysis of 43 Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) datasets (27 of the datasets are reanalyzed in this work). The components from all sites, when taken together, ...

Kroll, Jesse

329

Two Hundred Fifty Years of Aerosols and Climate: The End of the Age of Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonaceous and sulfur aerosols have a substantial global and regional influence on climate in addition to their impact on health and ecosystems. The magnitude of this influence has changed substantially over the past and is expected to continue to change into the future. An integrated picture of the changing climatic influence of black carbon, organic carbon and sulfate over the period 1850 through 2100, focusing on uncertainty, is presented using updated historical inventories and a coordinated set of emission projections. While aerosols have had a substantial impact on climate over the past century, by the end of the 21st century aerosols will likely be only a minor contributor to radiative forcing due to increases in greenhouse gas forcing and a global decrease in pollutant emissions. This outcome is even more certain under a successful implementation of a policy to limit greenhouse gas emissions as low-carbon energy technologies that do not emit appreciable aerosol or SO2 are deployed.

Smith, Steven J.; Bond, Tami C.

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Calibration of the On-Line Aerosol Monitor (OLAM) with ammonium chloride and sodium chloride aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The On-Line Aerosol Monitor (OLAM) is a light attenuation device designed and built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EG&G Idaho. Its purpose is to provide an on-line indication of aerosol concentration in the PHEBUS-FP tests. It does this by measuring the attenuation of a light beam across a tube through which an aerosol is flowing. The OLAM does not inherently give an absolute response and must be calibrated. A calibration has been performed at Sandia National Laboratories` (SNL) Sandia Aerosol Research Laboratory (SARL) and the results are described here. Ammonium chloride and sodium chloride calibration aerosols are used for the calibration and the data for the sodium chloride aerosol is well described by a model presented in this report. Detectable instrument response is seen over a range of 0.1 cm{sup 3} of particulate material per m{sup 3} of gas to 10 cm{sup 3} of particulate material per m{sup 3} of gas.

Brockmann, J.E.; Lucero, D.A.; Romero, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pentecost, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) and first applications with a GC/MS-FID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to ...

Hohaus, T.

332

The mechano-chemistry of cytoskeletal force generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this communication, we propose a model to study the non-equilibrium process by which actin stress fibers develop force in contractile cells. The emphasis here is on the non-equilibrium thermodynamics, which is necessary to address the mechanics as well as the chemistry of dynamic cell contractility. In this setting we are able to develop a framework that relates (a) the dynamics of force generation within the cell and (b) the cell response to external stimuli to the chemical processes occurring within the cell, as well as to the mechanics of linkage between the stress fibers, focal adhesions and extra-cellular matrix.

Mirko Maraldi; Krishna Garikipati

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that they play in human health, biogeochemical cycles and the Earth's climate. ...

Kroll, Jesse

334

EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop - Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the workshop scope and recommendations from the workshop attendees in identifying scientific gaps in new particle formation, growth and properties of particles and reactions in and on particles as well as the laboratory-focused capabilities, field-deployable capabilities and modeling/theory tools along with linking of models to fundamental data.

Baer, Donald R.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.; Allen, Heather C.; Bertram, Allan K.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Martin, Scot T.; Penner, Joyce E.; Prather, Kimberly; Rasch, Philip J.; Signorell, Ruth; Smith, James N.; Wyslouzil, Barbara; Ziemann, Paul; Dabdub, Donald; Furche, Filipp; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Tobias, Douglas J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Emission and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Gas and Aerosol Phase at a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecond stage of theEMI SIGTrends inSub-Urban Site Near

336

Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Aerosol Spray Synthesis of Porous Molybdenum Sulfide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and colloidal silica, SiO2, was ultrasonically nebulized using a household humidifier; the resulting aerosol in materials science because of their ability to be scaled-up for industrial applications.[2] USP solution, as indicated by Eq. 2. Typically, micron-sized particles are obtained; however, by adding

Suslick, Kenneth S.

338

3, 59195976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 3, 5919­5976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol field over Europe M. Schaap et al. Title Page Abstract of Utrecht, Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science, PO Box 80005, 3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands 2, The Netherlands 3 Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), PO Box 1, 1755 LE Petten, The Netherlands 4 Joint

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

Source Apportionment of Carbonaceous Aerosols using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are different than the collection of particles from water Filtration has high efficiency for all sizes Size Condensation Nuclei (CCN) Human health Carbonaceous aerosol implicated as important for toxicity and adverse of particulate matter Again, agreement between these two approaches would give a high level of confidence

Einat, Aharonov

340

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Chemistry & Biology Directed Evolution of the Nonribosomal Peptide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry & Biology Article Directed Evolution of the Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Adm University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA 3Department of Chemistry 4The Chemistry of Life Processes

Zhao, Huimin

342

Statistical Approaches to Aerosol Dynamics for Climate Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we introduce two general non-parametric regression analysis methods for errors-in-variable (EIV) models: the compound regression, and the constrained regression. It is shown that these approaches are equivalent to each other and, to the general parametric structural modeling approach. The advantages of these methods lie in their intuitive geometric representations, their distribution free nature, and their ability to offer a practical solution when the ratio of the error variances is unknown. Each includes the classic non-parametric regression methods of ordinary least squares, geometric mean regression, and orthogonal regression as special cases. Both methods can be readily generalized to multiple linear regression with two or more random regressors.

Zhu, Wei

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of Southern African biomass burning aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct and semi-direct radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. The aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from MODIS and for aerosol layers above clouds from CALIPSO. Over the ocean, where the absorbing biomass burning aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semi-direct radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semi-direct radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by aerosol absorptive warming in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The ocean cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land where cloud cover changes are minimal, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative requiring a reduction in precipitation. This is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rainforest and the ITCZ in the southern Sahel. The changes are consistent with the low-level aerosol forced cooling pattern. The results highlight the importance of semi-direct radiative effects and precipitation responses for determining the climatic effects of aerosols in the African region.

Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

345

Thermal chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on rutile TiO2(110) . Thermal chemistry and photochemistry of hexafluoroacetone on rutile TiO2(110) . Abstract: The ultraviolet...

346

Capturing Chemistry in XML/CML  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Markup Language (CML) is an XML-conformant Schema that describes molecules, spectra, reactions, and computational chemistry. It is capable of capturing the chemistry in a variety of current publications and is becoming adopted by many...

Townsend, Joseph A; Adams, Sam; Goodman, Jonathan M; Murray-Rust, Peter; Waudby, Chris A

347

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Monday, 25 February 2013 15:59 Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are...

348

Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Annual Report 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report describes the research and staff accomplishments in 2000 for the EMSL Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Directorate.

Grate, Jay W.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Chemistry / Biochemistry B.S. Curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry / Biochemistry B.S. Curriculum Freshman Chemistry CHE 133/133L, 134/134L; ENG 131, 132, BIO elective Sophomore Chemistry CHE 231/231L, 241/241L, 331/331L, 332/332L; MTH 233, 234; PHY 241 elective Junior Chemistry CHE 337/337L, 338/338L, 452/452L; CSC 101 or 201, ENG 273, Eng. Lit; Core

Long, Nicholas

350

Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Chemistry 109 (3 credit hours) Honors General Chemistry Lecture, Part I; Fall 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the book are available at the University Bookstore. Corequisite: CHE 129 ­ Honors General Chemistry introduce you to all areas of chemistry: physical, organic, inorganic, quantum, biophysical, and analyticalChemistry 109 (3 credit hours) Honors General Chemistry Lecture, Part I; Fall 2014 Instructor

Doyle, Robert

352

Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemie 07 Inorganic chemistry 11.14 - 08 Organische chemie 08 Organic chemistry 12.11 - 10 Didactics and priciples of chemistry 14.03 - 16 Vervolgwerken - Annuals 16 Book series and annuals 14Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken

Galis, Frietson

353

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMR Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry analytical chemistry and metallurgy. In 1952, the first LANL CMR facility was completed. At that time chemistry and metallurgy. Upgrades to the original CMR were completed in 2002. In 2012, the CMR facility

354

Roadmap: Chemistry Materials Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-MCHM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Materials Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-MCHM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 17 Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [14 Credit Hours] CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM

Sheridan, Scott

355

BS in CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (692828) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BS in CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (692828) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students a cumulative 2.85 GPA in teaching major/minor courses to qualify for student teaching. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit must be taken in residence

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

356

Roadmap: Chemistry Materials Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-MCHM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Materials Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-MCHM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 30 Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [14 Credit Hours] CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM

Sheridan, Scott

357

BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BA in CHEMISTRY (692827) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students entering in major courses. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit to be taken in residence at BYU for this degree program. These hours may also go toward BYU

Seamons, Kent E.

358

Why Study Chemistry at ESF A Rigorous Education: Chemistry faculty bring their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why Study Chemistry at ESF A Rigorous Education: Chemistry faculty bring their expertise in cutting and real-world examples. Also, in addition to the usual chemistry courses, undergraduates take three our students receive: 95% of our students are employed in chemistry or accepted into graduate

Chatterjee, Avik P.

359

Minor in Chemistry Handout1.doc (04/30/08) Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor in Chemistry Handout1.doc (04/30/08) Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Student Academic.fleming@ucr.edu Minor in Chemistry Procedure: It is assumed that you have completed the requirements listed in section to Declare a Minor to Chemistry. Include the following: full name, student identification number, and email

Reed, Christopher A.

360

Roadmap: Chemistry Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD for certification by the American Chemical Society CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General

Sheridan, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY 2011 Academic regulations for the Bachelor's degree in Chemistry Bachelor's degree programme provides graduates with the title Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Chemistry and Technology. Academic line and main subject areas of the degree The Bachelor's degree in Chemistry

362

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH5UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Environmental -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH5UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Environmental - ACS credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 BL1040 Principles of Biology 4 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 BL3310 Environmental Microbiology 3 CH1153 University

363

BS in CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (692828) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BS in CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (692828) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students is allowed in major courses. --The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry credit must be taken in residence at BYU for this degree program. These hours may also

Seamons, Kent E.

364

Roadmap: Chemistry Chemistry -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Chemistry ­ Chemistry - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-CHEM-CHEM] College of Arts and Sciences Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 17-May-12/LNHD for certification by the American Chemical Society CHEM 10060 General Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 10062 General

Sheridan, Scott

365

Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated March 2011 Ph.D. Chemistry; Option in Chemistry Education University of New Hampshire below), or candidate can obtain MS at UNH on the way to the PhD with Option in Chemistry Education Cumulative exams are split between education and chemistry cores Professional presentation allowed in place

New Hampshire, University of

366

Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 Oct–Nov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Safety Statement Virginia Tech Chemistry Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Statement Virginia Tech Chemistry Department This safety statement was prepared by the Chemistry Department Safety Committee and approved by the Department Chairperson on October 24, 2006. 1. Laboratory safety, chemical hygiene, and environmental responsibility are central objectives of the Chemistry

Crawford, T. Daniel

368

The School of Chemistry Handbook for Postgraduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The School of Chemistry Handbook for Postgraduate Research Students 2013/14 School of Chemistry FACULTY OF MATHS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES #12;2 Welcome The School of Chemistry welcomes new postgraduate that is relevant for your time spent in the School, including information about facilities to support your research

Rzepa, Henry S.

369

GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST ISBN Number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 2013 GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST Course Number ISBN Number Title of Text and/or Material Edition Author Publishers 11100 978-1-2591-9687-4 Introduction to Chemistry, 3rd ed. (packaged w 978-1-2591-6192-6 Chemistry, The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6e (packaged w

Jiang, Wen

370

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 ­ 10:50, 212B ACRC) 491-8587 Teaching Assistant: Lauren Potter Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 11 Lepotter, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical composition; 2) Explain the chemical

371

4, 419470, 2004 HOx chemistry in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 4, 419­470, 2004 HOx chemistry in clean marine air R. Sommariva et al. Title Page Abstract-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2004-4-419 © European Geosciences Union 2004 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions OH and HO2 chemistry in clean marine air during SOAPEX-2 R. Sommariva 1 , A.-L. Haggerstone 2 , L

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

372

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry Monday and Wednesday, 9 ­ 9:50, 212B ACRC Instructor: Prof) Understand quantitatively how emissions, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical to Atmospheric Chemistry, D.J. Jacob Princeton University Press, 1999 PDF versions of the chapters can

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

373

Chemistry Department Assessment Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Chemistry Department Assessment May, 2006 Table of Contents Page Executive Summary 1 Prelude 1 Mission Statement and Learning Goals 1 Facilities 2 Staffing 3 Students: Chemistry Majors and Student Taking Service Courses Table: 1997-2005 graduates profile Table: GRE Score for Chemistry Majors, 1993

Bogaerts, Steven

374

College of Arts and Sciences CHE Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Arts and Sciences CHE Chemistry KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped will be discussed in terms of their properties and impact on our everyday real world experience. CHE 103 CHEMISTRY, or completion of MA 108R. CHE 104 INTRODUCTORY GENERAL CHEMISTRY. (3

MacAdam, Keith

375

Climate Engineering with Stratospheric Aerosols and Associated Engineering Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate engineering with stratospheric aerosols, an idea inspired by large volcaniceruptions, could cool the Earth’s surface and thus alleviate some of the predicted dangerous impacts of anthropogenic climate change. However, the effectiveness of climate engineering to achieve a particular climate goal, and any associated side effects, depend on certain aerosol parameters and how the aerosols are deployed in the stratosphere. Through the examples of sulfate and black carbon aerosols, this paper examines "engineering" parameters-aerosol composition, aerosol size, and spatial and temporal variations in deployment-for stratospheric climate engineering. The effects of climate engineering are sensitive to these parameters, suggesting that a particle could be found ordesigned to achieve specific desired climate outcomes. This prospect opens the possibility for discussion of societal goals for climate engineering.

Kravitz, Benjamin S.

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

378

Correction to "Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correction to "Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols (2010), Correction to "Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols" (Journal of Geophysical Research, 114, D14109

Robock, Alan

379

Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible pollutant sources. Keywords Atmospheric aerosols . Canonical correlation analysis . Chicago air pollution studies involve collection and anal- ysis of atmospheric aerosols and concurrent meteorol- ogy) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to atmospheric aerosol and trace gas concentrations

O'Brien, Timothy E.

380

The Effect of Solvent on the Analysis of Secondary Organic Aerosol Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvent-analyte reactions in organic aerosol (OA) extracts prepared for analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) were examined. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by ozonation of d-limonene as well as several test organic chemicals with functional groups typical for OA constituents were dissolved and stored in methanol, d3-methanol, acetonitrile, and d3-acetonitrile to investigate the extent and relative rates of reactions between analyte and solvent. High resolution ESI-MS showed that reactions of carbonyls with methanol produce significant amounts of hemiacetals and acetals on time scales ranging from several minutes to several days, with the reaction rates increasing in acidified solutions. Carboxylic acid groups were observed to react with methanol resulting in the formation of esters. In contrast, acetonitrile extracts showed no evidence of reactions with analyte molecules, suggesting that acetonitrile is the preferred solvent for SOA extraction. The use of solvent-analyte reactivity as an analytical chemistry tool for the improved characterization of functional groups in complex organic mixtures was also demonstrated. Direct comparison between ESI mass spectra of the same SOA samples extracted in reactive (methanol) versus non-reactive (acetonitrile) solvents was used to estimate the relative fractions of ketones (?38%), aldehydes (?6%), and carboxylic acids (?55%) in d-limonene SOA.

Bateman, Adam P.; Walser, Maggie L.; Dessiaterik, Yury; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Final Report for Ă?¢Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Cloud-Aerosol Physics in Super-Parameterized Atmospheric Regional Climate Simulations (CAP-SPARCS)Ă?¢Ă?Â?Ă?Âť (DE-SC0002003) for 8/15/2009 through 8/14/2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving the representation of local and non-local aerosol interactions in state-of-the-science regional climate models is a priority for the coming decade (Zhang, 2008). With this aim in mind, we have combined two new technologies that have a useful synergy: (1) an aerosol-enabled regional climate model (Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Chemistry WRF-Chem), whose primary weakness is a lack of high quality boundary conditions and (2) an aerosol-enabled multiscale modeling framework (PNNL Multiscale Aerosol Climate Model (MACM)), which is global but captures aerosol-convection-cloud feedbacks, and thus an ideal source of boundary conditions. Combining these two approaches has resulted in an aerosol-enabled modeling framework that not only resolves high resolution details in a particular region, but crucially does so within a global context that is similarly faithful to multi-scale aerosol-climate interactions. We have applied and improved the representation of aerosol interactions by evaluating model performance over multiple domains, with (1) an extensive evaluation of mid-continent precipitation representation by multiscale modeling, (2) two focused comparisons to transport of aerosol plumes to the eastern United States for comparison with observations made as part of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT), with the first being idealized and the second being linked to an extensive wildfire plume, and (3) the extension of these ideas to the development of a new approach to evaluating aerosol indirect effects with limited-duration model runs by �¢����nudging�¢��� to observations. This research supported the work of one postdoc (Zhan Zhao) for two years and contributed to the training and research of two graduate students. Four peer-reviewed publications have resulted from this work, and ground work for a follow-on project was completed.

Lynn M. Russell; Richard C.J. Somerville

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670 nm). Aerosols and Rayleigh scattering contribute atmospheric extinction in all MFRSR channels. Our recently updated MFRSR data analysis algorithm allows us to partition the spectral aerosol optical depth into fine and coarse modes and to retrieve the fine mode effective radius. In this approach we rely on climatological amounts of NO2 from SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals and use daily ozone columns from TOMS.

Alexandrov, Mikhail

383

Stackable differential mobility analyzer for aerosol measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-stage differential mobility analyzer (MDMA) for aerosol measurements includes a first electrode or grid including at least one inlet or injection slit for receiving an aerosol including charged particles for analysis. A second electrode or grid is spaced apart from the first electrode. The second electrode has at least one sampling outlet disposed at a plurality different distances along its length. A volume between the first and the second electrode or grid between the inlet or injection slit and a distal one of the plurality of sampling outlets forms a classifying region, the first and second electrodes for charging to suitable potentials to create an electric field within the classifying region. At least one inlet or injection slit in the second electrode receives a sheath gas flow into an upstream end of the classifying region, wherein each sampling outlet functions as an independent DMA stage and classifies different size ranges of charged particles based on electric mobility simultaneously.

Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Da-Ren (Creve Coeur, MO)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

ARM - PI Product - Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethaneProductsCSSEFProductsMerged andAerosol Optical

385

Aerosol Working Group Contributions Accomplishments for 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011 Simulation StudiesAerosol

386

Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM) Page 277Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Chemistry (CHEM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courses: Chemistry (CHEM) Page 277Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog Chemistry (CHEM) CHeM nC SeLeCted topiCS (0) CHeM 102 CHeMiStry And SoCiety (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. An introductory course in chemistry for non-majors. Covers the basics of chemistry related to everyday life

Ravikumar, B.

388

Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy, And Comparison with C60  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy of Chemistry, New York UniVersity, New York, New York 10003, Department of Chemistry, Brown UniVersity, ProVidence, Rhode Island 02912, and Department of Chemistry, Columbia UniVersity, New York, New York 10027 Received

Turro, Nicholas J.

389

Revised 4/18/12 Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised 4/18/12 Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Handbook #12;2 #12;3 Table of Contents THE CHAIRMAN'S WELCOME 7 CAREER PATHS IN CHEMISTRY AND MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 8 CHEMISTRY PROGRAMS AT UB 11 ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM 14 CHANGING YOUR MAJOR TO CHEMISTRY/ MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 14 ADVISEMENT 15 UB HUB

ColĂłn, Luis A.

390

Revised 8/01/12 Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised 8/01/12 Department of Chemistry Undergraduate Handbook #12;2 #12;3 Table of Contents THE CHAIRMAN'S WELCOME 7 CAREER PATHS IN CHEMISTRY AND MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 7 CHEMISTRY PROGRAMS AT UB 11 ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM 14 CHANGING YOUR MAJOR TO CHEMISTRY/ MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY 14 ADVISEMENT 15 UB HUB

ColĂłn, Luis A.

391

TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOL PROGRAM, PROGRAM PLAN, MARCH 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of Tropospheric Aerosol Program (TAP) will be to develop the fundamental scientific understanding required to construct tools for simulating the life cycle of tropospheric aerosols--the processes controlling their mass loading, composition, and microphysical properties, all as a function of time, location, and altitude. The TAP approach to achieving this goal will be by conducting closely linked field, modeling, laboratory, and theoretical studies focused on the processes controlling formation, growth, transport, and deposition of tropospheric aerosols. This understanding will be represented in models suitable for describing these processes on a variety of geographical scales; evaluation of these models will be a key component of TAP field activities. In carrying out these tasks TAP will work closely with other programs in DOE and in other Federal and state agencies, and with the private sector. A forum to directly work with our counterparts in industry to ensure that the results of this research are translated into products that are useful to that community will be provided by NARSTO (formerly the North American Research Strategy on Tropospheric Ozone), a public/private partnership, whose membership spans government, the utilities, industry, and university researchers in Mexico, the US, and Canada.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.; LUNN,P.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

aerosol challenge model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

climate change is important because of its strong capability in causing extinction of solar radiation. A three-dimensional interactive aerosol-climate model has been used to...

393

Iron Speciation and Mixing in Single Aerosol Particles from the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iron from atmospheric aerosol is an essential nutrient that can control oceanic productivity, thereby impacting the global carbon budget and climate. Particles collected on...

394

aircraft exhaust aerosol: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window Location on a King Air 200 Aircraft:aerosol.atmos.und.edu) Objective A Raytheon Beechcraft King Air 200 aircraft has been used to obtain Condensation Particle...

395

aerosol mass spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analysis of aerosol organic nitrates with electron ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry MIT - DSpace Summary: Four hydroxynitrates (R(OH)R'ONO2) representative of...

396

aerosol assisted chemical: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 5 Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of...

397

ambient fine aerosols: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 4 Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water:...

398

aerosol chemical characteristion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 5 Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of...

399

aerosol characterization experiment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 8 Desert dust aerosol age characterized by massage tracking of tracers...

400

aerosol generation characterization: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 5 Desert dust aerosol age characterized by massage tracking of tracers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

aerosol monitor development: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paris May 2003John Matthews Monitoring the Aerosol Phase Function University of New Mexico 12;AstroParticles & Atmosphere, Paris May 2003John Matthews 12;AstroParticles &...

402

aerosol particle charger: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Introduction The Universal Serial Bus (USB) port Allen, Jont 9 New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry...

403

aerosol mass spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2004. The concentration of a species Zhang, Qi 8 Development of a thermal desorption chemical ionization mobility mass spectrometer for the speciation of ultrafine aerosols. Open...

404

aerosol particles generated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: Real-...

405

aerosol monitors including: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical ... Ridley, David Andrew 33...

406

aerosol retrieval validation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

off the coast of Chile and Peru, where aerosol-cloud interactions are important to the energy balance (15), and limitations in current observing and modeling capabilities...

407

aerosol detection equipment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Daniel, Rosenfeld 464 Mixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites...

408

Aerosol generation and entrainment model for cough simulations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The airborne transmission of diseases is of great concern to the public health community. The possible spread of infectious disease by aerosols is of particular… (more)

Ersahin, Cem.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

atmospheric aerosols basic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of atmospheric aerosol. Aplin, KL 2012-01-01 13 1. Introduction The atmospheric greenhouse effect is the basic mechanism Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 1....

410

Aerosols, Clouds, and Climate Change Stephen E. Schwartz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in atmospheric carbon dioxide associated with fossil fuel combustion. Briefly the options are mitigation work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous

Schwartz, Stephen E.

411

Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

Worsnop, Douglas R.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Water dynamics in large and small reverse micelles: From two ensembles to collective behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water dynamics in large and small reverse micelles: From two ensembles to collective behavior David July 2009 The dynamics of water in Aerosol-OT reverse micelles are investigated with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch. In large reverse micelles, the dynamics of water are separable into two

Fayer, Michael D.

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - administrado como aerosol Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

del ozono estratosfrico, los aerosoles atmosfricos y... a los cambios en las emisiones que los GEI de larga duracin, como el CO2. Los aerosoles antropgenos... ms...

414

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol robotic network Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

), AERONET--A federated instrument network and data archive for aerosol characterization, Remote Sens... Period examining aerosol properties and radiative ... Source: Brookhaven...

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol condensation model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 8 DETERMINING AEROSOL RADIATIVE FORCING AT ARM SITES Summary: OF AEROSOL DIRECT FORCING By linear model and by...

416

SciTech Connect: Results and code predictions for ABCOVE aerosol...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results and code predictions for ABCOVE aerosol code validation - Test AB5 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Results and code predictions for ABCOVE aerosol code...

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosolized polymerized type Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spheric aerosol particles and isolated from fog... in atmospheric aerosol particles and rainwater in the 1980's (Si- moneit, 1980; Likens and ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

418

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol radiative forcing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

No. DE- Summary: : WHY MEASUREMENTS ALONE CANNOT QUANTIFY AEROSOL RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE Stephen E. Schwartz... of radiative forcing of climate change by aerosols,...

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosols nanometriques application Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is studying how aerosol particles affect everything from Summary: of aerosol particles on climate change, public health, and renewable energy applications. In particular, he......

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol main physical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND INTEGRAL AEROSOL PROPERTIES RETRIEVAL FROM RAMAN LIDAR DATA USING PRINCIPLE COMPONENT ANALYSIS Summary: retrievals of physical aerosol parameters from ground-based and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Trade Wind Boundary Layer.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation includes an overview of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX,… (more)

Jung, Eunsil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol light absorption Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND Summary: population centers were used to calculate the aerosol forcing due to light scattering and absorption. Directly... , NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Aerosols influence...

423

Large Aerosols Play Unexpected Role in Ganges Valley | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

The data have revealed that large aerosols in this region absorb a greater amount of light than expected. The Science Aerosol particles in the atmosphere may absorb solar...

424

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol atmospheric interactions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Climate Summary: order estimates of aerosol-climate interaction But... only Earth System Models can include all... of the interactions (in theory at least) 12;Aerosols <>...

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol size Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for about ten percent of all aerosols in the atmosphere. We... , can actually absorb solar energy and warm the atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosols are very important... by...

426

aerosol source-receptor relationships: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol load study Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions... reserved. Keywords: India; Aerosol loading; Aerosol forcing; MODIS; TOMS; Remote sensing 1. Introduction... heating effect on the earth surface and in turn...

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis od aerosol Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tivanski, Rebecca Hopkins, Yury Desyaterik... of Aerosols 12;Aerosol Transport From Mexico City During MILAGRO T0 T1 T2 Mexico ... Source: Brookhaven National Laboratory,...

429

IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

E. Thomas

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

430

UCLA PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION 2012-2013 CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.), PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION: This concentration is designed primarily for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UCLA PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION 2012-2013 CHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.), PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION: This concentration is designed primarily for Chemistry majors who are interested in attending graduate school in Physical Chemistry/Physics or related areas. It may also satisfy some of the needs

Levine, Alex J.

431

Comparing three vegetation monoterpene emission models to measured gas concentrations with a model of meteorology, air chemistry and chemical transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are essential in atmospheric chemistry because of their chemical reactions that produce and destroy tropospheric ozone, their effects on aerosol formation and growth, and their potential influence on global warming. As one of the important BVOC groups, monoterpenes have been a focus of scientific attention in atmospheric research. Detailed regional measurements and model estimates are needed to study emission potential and the monoterpene budget on a global scale. Since the use of empirical measurements for upscaling is limited by many physical and biological factors such as genetic variation, temperature and light, water availability, seasonal changes, and environmental stresses, comprehensive inventories over larger areas are difficult to obtain.

Smolander, S.; He, Q.; Mogensen, Ditte; Zhou, L.; Back, J.; Ruuskanen, T.; Noe, S.; Guenther, Alex B.; Aaltonen, H.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, Michael

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Aerosol radiative forcing and the accuracy of satellite aerosol optical depth retrieval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of the AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) is typically between 0.06 and 0.15, while the RMSE between t = 0.1 and t = 0.8. The Department of Energy research satellite instrument, the Multispectral aerosol radiative forcing are known, the predictions of future global warming may remain unacceptably high

433

Variability of Aerosol Optical Properties from Long-term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%) controlled measurements: sp ­ Aerosol total light scattering coefficient at 450, 550, and 700 nm wavelengths automated generation and review of quality control plots · Weekly editing of data by station scientist]. Indirect Forcing Direct Forcing Carbon Dioxide Forcing Total Forcing Importance of Aerosols #12;Direct

Delene, David J.

434

Sulfate Aerosol Geoengineering: The Question of Justice Toby Svoboda1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sulfate Aerosol Geoengineering: The Question of Justice Toby Svoboda1,* , Klaus Keller2 , Marlos of geoengineering as a means to address global climate change. This paper focuses on the question of whether a particular form of geoengineering, namely deploying sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere to counteract some

435

An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols BY PHILIP J, MD 21218, USA We provide an overview of geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosols. The state after geoengineering, with some regions experiencing significant changes in temperature or precipitation

Robock, Alan

436

aerosol ratio test: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosol ratio test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Effect of mineral dust aerosol...

437

Organic Aerosol Formation Downwind from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Aerosol Formation Downwind from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Nicole ONeill - ATOC 3500 and aerosol composition of air over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. · The lightest chemicals in the oil evaporated within hours, as scientists expected them to do. What they didn't expect

Toohey, Darin W.

438

Spatial and Seasonal Trends in Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial and Seasonal Trends in Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Tracers and Water-Soluble Organic biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC natural and anthropogenic sources and is dominated by terrestrial plant foliage (7). The global

Zheng, Mei

439

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration of warm convective clouds Ilan Koren,1 * Guy Dagan,1 Orit Altaratz1 Among all cloud-aerosol interactions, the invigoration effect is the most elusive. Most of the studies that do suggest this effect link it to deep convective clouds with a warm base

Napp, Nils

440

Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-47669 Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Iain Walker of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey A. Siegel Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. ASHRAE Student Member that are found in commercial and residential HVAC systems of 1 - 6 m/s (200 - 1200 ft/min), particle diameters

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Climatology of aerosol optical depth in northcentral Oklahoma: 19922008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aerosol models; for identification of aerosols from spe- cific events (e.g., the Central American fires Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most dimming; that is, the decrease in solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. Additionally, the wavelength

442

Absorption cross-section 139 Accumulation mode, of aerosol 146  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

133, 151 residence times 153 size distributions 144 Air composition 2 molecular weight 4, 6 Albedo 122 dioxide Coagulation (aerosol) 146 Column model 32 Conditional unstability 56 Continuity equation 75261 INDEX A Absorption cross-section 139 Accumulation mode, of aerosol 146 Acetaldehyde (CH3CHO

Jacob, Daniel J.

443

Laboratory Measurements of Sea Salt Aerosol Refractive Index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.3 Complex Refractive Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.4 Size Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.3.5 Coagulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.4 Sea Salt AerosolsLaboratory Measurements of Sea Salt Aerosol Refractive Index Thesis submitted for the degree

Oxford, University of

444

Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) Analysis of Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) Analysis of Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Rachel L. Atlas1' gas-phase emissions and the aerosols they form (figure 6), including a cloud condensation nuclei Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are particles which water vapor condenses onto to form cloud droplets

Collins, Gary S.

445

6, 43414373, 2006 Cloud-borne aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., par- ticle nucleation, coagulation, gravitational settling, dry deposition); some involve AP attached to a single type of cloud/precipitation particle (e.g., aqueous and heteroge-25 neous chemistry), and some, transformation, and removal processes on the attachment state, one might expect that model simulations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films.AdministrationAerosol Indirect

448

Aerosol Remote Sealing System - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation 2011 Simulation StudiesAerosol Remote Sealing

449

Light Absorption by Secondary Organic Aerosol from ?-Pinene: Effects of Oxidants, Seed Aerosol Acidity, and Relative Humidity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from ozonolysis or NO3 oxidation of ?-pinene in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532 and 870 nm. Light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed by SOA generated from oxidation of ?-pinene in the presence of acidic sulfate seed aerosols, under dry conditions. No absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27%, or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. The light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with organosulfate and organic nitrate groups. The results of this study also indicate that organic nitrates from ?-pinene SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols do not appear to absorb near-UV and UV radiation.

Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

450

Scale-free Universal Spectrum for Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution for Davos, Mauna Loa and Izana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric flows exhibit fractal fluctuations and inverse power law form for power spectra indicating an eddy continuum structure for the selfsimilar fluctuations. A general systems theory for fractal fluctuations developed by the author is based on the simple visualisation that large eddies form by space-time integration of enclosed turbulent eddies, a concept analogous to Kinetic Theory of Gases in Classical Statistical Physics. The ordered growth of atmospheric eddy continuum is in dynamical equilibrium and is associated with Maximum Entropy Production. The model predicts universal (scale-free) inverse power law form for fractal fluctuations expressed in terms of the golden mean. Atmospheric particulates are held in suspension in the fractal fluctuations of vertical wind velocity. The mass or radius (size) distribution for homogeneous suspended atmospheric particulates is expressed as a universal scale-independent function of the golden mean, the total number concentration and the mean volume radius. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement (within two standard deviations on either side of the mean) with total averaged radius size spectra for the AERONET (aerosol inversions) stations Davos and Mauna Loa for the year 2010 and Izana for the year 2009 daily averages. The general systems theory model for aerosol size distribution is scale free and is derived directly from atmospheric eddy dynamical concepts. At present empirical models such as the log normal distribution with arbitrary constants for the size distribution of atmospheric suspended particulates are used for quantitative estimation of earth-atmosphere radiation budget related to climate warming/cooling trends. The universal aerosol size spectrum will have applications in computations of radiation balance of earth-atmosphere system in climate models.

A. M. Selvam

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Cluster Dynamics of Planetary Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of nonlinear atmospheric planetary waves is determined by a small number of independent wave clusters consisting of a few connected resonant triads. We classified the different types of connections between neighboring triads that determine the general dynamics of a cluster. Each connection type corresponds to substantially different scenarios of energy flux among the modes. The general approach can be applied directly to various mesoscopic systems with 3-mode interactions, encountered in hydrodynamics, astronomy, plasma physics, chemistry, medicine, etc.

Elena Kartashova; Victor S. L'vov

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

452

Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistant navalChemCamSearch Button

453

Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporous Materials | Center for GasChemical

454

Last updated 6/13/2011 Chemistry Major III: FORENSIC CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Last updated 6/13/2011 Chemistry Major III: FORENSIC CHEMISTRY Suggested Program of Study FIRST and 3 of the arts. ***Three additional Forensic Sciences courses must be taken: FORS 6238-6239 plus FORS

Vertes, Akos

455

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

456

ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

457

ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

458

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

459

spectra from size-resolved particle samples col-lected from the Southeastern Aerosol Visibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and acrolein aerosols. We believe that these transformations are due to acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reac

Bishop, James K.B.

460

Modeling the Direct and Indirect Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

’ are conducted under the three aerosol scenarios: 1) the clean case with an aerosol number concentration of 200 cm-1, 2) the polluted case with a number concentration of 1000 cm-1, and 3) the aerosol radiative effects (AR) case with same aerosol concentration...

Lee, Keun-Hee

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck InChemistry Oxide

463

Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell BatteriesArchivesNuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

464

Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

Sherrill, David

466

Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intro Chem and MatSci Apps Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 L ast edited: 2014-06-02 08:56:54...

467

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are drawing attention in many areas of catalysis as scientists attempt to reduce...

468

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy A Consortium to Optimize...

469

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Bruce Bunting, Sam Lewis, John Storey OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S....

470

2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The materials uploaded are meant to serve as final report on the funds provided by DOE-BES to help sponsor the 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry.

Carter, Emily A

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

471

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, SPRING, 2014 (Updated 12/05/2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, SPRING, 2014 (Updated 12/05/2013) CHEM 0001-01 - CHEMICAL FUNDAMENTALS and chemistry of materials. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation. Only one of Chemistry 1, 11, or 16, and coordination chemistry, and chemistry of selected elements. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation

Kounaves, Samuel P.

472

Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper 3 June 2014 http://quantum.chem.olemiss.edu Introduction to Computational Quantum Chemistry I #12;Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi chemistry § Convergent quantum chemistry · Basis sets · Methods �Part II § A case

Tchumper, Gregory S.

473

Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi Gregory S. Tschumper 4 June 2014 http://quantum.chem.olemiss.edu Introduction to Computational Quantum Chemistry II #12;Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Mississippi chemistry § Convergent quantum chemistry · Basis sets · Methods �Part II § A case

Tchumper, Gregory S.

474

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, SPRING, 2015 (updated Oct.28, 2014 )  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, SPRING, 2015 (updated Oct.28, 2014 ) CHEM 0001 - CHEMICAL FUNDAMENTALS and chemistry of materials. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation. Only one of Chemistry 1, 11, or 16, and coordination chemistry, and chemistry of selected elements. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation

Kounaves, Samuel P.

475

Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rev. 3/1/10 NEW.........Minor in Chemistry The Department of Chemistry offers a minor in chemistry to students who wish to enhance their degrees with a strong concentration in this area. The Chemistry minor and enhances the records of students. The Chemistry minor provides a broad and general exposure

Chatterjee, Avik P.

476

CHEMISTRY 1 Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY 1 Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of --Chemistry This publication refers.imperial.ac.uk/pgprospectus. Chemistry Interests in chemistry at Imperial College cover physical, organic, inorganic, analytical, polymer and biological chemistry and chemical crystallography, as well as intersectional and medical topics

477

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, FALL, 2013 (Updated 8/1/13)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMISTRY COURSE OFFERINGS, FALL, 2013 (Updated 8/1/13) CHEM 0001-01 & 0001-02 - CHEMICAL and chemistry of materials. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation. Only one of Chemistry 1, 11, or 16, and coordination chemistry, and chemistry of selected elements. Three lectures, one laboratory, one recitation

Kounaves, Samuel P.

478

CARES Helps Explain Secondary Organic Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

What happens when urban man-made pollution mixes with what we think of as pristine forest air? To know more about what this interaction means for the climate, the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study, or CARES, field campaign was designed in 2010. The sampling strategy during CARES was coordinated with CalNex 2010, another major field campaign that was planned in California in 2010 by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the California Energy Commission (CEC). "We found two things. When urban pollution mixes with forest pollutions we get more secondary organic aerosols," said Rahul Zaveri, FCSD scientist and project lead on CARES. "SOAs are thought to be formed primarily from forest emissions but only when they interact with urban emissions. The data is saying that there will be climate cooling over the central California valley because of these interactions." Knowledge gained from detailed analyses of data gathered during the CARES campaign, together with laboratory experiments, is being used to improve existing climate models.

Zaveri, Rahul

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

479

CARES Helps Explain Secondary Organic Aerosols  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

What happens when urban man-made pollution mixes with what we think of as pristine forest air? To know more about what this interaction means for the climate, the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study, or CARES, field campaign was designed in 2010. The sampling strategy during CARES was coordinated with CalNex 2010, another major field campaign that was planned in California in 2010 by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the California Energy Commission (CEC). "We found two things. When urban pollution mixes with forest pollutions we get more secondary organic aerosols," said Rahul Zaveri, FCSD scientist and project lead on CARES. "SOAs are thought to be formed primarily from forest emissions but only when they interact with urban emissions. The data is saying that there will be climate cooling over the central California valley because of these interactions." Knowledge gained from detailed analyses of data gathered during the CARES campaign, together with laboratory experiments, is being used to improve existing climate models.

Zaveri, Rahul

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

480

Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dynamics aerosol chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

Shah, K.B.

1990-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

482

Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. (California Department of Health Services, Berkeley (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Berkeley Center for Green Chemistry Newsletter First mobile app for green chemistry fosters sustainable manufacturing of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Berkeley Center for Green Chemistry Newsletter First mobile app for green chemistry fosters sustainable manufacturing of medicines Mention mobile applications, or mobile apps, and people think of games of the environmentally friendly and sustainable principles of green chemistry -- is the topic of a report in the American

Silver, Whendee

484

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

485

Scalable Computational Chemistry: New Developments and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computational part of the thesis is the investigation of titanium chloride (II) as a potential catalyst for the bis-silylation reaction of ethylene with hexaclorodisilane at different levels of theory. Bis-silylation is an important reaction for producing bis(silyl) compounds and new C-Si bonds, which can serve as monomers for silicon containing polymers and silicon carbides. Ab initio calculations on the steps involved in a proposed mechanism are presented. This choice of reactants allows them to study this reaction at reliable levels of theory without compromising accuracy. The calculations indicate that this is a highly exothermic barrierless reaction. The TiCl{sub 2} catalyst removes a 50 kcal/mol activation energy barrier required for the reaction without the catalyst. The first step is interaction of TiCl{sub 2} with ethylene to form an intermediate that is 60 kcal/mol below the energy of the reactants. This is the driving force for the entire reaction. Dynamic correlation plays a significant role because RHF calculations indicate that the net barrier for the catalyzed reaction is 50 kcal/mol. They conclude that divalent Ti has the potential to become an important industrial catalyst for silylation reactions. In the programming part of the thesis, parallelization of different quantum chemistry methods is presented. The parallelization of code is becoming important aspects of quantum chemistry code development. Two trends contribute to it: the overall desire to study large chemical systems and the desire to employ highly correlated methods which are usually computationally and memory expensive. In the presented distributed data algorithms computation is parallelized and the largest arrays are evenly distributed among CPUs. First, the parallelization of the Hartree-Fock self-consistent field (SCF) method is considered. SCF method is the most common starting point for more accurate calculations. The Fock build (sub step of SCF) from AO integrals is also often used to avoid MO integral computation. The presented distributed data SCF increases the size of chemical systems that can be calculated by using RHF and DFT. The important ab initio method to study bond formation and breaking as well as excited molecules is CASSCF. The presented distributed data CASSCF algorithm can significantly decrease computational time and memory requirements per node. Therefore, large CASSCF computations can be performed. The most time consuming operation to study potential energy surfaces of reactions and chemical systems is Hessian calculations. The distributed data parallelization of CPHF will alloy scientists carry out large analytic Hessian calculations.

Yuri Alexeev

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

487

Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in the Arctic winter (summer) BC burden. This BC aging treatment, however, has minimal effect on other under-predicted species. Interestingly, our modifications to CAM5 that aim at improving prediction of high-latitude and upper tropospheric aerosols also produce much better AOD and AAOD over various other regions globally when compared to multi-year AERONET retrievals. The improved aerosol distributions have impacts on other aspects of CAM5, improving the simulation of global mean liquid water path and cloud forcing.

Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

488

Page 1 | B.A. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.A. in Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 | B.A. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.A. in Chemistry Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Chemistry chemistry.uncc.edu PROGRAM to declare the major. · Advising (For the Major): completed by your chemistry faculty advisor (please refer

Raja, Anita

489

User:Smallman12q/articles/Chemistry 1 User:Smallman12q/articles/Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

User:Smallman12q/articles/Chemistry 1 User:Smallman12q/articles/Chemistry Chemistry is the science during chemical reactions. Chemistry is the study of interactions of chemical substances with one another and energy. Chemistry (from Egyptian kme (chem), meaning "earth" [1] ) is the science concerned

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

490

Minor in Chemistry 1. A Chemistry Minor is achieved by taking courses with a "CHEM" label. Biochemistry ("BCHM")  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minor in Chemistry 1. A Chemistry Minor is achieved by taking courses with a "CHEM" label. Biochemistry ("BCHM") courses do not count toward a Chemistry Minor. The following CHEM courses in Chemistry unless you have completed Physical Chemistry 1 (Chem 683) and the accompanying laboratory course

New Hampshire, University of

491

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH3UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Secondary Education -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH3UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Secondary Education - 40 credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH3020 Laboratory Teaching Internship 2 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 CH4810 Design/Oper of High School Chemistry

492

Page 1 | B.S. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 | B.S. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Chemistry Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Chemistry chemistry.uncc.edu PROGRAM to declare the major. · Advising (For the Major): completed by your chemistry faculty advisor (please refer

Raja, Anita

493

Chemistry -Bachelor of Science (SCH4UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Chemical Physics -ACS Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry - Bachelor of Science (SCH4UG) Total Credits Required: 128 Chemistry/Chemical Physics - 49 credits Course Credits Course Credits CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH4560 Computational Chemistry 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab 1 AND 1 PH2300 Univ Physics III - Fluids & Thermo 2 CH1153

494

Aerodynamic size associations of natural radioactivity with ambient aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aerodynamic size of /sup 214/Pb, /sup 212/Pb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S (as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and stable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was measured using cascade impactors. The activity distribution of /sup 212/Pb and /sup 214/Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with aerosols smaller than 0.52 ..mu..m. Based on 46 measurements, the activity median aerodynamic diameter of /sup 212/Pb averaged 0.13 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.97), while /sup 214/Pb averaged 0.16 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.86). The larger median size of /sup 214/Pb was attributed to ..cap alpha..-recoil depletion of smaller aerosols following decay of aerosol-associated /sup 218/Po. Subsequent /sup 214/Pb condensation on all aerosols effectively enriches larger aerosols. /sup 212/Pb does not undergo this recoil-driven redistribution. Low-pressure impactor measurements indicated that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was about three times larger than the activity median diameter /sup 212/Pb, reflecting differences in atmospheric residence times as well as the differences in surface area and volume distributions of the atmospheric aerosol. Cosmogenic radionuclides, especially /sup 7/Be, were associated with smaller aerosols than SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ regardless of season, while /sup 210/Pb distributions in summer measurements were similar to sulfate but smaller in winter measurements. Even considering recoil following /sup 214/Po ..cap alpha..-decay, the avervage /sup 210/Pb labeled aerosol grows by about a factor of two during its atmospheric lifetime. The presence of 5 to 10% of the /sup 7/Be on aerosols greater than 1 ..mu..m was indicative of post-condensation growth, probably either in the upper atmosphere or after mixing into the boundary layer.

Bondietti, E.A.; Papastefanou, C.; Rangarajan, C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Research Unit on Biosphere -Aerosol -Cloud -Climate Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-222. Seinfeld J., 1986: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics of Air Pollution. Jonh Wiley and sons. New York, USA that dry deposition and surface exchange processes require a better description in atmospheric chemistry.R. and Lenschow D.H., 1983) in the modelling. Finlayson-Pitts B.J. and Pitts J.N., 1986: Atmospheric Chemistry

496

Criteria pollutant and acid aerosol characterization study, Catano, Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Catano Criteria Pollutant and Acid Aerosol Characterization Study (CPAACS) was to measure criteria pollutant concentrations and acid aerosol concentrations in and around the Ward of Catano, Puerto Rico, during the summer of 1994. Continuous air sampling for criteria pollutants was performed at three fixed stations and one moobile station that was deployed to four locations. Air samples for acid aerosol analyses and particulate matter measurements were collected at three sites. Semicontinuous sulfate analysis was performed at the primary site. Continuous measurements of wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and relative humidity were also made at each site. The study was conducted from June 1 through September 30, 1994.

Edgerton, E.S.; Harlos, D.P.; Sune, J.M.; Akland, G.G.; Vallero, D.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

CHEMISTRY 324W Fall 2010 ORGANIC LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CHEMISTRY 324W Fall 2010 ORGANIC LABORATORY Lecture: ...................Monday and Friday 2 book for over 10,000 important organic substances. It has a handy cross index and molecular formula.) Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Structure by March (McGraw-Hill) is particularly

Wagner, Diane

499

Summer 2009 Chemistry Olympiad in Cambridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, then head of organic chemistry at the University of Cape Town, but it was at the time of the first electionsSummer 2009 Chemistry Olympiad in Cambridge Protein folding ­ and misfolding about the academic staff in the department, but I looked through the book- let they sent me and I

Keeler, James

500

PHILOSOPHY OF CHEMISTRY Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHILOSOPHY OF CHEMISTRY Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent in A. Brenner, J. Gayon eds, French Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Springer, 2009, 165-185. The notion of "philosophy of chemistry" challenges the singular in the phrase "philosophy of science", which is the standard

Paris-Sud XI, Université de