National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for dynamic organic light

  1. INFLUENCE OF FILM STRUCTURE AND LIGHT ON CHARGE TRAPPING AND DISSIPATION DYNAMICS IN SPUN-CAST ORGANIC THIN-FILM TRANSISTORS MEASURED BY SCANNING KELVIN PROBE MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teague, L.; Moth, M.; Anthony, J.

    2012-05-03

    Herein, time-dependent scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of solution processed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) reveals a correlation between film microstructure and OTFT device performance with the location of trapped charge within the device channel. The accumulation of the observed trapped charge is concurrent with the decrease in I{sub SD} during operation (V{sub G}=-40 V, V{sub SD}= -10 V). We discuss the charge trapping and dissipation dynamics as they relate to the film structure and show that application of light quickly dissipates the observed trapped charge.

  2. Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand-blasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand@ust.hk Abstract: Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by scattering the light is one of the effective methods for large-area lighting applications. In this paper, we present a very simple and cost

  3. Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY)

    2007-07-17

    Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction include a light-scattering medium disposed adjacent thereto. The light-scattering medium has a light scattering anisotropy parameter g in the range from greater than zero to about 0.99, and a scatterance parameter S less than about 0.22 or greater than about 3.

  4. Glassy dynamics distinguishes chromosome organization across organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongsuk Kang; Young-Gui Yoon; D. Thirumalai; Changbong Hyeon

    2015-06-03

    Recent experiments showing scaling of the intrachromosomal contact probability, $P(s)\\sim s^{-1}$ with the genomic distance $s$, are interpreted to mean a self-similar fractal-like chromosome organization. However, scaling of $P(s)$ varies across organisms, requiring an explanation. We illustrate that dynamical arrest in a highly confined space as a discriminating marker for genome organization, by modeling chromosome inside a nucleus as a self-avoiding homopolymer confined to a sphere of varying sizes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the chain dynamics slows down as the polymer volume fraction ($\\phi$) inside the confinement approaches a critical value $\\phi_c$. Using finite size scaling analysis, we determine $\\phi_c^{\\infty}\\approx 0.44$ for a sufficiently long polymer ($N\\gg 1$). Our study shows that the onset of glassy dynamics is the reason for the formation of segregated organization in human chromosomes ($N\\approx 3\\times 10^9$, $\\phi\\gtrsim\\phi_c^{\\infty}$), whereas chromosomes of budding yeast ($N\\approx 1.2\\times 10^7$, $\\phi<\\phi_c^{\\infty}$) are equilibrated with no clear signature of such organization.

  5. Stable blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark; Giebink, Noel

    2014-08-26

    Novel combination of materials and device architectures for organic light emitting devices is provided. An organic light emitting device, is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer includes a host and a phosphorescent emissive dopant having a peak emissive wavelength less than 500 nm, and a radiative phosphorescent lifetime less than 1 microsecond. Preferably, the phosphorescent emissive dopant includes a ligand having a carbazole group.

  6. White light-emitting organic electroluminescent devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John; Duggal, Anil Raj; Parthasarathy, Gautam

    2006-06-20

    A light-emitting device comprises a light-emitting member, which comprises two electrodes, at least two organic electroluminescent ("EL") materials disposed between the electrodes, a charge blocking material disposed between the electrodes, and at least one photoluminescent ("PL") material. The light-emitting member emits electromagnetic ("EM") radiation having a first spectrum in response to a voltage applied across the two electrodes. The PL material absorbs a portion of the EM radiation emitted by the light-emitting member and emits EM radiation having second spectrum different than the first spectrum. Each of the organic EL materials emits EM radiation having a wavelength range selected from the group consisting of blue and red wavelength ranges.

  7. Method of making organic light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Janora, Kevin Henry (Schenectady, NY); Parthasarathy, Gautam (Saratoga Springs, NY); Cella, James Anthony (Clifton Park, NY); Chichak, Kelly Scott (Clifton Park, NY)

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides a method for the preparation of organic light-emitting devices comprising a bilayer structure made by forming a first film layer comprising an electroactive material and an INP precursor material, and exposing the first film layer to a radiation source under an inert atmosphere to generate an interpenetrating network polymer composition comprising the electroactive material. At least one additional layer is disposed on the reacted first film layer to complete the bilayer structure. The bilayer structure is comprised within an organic light-emitting device comprising standard features such as electrodes and optionally one or more additional layers serving as a bipolar emission layer, a hole injection layer, an electron injection layer, an electron transport layer, a hole transport layer, exciton-hole transporting layer, exciton-electron transporting layer, a hole transporting emission layer, or an electron transporting emission layer.

  8. High-Performance Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using ITO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Seng-Tiong

    High-Performance Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using ITO Anodes Grown on Plastic by Room,* Mark E. Madsen, Antonio DiVenere, and Seng-Tiong Ho Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabricated

  9. White organic light-emitting diodes: Status and perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reineke, Sebastian

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are ultrathin, large-area light sources made from organic semiconductor materials. Over the past decades, much research has been spent on finding suitable materials to realize ...

  10. Enhanced coupling of light from organic light emitting diodes using nanoporous films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enhanced coupling of light from organic light emitting diodes using nanoporous films H. J. Peng, Y the light extraction efficiency for organic light emitting diode OLED . Nanoporous alumina film was used by Bragg scattering. The corrugated light- emitting diode had two-times the efficiency as compared

  11. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Having Carbon Nanotube Anodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    , flexible anodes for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). For polymer-based OLEDs having the structure applications. Polymer and small molecule-based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are rapidly approachingOrganic Light-Emitting Diodes Having Carbon Nanotube Anodes Jianfeng Li, Liangbing Hu, Lian Wang

  12. and Self-Organization for Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAD-Drawings: Udo Schminke Photos: Kai Bröking, Irene Böttcher-Gajewski, Will Brunner, Ragnar-Organization in the Visual Cortex 10 2.1.3.2 Self-Organized Criticality in the Activity Dynamics of Neural Networks 13 2

  13. Photonic modes of organic light emitting Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    is a metallic cathode. To achieve high efficiency OLEDs a primary issue to address is how the light resultingPhotonic modes of organic light emitting structures Submitted by Peter Allen Hobson for the award of a degree by this or any other University. #12;Abstract 2 Abstract Organic light emitting diodes

  14. Light Meson Dynamics Workshop. Mini proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bijnens; R. Escribano; S. Fang; S. Giovannella; W. Gradl; C. Hanhart; B. Kubis. S. Leupold; M. F. M. Lutz; P. Masjuan; B. Moussallam; A. Neiser; E. Oset; M. Ostrick; J. R. Pelaez; S. Scherer; A. Švarc; M. Unverzagt; R. Wanke; M. Wolke

    2014-03-31

    The mini-proceedings of the Light Meson Dynamics Workshop held in Mainz from February 10th to 12th, 2014, are presented. The web page of the conference, which contains all talks, can be found at https://indico.cern.ch/event/287442/overview .

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. , NO. , 2012 1 Dynamic Driver Supply Voltage Scaling for Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Dynamic Driver Supply Voltage Scaling for Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays Donghwa Shin, Student, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Organic light emitting diode (OLED) display is a self-illuminating device]. On the other hand, an organic light emitting diode (OLED) is self-illuminating using organic light emission

  16. Fabrication of High Efficiency, Printable Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    design of OLED: Transparent Anode--ITO Glass substrate Organic layer(s) Metal Cathode Light #12;PRISMFabrication of High Efficiency, Printable Organic Light Emitting Diodes Michael AdamsMichael Adams: Design, fabricate, and characterize high efficiency OLEDs · Introduction · Background on OLEDs · Methods

  17. QCD and Light-Front Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Costa Rica U.

    2011-01-10

    AdS/QCD, the correspondence between theories in a dilaton-modified five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and confining field theories in physical space-time, provides a remarkable semiclassical model for hadron physics. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound state wavefunctions as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. Higher Fock states with extra quark-anti quark pairs also arise. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the nonperturbative effective coupling and its {beta}-function. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method to systematically include QCD interaction terms. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates. A method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level is outlined.

  18. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Organic Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells Based on Silole-Fluorene Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and to stop the well known spectral shift degradation occurring in fluorene based materials. In this paper we1 Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Organic Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells Based on Silole-Fluorene, copolymerization of siloles with fluorene was aimed at improving electron injection into the polymer layer and so

  19. Stopping of Light by the Dynamic Tuning of Photonic Crystal Slow Light Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baba, Toshihiko

    Stopping of Light by the Dynamic Tuning of Photonic Crystal Slow Light Device Yuji Saito1-cho, Chiyodaku, Tokyo 102-0075, Japan *baba@ynu.ac.jp Abstract: We propose a simple technique of stopping light pulses using a slow-light device based on photonic crystal coupled waveguide (PCCW). Dynamically tuning

  20. Dynamical model for light composite fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derman, E.

    1981-04-01

    A simple dynamical model for the internal structure of the three light lepton and quark generations (..nu../sub e/,e,u,d), (..nu../sub ..mu../,..mu..,c,s), and (..nu../sub tau/,tau,t,b) is proposed. Each generation is constructed of only one fundamental massive generation F=(L-italic/sup 0/,L/sup -/,U,D) with the same (SU/sub 3/)/sub c/ x SU/sub 2/ x U/sub 1/ quantum numbers as the light generations, bound to a core of one or more massive Higgs bosons H, where H is the single physical Higgs boson necessary for spontaneous symmetry breaking in the standard model. For example, e/sup -/=L/sup -/H), ..mu../sup -/=L/sup -/HH), tau/sup -/=L/sup -/HHH). It is shown that the known binding force due to H exchange is attractive and strong enough to produce light bound states. Dynamical calculations for the bound-state composite fermions using the Bethe-Salpeter equation, together with some phenomenological imput, suggest M/sub H/approx.16 TeV and M/sub F/approx.100 GeV. It is likely that such bound states can have properties compatible with the up to now apparently elementary appearance of known fermions, for example, their Dirac magnetic moments and absence of intergeneration radiative decays (such as ..mu -->..e..gamma..). Phenomenological consequences and tests of the model are discussed.

  1. Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells Aaswath Raman, Zongfu@stanford.edu Abstract: Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells are a promising candidate for low-cost next lying on top of the organic solar cell stack produce a 8-15% increase in photocurrent for a model

  2. Adhesion in flexible organic and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting device and solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, D.; Kwabi, D.; Akogwu, O.; Du, J. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Oyewole, O. K. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete, Kwara State (Nigeria); Tong, T. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Anye, V. C.; Rwenyagila, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Asare, J.; Fashina, A. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10, Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2014-08-21

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the adhesion between bi-material pairs that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells on flexible substrates. Adhesion between the possible bi-material pairs is measured using force microscopy (AFM) techniques. These include: interfaces that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid combinations of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results of AFM measurements are incorporated into the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model for the determination of adhesion energies. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust organic and hybrid organic/inorganic electronic devices.

  3. Improving the external extraction efficiency of organic light emitting devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, John C., 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Over the last decade Organic Light Emitting Device (OLED) technology has matured, progressing to the point where state-of-the-art OLEDs can demonstrate external extraction efficiencies that surpass those of fluorescent ...

  4. Organic Solid State Lighting | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solid State Lighting March 15, 2011 at 3pm36-428 Paul E. Burrows Reata Research burrows.p abstract: Many scientific papers and presentations in the field of organic electronic...

  5. Dynamic Organic Light Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDouble Oak,Durra Building SystemsDyke

  6. Nanoantennas for enhanced light trapping in transparent organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voroshilov, Pavel M; Belov, Pavel A

    2014-01-01

    We propose a light-trapping structure offering a significant enhancement of photovoltaic absorption in transparent organic solar cells operating at infrared while the visible light transmission keeps sufficiently high. The main mechanism of light trapping is related with the excitation of collective oscillations of the metal nanoantenna arrays, characterized by advantageous field distribution in the volume of the solar cell. It allows more than triple increase of infrared photovoltaic absorption.

  7. Surface plasmonpolariton mediated emission of light from top-emitting organic light-emitting diode type structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    .60.Jb; 72.80.Le Keywords: Surface plasmons; Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs); Microstructure 1Surface plasmon­polariton mediated emission of light from top-emitting organic light-emitting diode as significant loss channels in organic light-emitting diode devices. We present experimental data illustrating

  8. Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dynamic model of organic Rankine cycle with R245fa working fluid and conservative component efficiencies predict power generation in excess of electrical accessory load demand under highway drive cycle

  9. Organic light emitting diodes with structured electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mao, Samuel S.; Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen G.

    2012-12-04

    A cathode that contain nanostructures that extend into the organic layer of an OLED has been described. The cathode can have an array of nanotubes or a layer of nanoclusters extending out from its surface. In another arrangement, the cathode is patterned and etched to form protruding nanostructures using a standard lithographic process. Various methods for fabricating these structures are provided, all of which are compatible with large-scale manufacturing. OLEDs made with these novel electrodes have greatly enhanced electron injection, have good environmental stability.

  10. Concave-hemisphere-patterned organic top-light emitting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Slootsky, Michael; Lunt, Richard

    2014-01-21

    A first device is provided. The first device includes an organic light emitting device, which further comprises a first electrode, a second electrode, and an organic emissive layer disposed between the first and second electrode. Preferably, the second electrode is more transparent than the first electrode. The organic emissive layer has a first portion shaped to form an indentation in the direction of the first electrode, and a second portion shaped to form a protrusion in the direction of the second electrode. The first device may include a plurality of organic light emitting devices. The indentation may have a shape that is formed from a partial sphere, a partial cylinder, a pyramid, or a pyramid with a mesa, among others. The protrusions may be formed between adjoining indentations or between an indentation and a surface parallel to the substrate.

  11. Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  12. Mechanically flexible organic electroluminescent device with directional light emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Schaepkens, Marc

    2005-05-10

    A mechanically flexible and environmentally stable organic electroluminescent ("EL") device with directional light emission comprises an organic EL member disposed on a flexible substrate, a surface of which is coated with a multilayer barrier coating which includes at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent organic polymer and at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent inorganic material. The device includes a reflective metal layer disposed on the organic EL member opposite to the substrate. The reflective metal layer provides an increased external quantum efficiency of the device. The reflective metal layer and the multilayer barrier coating form a seal around the organic EL member to reduce the degradation of the device due to environmental elements.

  13. Phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with high efficiency and brightness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-11-12

    An organic light emitting device including a) an anode; b) a cathode; and c) an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode, the emissive layer comprising an organic host compound and a phosphorescent compound exhibiting a Stokes Shift overlap greater than 0.3 eV. The organic light emitting device may further include a hole transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the anode; and an electron transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the cathode. In some embodiments, the phosphorescent compound exhibits a phosphorescent lifetime of less than 10 .mu.s. In some embodiments, the concentration of the phosphorescent compound ranges from 0.5 wt. % to 10 wt. %.

  14. Light trapping in a 30-nm organic photovoltaic cell for efficient carrier collection and light absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Banerjee, Ashish; Osgood, Richard M; Englund, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We describe surface patterning strategies that permit high photon-collection efficiency together with high carrier-collection efficiency in an ultra-thin planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell. Optimized designs reach up to 50% photon collection efficiency in a P3HT layer of only 30 nm, representing a 3- to 5-fold improvement over an unpatterned cell of the same thickness. We compare the enhancement of light confinement in the active layer with an ITO top layer for TE and TM polarized light, and demonstrate that the light absorption can increase by a factor of 2 due to a gap-plasmon mode in the active layer.

  15. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  16. Organic light emitting device structure for obtaining chromaticity stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tung, Yeh-Jiun (Princeton, NJ); Ngo, Tan (Levittown, PA)

    2007-05-01

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The devices of the present invention are efficient white or multicolored phosphorescent OLEDs which have a high color stability over a wide range of luminances. The devices of the present invention comprise an emissive region having at least two emissive layers, with each emissive layer comprising a different host and emissive dopant, wherein at least one of the emissive dopants emits by phosphorescence.

  17. Static and Dynamic Light Scattering G. C. Berry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnikova, Maria

    copolymers or very low molecular weight polymers), for polyelectrolytes dissolved in an electrolyte9/23/97 Static and Dynamic Light Scattering G. C. Berry Department of Chemistry Carnegie Mellon 1 SCATTERING RELATIONS 2 Scattered Intensity Measures 2 Static Scattering Relations 2 Dynamic

  18. Numerical Modelling of Light Emission and Propagation in (Organic) LEDs with the Green's Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    light emitting diodes, light emission, light extraction, dipole radiation, stratified media, layered surpasses incandescent sources by a factor of 2 and with further improvements light emitting diodes could on light extraction techniques from inorganic light emitting diodes we recommend chapter 5 in 1 . Organic

  19. Injection and transport processes in organic light emitting diodes based on N. Huby a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Injection and transport processes in organic light emitting diodes based on a silole. N. Huby a- conductors in light emitting diodes1 . The different fields of research around the organic electronic allowed

  20. NDN, VOLUME TRANSMISSION, AND SELF-ORGANIZATION IN BRAIN DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Walter J.

    NDN, VOLUME TRANSMISSION, AND SELF- ORGANIZATION IN BRAIN DYNAMICS WALTER J FREEMAN Department for the field synchrony: electric fields; magnetic fields; electromagnetic fields (radio waves); diffusion transmission by nonsynaptic diffusion transmission, in concert with the self- organization of the textured

  1. Enhancement of Barrier Properties Using Ultrathin Hybrid Passivation Layer for Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Sung Woo

    acrylate layer and MS-31 (MgO : SiO2 ¼ 3 : 1 wt %) layer was adopted in organic light emitting diode (OLED the penetrations of oxygen and moisture. [DOI: 10.1143/JJAP.45.5970] KEYWORDS: organic light emitting diode (OLED. Introduction As a next generation display, the organic light emitting diode (OLED) has to great performances

  2. Effective intermediate layers for highly efficient stacked organic light-emitting devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    studied in stacked organic light-emitting devices OLEDs . Stacked OLEDs with two identical emissive units organic light-emitting diode OLED device.1­3 The first three-color SOLED was reported in 1997, in whichEffective intermediate layers for highly efficient stacked organic light-emitting devices J. X. Sun

  3. Vanadium pentoxide modified polycrystalline silicon anode for active-matrix organic light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be an efficient anode for organic light-emitting diode OLED X. L. Zhu, J. X. Sun, H. J. Peng, Z. G. Meng, M. Wong of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2099520 Organic light-emitting diodes OLEDs have attracted wide attention dueVanadium pentoxide modified polycrystalline silicon anode for active-matrix organic light

  4. High-efficiency microcavity top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes using silver anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -film transistors can be bur- ied under the organic light-emitting diode OLED .3 Thus, complicated pixel circuitsHigh-efficiency microcavity top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes using silver anode Huajun February 2006 Top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes TOLEDs employing highly reflective Ag as anode

  5. DNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    -7707 USA. We report on the use of nucleic acid bases (NBs) in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). NBs. DNA has been used in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs)4,5,7­14 yielding significant increasesDNA Bases Thymine and Adenine in Bio-Organic Light Emitting Diodes Eliot F. Gomez1 , Vishak

  6. Comparative study of metal or oxide capped indiumtin oxide anodes for organic light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1556184 I. INTRODUCTION Organic light-emitting diodes OLEDs 1 are challengingComparative study of metal or oxide capped indium­tin oxide anodes for organic light as anodes in organic light-emitting diodes based on N,N -diphenyl-N,N bis 3-methyl-phenyl-1,1 -biphenyl-4

  7. Dynamic Solid State Lighting Matthew Aldrich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of domains, environments, sensors, and actuators to dynamically miti- gate energy usage while attaining Submitted to the Program in Media Arts and Sciences, School of Architecture and Planning, in partial Submitted to the Program in Media Arts and Sciences, School of Architecture and Planning, on May 7, 2010

  8. Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electrically doped microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzeo, M., E-mail: marco.mazzeo@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Genco, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gambino, S. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy); Ballarini, D.; Mangione, F.; Sanvitto, D. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Di Stefano, O.; Patanè, S.; Savasta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d'Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Gigli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-09

    The coupling of the electromagnetic field with an electronic transition gives rise, for strong enough light-matter interactions, to hybrid states called exciton-polaritons. When the energy exchanged between light and matter becomes a significant fraction of the material transition energy an extreme optical regime called ultrastrong coupling (USC) is achieved. We report a microcavity embedded p-i-n monolithic organic light emitting diode working in USC, employing a thin film of squaraine dye as active layer. A normalized coupling ratio of 30% has been achieved at room temperature. These USC devices exhibit a dispersion-less angle-resolved electroluminescence that can be exploited for the realization of innovative optoelectronic devices. Our results may open the way towards electrically pumped polariton lasers.

  9. Efficient Light Extraction from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Plasmonic Scattering Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothberg, Lewis

    2012-11-30

    Our project addressed the DOE MYPP 2020 goal to improve light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to 75% (Core task 6.3). As noted in the 2010 MYPP, “the greatest opportunity for improvement is in the extraction of light from [OLED] panels”. There are many approaches to avoiding waveguiding limitations intrinsic to the planar OLED structure including use of textured substrates, microcavity designs and incorporating scattering layers into the device structure. We have chosen to pursue scattering layers since it addresses the largest source of loss which is waveguiding in the OLED itself. Scattering layers also have the potential to be relatively robust to color, polarization and angular distributions. We note that this can be combined with textured or microlens decorated substrates to achieve additional enhancement.

  10. Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes: a promising molecular design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes Light Emitting Diode (OLED), intermolecular p­p interactions should be usually suppressed to avoid any Emitting Diodes (SMOLEDs) is almost absent from the literature. In this work, three aryl-substituted Di

  11. Dynamical synapses causing self-organized criticality in neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Dynamical synapses causing self-organized criticality in neural networks A. LEVINA1,2,3 , J more realistic) dynamical synapses14 in a spiking neural network, the neuronal avalanches turn from dynamics is robust to parameter changes. Consider a network of N integrate-and-fire neurons. Each neuron

  12. Efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes employing thermally activated delayed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes employing thermally activated delayed fluorescence,2 * Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) employing thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) have energy is high enough and the 3 LE state is higher than the 3 CT state. O rganic light-emitting diodes

  13. Efficient organic light-emitting diodes using polycrystalline silicon thin films as semitransparent anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1063/1.2032604 Organic light-emitting diodes OLED have attracted much interest due to their potential application in flat with silicon microdisplay OLED.8,9 However, silicon has high absorption in the visible light which greatlyEfficient organic light-emitting diodes using polycrystalline silicon thin films as semitransparent

  14. 22.3 / H. J. Peng 22.3: High Efficiency Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an organic light emitting diode (OLEDs) based on tris(phenyl pyridine)iridium [Ir(ppy)3]. Using. The improvement is due to a carefully designed microcavity. 1. Introduction Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs rate can be enhanced due to Purcell effect. Therefore, a microcaivty OLED should emit more light than

  15. Fabrication of color tunable organic light-emitting diodes by an alignment free mask patterning method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposed for fabricating the side-by- side color tunable organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs-voltage organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in 1987 [1], OLEDs have attracted much attention for the application of the white light OLEDs can be as high as 100 lm/W at a illumination level of 1000 cd/m2 [2], which is beyond

  16. Blue fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with multilayered graphene anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Joohyun [OLED Lighting Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)] [OLED Lighting Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hong Kyw [Graphene Electronics Creative Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)] [Graphene Electronics Creative Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jaehyun; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Han, Jun-Han; Cho, Doo-Hee; Huh, Jin Woo [OLED Lighting Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)] [OLED Lighting Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung-Yool [Graphene Electronics Creative Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)] [Graphene Electronics Creative Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Ik, E-mail: jiklee@etri.re.kr [OLED Lighting Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)] [OLED Lighting Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Chu, Hye Yong [OLED Lighting Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)] [OLED Lighting Research Team, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    As an innovative anode for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), we have investigated graphene films. Graphene has importance due to its huge potential in flexible OLED applications. In this work, graphene films have been catalytically grown and transferred to the glass substrate for OLED fabrications. We have successfully fabricated 2 mm × 2 mm device area blue fluorescent OLEDs with graphene anodes which showed 2.1% of external quantum efficiency at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. This is the highest value reported among fluorescent OLEDs using graphene anodes. Oxygen plasma treatment on graphene has been found to improve hole injections in low voltage regime, which has been interpreted as oxygen plasma induced work function modification. However, plasma treatment also increases the sheet resistance of graphene, limiting the maximum luminance. In summary, our works demonstrate the practical possibility of graphene as an anode material for OLEDs and suggest a processing route which can be applied to various graphene related devices.

  17. Organic light emitting device architecture for reducing the number of organic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Andrade, Brian (Westampton, NJ); Esler, James (Levittown, PA)

    2011-10-18

    An organic light emitting device is provided. The device includes an anode and a cathode. A first emissive layer is disposed between the anode and the cathode. The first emissive layer includes a first non-emitting organic material, which is an organometallic material present in the first emissive layer in a concentration of at least 50 wt %. The first emissive layer also includes a first emitting organic material. A second emissive layer is disposed between the first emissive layer and the cathode, preferably, in direct contact with the first emissive layer. The second emissive material includes a second non-emitting organic material and a second emitting organic material. The first and second non-emitting materials, and the first and second emitting materials, are all different materials. A first non-emissive layer is disposed between the first emissive layer and the anode, and in direct contact with the first emissive layer. The first non- emissive layer comprises the first non-emissive organic material.

  18. Soft holographic interference lithography microlens for enhanced organic light emitting diode light extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Joong-Mok; Gan, Zhengqing; Leung, Wai Y.; Liu, Rui; Ye, Zhuo; Constant, Kristen; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2011-06-06

    Very uniform 2 {micro}m-pitch square microlens arrays ({micro}LAs), embossed on the blank glass side of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated 1.1 mm-thick glass, are used to enhance light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by {approx}100%, significantly higher than enhancements reported previously. The array design and size relative to the OLED pixel size appear to be responsible for this enhancement. The arrays are fabricated by very economical soft lithography imprinting of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold (itself obtained from a Ni master stamp that is generated from holographic interference lithography of a photoresist) on a UV-curable polyurethane drop placed on the glass. Green and blue OLEDs are then fabricated on the ITO to complete the device. When the {mu}LA is {approx}15 x 15 mm{sup 2}, i.e., much larger than the {approx}3 x 3 mm{sup 2} OLED pixel, the electroluminescence (EL) in the forward direction is enhanced by {approx}100%. Similarly, a 19 x 25 mm{sup 2} {mu}LA enhances the EL extracted from a 3 x 3 array of 2 x 2 mm{sup 2} OLED pixels by 96%. Simulations that include the effects of absorption in the organic and ITO layers are in accordance with the experimental results and indicate that a thinner 0.7 mm thick glass would yield a {approx}140% enhancement.

  19. Functional Polymer Architectures for Solution Processed Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Daniel Andrew

    2010-01-01

    developing new OLED displays and lighting devices withOLED technology has reached a point where highly efficient thin film devices which rival other lighting

  20. The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwang-Ohk Cheon

    2003-08-05

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either {alpha}-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance.

  1. Low Voltage, Low Power Organic Light Emitting Transistors for AMOLED Displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Liu, B. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Donoghue, E. P. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Kim, D. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Reynolds, J. R. [University of Florida, Gainesville; So, Franky [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rinzler, A. G. [University of Florida, Gainesville

    2011-01-01

    Low voltage, low power dissipation, high aperture ratio organic light emitting transistors are demonstrated. The high level of performance is enabled by a carbon nanotube source electrode that permits integration of the drive transistor and the organic light emitting diode into an efficient single stacked device. Given the demonstrated performance, this technology could break the technical logjam holding back widespread deployment of active matrix organic light emitting displays at flat panel screen sizes.

  2. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-09-08

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  3. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising approach for display and solid state lighting applications. However, further work is needed in establishing the availability of efficient and stable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising approach for display and solid state lighting organic light emitting diode (MOLED), significant enhancement in the external quantum efficiency & Engineering Doctoral Defense Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes with Platinum Complexes Jeremy Ecton

  4. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

  5. Efficiency improvement of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes using semitransparent Ag as anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency improvement of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes using semitransparent Ag The emission efficiency in an organic light-emitting diode OLED based on fac tris phenyl pyridine iridium Ir current efficiency of 81 cd/A and a power efficiency of 79 lm/W, compared with 46 cd/A and 39 lm

  6. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillermo Bazan; Alexander Mikhailovsky

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop the fundamental understanding and practical techniques for enhancement of Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) performance by utilizing radiative decay control technology. Briefly, the main technical goal is the acceleration of radiative recombination rate in organometallic triplet emitters by using the interaction with surface plasmon resonances in noble metal nanostructures. Increased photonic output will enable one to eliminate constraints imposed on PhOLED efficiency by triplet-triplet annihilation, triplet-polaron annihilation, and saturation of chromophores with long radiative decay times. Surface plasmon enhanced (SPE) PhOLEDs will operate more efficiently at high injection current densities and will be less prone to degradation mechanisms. Additionally, introduction of metal nanostructures into PhOLEDs may improve their performance due to the improvement of the charge transport through organic layers via multiple possible mechanisms ('electrical bridging' effects, doping-like phenomena, etc.). SPE PhOLED technology is particularly beneficial for solution-fabricated electrophosphorescent devices. Small transition moment of triplet emitters allows achieving a significant enhancement of the emission rate while keeping undesirable quenching processes introduced by the metal nanostructures at a reasonably low level. Plasmonic structures can be introduced easily into solution-fabricated PhOLEDs by blending and spin coating techniques and can be used for enhancement of performance in existing device architectures. This constitutes a significant benefit for a large scale fabrication of PhOLEDs, e.g. by roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Besides multieexciton annihilation, the power efficacy of PhOLEDs is often limited by high operational bias voltages required for overcoming built-in potential barriers to injection and transport of electrical charges through a device. This problem is especially pronounced in solution processed OLEDs lacking the accuracy and precision of fabrication found in their small molecule counterparts. From this point of view, it seems beneficial to develop materials allowing reduction of the operation bias voltage via improvement of the charge injection. The materials sought have to be compatible with solution-based fabrication process and allow easy incorporation of metal nanostructures.

  7. Organic optoelectronic devices have remained a research topic of great interest over the past two decades, particularly in the development of efficient organic photovoltaics (OPV) and organic light emitting diodes (OLED). In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    emitting diodes (OLED). In order to improve the efficiency, stability, and materials variety for organic decades, particularly in the development of efficient organic photovoltaics (OPV) and organic light

  8. Direct nanoimprint of submicron organic light-emitting structures Jian Wang, Xiaoyun Sun, Lei Chen, and Stephen Y. Choua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    light-emitting diodes OLED , organic flat panel dis- plays, and organic lasers have been under intensiveDirect nanoimprint of submicron organic light-emitting structures Jian Wang, Xiaoyun Sun, Lei Chen demonstrated a method to directly pattern organic light-emitting structures with a submicron resolution without

  9. Adhesion and degradation of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic light-emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momodu, D. Y.; Chioh, A. V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Federal Capital Territory, Abuja (Nigeria); Tong, T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Zebaze Kana, M. G. [Physics Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex, Abuja (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Federal Capital Territory, Abuja (Nigeria); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical, computational, and experimental study of adhesion and degradation of Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLEDs). The adhesion between layers that are relevant to OLEDs is studied using an atomic force microscopy technique. The interfacial failure mechanisms associated with blister formation in OLEDs and those due to the addition of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles into the active regions are then elucidated using a combination of fracture mechanics, finite element modeling and experiments. The blisters observed in the models are shown to be consistent with the results from adhesion, interfacial fracture mechanics models, and prior reports of diffusion-assisted phenomena. The implications of the work are then discussed for the design of OLED structures with improved lifetimes and robustness.

  10. Structurally Integrated Photoluminescence-Based Lactate Sensor Using Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLEDs) as the Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chengliang Qian

    2006-08-09

    Multianalyte bio(chemical) sensors are extensively researched for monitoring analytes in complex systems, such as blood serum. As a step towards developing such multianalyte sensors, we studied a novel, structurally integrated, organic light emitting device (OLED)-based sensing platform for detection of lactate. Lactate biosensors have attracted numerous research efforts, due to their wide applications in clinical diagnosis, athletic training and food industry. The OLED-based sensor is based on monitoring the oxidation reaction of lactate, which is catalyzed by the lactate oxidase (LOX) enzyme. The sensing component is based on an oxygen-sensitive dye, Platinum octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP), whose photoluminescence (PL) lifetime {tau} decreases as the oxygen level increases. The PtOEP dye was embedded in a thin film polystyrene (PS) matrix; the LOX was dissolved in solution or immobilized in a sol-gel matrix. {tau} was measured as a function of the lactate concentration; as the lactate concentration increases, {tau} increases due to increased oxygen consumption. The sensors performance is discussed in terms of the detection sensitivity, dynamic range, and response time. A response time of {approx}32 sec was achieved when the LOX was dissolved in solution and kept in a closed cell. Steps towards development of a multianalyte sensor array using an array of individually addressable OLED pixels were also presented.

  11. Image-based Dynamic Lighting Control Jun SHINGU , Yoshinari KAMEDA , Masayuki MUKUNOKI ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kameda, Yoshinari

    Image-based Dynamic Lighting Control Jun SHINGU , Yoshinari KAMEDA , Masayuki MUKUNOKI , Koh, it is important to shoot target objects under an appropriate lighting. If the lighting is inappropriate be seen. We propose a method to control lighting automatically to keep the image brightness of the target

  12. Supporting Decentralized, Security focused Dynamic Virtual Organizations across the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Supporting Decentralized, Security focused Dynamic Virtual Organizations across the Grid R and subsequently manage secure virtual organisations (VO) is one of the key challenges facing the Grid community in the education domain. We believe that this federated VO security model for fine grained access to Grid services

  13. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  14. 4.2: Design of an Improved Pixel for a Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4.2: Design of an Improved Pixel for a Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) pixel with high pixel to pixel luminance uniformity such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are presently of great interest due to their potential application

  15. Vacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Hsin-Fei

    -coated organic light-emitting diode is transferred from a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold by lamination, or blade coating [1,2] for organic light emitting diode (OLED) as well as solar cell. The top electrodeVacuum-free lamination of low work function cathode for efficient solution-processed organic light-emitting

  16. Top-emitting Organic Light-Emitting Diode with a Cap Layer Chengfeng Qiu, Huajun Peng, Haiying Chen, Zhilang Xie,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Kowloon, Hong Kong, China ABSTRACT For top emitting Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLED), the study of top layer. INTRODUCTION Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) [1] is challenging liquid-crystal display (LCD8.4.4-86 Top-emitting Organic Light-Emitting Diode with a Cap Layer Chengfeng Qiu, Huajun Peng

  17. Enhanced emission efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes using deoxyribonucleic acid complex as an electron blocking layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    as an integral element of organic light-emitting diodes OLED . Devices that incorporate DNA thin films#12;Enhanced emission efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes using deoxyribonucleic acid as an electron blocking EB material has been demonstrated in both green- and blue-emitting organic light

  18. AC-driven, color-and brightness-tunable organic light-emitting diodes constructed from an electron only device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    - and brightness-tunable organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is reported. This OLED was realized by inserting emission from an organic light- emitting diode (OLED) [1] results from the electron/hole recombinationAC-driven, color- and brightness-tunable organic light-emitting diodes constructed from an electron

  19. Using a low-index host layer to increase emission from organic light-emitting diode structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    The out-coupling efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) may be significantly increased by use.60.Jb; 72.80.Le Keywords: Organic light-emitting diode (OLED); Out-coupling efficiency; Refractive index organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), with a large amount of this work centring on the efficiency

  20. 47.2 / C. F. Qiu 47.2: Hole Injection and Power Efficiency of Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been obtained. 1. Introduction Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is challenging liquid- crystal (LC47.2 / C. F. Qiu 47.2: Hole Injection and Power Efficiency of Organic Light Emitting Diodes- metal layer such as, carbon, gallium, silicon, has been used as hole-injecting anode in organic light

  1. P-107 / C.F. Qiu P-107: Very Bright and Efficient Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction Organic-light emitting diodes (OLEDs) as pixels for flat- panel displays are being hotly pursuedP-107 / C.F. Qiu P-107: Very Bright and Efficient Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diode and Technology Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract The characteristics of an organic light

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 49, NO. 6, JUNE 2002 991 Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manufacturing practice, it is far from ideal. Organic light- emitting diodes (OLEDs) [1] are being hotly pursuedIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 49, NO. 6, JUNE 2002 991 Active-Matrix Organic Light, particularly in terms of current-drive and parameter uniformity, for ac- tive-matrix organic light

  3. Physical properties and design of light-emitting devices based on organic materials and nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anikeeva, Polina Olegovna

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the detailed experimental and theoretical characterization of light-emitting devices (LEDs) based on organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots (QDs). This hybrid material system has several ...

  4. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy transfer...

  5. High Efficiency White Organic Light Emission Device Based On New Orange Phosphorescence Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Efficiency White Organic Light Emission Device Based On New Orange Phosphorescence Material University, Kowloon, Hong Kong ABSTRACT White light emitting device based on a new orange phosphorescent fabricated. The white OLED consists of it and a blue phosphorescent material FIrPic (iridum-bis(4

  6. Electroluminescence property of organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Özdemir, Orhan; Kavak, Pelin; Saatci, A. Evrim; Gökdemir, F. P?nar; Menda, U. Deneb; Can, Nursel; Kutlu, Kubilay; Tekin, Emine; Pravadal?, Selin

    2013-12-16

    Transport properties of electrons and holes were investigated not only in a anthracene-containing poly(p-phenylene-ethynylene)- alt - poly(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPE-PPV) polymer (AnE-PVstat) light emitting diodes (OLED) but also in an ITO/Ag/polymer/Ag electron and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer/Au hole only devices. Mobility of injected carriers followed the Poole-Frenkel type conduction mechanism and distinguished in the frequency range due to the difference of transit times in admittance measurement. Beginning of light output took place at the turn-on voltage (or flat band voltage), 1.8 V, which was the difference of energy band gap of polymer and two barrier offsets between metals and polymer.

  7. Resonant cavity enhanced light harvesting in flexible thin-film organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    Resonant cavity enhanced light harvesting in flexible thin-film organic solar cells Nicholas P of solar energy conversion be- cause they use thin films of photoactive material and can be manufactured and photocurrent in flexible organic solar cells. We demonstrate that this enhancement is attributed to a broadband

  8. Dynamical quark loop light-by-light contribution to muon g-2 within the nonlocal chiral quark model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Dorokhov; A. E. Radzhabov; A. S. Zhevlakov

    2015-07-24

    The hadronic corrections to the muon anomalous magnetic moment a_mu, due to the gauge-invariant set of diagrams with dynamical quark loop light-by-light scattering insertions, are calculated in the framework of the nonlocal chiral quark model. These results complete calculations of all hadronic light-by-light scattering contributions to a_mu in the leading order in the 1/Nc expansion. The result for the quark loop contribution is a_mu^{HLbL,Loop}=(11.0+-0.9)*10^(-10), and the total result is a_mu^{HLbL,NxQM}=(16.8+-1.2)*10^(-10).

  9. Intermediate connector for stacked organic light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Andrade, Brian

    2013-02-12

    A device is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an intermediate connector disposed between the anode and the cathode. A first organic layer including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the anode and the intermediate connector, and a second including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the intermediate connector and the cathode. The intermediate connector includes a first metal having a work function lower than 4.0 eV and a second metal having a work function lower than 5.0 eV. The work function of the first metal is at least 0.5 eV less than the work function of the second metal. The first metal is in contact with a sublayer of the second organic layer that includes a material well adapted to receive holes from a low work function metal.

  10. Precomputed Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Rendering in Dynamic, Low-Frequency Lighting Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Precomputed Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Rendering in Dynamic, Low-Frequency Lighting a new, real-time method for rendering diffuse and glossy objects in low-frequency lighting environments-frequency incident lighting into transferred radiance which includes global effects like shadows and interreflections

  11. High-density organic light emitting diodes by nanoimprint technology Krutarth Trivedi, Caleb Nelson, Li Tao, Mathew Goeckner, Walter Hua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wenchuang "Walter"

    High-density organic light emitting diodes by nanoimprint technology Krutarth Trivedi, Caleb Nelson sources. Despite the considerable development of inorganic semiconductor based light emitting diodes of miniaturization to nanoscale. Organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology is immune to quantum confinement

  12. The synthesis, characterization and electroluminescent properties of zinc(II) complexes for single-layer organic light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    reserved. 1. Introduction Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are making significant advances in flat are in commercial volume production [3]. In a typical OLED, a hole transporter, an electron transporter, and a light-layer organic light-emitting diodes He-Ping Zeng a,*, Guang-Rong Wang a , Gong-Chang Zeng c , Jing Li a

  13. 11.4 / H. J. Peng 11.4: Coupling Efficiency Enhancement of Organic Light Emitting Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the coupling efficiency of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is studied. Refractive microlens arrays as mask. Over 65% more light is extracted from the OLED on the microlens array substrate as compared by the microlens array. 1. Introduction High efficiency organic light emitting diodes (OLED) are required

  14. Transflective device with a transparent organic light-emitting diode and a reflective liquid-crystal device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    based on a hybrid structure consisting of a trans- parent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) stacked Introduction The organic light-emitting diode (OLED) holds great prom- ise as a display technology due of the ambient light by using an OLED and RLCD under dark and bright ambient, respectively. Also, an emi

  15. 1 Fully Printed Separated Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistor Circuits 2 and Its Application in Organic Light Emitting Diode Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    attention. Recently, the 27 organic light emitting diode (OLED)3 has shed new light on this 28 realm in Organic Light Emitting Diode Control 3 Pochiang Chen,,|| Yue Fu,,|| Radnoosh Aminirad,,§ Chuan Wang, Jialu. Compared to LCD, OLED has lightweight, compatibility 29 with flexible plastic substrate, wide viewing

  16. Light-Triggered Myosin Activation for Probing Dynamic Cellular Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goguen, Brenda N.

    Shining light on myosin: The incorporation of a caging group onto the essential phosphoserine residue of myosin by protein semisynthesis enables light-triggered activation of the protein (see picture). Caging eliminates ...

  17. Very high efficiency phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices by using rough indium tin oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Aziz, Hany, E-mail: h2aziz@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2014-07-07

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) is shown to significantly depend on the roughness of the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. By using rougher ITO, light trapped in the ITO/organic wave-guided mode can be efficiently extracted, and a light outcoupling enhancement as high as 40% is achieved. Moreover, contrary to expectations, the lifetime of OLEDs is not affected by ITO roughness. Finally, an OLED employing rough ITO anode that exhibits a current efficiency of 56?cd/A at the remarkably high brightness of 10{sup 5}?cd/m{sup 2} is obtained. This represents the highest current efficiency at such high brightness to date for an OLED utilizing an ITO anode, without any external light outcoupling techniques. The results demonstrate the significant efficiency benefits of using ITO with higher roughness in OLEDs.

  18. Organic light-emitting device with a phosphor-sensitized fluorescent emission layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen (Ann Arbor, MI); Kanno, Hiroshi (Osaka, JP)

    2009-08-25

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters. The emissive region of the devices of the present invention comprise at least one phosphor-sensitized layer which has a combined emission from a phosphorescent emitter and a fluorescent emitter. In preferred embodiments, the invention relates to white-emitting OLEDS (WOLEDs).

  19. Enhancing the emission directionality of organic light-emitting diodes by using photonic microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shuyu; Turnbull, Graham A., E-mail: gat@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: idws@st-andrews.ac.uk; Samuel, Ifor D. W., E-mail: gat@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: idws@st-andrews.ac.uk [Organic Semiconductor Centre, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)] [Organic Semiconductor Centre, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-18

    We report microstructured organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with directional emission based on efficient solution-processable europium-OLEDs patterned by solvent assisted microcontact molding. The angle dependence of the light emission is characterized for OLEDs with square-array photonic crystals with periods between 275?nm and 335?nm. The microstructured devices have emission patterns strongly modified from the Lambertian emission of planar OLEDs and can approximately double the emitted power in a desired angle range in both s- and p-polarizations. The modified emission is attributed to light diffracted out of the waveguide modes of the OLEDs.

  20. 5-23 Photonics MTL Annual Research Report 2008 Micro-patterning Organic Thin Films via Contact Stamp Lift-off for Organic Light-emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an ambient environment, although a nitrogen environment is preferred for organic light-emitting device (OLED Stamp Lift-off for Organic Light-emitting Device Arrays J Yu, V Bulovi Sponsor: CMSE, PECASE Patterning) fabrication. This technique is applied to pattern 13 micron-sized features of a two-color OLED structure

  1. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon...

  2. Light Bridge in a Developing Active Region. I. Observation of Light Bridge and its Dynamic Activity Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toriumi, Shin; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01

    Light bridges, the bright structures that divide the umbra of sunspots and pores into smaller pieces, are known to produce wide variety of activity events in solar active regions (ARs). It is also known that the light bridges appear in the assembling process of nascent sunspots. The ultimate goal of this series of papers is to reveal the nature of light bridges in developing ARs and the occurrence of activity events associated with the light bridge structures from both observational and numerical approaches. In this first paper, exploiting the observational data obtained by Hinode, IRIS, and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we investigate the detailed structure of the light bridge in NOAA AR 11974 and its dynamic activity phenomena. As a result, we find that the light bridge has a weak, horizontal magnetic field, which is transported from the interior by large-scale convective upflow and is surrounded by strong, vertical fields of adjacent pores. In the chromosphere above the bridge, a transient brightening ...

  3. Supplementary material1 Water-Soluble Organic Aerosol Material and the Light-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Supplementary material1 2 3 4 Water-Soluble Organic Aerosol Material and the Light-5 Absorption., (2010) Fig. 1S.36 37 Reference38 Zhang, X., A. Hecobian, M. Zheng, N. Frank, and R. J. Weber, Biomass measurements,40 MODIS fire counts and PMF analysis, Atm. Chem. Phys. Disc., 10, 7037-7077, 2010.41 42 #12;2 1 2

  4. Dynamics Displayed by Energetic C60 Bombardment of Metal Overlayers on an Organic Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zbigniew, Postawa

    in organic light- emitting diodes (OLED).5 However, metal layers have also been applied in developing organic used successfully to depth profile through OLED type devices using large gas cluster ion beams

  5. Exploration of High Dynamic Range Photography As a Useful Tool for Lighting Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saifan, Mariam

    2014-12-31

    This thesis introduces a camera-aided imaging method, better known as high dynamic range (HDR) photography, and how this method could potentially help improve the quality of lighting design analysis. The imaging method captures 18 million luminance...

  6. Polarization fields: dynamic light field display using multi-layer LCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanman, Douglas

    We introduce polarization field displays as an optically-efficient design for dynamic light field display using multi-layered LCDs. Such displays consist of a stacked set of liquid crystal panels with a single pair of ...

  7. Static-light mesons on a dynamical anisotropic lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Foley; Alan O Cais; Mike Peardon; Sinead M Ryan

    2006-10-09

    We present results for the spectrum of static-light mesons from Nf=2 lattice QCD. These results were obtained using all-to-all light quark propagators on an anisotropic lattice, yielding an improved signal resolution when compared to more conventional lattice techniques. In particular, we consider the inversion of orbitally-excited multiplets with respect to the `standard ordering', which has been predicted by some quark models.

  8. A novel class of phosphorescent gold(III) alkynyl-based organic light-emitting devices with tunable colour{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the roles of electrophosphorescent emitters or dopants of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with highA novel class of phosphorescent gold(III) alkynyl-based organic light-emitting devices with tunable brightness and efficiency. There have been significant improvements in OLED efficiencies by using

  9. DATA COLLECTION FOR DEVELOPING A DYNAMIC MODEL OF A LIGHT HELICOPTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DATA COLLECTION FOR DEVELOPING A DYNAMIC MODEL OF A LIGHT HELICOPTER Stefano Geluardi 1,2 , Frank for Biological Cybernetics the influence of an augmented system on helicopter pilots with limited flight skills are necessary to identify the helicopter dynamic model. The mathematical and technical tools used to reach

  10. Highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes with a silole-based compound Center for Display Research, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the emission efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes OLED . For con- ventional undoped small-molecule OLEDHighly efficient organic light-emitting diodes with a silole-based compound H. Y. Chen Center Efficient light emission was obtained in a silole-based organic light-emitting diode. A high luminous

  11. Single-layer organic light-emitting diodes using naphthyl diamine S. C. Tse, K. K. Tsung, and S. K. Soa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Shu K.

    , was employed to fabricate single-layer organic light-emitting diodes OLEDs . With a quasi-Ohmic anode, NPB. DOI: 10.1063/1.2740110 Organic light-emitting diodes OLEDs are thin, light- weight, and powerSingle-layer organic light-emitting diodes using naphthyl diamine S. C. Tse, K. K. Tsung, and S. K

  12. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  13. Organic Light Emitting Diodes Using a Ga:ZnO Anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.; Burrows, Paul E.

    2008-05-12

    We report the application of gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) films as anodes in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Pulsed laser deposited GZO films of differing Ga composition are examined. Bilayer OLEDs using GZO and indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes are then compared. Relative to ITO, the GZO anodes have slightly better sheet resistance and transparency in the visible spectral region. Device data suggest GZO results in more effective hole injection into an aromatic triamine hole transporting layer. Indium free anodes are expected toimprove OLED stability while lowering the cost per unit area, crucial for OLED based lighting applications.

  14. FEATURE ARTICLE Femtosecond Dynamics of Electrons Photoinjected into Organic Semiconductors at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Charles B.

    FEATURE ARTICLE Femtosecond Dynamics of Electrons Photoinjected into Organic Semiconductors, 2001 The layer dependent evolution of the unoccupied electronic structure and electron dynamics be assigned as either image potential states or electron affinity (EA) levels, but rather as hybridized EA

  15. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Min

    2011-11-30

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to other OLEDs' attributes such as mechanical flexibility and potential low cost), the OLED technology is promising to successfully compete with current technologies, such as LCDs and inorganic LEDs.

  16. Static-light hadrons on a dynamical anisotropic lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Foley; Alan O Cais; Mike Peardon; Sinead M. Ryan; Jon-Ivar Skullerud

    2005-11-02

    We present preliminary results for the static-light meson and baryon spectra for $N_f=2$ QCD. The study is performed on an anisotropic lattice and uses a new all-to-all propagator method allowing us to determine particle masses to a high precision.

  17. Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDS) and Their Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gang Li

    2003-12-12

    Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDs), both small molecular and polymeric have been studied extensively since the first efficient small molecule OLED was reported by Tang and VanSlyke in 1987. Burroughes' report on conjugated polymer-based OLEDs led to another track in OLED development. These developments have resulted in full color, highly efficient (up to {approx} 20% external efficiency 60 lm/W power efficiency for green emitters), and highly bright (> 140,000 Cd/m{sup 2} DC, {approx}2,000,000 Cd/m{sup 2} AC), stable (>40,000 hr at 5 mA/cm{sup 2}) devices. OLEDs are Lambertian emitters, which intrinsically eliminates the view angle problem of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Thus OLEDs are beginning to compete with the current dominant LCDs in information display. Numerous companies are now active in this field, including large companies such as Pioneer, Toyota, Estman Kodak, Philipps, DuPont, Samsung, Sony, Toshiba, and Osram, and small companies like Cambridge Display Technology (CDT), Universal Display Corporation (UDC), and eMagin. The first small molecular display for vehicular stereos was introduced in 1998, and polymer OLED displays have begun to appear in commercial products. Although displays are the major application for OLEDs at present, they are also candidates for nest generation solid-state lighting. In this case the light source needs to be white in most cases. Organic transistors, organic solar cells, etc. are also being developed vigorously.

  18. Controlled Synthesis of Organic/Inorganic van de Waals Solid for Tunable Light-matter Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Lin; Cong, Chunxiao; Wu, Chunyang; Wu, Di; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wang, Hong; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jiadong; Wang, Xingli; Fu, Wei; Yu, Peng; Fu, Qundong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Yakobson, Boris I; Tay, Beng Kang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Sum, Tze Chien; Jin, Chuanhong; He, Haiyong; Yu, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Van de Waals (vdW) solids, as a new type of artificial materials that consisting of alternative layers bonded by weak interactions, have shed light on fantastic optoelectronic devices. As a result, a large variety of shining vdW devices have been engineered via layer-by-layer stacking of two-dimensional materials, although shadowed by the difficulties of fabrication. Alternatively, direct growth of vdW solids have been proved a scalable and swift way towards vdW solids, reflected by the successful synthesis of graphene/h-BN and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) vertical heterostructures from controlled vapor deposition. Enlightened by it, with a three-step deposition and reaction, we realize high-quality organic and inorganic vdW solids, using methylammonium lead halide as the organic part (organic perovskite) and 2D monolayers inorganic as counterpart. Being a perfect light absorbent, the electrons and holes generated in organic perovskite couple with its inorganic 2D companions, and behave dramaticall...

  19. Low Power, Red, Green and Blue Carbon Nanotube Enabled Vertical Organic Light Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix OLED Displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Liu, B. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Donoghue, E. P. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Kim, D. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; So, Franky [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rinzler, A. G. [University of Florida, Gainesville

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are potential alternatives to polycrystalline silicon as the semiconductor used in the backplane of active matrix organic light emitting diode displays. Demonstrated here is a light-emitting transistor with an organic channel, operating with low power dissipation at low voltage, and high aperture ratio, in three colors: red, green and blue. The single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode is responsible for the high level of performance demonstrated. A major benefit enabled by this architecture is the integration of the drive transistor, storage capacitor and light emitter into a single device. Performance comparable to commercialized polycrystalline-silicon TFT driven OLEDs is demonstrated.

  20. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or shaped features. As a result, we believe that this work will lead to the development of a cost-effective manufacturing solution to produce very-high efficiency OLEDs. By comparison to more common ink-jet printing (IJP), OVJP can also produce well-defined patterns without the need to pattern the substrate with ink wells or to dry/anneal the ink. In addition, the material set is not limited by viscosity and solvent solubility. During the program we successfully demonstrated a 6-inch x 6-inch PHOLED lighting panel consisting of fine-featured red, green and blue (R-G-B) stripes (1mm width) using an OVJP deposition system that was designed, procured and installed into UDC's cleanroom as part of this program. This project will significantly accelerate the DOE's ability to meet its 2015 DOE SSL targets of 70-150 lumens/Watt and less than $10 per 1,000 lumens for high CRI lighting index (76-90). Coupled with a low cost manufacturing path through OVJP, we expect that this achievement will enable the DOE to achieve its 2015 performance goals by the year 2013, two years ahead of schedule. As shown by the technical work performed under this program, we believe that OVJP is a very promising technology to produce low cost, high efficacy, color tunable light sources. While we have made significant progress to develop OVJP technology and build a pilot line tool to study basic aspects of the technology and demonstrate a lighting panel prototype, further work needs to be performed before its full potential and commercial viability can be fully assessed.

  1. Characterization of uranium corrosion product colloids by dynamic light scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertz, C.; Bowers, D.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

    2000-11-16

    The Department of Energy plans to dispose of approximately 2100 metric tons of spent metallic uranium fuel in the mined repository at Yucca Mountain. Laboratory studies at Argonne National Laboratory have shown that corrosion of metallic uranium fuel with groundwater generates significant quantities of stable colloids. This finding is considered very important in light of the recent report (1) of rapid subsurface transport of radionuclides at the Nevada Test Site via colloids. Thus, sparingly soluble radionuclides can be transported with the colloids through the subsurface aqueous environment to much greater distances than is predicted based on the aqueous volubility of the radionuclides alone. Accordingly, characterization of colloids generated by fuel corrosion is necessary for assessing the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides in the repository environment.

  2. Light-harvesting in bacteria exploits a critical interplay between transport and trapping dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe Caycedo-Soler; Ferney J. Rodriguez; Luis Quiroga; Neil F. Johnson

    2010-03-11

    Light-harvesting bacteria Rhodospirillum Photometricum were recently found to adopt strikingly different architectures depending on illumination conditions. We present analytic and numerical calculations which explain this observation by quantifying a dynamical interplay between excitation transfer kinetics and reaction center cycling. High light-intensity membranes (HLIM) exploit dissipation as a photo-protective mechanism, thereby safeguarding a steady supply of chemical energy, while low light-intensity membranes (LLIM) efficiently process unused illumination intensity by channelling it to open reaction centers. More generally, our analysis elucidates and quantifies the trade-offs in natural network design for solar energy conversion.

  3. Thermal-Light-Induced Coherent Dynamics in Atoms and Molecules -- an Exact Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Avisar; Asaf Eilam; A. D. Wilson-Gordon

    2015-05-01

    The question of whether sunlight induces coherent dynamics in biological systems is under debate. Here we show, on the basis of an exact fully quantum mechanical treatment, that thermal light induces excited-state coherences in matter similar to those induced by a coherent state. We demonstrate the phenomenon on a V-type model system and a two-state Born-Oppenheimer molecular system. Remarkably, wavepacket-like dynamics is induced in the excited molecular potential-energy surface.

  4. Direct Evidence of Molecular Aggregation and Degradation Mechanism of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes under Joule Heating: an STM and Photoluminescence Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Jian Ru

    of organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and photoluminescence (PL the PL intensity due to temperature. Introduction Organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) have attractedDirect Evidence of Molecular Aggregation and Degradation Mechanism of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

  5. Efficient organic light-emitting diode using semitransparent silver as anode Huajun Peng, Xiuling Zhu, Jiaxin Sun, Zhiliang Xie, Shuang Xie,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A semitransparent silver layer is investigated as the anode for organic light-emitting devices OLEDs.1063/1.2115076 Organic light-emitting diodes OLEDs have attracted a great deal of attention due to their applicationsEfficient organic light-emitting diode using semitransparent silver as anode Huajun Peng, Xiuling

  6. Room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes with a single ferromagnetic electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Baofu, E-mail: b.ding@ecu.edu.au; Alameh, Kamal, E-mail: k.alameh@ecu.edu.au [Electron Science Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup WA 6027 Australia (Australia); Song, Qunliang [Institute for Clean Energy and Advanced Materials, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2014-05-19

    In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diode (Spin-OLED) structure based on (i) the deposition of an ultra-thin p-type organic buffer layer on the surface of the ferromagnetic electrode of the Spin-OLED and (ii) the use of oxygen plasma treatment to modify the surface of that electrode. Experimental results demonstrate that the brightness of the developed Spin-OLED can be increased by 110% and that a magneto-electroluminescence of 12% can be attained for a 150?mT in-plane magnetic field, at room temperature. This is attributed to enhanced hole and room-temperature spin-polarized injection from the ferromagnetic electrode, respectively.

  7. Salt Effect on Microstructures in Cationic Gemini Surfactant Solutions as Studied by Dynamic Light Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianbin

    Salt Effect on Microstructures in Cationic Gemini Surfactant Solutions as Studied by Dynamic Light, C12C12C12(Et) underwent a typical "ordinary-to-extraordinary (o-e) transition" with decreasing salt concentration to zero. At higher salt concentration, a single relaxation mode, corresponding to the diffusion

  8. Study of the nanobubble phase of aqueous NaCl solutions by dynamic light scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunkin, N F; Shkirin, A V [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Burkhanov, I S; Chaikov, L L [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomkova, A K [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    Aqueous NaCl solutions with different concentrations have been investigated by dynamic scattering of laser radiation. It is experimentally shown that these solutions contain scattering particles with a wide size distribution in a range of ?10 – 100 nm. The experimental results indirectly confirm the existence of quasi-stable gas nanobubbles in the bulk of aqueous ionic solutions. (light scattering)

  9. Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics 30 September 2005 As an application of atomistic simulation methods to heat capacities, path-integral has estimated the heat capacities too high, the quantum simulation based on path-integral molecular

  10. Dynamic Wavelength Conversion in Copropagating Slow-Light Pulses K. Kondo and T. Baba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baba, Toshihiko

    -8501, Japan (Received 16 December 2013; published 6 June 2014) Dynamic wavelength conversion (DWC) is obtained. Dispersion-engineered Si photonic crystal waveguides produce such slow-light pulses. Free carriers generated that differs from nonlinear processes, such as parametric four-wave mixing and Kerr-based cross

  11. Modifying the organic/electrode interface in Organic Solar Cells (OSCs) and improving the efficiency of solution-processed phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Teng

    2012-04-27

    Organic semiconductors devices, such as, organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have drawn increasing interest in recent decades. As organic materials are flexible, light weight, and potentially low-cost, organic semiconductor devices are considered to be an alternative to their inorganic counterparts. This dissertation will focus mainly on OSCs and OLEDs. As a clean and renewable energy source, the development of OSCs is very promising. Cells with 9.2% power conversion efficiency (PCE) were reported this year, compared to < 8% two years ago. OSCs belong to the so-called third generation solar cells and are still under development. While OLEDs are a more mature and better studied field, with commercial products already launched in the market, there are still several key issues: (1) the cost of OSCs/OLEDs is still high, largely due to the costly manufacturing processes; (2) the efficiency of OSCs/OLEDs needs to be improved; (3) the lifetime of OSCs/OLEDs is not sufficient compared to their inorganic counterparts; (4) the physics models of the behavior of the devices are not satisfactory. All these limitations invoke the demand for new organic materials, improved device architectures, low-cost fabrication methods, and better understanding of device physics. For OSCs, we attempted to improve the PCE by modifying the interlayer between active layer/metal. We found that ethylene glycol (EG) treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT: PSS) improves hole collection at the metal/polymer interface, furthermore it also affects the growth of the poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends, making the phase segregation more favorable for charge collection. We then studied organic/inorganic tandem cells. We also investigated the effect of a thin LiF layer on the hole-collection of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C70-based small molecular OSCs. A thin LiF layer serves typically as the electron injection layer in OLEDs and electron collection interlayer in the OSCs. However, several reports showed that it can also assist in holeinjection in OLEDs. Here we first demonstrate that it assists hole-collection in OSCs, which is more obvious after air-plasma treatment, and explore this intriguing dual role. For OLEDs, we focus on solution processing methods to fabricate highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs. First, we investigated OLEDs with a polymer host matrix, and enhanced charge injection by adding hole- and electron-transport materials into the system. We also applied a hole-blocking and electron-transport material to prevent luminescence quenching by the cathode. Finally, we substituted the polymer host by a small molecule, to achieve more efficient solution processed small molecular OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common vacuum thermal evaporation. All these studies help us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OSCs and OLEDs’ performance and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiencies of OSCs and OLEDs. With better efficiency and longer lifetime, the OSCs and OLEDs will be competitive with their inorganic counterparts.

  12. Development of large area transparent conducting oxides from a combinatorial lead for organic solid state lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matson, Dean W.; Bonham, Charles C.; Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Berry, J. J.; Sigdel, Ajaya K.; Gorrie, Christopher W.; Ginley, D. S.

    2009-09-01

    Organic light emitting device (OLEDs) may provide a low-cost, long-lived, and efficient wide area lighting solution if a number of challenges in reliability, cost and efficiency can be overcome. There is a need to develop new TCOs for use as the anode in a bottom-emitting device that do not contain In, have optimal work function, conductivity and visible light transmission properties, possess acceptable stability and possess a high work function to match the deep HOMO of blue OLED HTLs. We report here results from our efforts to scale up sputter deposition on large area substrates (up to 12”x12”) of TCO candidates (including Ga:ZnO and Zn:SnO) identified using combinatorial methods. We present transmission, electrical properties, work function, compositional and structural data for these films. Finally, we have evaluated the use of these materials in OLEDs, and show device performance comparisons between devices fabricated on combinatorial substrates, single composition substrates, and substrates grown at larger scale (up to 12”x12”). Post-operation analysis of the materials using a combination of surface analysis and electron microscopy techniques was performed. The device results demonstrate that we are able to generate substrates with the appropriate work function to reduce the operating voltage of blue phosphorescent OLEDs compared to commercial ITO, which we ascribe to improved work function-HOMO energy matching leading to more efficient charge injection into the device HTL.

  13. Dynamics of excitons and charges in organic materials and semiconducto...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The seminar will report studies on excitons and charge carriers in conjugated polymers, covalent organic frameworks and semiconductor nanocrystals. These materials have...

  14. In-situ optical measurement of charge transport dynamics in organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Philip C. Y.; Bayliss, Sam L.; Lakhwani, Girish; Greenham, Neil C.; Friend, Richard H.

    2015-01-13

    We present a novel experimental approach which allows extraction of both spatial and temporal information on charge dynamics in organic solar cells. Using the wavelength dependence of the photonic structure in these devices, we monitor the change...

  15. Dynamical polarizability of atoms in arbitrary light fields: general theory and application to cesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fam Le Kien; Philipp Schneeweiss; Arno Rauschenbeutel

    2012-12-06

    We present a systematic derivation of the dynamical polarizability and the ac Stark shift of the ground and excited states of atoms interacting with a far-off-resonance light field of arbitrary polarization. We calculate the scalar, vector, and tensor polarizabilities of atomic cesium using resonance wavelengths and reduced matrix elements for a large number of transitions. We analyze the properties of the fictitious magnetic field produced by the vector polarizability in conjunction with the ellipticity of the polarization of the light field.

  16. Hydrogen dynamics and light-induced structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon T. A. Abtew* and D. A. Drabold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drabold, David

    Hydrogen dynamics and light-induced structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon T. A first-principles methods to study the network dynamics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, including the motion of hydrogen. In addition to studies of atomic dynamics in the electronic ground state, we also

  17. Optoelectrical properties of four amorphous silicon thin-film transistors 200 dpi active-matrix organic polymer light-emitting display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanicki, Jerzy

    with the polycrystal- line silicon poly-Si TFTs technology1­3 for the active- matrix organic light-emitting displays AM­OLEDs . Fur- thermore, recent enhancements of the organic light-emitting device OLED performances4 have made and driving devices in pixel electrode circuits. To drive light-emitting devices in AM­ OLEDs, a continuous

  18. Highly stable and high power efficiency tandem organic light-emitting diodes with transition metal oxide-based charge generation layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    efficiency improvement Transition metal oxide a b s t r a c t Tandem organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. Ó 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) [1 displays and lighting panels. However, before mass production of OLEDs for the consumer market can start

  19. Modifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency for organic light-emitting devices with a weak/strong microcavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

    to their applications in display and lighting.1­4 Considering the microcavity effect, OLEDs can be roughly categorizedModifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency for organic light on the modifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency int for organic light-emitting devices

  20. Molecular C dynamics downstream: The biochemical decomposition sequence and its impact on soil organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    Decomposition Carbon Pyrolysis-GC/MS Disturbance 1. Introduction Soil organic matter (SOM) is an importantMolecular C dynamics downstream: The biochemical decomposition sequence and its impact on soil in spectroscopic and other chemical methods have greatly enhanced our ability to characterize soil organic matter

  1. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hua, Wang, E-mail: wmsu2008@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: wanghua001@tyut.edu.cn; Du, Xiaogang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China) [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Su, Wenming, E-mail: wmsu2008@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: wanghua001@tyut.edu.cn; Zhang, Dongyu [Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China)] [Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China); Lin, Wenjing [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China) [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED) with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4{sup ?}-N,N{sup ?}-dicarbazole)biphenyl (CBP) : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N{sup ?})iridium(III) (Ir(2-phq){sub 3}) was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylamino)pheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC) : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2{sup ?}]picolinate (FIrpic) and tris[3-(3-pyridyl)mesityl]borane (3TPYMB):FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m{sup 2}. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y) coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37) to (0.33, 0.37) as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  2. Analyzing degradation effects of organic light-emitting diodes via transient optical and electrical measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Tobias D. Jäger, Lars; Brütting, Wolfgang; Noguchi, Yutaka; Ishii, Hisao

    2015-06-07

    Although the long-term stability of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) under electrical operation made significant progress in recent years, the fundamental underlying mechanisms of the efficiency decrease during operation are not well understood. Hence, we present a comprehensive degradation study of an OLED structure comprising the well-known green phosphorescent emitter Ir(ppy){sub 3}. We use transient methods to analyze both electrical and optical changes during an accelerated aging protocol. Combining the results of displacement current measurements with time-resolved investigation of the excited states lifetimes of the emitter allows for a correlation of electrical (e.g., increase of the driving voltage due to trap formation) and optical (e.g., decrease of light-output) changes induced by degradation. Therewith, it is possible to identify two mechanisms resulting in the drop of the luminance: a decrease of the radiative quantum efficiency of the emitting system due to triplet-polaron-quenching at trapped charge carriers and a modified charge carrier injection and transport, as well as trap-assisted non-radiative recombination resulting in a deterioration of the charge carrier balance of the device.

  3. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2015-07-31

    The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. The new representation (a) explains the parametric order of the peripheral transverse densities; (b) establishes an inequality between the spin-independentmore »and -dependent densities; (c) exposes the role of pion orbital angular momentum in chiral dynamics; (d) reveals a large left-right asymmetry of the current in a transversely polarized nucleon and suggests a simple interpretation. The light-front representation enables a first-quantized, quantum-mechanical view of chiral dynamics that is fully relativistic and exactly equivalent to the second-quantized, field-theoretical formulation. It relates the charge and magnetization densities measured in low-energy elastic scattering to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes. The method can be applied to nucleon form factors of other operators, e.g. the energy-momentum tensor.« less

  4. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Granados; C. Weiss

    2015-03-16

    The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances $b = O(M_\\pi^{-1})$ the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. The new representation (a) explains the parametric order of the peripheral transverse densities; (b) establishes an inequality between the spin-independent and -dependent densities; (c) exposes the role of pion orbital angular momentum in chiral dynamics; (d) reveals a large left-right asymmetry of the current in a transversely polarized nucleon and suggests a simple interpretation. The light-front representation enables a first-quantized, quantum-mechanical view of chiral dynamics that is fully relativistic and exactly equivalent to the second-quantized, field-theoretical formulation. It relates the charge and magnetization densities measured in low-energy elastic scattering to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes. The method can be applied to nucleon form factors of other operators, e.g. the energy-momentum tensor.

  5. Development and Utilization of Host Materials for White Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Ching; Chen, Shaw

    2013-05-31

    Our project was primarily focused on the MYPP 2015 goal for white phosphorescent organic devices (PhOLEDs or phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes) for solid-state lighting with long lifetimes and high efficiencies. Our central activity was to synthesize and evaluate a new class of host materials for blue phosphors in the PhOLEDs, known to be a weak link in the device operating lifetime. The work was a collaborative effort between three groups, one primarily responsible for chemical design and characterization (Chen), one primarily responsible for device development (Tang) and one primarily responsible for mechanistic studies and degradation analysis (Rothberg). The host materials were designed with a novel architecture that chemically links groups with good ability to move electrons with those having good ability to move “holes” (positive charges), the main premise being that we could suppress the instability associated with physical separation and crystallization of the electron conducting and hole conducting materials that might cause the devices to fail. We found that these materials do prevent crystallization and that this will increase device lifetimes but that efficiencies were reduced substantially due to interactions between the materials creating new low energy “charge transfer” states that are non-luminescent. Therefore, while our proposed strategy could in principle improve device lifetimes, we were unable to find a materials combination where the efficiency was not substantially compromised. In the course of our project, we made several important contributions that are peripherally related to the main project goal. First, we were able to prepare the proposed new family of materials and develop synthetic routes to make them efficiently. These types of materials that can transport both electrons and holes may yet have important roles to play in organic device technology. Second we developed an important new method for controlling the deposition profile of material so that arbitrary concentration gradients can be implemented in layers with mixed composition. These concentration profiles are known to increase device efficiency and longevity and we confirmed that experimentally. Third, we investigated a new method for analyzing degradation in devices using mass spectrometry to look for degradation products. We showed that these methods are not simple to interpret unambiguously and need to be used with caution.

  6. Highly efficient greenish-blue platinum-based phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes on a high triplet energy platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y. L. Gong, S. White, R.; Lu, Z. H.; Wang, X.; Wang, S.; Yang, C.

    2014-04-28

    We have demonstrated high-efficiency greenish-blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) based on a dimesitylboryl-functionalized C^N chelate Pt(II) phosphor, Pt(m-Bptrz)(t-Bu-pytrz-Me). Using a high triplet energy platform and optimized double emissive zone device architecture results in greenish-blue PHOLEDs that exhibit an external quantum efficiency of 24.0% and a power efficiency of 55.8?lm/W. This record high performance is comparable with that of the state-of-the-art Ir-based sky-blue organic light-emitting diodes.

  7. Temporal stability of blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes affected by thermal annealing of emitting layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shaw H.

    Temporal stability of blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes affected by thermal morphological instability as part of the challenge to the PhOLED device lifetime. Introduction Blue. In addition to the need for efficient and stable blue emitters,1,2 the technological advances in blue Ph

  8. Enhanced Light Trapping and Power Conversion Efficiency in Ultrathin Plasmonic Organic Solar Cells: A Coupled Optical-Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    much attention for the more efficient harvesting of solar energy. Notably, even as the thickness acceptor materials have been envisioned as a promising next generation energy harvesting device dueEnhanced Light Trapping and Power Conversion Efficiency in Ultrathin Plasmonic Organic Solar Cells

  9. P-55 / J. X. Sun P-55: Bright and Efficient Stacked White Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P-55 / J. X. Sun P-55: Bright and Efficient Stacked White Organic Light-emitting Diodes J. X. Sun N mCP N NN N N N TPBi FirPic Alq3 N O N O N O Al EuroDisplay 2005 · 397 #12;P-55 / J. X. Sun

  10. Interface electronic structures of organic light-emitting diodes with WO3 interlayer: A study by photoelectron spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Interface electronic structures of organic light-emitting diodes with WO3 interlayer: A study,10 -biphenyl-4,40 -diamine (NPB)/indium tin oxide (ITO) was estimated 1.32 eV, while that with a thin WO3 layer annealing the WO3 interlayer at 350 °C, the reduction of hole injection barrier height largely disappears

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of New Hybrid Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED): Europium-picrate-triethylene oxide Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjidan, M. A. Mohd; Abu Zakaria, N. Z. A.; Abd. Majid, W. H. [Solid State Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kusrini, Eny; Saleh, M. I. [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2009-07-07

    Thin-film light emitting devices based on organic materials have attracted vast interest in applications such as light emitting diode (LED) and flat-panel display. The organic material can be attached with inorganic material to enhance the performance of the light emitting device. A hybrid OLED based on a new complex of europium picrate (Eu-pic) with triethylene oxide (EO3) ligand is fabricated. The OLED is fabricated by using spin coating technique with acetone as the solvent and aluminum as the top electrode. The optical, photoluminescence (PL) and electrical properties of the sample are carried out by UV-Vis spectroscopy (Jasco V-750), luminescence spectroscopy (Perkin Elmer LS-500) and source measure unit (SMU)(Keithly), respectively.

  12. Modified Baryonic Dynamics: two-component cosmological simulations with light sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angus, G.W.; Gentile, G.; Diaferio, A.; Famaey, B.; Heyden, K.J. van der E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: gianfranco.gentile@ugent.be

    2014-10-01

    In this article we continue to test cosmological models centred on Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) with light sterile neutrinos, which could in principle be a way to solve the fine-tuning problems of the standard model on galaxy scales while preserving successful predictions on larger scales. Due to previous failures of the simple MOND cosmological model, here we test a speculative model where the modified gravitational field is produced only by the baryons and the sterile neutrinos produce a purely Newtonian field (hence Modified Baryonic Dynamics). We use two-component cosmological simulations to separate the baryonic N-body particles from the sterile neutrino ones. The premise is to attenuate the over-production of massive galaxy cluster halos which were prevalent in the original MOND plus light sterile neutrinos scenario. Theoretical issues with such a formulation notwithstanding, the Modified Baryonic Dynamics model fails to produce the correct amplitude for the galaxy cluster mass function for any reasonable value of the primordial power spectrum normalisation.

  13. Haldane Quantum Hall Effect for Light in a Dynamically Modulated Array of Resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minkov, Momchil

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators have attracted abundant attention for a variety of reasons -- notably, the possibility for lossless energy transport through edge states `protected' against disorder. Topological effects like the Quantum Hall state can be induced through a gauge field, which is however hard to create in practice, especially for charge-neutral particles. One way to induce an effective gauge potential is through a dynamic, time-periodic modulation of the lattice confining such particles. In this way, the Haldane Quantum Hall effect was recently observed in a cold atom system. Here, we show how this same effect can be induced for light confined to a lattice of identical optical resonators, using an on-site modulation of the resonant frequencies. We further demonstrate the existence of one-directional edge states immune to back-scattering losses, and discuss the possibilities for a practical implementation, which would enable slow-light devices of unprecedented quality.

  14. Haldane Quantum Hall Effect for Light in a Dynamically Modulated Array of Resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momchil Minkov; Vincenzo Savona

    2015-07-16

    Topological insulators have attracted abundant attention for a variety of reasons -- notably, the possibility for lossless energy transport through edge states `protected' against disorder. Topological effects like the Quantum Hall state can be induced through a gauge field, which is however hard to create in practice, especially for charge-neutral particles. One way to induce an effective gauge potential is through a dynamic, time-periodic modulation of the lattice confining such particles. In this way, the Haldane Quantum Hall effect was recently observed in a cold atom system. Here, we show how this same effect can be induced for light confined to a lattice of identical optical resonators, using an on-site modulation of the resonant frequencies. We further demonstrate the existence of one-directional edge states immune to back-scattering losses, and discuss the possibilities for a practical implementation, which would enable slow-light devices of unprecedented quality.

  15. Dynamical Arrest, Structural Disorder, and Optimization of Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, Ian; Dmitry, Matyushov

    2014-09-11

    This project describes fundamental experimental and theoretical work that relates to charge separation and migration in the solid, heterogeneous or aggregated state. Marcus theory assumes a system in equilibrium with all possible solvent (dipolar) configurations, with rapid interconversion among these on the ET timescale. This project has addressed the more general situation where the medium is at least partially frozen on the ET timescale, i.e. under conditions of dynamical arrest. The approach combined theory and experiment and includes: (1) Computer simulations of model systems, (2) Development of analytical procedures consistent with computer experiment and (3) Experimental studies and testing of the formal theories on this data. Electron transfer processes are unique as a consequence of the close connection between kinetics, spectroscopy and theory, which is an essential component of this work.

  16. Time dynamics of multiparty quantum correlations indicate energy transfer route in light-harvesting complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titas Chanda; Utkarsh Mishra; Aditi Sen De; Ujjwal Sen

    2015-02-10

    The time-evolution of multiparty quantum correlations as quantified by monogamy scores and bipartition collections of quantum correlations is investigated for light-harvesting complexes modeled by the fully connected and the Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) networks. The dynamics consists of a coherent term as well as dissipative, dephasing, and sink operator terms. The multiparty quantum correlation reveals important information regarding the sharability of quantum correlations in the networks, which allow us to categorize the network sites into three distinct groups in the FMO complex and to predict the structural geometry of the complex. In particular, we show that the relative values of the ingredients of multiparty quantum correlation measures in the time dynamics clearly indicate the primary route of energy transfer from the antenna to the bacterial reaction center in the FMO complex.

  17. The Dynamics of Internet Traffic: Self-Similarity, Self-Organization, and Complex Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2010-09-05

    The Internet is the most complex system ever created in human history. Therefore, its dynamics and traffic unsurprisingly take on a rich variety of complex dynamics, self-organization, and other phenomena that have been researched for years. This paper is a review of the complex dynamics of Internet traffic. Departing from normal treatises, we will take a view from both the network engineering and physics perspectives showing the strengths and weaknesses as well as insights of both. In addition, many less covered phenomena such as traffic oscillations, large-scale effects of worm traffic, and comparisons of the Internet and biological models will be covered.

  18. Dynamic proteome analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aryal, Uma K.; Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Jacobs, Jon M.

    2012-02-03

    Understanding the dynamic nature of protein abundances provides insights into protein turnover not readily apparent from conventional, static mass spectrometry measurements. This level of data is particularly informative when surveying protein abundances in biological systems subjected to large perturbations or alterations in environment such as cyanobacteria. Our current analysis expands upon conventional proteomic approaches in cyanobacteria by measuring dynamic changes of the proteome using a 13C15N-L-leucine metabolic labeling in Cyanothece ATCC51142. Metabolically labeled Cyanothece ATCC51142 cells grown under nitrogen sufficient conditions in continuous light were monitored longitudinally for isotope incorporation over a 48 h period, revealing 422 proteins with dynamic changes in abundances. In particular, proteins involved in carbon fixation, pentose phosphate pathway, cellular protection, redox regulation, protein folding, assembly and degradation showed higher levels of isotope incorporation suggesting that these biochemical pathways are important for growth under non-diazotrophic conditions. Calculation of relative isotope abundances (RIA) values allowed to measure actual active protein synthesis over time for different biochemical pathways under non-diazotrophic conditions. Overall results demonstrated the utility of 'non-steady state' pulsed metabolic labeling for systems-wide dynamic quantification of the proteome in Cyanothece ATCC51142 that can also be applied to other cyanobacteria.

  19. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS) and OLED-based structurally integrated optical sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yuankun

    2010-05-16

    General introduction to OLED basics and OLED-based structurally integrated sensors was provided in chapter 1 and chapter 2. As discussed in chapter 3, OLEDs were developed or improved using novel engineering methods for better charge injection (increased by over 1 order of magnitude) and efficiency. As the excitation sources, these OLEDs have preferred characteristics for sensor applications, including narrowed emission, emission at desired wavelength, and enhanced output for reduced EL background, higher absorption and improved device lifetime. In addition to OLEDs with desired performance, sensor integration requires oxidase immobilization with the sensor film for O{sub 2}-based biological and chemical sensing. Nanoparticles such as ZnO have large surface area and high isoelectric point ({approx}9.5), which favors enzyme immobilization via physical adsorption as well as Coulombic bonding. In chapter 4, it was demonstrated that ZnO could be used for this purpose, although future work is needed to further bond the ZnO to the sensor film. In chapter 5, single unit sensor was extended to multianalyte parallel sensing based on an OLED platform, which is compact and integrated with silicon photodiodes and electronics. Lactate and glucose were simultaneously monitored with a low limit of detection 0.02 mM, fast response time ({approx} 1 minute) and dynamic range from 0-8.6 ppm of dissolved oxygen. As discovered in previous work, the dynamic range covers 0-100% gas phase O{sub 2} or 0-40 ppm dissolved oxygen at room temperature. PL decay curve, which is used to extract the decay time, is usually not a simple exponential at high O{sub 2} concentration, which indicates that O{sub 2} is not equally accessible for different luminescent sites. This creates a challenge for data analysis, which however was successfully processed by stretched exponential as shown in chapter 6. This also provides an insight about the distribution of O{sub 2}:dye collisional quenching rate due to microheterogeneity. Effect of TiO{sub 2} doping was also discussed. Stretched exponential analysis also generates calibration curves with higher sensitivity, which is preferred from the operational point of view. The work of enhanced integration was shown in chapter 7 with a polymer photodetector, which enables the preferred operation mode, decay time measurement, due to fast reponse (<20 {mu}s). Device thickness was enlarged for maximum absorption of the PL, which was realized by slow spincoating rate and shorter spincoating time. Film prepared this way shows more crystalline order by Raman spectra, probably due to slow evaporation. This also ensures charge transport is not affected even with a thick film as indicated in the response time. Combination of OLEDs and polymer photodetectors present opportunities for solution processed all-organic sensors, which enables cheap processing at large scale. Future development can focus on monolithically integration of OLEDs and organic photodetectors (OPD) on the same substrate at a small scale, which could be enabled by inkjet printing. As OLED and OPD technologies continue to advance, small-sized, flexible and all-organic structurally integrated sensor platforms will become true in the near future.

  20. Comparison of light out-coupling enhancements in single-layer blue-phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using small-molecule or polymer hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yung-Ting; Liu, Shun-Wei; Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Chien; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Lee, Yi-Ting; Wu, Min-Fei; Chen, Chin-Ti E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw; Wu, Chih-I E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw

    2013-11-07

    Single-layer blue phosphorescence organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with either small-molecule or polymer hosts are fabricated using solution process and the performances of devices with different hosts are investigated. The small-molecule device exhibits luminous efficiency of 14.7?cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 8.39?lm/W, which is the highest among blue phosphorescence OLEDs with single-layer solution process and small molecular hosts. Using the same solution process for all devices, comparison of light out-coupling enhancement, with brightness enhancement film (BEF), between small-molecule and polymer based OLEDs is realized. Due to different dipole orientation and anisotropic refractive index, polymer-based OLEDs would trap less light than small molecule-based OLEDs internally, about 37% better based simulation results. In spite of better electrical and spectroscopic characteristics, including ambipolar characteristics, higher carrier mobility, higher photoluminescence quantum yield, and larger triplet state energy, the overall light out-coupling efficiency of small molecule-based devices is worse than that of polymer-based devices without BEF. However, with BEF for light out-coupling enhancement, the improved ratio in luminous flux and luminous efficiency for small molecule based device is 1.64 and 1.57, respectively, which are significantly better than those of PVK (poly-9-vinylcarbazole) devices. In addition to the theoretical optical simulation, the experimental data also confirm the origins of differential light-outcoupling enhancement. The maximum luminous efficiency and power efficiency are enhanced from 14.7?cd/A and 8.39?lm/W to 23?cd/A and 13.2?lm/W, respectively, with laminated BEF, which are both the highest so far for single-layer solution-process blue phosphorescence OLEDs with small molecule hosts.

  1. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a rapidly emerging technology based on organic thin film semiconductors. Recently, there has been substantial investment in their use in displays. At the heart of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a rapidly emerging technology based on organic thin film semiconductors. Recently, there has been substantial investment in their use in displays. At the heart of an OLED are emissive molecules that generate light in response to electrical stimulation. Ideal emitters are efficient

  2. Noise can play an organizing role for the recurrent dynamics in excitable media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    Noise can play an organizing role for the recurrent dynamics in excitable media Cyrill B. Muratov in the presence of noise. Without noise, this model robustly predicts the existence of spiral waves as the only recurrent patterns in two dimensions. With small noise, however, we found that this model is also capable

  3. COMPARISON OF FIVE ORGANIC WASTES REGARDING THEIR BEHAVIOUR DURING1 COMPOSTING: PART 2, NITROGEN DYNAMIC2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 COMPARISON OF FIVE ORGANIC WASTES REGARDING THEIR BEHAVIOUR DURING1 COMPOSTING: PART 2, NITROGEN nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three3 composting simulations were performed applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the5 compost were characterized

  4. Information driven self-organization: The dynamical system approach to autonomous robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Der, Ralf

    Information driven self-organization: The dynamical system approach to autonomous robot behavior robots and liv- ing beings. One root for these approaches is the idea that living beings are information from these more principal questions, there is much interest recently in the question how a robot can

  5. Enterprise design for dynamic complexity : architecting & engineering organizations using system & structural dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepenbrock, Theodore F. (Theodore Frederick), 1965-

    2004-01-01

    As the business world is neither linear nor static, the mastery of its "chaotic" nonlinear dynamics lies at the heart of finding high-leverage policies that return uncommon benefits for marginal costs. Today's global ...

  6. Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N13,CenterCenterLighting Sign In

  7. Self-Diffusion and Collective Diffusion of Charged colloids Studied by Dynamic Light Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacqueline Appell; Grégoire Porte; Eric Buhler

    2005-06-24

    A microemulsion of decane droplets stabilized by a non-ionic surfactant film is progressively charged by substitution of a non-ionic surfactant molecule by a cationic surfactant. We check that the microemulsion droplets remain identical within the explored range of volume fraction (0.02 to 0.18) and of the number of charge per droplets (0 to 40) . We probe the dynamics of these microemulsions by dynamic light scattering. Despite the similar structure of the uncharged and charged microemulsions the dynamics are very different . In the neutral microemulsion the fluctuations of polarization relax, as is well known, via the collective diffusion of the droplets. In the charged microemulsions, two modes of relaxation are observed. The fast one is ascribed classically to the collective diffusion of the charged droplets coupled to the diffusion of the counterions. The slow one has, to our knowledge, not been observed previously neither in similar microemulsions nor in charged spherical colloids. We show that the slow mode is also diffusive and suggest that its possible origine is the relaxation of local charge fluctuations via local exchange of droplets bearing different number of charges . The diffusion coefficient associated with this mode is then the self diffusion coefficient of the droplets.

  8. A web-based approach to image-based lighting using high dynamic range images and QuickTime object virtual reality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuellar, Tamara Melissa

    2008-10-10

    This thesis presents a web-based approach to lighting three-dimensional geometry in a virtual scene. The use of High Dynamic Range (HDR) images for the lighting model makes it possible to convey a greater sense of ...

  9. Particle sizing by dynamic light scattering: non-linear cumulant analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alastair G. Mailer; Paul S. Clegg; Peter N. Pusey

    2015-04-24

    We revisit the method of cumulants for analysing dynamic light scattering data in particle sizing applications. Here the data, in the form of the time correlation function of scattered light, is written as a series involving the first few cumulants (or moments) of the distribution of particle diffusion constants. Frisken (2001 Applied Optics 40, 4087) has pointed out that, despite greater computational complexity, a non-linear, iterative, analysis of the data has advantages over the linear least-squares analysis used originally. In order to explore further the potential and limitations of cumulant methods we analyse, by both linear and non-linear methods, computer-generated data with realistic `noise', where the parameters of the distribution can be set explicitly. We find that, with modern computers, non-linear analysis is straightforward and robust. The mean and variance of the distribution of diffusion constants can be obtained quite accurately for distributions of width (standard deviation/mean) up to about 0.6, but there appears to be little prospect of obtaining meaningful higher moments.

  10. A low temperature amorphous oxide thin film transistor (TFT) backplane technology for flexible organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays has been developed to create 4.1-in. diagonal backplanes. The critical steps in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays has been developed to create 4.1-in. diagonal backplanes organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays. Mixed oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (TFT

  11. Diffusing-Wave Spectroscopy in a Standard Dynamic Light Scattering Setup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahra Fahimi; Frank Aangenendt; Panayiotis Voudouris; Johan Mattson; Hans M. Wyss

    2015-09-11

    Diffusing-Wave Spectroscopy (DWS) treats the transport of photons through turbid samples as a diffusion process, thereby making it possible to extract the dynamics of scatterers from measured correlation functions. The analysis of DWS data requires knowledge of the path length distribution of photons traveling through the sample. While for flat sample cells this path length distribution can be readily expressed in analytical form, no such expression is available for cylindrical sample cells. DWS measurements have therefore typically relied on dedicated setups that use flat sample cells. Here we show how DWS measurements, in particular DWS-based microrheology measurements, can be performed in standard dynamic light scattering setups that use cylindrical sample cells. To do so we perform simple random walk simulations which yield numerical predictions of the path length distribution as a function of both the transport mean free path and the detection angle. This information is used in experiments to extract the mean-square displacement of tracer particles in the material, as well as the resulting frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. An important advantage of our approach is that by measuring at different detection angles, the average photon path length can be varied. Using a single sample cell, this gives access to a wider range of length and time scales than obtained in a conventional DWS setup. Such angle-dependent measurements also offer an important consistency check, as for all detection angles the DWS analysis should yield the same tracer dynamics, even though the respective path length distributions are very different. We validate our approach by performing measurements both on aqueous suspensions of tracer particles and on solid-like gelatin samples, for which we find our DWS-based microrheology data to be in excellent agreement with rheological measurements.

  12. A Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display with Integrated Drivers R.M.A. Dawson, Z. Shen, D.A. Furst, S. Connor, J. Hsu, M.G. Kane, R.G. Stewart, A. Ipri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display with Integrated Drivers R.S.A. Abstract The design of an active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display using a polysilicon. Introduction Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are presently of great interest due to their potential

  13. Optical Simulation of Top-emitting Organic Light Emitting Diodes H. J. Peng, C.F. Qiu, Z. L. Xie, H. Y. Chen, M. Wong and H. S. Kwok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8.3.3-89 Optical Simulation of Top-emitting Organic Light Emitting Diodes H. J. Peng, C.F. Qiu, Z the optical effects for the top-emitting organic light emitting diodes. The optical performance of the devices with experiments Keywords: Top-emitting organic light emitting diode, optical modeling, microcavity INTRODUCTION

  14. Efficient light emitting devices utilizing CdSe(ZnS) quantum dots in organic host matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coe-Sullivan, Seth (Seth Alexander)

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient electroluminescence from thin film structures containing core-shell CdSe(ZnS) quantum dots dispersed in molecular organic host materials. In the most efficient devices, excitons are created on the ...

  15. Large-scale patterning of indium tin oxide electrodes for guided mode extraction from organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geyer, Ulf; Hauss, Julian; Riedel, Boris; Gleiss, Sebastian; Lemmer, Uli; Gerken, Martina

    2008-11-01

    We describe a cost-efficient and large area scalable production process of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with photonic crystals (PCs) as extraction elements for guided modes. Using laser interference lithography and physical plasma etching, we texture the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode layer of an OLED with one- and two-dimensional PC gratings. By optical transmission measurements, the resonant mode of the grating is shown to have a drift of only 0.4% over the 5 mm length of the ITO grating. By changing the lattice constant between 300 and 600 nm, the OLED emission angle of enhanced light outcoupling is tailored from -24.25 deg. to 37 deg. At these angles, the TE emission is enhanced up to a factor of 2.14.

  16. MoO3 as combined hole injection layer and tapered spacer in combinatorial multicolor microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Chun; Biswas, Rana; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

    2011-09-01

    Multicolor microcavity ({mu}C) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) arrays were fabricated simply by controlling the hole injection and spacer MoO{sub 3} layer thickness. The normal emission was tunable from {approx}490 to 640 nm and can be further expanded. A compact, integrated spectrometer with two-dimensional combinatorial arrays of {mu}C OLEDs was realized. The MoO{sub 3} yields more efficient and stable devices, revealing a new breakdown mechanism. The pixel current density reaches {approx}4 A/cm{sup 2} and a maximal normal brightness {approx}140 000 Cd/m{sup 2}, which improves photoluminescence-based sensing and absorption measurements.

  17. Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract--In metal organic vapor phase epitaxy we developed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract-- In metal organic vapor phase epitaxy we developed GaInN/GaN quantum well material suitable for 500 ­ 580 nm light emitting diodes at longer wavelengths. Index Terms-- a-plane GaN, GaInN, Green light emitting diode, m-plane GaN I

  18. Self-organization of frozen light in near-zero-index media with cubic nonlinearity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the existence of frozen light in near-zero-index media with cubic nonlinearity. Light is stopped to a standstill owing to the divergent wavelength and the vanishing group velocity, effectively rendering, through nonlinearity, a positive-epsilon trapping cavity carved in an otherwise slightly-negative-epsilon medium. By numerically solving Maxwell's equations, we find a soliton-like family of still azimuthal doughnuts, which we further study through an adiabatic perturbative theory that describes soliton evaporation in lossy media or condensation in actively pumped materials. Our results suggest applications in optical data processing and storage, quantum optical memories, and soliton-based lasers without cavities. Additionally, near-zero-index conditions can also be found in the interplanetary medium and in the atmosphere, where we provide an alternative explanation to the rare phenomenon of ball-lightning.

  19. Controlling charge transport in blue organic light-emitting devices by chemical functionalization of host materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Rainbolt, James E.; Von Ruden, Amber L.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2011-01-18

    Generation of white light from OLEDs for general lighting applications requires a highly efficient blue component. However, a stable and power efficient blue OLED component with simple device architecture remains a significant challenge partly due to lack of appropriate host materials. Here we report the photophysical and device properties of ambipolar host phosphine oxide based materials. In this work, we studied the effect of the structural modification made to phosphine oxide-based hosts on the charge balance. We observed significant changes in charge transport within the host occurred upon small modifications to their chemical structure. As a result, an alteration of the chemical design of these materials allows for the control of charge balance of the OLED.

  20. Towards an understanding of light activation processes in titanium oxide based inverted organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    solar cells S. Chambon, E. Destouesse, B. Pavageau, L. Hirsch, and G. Wantz Citation: J. Appl. Phys. 112. Related Articles Power losses in bilayer inverted small molecule organic solar cells Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 233903 (2012) Thin-film encapsulation of inverted indium-tin-oxide-free polymer solar cells by atomic

  1. General method for simultaneous optimization of light trapping and carrier collection in an ultra-thin film organic photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia Grote, Richard R.; Beck, Jonathan H.; Kymissis, Ioannis; Osgood, Richard M.; Englund, Dirk

    2014-07-14

    We describe a general method for maximizing the short-circuit current in thin planar organic photovoltaic (OPV) heterojunction cells by simultaneous optimization of light absorption and carrier collection. Based on the experimentally obtained complex refractive indices of the OPV materials and the thickness-dependence of the internal quantum efficiency of the OPV active layer, we analyze the potential benefits of light trapping strategies for maximizing the overall power conversion efficiency of the cell. This approach provides a general strategy for optimizing the power conversion efficiency of a wide range of OPV structures. In particular, as an experimental trial system, the approach is applied here to a ultra-thin film solar cell with a SubPc/C{sub 60} photovoltaic structure. Using a patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) top contact, the numerically optimized designs achieve short-circuit currents of 0.790 and 0.980?mA/cm{sup 2} for 30?nm and 45?nm SubPc/C{sub 60} heterojunction layer thicknesses, respectively. These values correspond to a power conversion efficiency enhancement of 78% for the 30?nm thick cell, but only of 32% for a 45?nm thick cell, for which the overall photocurrent is actually higher. Applied to other material systems, the general optimization method can elucidate if light trapping strategies can improve a given cell architecture.

  2. Fractal and Small-World Networks Formed by Self-Organized Critical Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Akitomo; Yakubo, Kousuke

    2015-01-01

    We propose a dynamical model in which a network structure evolves in a self-organized critical (SOC) manner and explain a possible origin of the emergence of fractal and small-world networks. Our model combines a network growth and its decay by failures of nodes. The decay mechanism reflects the instability of large functional networks against cascading overload failures. It is demonstrated that the dynamical system surely exhibits SOC characteristics, such as power-law forms of the avalanche size distribution, the cluster size distribution, and the distribution of the time interval between intermittent avalanches. During the network evolution, fractal networks are spontaneously generated when networks experience critical cascades of failures that lead to a percolation transition. In contrast, networks far from criticality have small-world structures. We also observe the crossover behavior from fractal to small-world structure in the network evolution.

  3. Evaluation of an Accounting Model for Dynamic Virtual Organizations Martin Waldburger Matthias Gohner Helmut Reiser Gabi Dreo Rodosek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of an Accounting Model for Dynamic Virtual Organizations Martin Waldburger · Matthias G¨ohner · Helmut Reiser · Gabi Dreo Rodosek · Burkhard Stiller Abstract Accounting of Grid resource and service-oriented computing in Dy- namic Virtual Organizations (DVO). An all-embracing study of existing Grid accounting

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of organic SIMS with Cu{sub n} (n=1-3) clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townes, J. A.; White, A. K.; Krantzman, K. D.; Garrison, B. J.

    1999-06-10

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the effect of cluster size on the emission yield and damage cross section in organic SIMS. A model system composed of a monolayer of biphenyl molecules on a Cu(001) substrate was bombarded with Cu{sub n} (n=1-3) projectiles at kinetic energies of 0.100 keV per atom. The yield increases with cluster size, but a nonlinear enhancement in yield is not observed. The yield-to-damage ratio, on the other hand, increases with the use of clusters, indicating that clusters have the potential to improve the sensitivity of SIMS.

  5. Concentration of light organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions by adsorption on bound silicalite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Kathryn Louise

    1989-01-01

    azeotrope, the solvent can enhance the volatility of either water or ethanol. Gasoline, when used as a solvent in the extractive distillation of azeotropic ethanol, enhances the volatility of water. The water and the lower boiling components... of the gasoline are taken ofF at the top of the column. The ethanol and the remaining components of the gasoline are collected at the bottom. The ethanol and organic compounds are separated from the water in the distillate from the extractive distillation...

  6. Dynamic Fluctuations in Ultrasmall Nanocrystals Induce White Light Timothy J. Pennycook,*,,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Information ABSTRACT: Individual ultrasmall CdSe nanocrystals have recently been found to emit white light-tunable optical properties of nanocrystals are of major interest for lighting and solar cell applications ultrasmall.7-12 White light emission from ultrasmall CdSe nanocrystals13-16 is a particularly interesting

  7. Dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves encountering a density bump or void

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: uhm@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves that encounter various density structures (such as bumps, voids, or steps) in the surrounding ambient medium. We present and explain the characteristic response features that each type of density structure in the medium leaves on the forward shock (FS) and reverse shock (RS) dynamics for blast waves with either a long-lived or short-lived RS. We show that when the ambient medium density drops, the blast waves exhibit in some cases a period of an actual acceleration (even during their deceleration stage) due to adiabatic cooling of blast waves. Comparing numerical examples that have different shapes of bumps or voids, we propose a number of consistency tests that must be satisfied by correct modeling of blast waves. Our model results successfully pass these tests. Employing a Lagrangian description of blast waves, we perform a sophisticated calculation of afterglow emission. We show that as a response to density structures in the ambient medium, the RS light curves produce more significant variations than the FS light curves. Some observed features (such as rebrightenings, dips, or slow wiggles) can be more easily explained within the RS model. We also discuss the origin of these different features imprinted on the FS and RS light curves.

  8. Effect of Biodiesel Blending on the Speciation of Soluble Organic Fraction from a Light Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL] [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL] [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2010-01-01

    Soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel was volumetrically blended with 2007 certification ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and run in a 1.7L direct-injection common rail diesel engine at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP). Engine fueling rate and injection timing were adjusted to maintain a constant load, while particulate samples were collected in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and with a dilution tunnel sampling train. The samples collected at these two locations were found to contain different levels of soluble organic fraction (SOF) and the different hydrocarbon species in the SOF. This observation indicates that traditional SOF measurements, in light of the specific sampling procedure used, may not be appropriate to DPF applications.

  9. Highly efficient inverted top emitting organic light emitting diodes using a transparent top electrode with color stability on viewing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Bum; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Jang-Joo, E-mail: jjkim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-17

    We report a highly efficient phosphorescent green inverted top emitting organic light emitting diode with excellent color stability by using the 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile/indium zinc oxide top electrode and bis(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) acetylacetonate as the emitter in an exciplex forming co-host system. The device shows a high external quantum efficiency of 23.4% at 1000?cd/m{sup 2} corresponding to a current efficiency of 110?cd/A, low efficiency roll-off with 21% at 10?000?cd/m{sup 2} and low turn on voltage of 2.4?V. Especially, the device showed very small color change with the variation of ?x?=?0.02, ?y?=?0.02 in the CIE 1931 coordinates as the viewing angle changes from 0° to 60°. The performance of the device is superior to that of the metal/metal cavity structured device.

  10. Low-cost electrochemical treatment of indium tin oxide anodes for high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui Cheng, Chuan, E-mail: chengchuanhui@dlut.edu.cn; Shan Liang, Ze; Gang Wang, Li; Dong Gao, Guo; Zhou, Ting; Ming Bian, Ji; Min Luo, Ying [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Tong Du, Guo, E-mail: dugt@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate a simple low-cost approach as an alternative to conventional O{sub 2} plasma treatment to modify the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes for use in organic light-emitting diodes. ITO is functionalized with F{sup ?} ions by electrochemical treatment in dilute hydrofluoric acid. An electrode with a work function of 5.2?eV is achieved following fluorination. Using this electrode, a maximum external quantum efficiency of 26.0% (91?cd/A, 102?lm/W) is obtained, which is 12% higher than that of a device using the O{sub 2} plasma-treated ITO. Fluorination also increases the transparency in the near-infrared region.

  11. Spectrally resolved hyperfine interactions between polaron and nuclear spins in organic light emitting diodes: Magneto-electroluminescence studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooker, S. A.; Kelley, M. R.; Martinez, N. J. D.; Nie, W.; Mohite, A.; Nayyar, I. H.; Tretiak, S.; Smith, D. L.; Liu, F.; Ruden, P. P.

    2014-10-13

    We use spectrally resolved magneto-electroluminescence (EL) measurements to study the energy dependence of hyperfine interactions between polaron and nuclear spins in organic light-emitting diodes. Using layered devices that generate bright exciplex emission, we show that the increase in EL emission intensity I due to small applied magnetic fields of order 100?mT is markedly larger at the high-energy blue end of the EL spectrum (?I/I???11%) than at the low-energy red end (?4%). Concurrently, the widths of the magneto-EL curves increase monotonically from blue to red, revealing an increasing hyperfine coupling between polarons and nuclei and directly providing insight into the energy-dependent spatial extent and localization of polarons.

  12. ZnO light-emitting diode grown by plasma-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W.Z.; Ye, Z.Z.; Zeng, Y.J.; Zhu, L.P.; Zhao, B.H.; Jiang, L.; Lu, J.G.; He, H.P.; Zhang, S.B. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2006-04-24

    We report a breakthrough in fabricating ZnO homojunction light-emitting diode by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Using NO plasma, we are able to grow p-type ZnO thin films on n-type bulk ZnO substrates. The as-grown films on glass substrates show hole concentration of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and mobility of 1-10 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal nitrogen-related emissions. A typical ZnO homojunction shows rectifying behavior with a turn-on voltage of about 2.3 V. Electroluminescence at room temperature has been demonstrated with band-to-band emission at I=40 mA and defect-related emissions in the blue-yellow spectrum range.

  13. Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  14. Studies of solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes and their materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellerich, Emily

    2013-05-15

    A hitherto unexplored approach is presented in which a small molecule is used as a host to polymer guests in solution-processed OLEDs. We find that the small molecule host results in much more efficient devices than the often-used alternative polymer host when used for the guests presented. It is likely that nano- and microstructural differences between the hosts contribute to the improvements, which highlights some interesting characteristics that can help to better understand the nature of these mixtures. A number of the guests used in this study were newly synthesized benzobisoxazole-based copolymers. New organic copolymers are presented that are based on the chemical structure of benzobisoxazoles, which have been shown in the past to have good electron transporting properties. The novel concept in this publication pertains to a change in the direction of polymerization, also known as the conjugation pathway, which we show increases the emission efficiency. This work highlights a unique and useful property of organic semiconducting materials in that they can be synthesized to create the desired characteristics. Earlier work is described that kick-started in our research group the use of small molecules in solution-processed OLEDs. Originally these devices were to be used in magnetoresistance studies, but the project took a different path when the devices were more efficient than expected. The efficient use of small molecules in solution-processed OLEDs is highlighted, which at the time was not often the case. Also, the important observation of the effect of solvent choice on the resultant film is emphasized, with discussion of the likely cause of these effects. Microcavity OLEDs are introduced in which the transparent anode ITO is replaced with semi-transparent thin silver, which creates an optical cavity within the devices. The goal was to expand a previous work that created an on-chip spectrometer covering wavelengths 493 to 639 nm. In this case, a spin-coated mixed emitting layer (EML) is used, consisting of a polymer and a small molecule that both emit in the near UV and blue. The resulting combined spectra gives a wide band that can be used to create narrow microcavity emission peaks of 373 to 469 nm, depending on the device thickness (i.e. the cavity’s optical length). In the process of this effort, the mixed EML presented interesting complexities that we attempt to explain via simulation and morphology study.

  15. Pressure-assisted fabrication of organic light emitting diodes with MoO{sub 3} hole-injection layer materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, J. [The Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Anye, V. C.; Vodah, E. O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Tong, T. [The Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Zebaze Kana, M. G. [Physics Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Kwara State (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O. [The Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2014-06-21

    In this study, pressures of ?5 to ?8?MPa were applied to organic light emitting diodes containing either evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) or spin-coated poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulphonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hole-injection layers (HILs). The threshold voltages for both devices were reduced by about half, after the application of pressure. Furthermore, in an effort to understand the effects of pressure treatment, finite element simulations were used to study the evolution of surface contact between the HIL and emissive layer (EML) under pressure. The blister area due to interfacial impurities was also calculated. This was shown to reduce by about half, when the applied pressures were between ?5 and 8?MPa. The finite element simulations used Young's modulus measurements of MoO{sub 3} that were measured using the nanoindentation technique. They also incorporated measurements of the adhesion energy between the HIL and EML (measured by force microscopy during atomic force microscopy). Within a fracture mechanics framework, the implications of the results are then discussed for the pressure-assisted fabrication of robust organic electronic devices.

  16. Static and dynamic light scattering of healthy and malaria-parasite blood cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Subra

    We present the light scattering of individual Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized human red blood cells (Pf-RBCs), and demonstrate progressive alterations to the scattering signal arising from the development of malaria-inducing ...

  17. Developing a dynamic envelope/lighting control system with field measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Lee, E.S.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The feasibility of an intelligent venetian blind/lighting control system was tested in a 1:3 scale model outdoors under variable sun and sky conditions. The control algorithm, block direct sun and meet the design workplane illuminance level, was implemented using commercially available and custom designed blind and lighting systems hardware. While blocking direct sunlight, the blinds were properly controlled to maintain the design workplane illuminance within a tolerance of -10%, +25% when there was sufficient daylight. When daylight levels alone were inadequate, the electric lighting control system maintained the design workplane illuminance. The electric lighting could be turned off if a user-specified time period at minimum power was exceeded. Lighting energy savings of 51-71% (southwest) and 37-75% (south) was attained for the period from 8:00 to 17:00 on clear sunny days, compared to a fixed, partially closed blind with the same lighting system. Practical details for implementation and commissioning are discussed. The impact of control variations, such as profile angle, time step interval, and control area, on energy demand is investigated.

  18. Characterization of protein redox dynamics induced during light-to-dark transitions and nutrient limitation in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansong, Charles; Sadler, Natalie C.; Hill, Eric A.; Lewis, Michael P.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-07-03

    Protein redox chemistry constitutes a major void in knowledge pertaining to photoautotrophic system regulation and signaling processes. We have employed a chemical biology approach to analyze redox sensitive proteins in live Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells in both light and dark periods, and to understand how cellular redox balance is disrupted during nutrient perturbation. The present work identified several novel putative redox-sensitive proteins that are involved in the generation of reductant, macromolecule synthesis, and carbon flux through central metabolic pathways, and may be involved in cell signaling and response mechanisms. Furthermore, our research suggests that dynamic redox changes in response to specific nutrient limitations contribute to the regulatory changes driven by a shift from light to dark. Taken together, these results contribute to the high-level understanding of post-translational mechanisms regulating flux distributions and therefore present potential metabolic engineering targets for redirecting carbon towards biofuel precursors.

  19. WHITE ORGANIC LIGHT-EMITTING DIODES USING 1,1,2,3,4,5-HEXAPHENYLSILOLE (HPS) AS GREENISH-BLUE EMITTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WHITE ORGANIC LIGHT-EMITTING DIODES USING 1,1,2,3,4,5- HEXAPHENYLSILOLE (HPS) AS GREENISH-BLUE emitter and the 1,1,2,3,4,5- hexaphenylsilole (HPS) layer was used as the greenish- blue emitter. White of 160cd/m2 . This high efficiency was attributed to the highly efficient greenish- blue emitter-1

  20. Room-temperature ultraviolet emission from an organic light-emitting diode C. F. Qiu, L. D. Wang, H. Y. Chen, M. Wong, and H. S. Kwok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Room-temperature ultraviolet emission from an organic light-emitting diode C. F. Qiu, L. D. Wang, H Ultraviolet emission was obtained from N,N -diphenyl-N,N -bis 3-methylphenyl - 1,1 -bi phenyl -4,4 -diamine. Gallium nitride was used as a hole-blocking layer to contain the holes. A peak emission wavelength of 400

  1. The conformational evolution of elongated polymer solutions tailors the polarization of light-emission from organic nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Camposeo; Israel Greenfeld; Francesco Tantussi; Maria Moffa; Francesco Fuso; Maria Allegrini; Eyal Zussman; Dario Pisignano

    2014-07-30

    Polymer fibers are currently exploited in tremendously important technologies. Their innovative properties are mainly determined by the behavior of the polymer macromolecules under the elongation induced by external mechanical or electrostatic forces, characterizing the fiber drawing process. Although enhanced physical properties were observed in polymer fibers produced under strong stretching conditions, studies of the process-induced nanoscale organization of the polymer molecules are not available, and most of fiber properties are still obtained on an empirical basis. Here we reveal the orientational properties of semiflexible polymers in electrospun nanofibers, which allow the polarization properties of active fibers to be finely controlled. Modeling and simulations of the conformational evolution of the polymer chains during electrostatic elongation of semidilute solutions demonstrate that the molecules stretch almost fully within less than 1 mm from jet start, increasing polymer axial orientation at the jet center. The nanoscale mapping of the local dichroism of individual fibers by polarized near-field optical microscopy unveils for the first time the presence of an internal spatial variation of the molecular order, namely the presence of a core with axially aligned molecules and a sheath with almost radially oriented molecules. These results allow important and specific fiber properties to be manipulated and tailored, as here demonstrated for the polarization of emitted light.

  2. Stability improvement of organic light emitting diodes by the insertion of hole injection materials on the indium tin oxide substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jung-Hung; Liu, Shang-Yi; Wu, I-Wen; Chen, Tsung-Chin; Liu, Chia-Wei [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-I, E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-28

    The degradation of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is a very complex issue, which might include interfacial charge accumulation, material diffusion, and electrical-induced chemical reaction during the operation. In this study, the origins of improvement in device stability from inserting a hole injection layer (HIL) at the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode are investigated. The results from aging single-layer devices show that leakage current increases in the case of ITO/hole transport layer contact, but this phenomenon can be prevented by inserting molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) or 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN{sub 6}) as an HIL. Moreover, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy suggests that the diffusion of indium atoms and active oxygen species can be impeded by introducing MoO{sub 3} or HAT-CN{sub 6} as an HIL. These results reveal that the degradation of OLEDs is related to indium and oxygen out-diffusion from the ITO substrates, and that the stability of OLEDs can be improved by impeding this diffusion with HILs.

  3. High performance flexible top-emitting warm-white organic light-emitting devices and chromaticity shift mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Hongying; Deng, Lingling; Chen, Shufen E-mail: wei-huang@njupt.edu.cn; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaofei; Cheng, Fan; Huang, Wei E-mail: wei-huang@njupt.edu.cn; Jiangsu-Singapore Joint Research Center for Organic/Bio- Electronics and Information Displays and Institute of Advanced Materials, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 211816

    2014-04-15

    Flexible warm-white top-emitting organic light-emitting devices (TEOLEDs) are fabricated onto PET substrates with a simple semi-transparent cathode Sm/Ag and two-color phosphors respectively doped into a single host material TCTA. By adjusting the relative position of the orange-red EML sandwiched between the blue emitting layers, the optimized device exhibits the highest power/current efficiency of 8.07 lm/W and near 13 cd/A, with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4105 K and a color rendering index (CRI) of 70. In addition, a moderate chromaticity variation of (-0.025, +0.008) around warm white illumination coordinates (0.45, 0.44) is obtained over a large luminance range of 1000 to 10000 cd/m{sup 2}. The emission mechanism is discussed via delta-doping method and single-carrier device, which is summarized that the carrier trapping, the exciton quenching, the mobility change and the recombination zone alteration are negative to color stability while the energy transfer process and the blue/red/blue sandwiched structure are contributed to the color stability in our flexible white TEOLEDs.

  4. Highly-selective wettability on organic light-emitting-diodes patterns by sequential low-power plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svarnas, P.; Edwards, A. J.; Bradley, J. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Technological Plasmas Group, University of Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Yang, L.; Munz, M.; Shard, A. G. [Analytical Science Division, National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Patterned organic light-emitting-diode substrates were treated by oxygen (O{sub 2}) and tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) radio-frequency (rf, 13.56 MHz) plasmas of low-power (close to 1 W) that were capacitively-coupled. An unexpected wettability contrast (water contact angle difference up to 90 deg. ) between the indium-tin-oxide anode and the bank resist regions was achieved, providing excellent conditioning prior to the ink-jet printing. This selectivity was found to be adjustable by varying the relative exposure time to the O{sub 2} and CF{sub 4} sequential plasmas. Static contact angle measurements and extensive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed that the wetting properties depend on the carbon and fluorine chemical functional groups formed at the outermost surface layers, whereas atomic force microscopy images did not show a morphological change. Plasma optical emission spectroscopy and ion mass spectroscopy suggested that surface functionalization was initiated by energy transfer from ionic species (O{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sup +}, CF{sub 2}{sup +}, and CF{sub 3}{sup +}) and excited neutrals (O{sup *} and F{sup *}). The absolute ion fluxes measured on the substrates were up to 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and the ion energies up to 20 eV, despite the low powers applied during the process.

  5. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakins, D. E. Chapman, D. J.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  6. Bi-layer non-doped small-molecular white organic light-emitting diodes with high colour This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi-layer non-doped small-molecular white organic light-emitting diodes with high colour stability and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home-layer non-doped small-molecular white organic light-emitting diodes with high colour stability Shuming Chen1

  7. Two schemes for characterization and detection of the squeezed light: Dynamical Casimir effect and nonlinear materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Lotfipour; Z. Allameh; R. Roknizadeh; H. Heydari

    2015-05-04

    The detection and characterization of a non-classical-squeezed state of light, by using two different schemes, will be presented . In the first one, in an one-dimensional cavity with moving mirror (non-stationary Casimir effect) in the principal mode, we study the photon creation rate for two modes (squeezed and coherent state) of driving field. Since the cavity with moving mirror (similar to an optomechanical system) can be considered analogue to a Kerr-like medium, so that in the second scheme, the probability amplitude for multi-photons absorption in a nonlinear (Kerr) medium will be quantum mechanically calculated. It is shown that because of presence of nonlinear effects, the responses of these two systems to the squeezed versus coherent state are considerably distinguishable. The drastic difference between the results of these two states of light can be viewed as a proposal for detecting of non-classical states.

  8. 2338 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 55, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2008 Dynamic Response of Normal and Corbino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanicki, Jerzy

    -matrix organic light- emitting display (AM-OLED), bottom gate, corbino, dynamic measurement, dynamic response. INTRODUCTION TO DATE, the active-matrix organic light-emitting dis- play (AM-OLED) has attracted many interests of Normal and Corbino a-Si:H TFTs for AM-OLEDs Hojin Lee, Chun-Sung Chiang, and Jerzy Kanicki, Senior Member

  9. B-physics with dynamical domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth S. Van de Water; Oliver Witzel

    2011-01-24

    We report on our progress in calculating the B-meson decay constants and B^0-bar B^0 mixing parameters using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We present our computational method and show some preliminary results obtained on the coarser (a approx 0.11fm) 24^3 lattices. This work is presented on behalf of the RBC and UKQCD collaborations.

  10. The dynamic behavior of thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Sebastian B., E-mail: sebastian.meier@belectric.com, E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com [Department of Materials Science VI: Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT RTC MAT IEC-DE, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hartmann, David; Sarfert, Wiebke, E-mail: sebastian.meier@belectric.com, E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT RTC MAT IEC-DE, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI: Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-14

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) have received increasing attention during recent years due to their simple architecture, based on solely air-stabile materials, and ease of manufacture in ambient atmosphere, using solution-based technologies. The LEC's active layer offers semiconducting, luminescent as well as ionic functionality resulting in device physical processes fundamentally different as compared with organic light-emitting diodes. During operation, electrical double layers (EDLs) form at the electrode interfaces as a consequence of ion accumulation and electrochemical doping sets in leading to the in situ development of a light-emitting p-i-n junction. In this paper, we comment on the use of impedance spectroscopy in combination with complex nonlinear squares fitting to derive key information about the latter events in thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells based on the model compound bis-2-phenylpyridine 6-phenyl-2,2´-bipyridine iridium(III) hexafluoridophosphate ([Ir(ppy)?(pbpy)][PF?]). At operating voltages below the bandgap potential of the ionic complex used, we obtain the dielectric constant of the active layer, the conductivity of mobile ions, the transference numbers of electrons and ions, and the thickness of the EDLs, whereas the transient thickness of the p-i-n junction is determined at voltages above the bandgap potential. Most importantly, we find that charge transport is dominated by the ions when carrier injection from the electrodes is prohibited, that ion movement is limited by the presence of transverse internal interfaces and that the width of the intrinsic region constitutes almost 60% of the total active layer thickness in steady state at a low operating voltage.

  11. National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

    1998-02-01

    This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

  12. The temporal dynamics of terrestrial organic matter transfer to the oceans : initial assessment and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drenzek, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01

    This thesis employs compound-specific stable carbon and radiocarbon isotopic analysis of organic biomarkers to (a) resolve petrogenic from pre-aged vascular plant organic carbon (OC) in continental margin sediments, (b) ...

  13. Transcriptomic and proteomic dynamics in the metabolism of a diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 during a diurnal light–dark cycle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Welkie, David; Zhang, Xiaohui; Markillie, Meng; Taylor, Ronald; Orr, Galya; Jacobs, Jon; Bhide, Ketaki; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Gritsenko, Marina; Mitchell, Hugh; et al

    2014-12-29

    Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 is an excellent cyanobacterial model organism with great potential to be applied as a biocatalyst for the production of high value compounds. Like other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterial species, it has a tightly regulated metabolism synchronized to the light-dark cycle. Utilizing transcriptomic and proteomic methods, we were able to quantify the relationships between transcription and translation underlying central and secondary metabolism in response to nitrogen free, 12 hour light and 12 hour dark conditions.

  14. Transcriptomic and proteomic dynamics in the metabolism of a diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 during a diurnal light–dark cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welkie, David; Zhang, Xiaohui; Markillie, Meng; Taylor, Ronald; Orr, Galya; Jacobs, Jon; Bhide, Ketaki; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Gritsenko, Marina; Mitchell, Hugh; Smith, Richard D; Sherman, Louis A

    2014-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 is an excellent cyanobacterial model organism with great potential to be applied as a biocatalyst for the production of high value compounds. Like other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterial species, it has a tightly regulated metabolism synchronized to the light-dark cycle. Utilizing transcriptomic and proteomic methods, we were able to quantify the relationships between transcription and translation underlying central and secondary metabolism in response to nitrogen free, 12 hour light and 12 hour dark conditions.

  15. Transcriptomic and proteomic dynamics in the metabolism of a diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 during a diurnal light-dark cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welkie, David G.; Zhang, Xiaohui; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Orr, Galya; Jacobs, Jon M.; Bhide, Ketaki; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Smith, Richard D.; Sherman, Louis A.

    2014-12-29

    Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 is an excellent cyanobacterial model organism with great potential to be applied as a biocatalyst for the production of high value compounds. Like other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterial species, it has a tightly regulated metabolism synchronized to the light-dark cycle. Utilizing transcriptomic and proteomic methods, we were able to quantify the relationships between transcription and translation underlying central and secondary metabolism in response to nitrogen free, 12 hour light and 12 hour dark conditions.

  16. Dynamic electron correlation in interactions of light with matter formulated in b-space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev Kaplan; J. H. McGuire

    2015-09-02

    Scattering of beams of light and matter from multi-electron atomic targets is formulated in the position representation of quantum mechanics. This yields expressions for the probability amplitude, a(b), for a wide variety of processes. Here the spatial parameter b is the distance of closest approach of incoming particles traveling on a straight line with the center of the atomic target. The correlated probability amplitude, a(b), reduces to a relatively simple product of single electron probability amplitudes in the widely used independent electron approximation limit, where the correlation effects of the Coulomb interactions between the atomic electrons disappear. As an example in which a(b} has an explicit dependence on b}, we consider transversely finite vortex beams of twisted photons that lack the translational invariance of infinite plane-wave beams. Some experimental considerations and future applications are briefly considered.

  17. First results from $2+1$ dynamical quark flavors on an anisotropic lattice: light-hadron spectroscopy and setting the strange-quark mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Huey-Wen; Cohen, Saul; Dudek, Jozef; Edwards, Robert; Joo, Balint; Richards, David; Bulava, John; Foley, Justin; Morningstar, Colin; Engelson, Eric; Wallace, Stephen; Juge, Jimmy; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael; Ryan, Sinead

    2009-02-01

    We present the first light-hadron spectroscopy on a set of $N_f=2+1$ dynamical, anisotropic lattices. A convenient set of coordinates that parameterize the two-dimensional plane of light and strange-quark masses is introduced. These coordinates are used to extrapolate data obtained at the simulated values of the quark masses to the physical light and strange-quark point. A measurement of the Sommer scale on these ensembles is made and the performance of the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm used for generating the ensembles is estimated.

  18. First results from 2+1 dynamical quark flavors on an anisotropic lattice: Light-hadron spectroscopy and setting the strange-quark mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, H.-W.; Cohen, Saul D.; Dudek, Jozef; Edwards, Robert G.; Joo, Balint; Richards, David G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Bulava, John; Foley, Justin; Morningstar, Colin [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Engelson, Eric; Wallace, Stephen [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Juge, K. Jimmy [Department of Physics, University of the Pacific, Stockton, California 95211 (United States); Mathur, Nilmani [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Peardon, Michael J.; Ryan, Sinead M. [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2009-02-01

    We present the first light-hadron spectroscopy on a set of N{sub f}=2+1 dynamical, anisotropic lattices. A convenient set of coordinates that parameterize the two-dimensional plane of light and strange-quark masses is introduced. These coordinates are used to extrapolate data obtained at the simulated values of the quark masses to the physical light and strange-quark point. A measurement of the Sommer scale on these ensembles is made, and the performance of the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm used for generating the ensembles is estimated.

  19. Study on copper phthalocyanine and perylene-based ambipolar organic light-emitting field-effect transistors produced using neutral beam deposition method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dae-Kyu; Oh, Jeong-Do; Shin, Eun-Sol; Seo, Hoon-Seok; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2014-04-28

    The neutral cluster beam deposition (NCBD) method has been applied to the production and characterization of ambipolar, heterojunction-based organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) with a top-contact, multi-digitated, long-channel geometry. Organic thin films of n-type N,N?-ditridecylperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide and p-type copper phthalocyanine were successively deposited on the hydroxyl-free polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA)-coated SiO{sub 2} dielectrics using the NCBD method. Characterization of the morphological and structural properties of the organic active layers was performed using atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Various device parameters such as hole- and electron-carrier mobilities, threshold voltages, and electroluminescence (EL) were derived from the fits of the observed current-voltage and current-voltage-light emission characteristics of OLEFETs. The OLEFETs demonstrated good field-effect characteristics, well-balanced ambipolarity, and substantial EL under ambient conditions. The device performance, which is strongly correlated with the surface morphology and the structural properties of the organic active layers, is discussed along with the operating conduction mechanism.

  20. The synthesis of inorganic semiconductor nanocrystalline materials for the purpose of creating hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckel, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Stephen)

    2006-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) can be synthesized to efficiently emit light from the ultraviolet, across the entire visible spectrum, and into the near infrared. This is now possible due ...

  1. Resistance from top to bottom : the dynamics of risk management in complex organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyneis, John Landry

    2012-01-01

    Organizations today devote substantial resources towards the development of governance systems to increase transparency and accountability in areas such as quality, safety, financial accounting, and environmental performance. ...

  2. Dissolved organic carbon dynamics in anaerobic sediments of the Santa Monica Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    an organic-rich coastal sediment. Geochim. Cosmochim. Actaorganic carbon in sediments from the North Carolinaexchange between deep ocean sediments and sea water. Nature

  3. Systematic analysis of protein–detergent complexes applying dynamic light scattering to optimize solutions for crystallization trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Arne [University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Building 22a, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Dierks, Karsten [University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Building 22a, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); XtalConcepts, Marlowring 19, 22525 Hamburg (Germany); Hussein, Rana [University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Building 22a, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Brillet, Karl [ESBS, Pôle API, 300 Boulevard Sébastien Brant, CS10413, 67412 Illkirch CEDEX (France); Brognaro, Hevila [São Paulo State University, UNESP/IBILCE, Caixa Postal 136, São José do Rio Preto-SP, 15054 (Brazil); Betzel, Christian, E-mail: christian.betzel@uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Building 22a, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    Application of in situ dynamic light scattering to solutions of protein–detergent complexes permits characterization of these complexes in samples as small as 2 µl in volume. Detergents are widely used for the isolation and solubilization of membrane proteins to support crystallization and structure determination. Detergents are amphiphilic molecules that form micelles once the characteristic critical micelle concentration (CMC) is achieved and can solubilize membrane proteins by the formation of micelles around them. The results are presented of a study of micelle formation observed by in situ dynamic light-scattering (DLS) analyses performed on selected detergent solutions using a newly designed advanced hardware device. DLS was initially applied in situ to detergent samples with a total volume of approximately 2 µl. When measured with DLS, pure detergents show a monodisperse radial distribution in water at concentrations exceeding the CMC. A series of all-transn-alkyl-?-d-maltopyranosides, from n-hexyl to n-tetradecyl, were used in the investigations. The results obtained verify that the application of DLS in situ is capable of distinguishing differences in the hydrodynamic radii of micelles formed by detergents differing in length by only a single CH{sub 2} group in their aliphatic tails. Subsequently, DLS was applied to investigate the distribution of hydrodynamic radii of membrane proteins and selected water-insoluble proteins in presence of detergent micelles. The results confirm that stable protein–detergent complexes were prepared for (i) bacteriorhodopsin and (ii) FetA in complex with a ligand as examples of transmembrane proteins. A fusion of maltose-binding protein and the Duck hepatitis B virus X protein was added to this investigation as an example of a non-membrane-associated protein with low water solubility. The increased solubility of this protein in the presence of detergent could be monitored, as well as the progress of proteolytic cleavage to separate the fusion partners. This study demonstrates the potential of in situ DLS to optimize solutions of protein–detergent complexes for crystallization applications.

  4. Organic light-emitting devices with laminated top contacts Daniel A. Bernards, Tomasz Biegala, Zachary A. Samuels, Jason D. Slinker,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 Received 12 January 2004 of metals on organic semiconductors top contacts .1 The formation of top contacts metallization of the or

  5. Using interlayer step-wise triplet transfer to achieve an efficient white organic light-emitting diode with high color-stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qi [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, College of Engineering, South Dakota State University, Brookings, South Dakota 57007 (United States); Ma, Dongge, E-mail: mdg1014@ciac.jl.cn; Ding, Junqiao; Wang, Lixiang [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Leo, Karl [Tech. Univ. Dresden, Inst. Angew. Photophys., D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Qiao, Qiquan [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, College of Engineering, South Dakota State University, Brookings, South Dakota 57007 (United States); Jia, Huiping; Gnade, Bruce E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States)

    2014-05-12

    An efficient phosphorescent white organic light emitting-diode with a red-green-blue tri-emitting-layer structure is reported. The host of the red dopant possesses a lower triplet-energy than the green dye. An interlayer step-wise triplet transfer via blue dye ? green dye ? red host ? red dye is achieved. This mechanism allows an efficient triplet harvesting by the three dopants, thus maintaining a balanced white light and reducing energy loss. Moreover, the color stability of the device is improved significantly. The white device not only achieves a peak external quantum efficiency of 21.1?±?0.8% and power efficiency of 37.5?±?1.4?lm/W but shows no color shift over a wide range of voltages.

  6. Dynamic alliances : political economy of labor organization in post-revolution Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Sofia Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    The last decade in Egypt has witnessed significant innovations in the structure of social organizations spurred by the fraying of central government legitimacy. Within this dense network of new social actors independent ...

  7. The influence of organic carbon on oxygen dynamics and bacterial sulfate reduction in inland shrimp ponds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suplee, Michael Wayne

    1995-01-01

    Experiments conducted in saline aquaculture ponds demonstrated that organic matter was the primary factor influencing sediment sulfate reduction rates. Changes in sediment oxygen demand (SOD), sulfate reduction rates, and ...

  8. Kinetic isotope effects, dynamic effects, and mechanistic studies of organic reactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhihong

    2007-04-25

    Several organic reactions that could potentially involve coarctate transition states were investigated by a combination of experimental and theoretical studies. In the thermal fragmentation of �-1,3,4-oxadiazolines, ...

  9. Tracing the Evolution of the Light-Harvesting Antennae in Chlorophyll a/b-Containing Organisms1[OA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durnford, Dion G.

    -harvesting complexes (LHCs) of land plants and green algae have essential roles in light capture and photo- protection, the extent of this family in the majority of green algal groups is unknown. To examine the evolution) and Chlorarachniophyta (Bigelowiella natans), whose plastids evolved secondarily from a green alga. It is clear

  10. TOC Total organic carbon MBC Microbial biomass carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    C Carbon TOC Total organic carbon MBC Microbial biomass carbon Active C Pool Indicated by Light, the relationship between carbon dynamics including total organic carbon (TOC) storage, microbial biomass carbon and microbial biomass carbon in subsoil 4 years after rehabilitation · Microbial biomass carbon had a positive

  11. Social organization and group dynamics of white-tailed deer on brush-free coastal prairie in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Wendy Margaret

    1981-01-01

    more unusual. Hawkins and Klimstra (1970) and Hardin et al. (1976) stated that yearling bucks rarely, if ever, rejoin their dams after the breeding season. Among white-tailed deer studied thus far, this again seems to be unique to Texas populations...SOCIAL ORGANIZATION AND GROUP DYNAMICS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER ON BRUSH-FREE COASTAL PRAIRIE IN TEXAS A Thesis by WENDY MARGARET BROWN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  12. Ag@AgHPW as a plasmonic catalyst for visible-light photocatalytic degradation of environmentally harmful organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wenhui; Cao, Minhua, E-mail: caomh@bit.edu.cn; Li, Na; Su, Shuangyue; Zhao, Xinyu; Wang, Jiangqiang; Li, Xianghua; Hu, Changwen

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW12O40 (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant, which show a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • A new visible-light driven photocatalyst Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} was designed. • The photocatalyst shows a high activity for the degradation of methyl blue. • The high activity can be ascribed to the synergy of photoexcited AgHPW and Ag. - Abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant. They show strong absorption in the visible region because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag NPs. This plasmonic photocatalyst shows a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation, which could be attributed to the highly synergy of photoexcited Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (AgHPW) and plasmon-excited Ag NPs and the confinement effects at interfaces between polyoxometalates (POMs) and silver. POM anions have redox ability and high photocatalytic activity, whereas Ag NPs could effectively accelerate the separation of electrons and holes, both of which contribute to their high activity.

  13. Layered 3D: tomographic image synthesis for attenuation-based light field and high dynamic range displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzstein, Gordon

    We develop tomographic techniques for image synthesis on displays composed of compact volumes of light-attenuating material. Such volumetric attenuators recreate a 4D light field or high-contrast 2D image when illuminated ...

  14. Dynamic solid state lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, Matthew (Matthew Henry)

    2010-01-01

    Energy conservation concerns will mandate near-future environments to regulate themselves to accommodate occupants' objectives and best tend to their comfort while minimizing energy consumption. Accordingly, smart energy ...

  15. Complex Organization and Dynamic Regulation of the pks Gene Cluster in Bacillus subtilis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas Bautista, Carol M

    2014-08-27

    that they provide important functions to the organisms that synthesize them. It is estimated that a wide number of plants produce, as a group, over 22,000 different secondary metabolites (3). In addition, rough calculations predict more than 50,000 different... ................................ 101 Table 4- 4. Biolog results summary ............................................................................... 110 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION AND LITERATURE REVIEW Secondary metabolites were considered for long time as small...

  16. In-situ intercalation dynamics in inorganic-organic layered perovskite thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Shahab; Kanaujia, Pawan K.; Niu, Wendy; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Prakash, G. Vijaya

    2014-06-06

    , C. W.; Hamakawa, Y. Optimum Design and Preparation of a?Si/a?Si/a?SiGe Triple?Junction Solar Cells J. Appl. Phys. 1994, 75, 588- 595. 4. Hiibner, A.; Aberle, A. G.; Hezel, R. Novel Cost-Effective Bifacial Silicon Solar Cells with 19.4% Front... .; Virshup, G. F.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.; Ristow, M. L.; Wanlass, M. W. 25.2% Efficiency (1?Sun, Air Mass 0) AlGaAs/GaAs/InGaAsP Three?Junction, Two?Terminal Solar Cell Appl. Phys. Lett. 1992, 60, 1691-1693. 7. Tang, C.W. Two?Layer Organic Photovoltaic Cell...

  17. Structural dynamics of phenylisothiocyanate in the light-absorbing excited states: Resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouyang, Bing, E-mail: ouyangbing.zj@foxmail.com; Xue, Jia-Dan, E-mail: jenniexue@126.com; Zheng, Xuming, E-mail: zhengxuming126@126.com, E-mail: zxm@zstu.edu.cn, E-mail: fangwh@dnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Fang, Wei-Hai, E-mail: zxm@zstu.edu.cn, E-mail: fangwh@dnu.edu.cn, E-mail: fangwh@dnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-05-21

    The excited state structural dynamics of phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) after excitation to the light absorbing S{sub 2}(A?), S{sub 6}(A?), and S{sub 7}(A?) excited states were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field method calculations. The UV absorption bands of PITC were assigned. The vibrational assignments were done on the basis of the Fourier transform (FT)-Raman and FT-infrared measurements, the density-functional theory computations, and the normal mode analysis. The A-, B-, and C-bands resonance Raman spectra in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol solvents were, respectively, obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, 228.7, 217.8, and 208.8 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the corresponding structural dynamics of PITC. The results indicated that the structural dynamics in the S{sub 2}(A?), S{sub 6}(A?), and S{sub 7}(A?) excited states were very different. The conical intersection point CI(S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}) were predicted to play important role in the low-lying excited state decay dynamics. Two major decay channels were predicted for PITC upon excitation to the S{sub 2}(A?) state: the radiative S{sub 2,min} ? S{sub 0} transition and the nonradiative S{sub 2} ? S{sub 1} internal conversion via CI(S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}). The differences in the decay dynamics between methyl isothiocyanate and PITC in the first light absorbing excited state were discussed. The role of the intersystem crossing point ISC(S{sub 1}/T{sub 1}) in the excited state decay dynamics of PITC is evaluated.

  18. Using an ultra-thin non-doped orange emission layer to realize high efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes with low efficiency roll-off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Liping; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge, E-mail: mdg1014@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Zhao, Yongbiao [Luminous Center of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zhang, Hongmei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2014-06-28

    By adopting an ultra-thin non-doped orange emission layer sandwiched between two blue emission layers, high efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with reduced efficiency roll-off were fabricated. The optimized devices show a balanced white emission with Internationale de L'Eclairage of (0.41, 0.44) at the luminance of 1000?cd/m{sup 2}, and the maximum power efficiency, current efficiency (CE), and external quantum efficiency reach 63.2?lm/W, 59.3?cd/A, and 23.1%, which slightly shift to 53.4?lm/W, 57.1?cd/A, and 22.2% at 1000?cd/m{sup 2}, respectively, showing low efficiency roll-off. Detailed investigations on the recombination zone and the transient electroluminescence (EL) clearly reveal the EL processes of the ultra-thin non-doped orange emission layer in WOLEDs.

  19. Top-emission Si-based phosphor organic light emitting diode with Au doped ultrathin n-Si film anode and bottom Al mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Z.; Xu, W. J.; Ran, G. Z. [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qin, G. G. [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Lab of Semiconductor Materials, CAS, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2009-07-20

    We report a highly efficient top-emission Si-based phosphor organic light emitting diode (PhOLED) with an ultrathin polycrystalline n-Si:Au film anode and a bottom Al mirror. This anode is formed by magnetron sputtering followed by Ni induced crystallization and then Au diffusion. By optimizing the thickness of the n-Si:Au film anode, the Au diffusion temperature, and the other parameters of the PhOLED, the highest current and power efficiencies of the n-Si:Au film anode PhOLED reached 85{+-}9 cd/A and 80{+-}8 lm/W, respectively, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 21{+-}2% and a power conversion efficiency of 15{+-}2%, respectively, which are about 60% and 110% higher than those of the indium tin oxide anode counterpart and 70% and 50% higher than those of the bulk n{sup +}-Si:Au anode counterpart, respectively.

  20. Enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence by ordered Ag nanodot array on indium tin oxide anode in organic light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Mi, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Mo Yoon, Dang; Kim, Miyoung [Korea Printed Electronics Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Jeollabuk-do, 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulki; Lee, Taikjin; Hun Kim, Jae; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deokha, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Si-Hyung [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    We report the enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence (EL) in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an ordered Ag nanodot array on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode. Until now, most researches have focused on the improved performance of OLEDs by plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles due to the difficulty in fabricating metal nanodot arrays. A well-ordered Ag nanodot array is fabricated on the ITO anode of OLED using the nanoporous alumina as an evaporation mask. The OLED device with Ag nanodot arrays on the ITO anode shows higher current density and EL enhancement than the one without any nano-structure. These results suggest that the Ag nanodot array with the plasmonic effect has potential as one of attractive approaches to enhance the hole injection and EL in the application of the OLEDs.

  1. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence from {sup 3}n?* to {sup 1}n?* up-conversion and its application to organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Qisheng; Nomura, Hiroko [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Miyazaki, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Functional Materials Laboratory, Nippon Steel and Sumikin Chemical Co., Ltd, 46–80 Nakabaru, Sakinohama, Tobata, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804–8503 (Japan); Adachi, Chihaya, E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-07-07

    Intense n?* fluorescence from a nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compound, 2,5,8-tris(4-fluoro-3-methylphenyl)-1,3,4,6,7,9,9b-heptaazaphenalene (HAP-3MF), is demonstrated. The overlap-forbidden nature of the n?* transition and the higher energy of the {sup 3}??* state than the {sup 3}n?* one lead to a small energy difference between the lowest singlet (S{sub 1}) and triplet (T{sub 1}) excited states of HAP-3MF. Green-emitting HAP-3MF has a moderate photoluminescence quantum yield of 0.26 in both toluene and doped film. However, an organic light-emitting diode containing HAP-3MF achieved a high external quantum efficiency of 6.0%, indicating that HAP-3MF harvests singlet excitons through a thermally activated T{sub 1} ? S{sub 1} pathway in the electroluminescent process.

  2. Highly stable and efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices with intermediate connectors using lithium amide as n-type dopant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Dong-Ying; Zu, Feng-Shuo; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Liang-Sheng E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Aziz, Hany E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2014-08-25

    In this work, we report thermally decomposable lithium amide (LiNH{sub 2}) feasible to function as an effective n-type dopant for intermediate connectors in tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). Metallic lithium, which is released from the decomposition process of LiNH{sub 2}, is proved by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and responsible for n-type electrical doping of electron transporting materials. We demonstrate that tandem OLEDs using LiNH{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as n-type dopants, respectively, give a comparable electroluminescence efficiency and, moreover, the device with LiNH{sub 2} has far longer operational lifetime. The results therefore highlight the significance of selecting suitable n-type dopant in intermediate connectors to fabricate high-stability tandem OLEDs.

  3. Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

  4. Design and Synthesis of Plasmonic Core/Shell Nanorods for Light Trapping in Organic Photo-Voltaics, Non-Linear Optics and Photo-Thermal Tumor Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jankovic, Vladan

    2013-01-01

    High-efficiency organic solar cells." Applied Physicsplasmon resonance enhanced organic solar cell with gold1991). " Three-layered organic solar cell with a photoactive

  5. Permanent polarization and charge distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs): Insights from near-infrared charge-modulation spectroscopy of an operating OLED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Alfred P.; Haskins, Terri L.; Young, Ralph H.; Rothberg, Lewis J.

    2014-03-21

    Vapor-deposited Alq{sub 3} layers typically possess a strong permanent electrical polarization, whereas NPB layers do not. (Alq{sub 3} is tris(8-quinolinolato)aluminum(III); NPB is 4,4?-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl.) The cause is a net orientation of the Alq{sub 3} molecules with their large dipole moments. Here we report on consequences for an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with an NPB hole-transport layer and Alq{sub 3} electron-transport layer. The discontinuous polarization at the NPB|Alq{sub 3} interface has the same effect as a sheet of immobile negative charge there. It is more than compensated by a large concentration of injected holes (NPB{sup +}) when the OLED is running. We discuss the implications and consequences for the quantum efficiency and the drive voltage of this OLED and others. We also speculate on possible consequences of permanent polarization in organic photovoltaic devices. The concentration of NPB{sup +} was measured by charge-modulation spectroscopy (CMS) in the near infrared, where the NPB{sup +} has a strong absorption band, supplemented by differential-capacitance and current-voltage measurements. Unlike CMS in the visible, this method avoids complications from modulation of the electroluminescence and electroabsorption.

  6. Synthesis and application of 1,3,4,5,7,8-Hexafluorotetracyanonaphtoquinodimethane (F6-TNAP): A Conductivity Dopant for Organic Light-Emitting Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koech, Phillip K.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Darsell, Jens T.; Rainbolt, James E.; Gaspar, Daniel J.

    2010-07-13

    We report the synthesis, photophysical and organic light-emitting device (OLED) properties of an organic molecular p-dopant 1,3,4,5,7,8-hexafluorotetracyanonaphthoquinodimethane (F6-TNAP). F6-TNAP was obtained in a three step 2 pot synthesis from commercially available octafluoronaphthalene. Doping effect of F6-TNAP was evaluated using films of 1-5% F6-TNAP with N,N'-di-1-naphthyl-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'diamine???-NPD) co-evaporated on quartz. UV-vis analysis of these films showed an absorption peak at 950 nm corresponding to the charge transfer complex resulting from electron transfer from??-NPD to F6-TNAP. Hole only devices using ??NPD as the hole transport layer (HTL) doped with F6-TNAP show greater than 2V decrease in operating voltage compared to the undoped device. A decrease in operating voltage was also demonstrated in blue OLED devices using F6-TNAP doped HTL, with a slight decrease in external quantum efficiency (EQE), thus resulting in a net improvement in power efficiency.

  7. Monte Carlo study of efficiency roll-off of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes: Evidence for dominant role of triplet-polaron quenching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eersel, H. van, E-mail: h.v.eersel@tue.nl; Coehoorn, R. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bobbert, P. A.; Janssen, R. A. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-10-06

    We present an advanced molecular-scale organic light-emitting diode (OLED) model, integrating both electronic and excitonic processes. Using this model, we can reproduce the measured efficiency roll-off for prototypical phosphorescent OLED stacks based on the green dye tris[2-phenylpyridine]iridium (Ir(ppy){sub 3}) and the red dye octaethylporphine platinum (PtOEP) and study the cause of the roll-off as function of the current density. Both the voltage versus current density characteristics and roll-off agree well with experimental data. Surprisingly, the results of the simulations lead us to conclude that, contrary to what is often assumed, not triplet-triplet annihilation but triplet-polaron quenching is the dominant mechanism causing the roll-off under realistic operating conditions. Simulations for devices with an optimized recombination profile, achieved by carefully tuning the dye trap depth, show that it will be possible to fabricate OLEDs with a drastically reduced roll-off. It is envisaged that J{sub 90}, the current density at which the efficiency is reduced to 90%, can be increased by almost one order of magnitude as compared to the experimental state-of-the-art.

  8. Distinguishing triplet energy transfer and trap-assisted recombination in multi-color organic light-emitting diode with an ultrathin phosphorescent emissive layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Qin, E-mail: xueqin19851202@163.com; Liu, Shouyin [Department of Physical Science and Technology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Xie, Guohua; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Shiyong [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-03-21

    An ultrathin layer of deep-red phosphorescent emitter tris(1-phenylisoquinoline) iridium (III) (Ir(piq){sub 3}) is inserted within different positions of the electron blocking layer fac-tris (1-phenylpyrazolato-N,C{sup 2?})-iridium(III) (Ir(ppz){sub 3}) to distinguish the contribution of the emission from the triplet exciton energy transfer/diffusion from the adjacent blue phosphorescent emitter and the trap-assisted recombination from the narrow band-gap emitter itself. The charge trapping effect of the narrow band-gap deep-red emitter which forms a quantum-well-like structure also plays a role in shaping the electroluminescent characteristics of multi-color organic light-emitting diodes. By accurately controlling the position of the ultrathin sensing layer, it is considerably easy to balance the white emission which is quite challenging for full-color devices with multiple emission zones. There is nearly no energy transfer detectable if 7 nm thick Ir(ppz){sub 3} is inserted between the blue phosphorescent emitter and the ultrathin red emitter.

  9. Decoherence and Energy Relaxation in the Quantum-Classical Dynamics for Charge Transport in Organic Semiconducting Crystals: an Instantaneous Decoherence Correction Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Si, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We explore an instantaneous decoherence correction (IDC) approach for the decoherence and energy relaxation in the quantum-classical dynamics of charge transport in organic semiconducting crystals. These effects, originating from environmental fluctuations, are essential ingredients of the carrier dynamics. The IDC is carried out by measurement-like operations in the adiabatic representation. While decoherence is inherent in the IDC, energy relaxation is taken into account by considering the detailed balance through the introduction of energy-dependent reweighing factors, which could be either Boltzmann (IDC-BM) or Miller-Abrahams (IDC-MA) type. For a non-diagonal electron-phonon coupling model, it is shown that the IDC tends to enhance diffusion while energy relaxation weakens this enhancement. As expected, both the IDC-BM and IDC-MA achieve a near-equilibrium distribution at finite temperatures in the diffusion process, while the Ehrenfest dynamics renders system tending to infinite temperature limit. The r...

  10. Organic photovoltaics and concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapel, Jonathan King

    2008-01-01

    The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

  11. Small scatter and nearly-isothermal mass profiles to four half-light radii from two-dimensional stellar dynamics of early-type galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellari, Michele; Brodie, Jean P; Forbes, Duncan A; Strader, Jay; Foster, Caroline; Kartha, Sreeja S; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Spitler, Lee R; Usher, Christopher; Arnold, Jacob A

    2015-01-01

    We study the total mass-density profile for a sample of 14 fast-rotator early-type galaxies (stellar masses $10.2light radii $R_e$ (or 10 kpc), and a maximum radius of 2.0-6.2 $R_e$ (or 4-21 kpc). We use axisymmetric dynamical models based on the Jeans equations, which allow for a spatially varying anisotropy, and employ quite general profiles for the dark halos, and in particular do not place any restriction on the profile slope. This is made possible by the availability of spatially extended two-dimensional kinematics. We find that our relatively simple models provide a remarkably good description of the observed kinematics. The resulting total density profiles are well described by a nearly-isothermal power law $\\rho_{\\rm tot}(r)\\propto r^{-\\gamma}$ from $R_e$/10 to at least 4$R_e$, the largest average deviatio...

  12. Dynamics of low-energy nuclear forces for electromagnetic and weak reactions with the deuteron in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Ivanov; H. Oberhummer; N. I. Troitskaya; M. Faber

    2000-06-22

    A dynamics of low-energy nuclear forces is investigated for low-energy electromagnetic and weak nuclear reactions with the deuteron in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei by example of the neutron-proton radiative capture (M1-capture) n + p -> D + photon, the photomagnetic disintegration of the deuteron photon + D -> n + p and weak reactions of astrophysical interest. These are the solar proton burning p + p -> D + positron + nu_e, the pep-process p + electron + p -> D + nu_e and the neutrino and anti-neutrino disintegration of the deuteron caused by charged nu_e + D -> electron + p + p, anti-nu_e + D -> positron + n + n and neutral nu_e(anti-nu_e) + D -> nu_e(ant-nu_e) + n + p weak currents.

  13. Dynamics of low-energy nuclear forces and Solar Neutrino Problems in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Ivanov; H. Oberhummer; N. I. Troitskaya; M. Faber

    2000-11-04

    The Solar Neutrino Problems (SNP's) are analysed in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei. In this model a possible clue to the solution of the SNP's is in the reduction of the solar neutrino fluxes relative to the predicted by the Standard Solar Model through the decrease of the solar core temperature. The former can be realized through the enhancement of the astrophysical factor for the solar proton burning. The enhancement the upper bound of which is restricted by the helioseismological data goes dynamically via the contribution of the nucleon tensor current coupled to the deuteron. The agreement of the reduced solar neutrino fluxes with the experimental data can be reached within a scenario of vacuum two-flavour neutrino oscillations without a fine tuning of the neutrino-flavour oscillation parameters. In the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of light nuclei an enhancement of the astrophysical factor for the solar proton burning entails a change of the cross sections for neutrino and anti-neutrino disintegration of the deuteron at low energies. This provides a theoretical foundation for a new check of a value of the astrophysical factor in terrestrial laboratories.

  14. Lumental : web-based tunable lighting control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Harrison King

    2012-01-01

    Dynamically adjusting the light spectrum of spectrum-tunable light fixtures promises significant energy savings over binary or incremental dimming control. To enable this level of controllability, lighting must evolve from ...

  15. Design and Synthesis of Plasmonic Core/Shell Nanorods for Light Trapping in Organic Photo-Voltaics, Non-Linear Optics and Photo-Thermal Tumor Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jankovic, Vladan

    2013-01-01

    photodiodes, and photovoltaic cells." Applied Physics2-Layer Organic Photovoltaic Cell." Applied Physics Letters1995). "Polymer Photovoltaic Cells: Enhanced Efficiencies

  16. Light-Light Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naohiro Kanda

    2011-06-03

    For a long time, it is believed that the light by light scattering is described properly by the Lagrangian density obtained by Heisenberg and Euler. Here, we present a new calculation which is based on the modern field theory technique. It is found that the light-light scattering is completely different from the old expression. The reason is basically due to the unphysical condition (gauge condition) which was employed by the QED calcualtion of Karplus and Neumann. The correct cross section of light-light scattering at low energy of $(\\frac{\\omega}{m} \\ll 1)$ can be written as $ \\displaystyle{\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}=\\frac{1}{(6\\pi)^2}\\frac{\\alpha^4} {(2\\omega)^2}(3+2\\cos^2\\theta +\\cos^4\\theta)}$.

  17. MRS BULLETIN VOLUME 34 FEBRUARY 2009 www.mrs.org/bulletin 95 When light is absorbed in organic semiconductors, bound electronhole pairs known

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    . Nanostructured Organic­Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells Michael D. McGehee The following article is based, transistors, and solar cells." This article describes his research on organic solar cells. through Another advantage, which is partic- ularly important during the current stage of organic solar cell

  18. Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty...

  19. Atomistic Time-Domain Simulations of Light-Harvesting and Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Novel Nanoscale Materials for Solar Hydrogen Production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-03-22

    Funded by the DOE grant (i) we continued to study and analyze the atomistic detail of the electron transfer (ET) across the chromophore-TiO2 interface in Gratzel cell systems for solar hydrogen production. (ii) We extensively investigated the nature of photoexcited states and excited state dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) designed for photovoltaic applications. (iii) We continued a newly initiated research direction focusing on excited state properties and electron-phonon interactions in nanoscale carbon materials. Over the past year, the results of the DOE funded research were summarized in 3 review articles. 12 original manuscripts were written. The research results were reported in 28 invited talks at conferences and university seminars. 20 invitations were accepted for talks in the near future. 2 symposia at national and international meetings have being organized this year on topics closely related to the DOE funded project, and 2 more symposia have been planned for the near future. We summarized the insights into photoinduced dynamics of semiconductor QDs, obtained from our time-domain ab initio studies. QDs exhibit both molecular and bulk properties. Unlike either bulk or molecular materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. However, the chemical and physical properties of molecular and bulk materials often contradict each other, which can lead to differing viewpoints about the behavior of QDs. For example, the molecular view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, as well as slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. In contrast, the bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. By synthesizing the bulk and molecular viewpoints, we clarified the controversies and provided a unified atomistic picture of the nature and dynamics of photoexcited states in semiconductor QDs. We also summarized our recent findings about the photoinduced electron dynamics at the chromophore-semiconductor interfaces from a time-domain ab initio perspective. The interface provides the foundation for a new, promising type of solar cell and presents a fundamentally important case study for several fields, including photo-, electro- and analytical chemistries, molecular electronics, and photography. Further, the interface offers a classic example of an interaction between an organic molecular species and an inorganic bulk material. Scientists employ different concepts and terminologies to describe molecular and solid states of matter, and these differences make it difficult to describe the interface with a single model. At the basic atomistic level of description, however, this challenge can be largely overcome. Recent advances in non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and time-domain density functional theory have created a unique opportunity for simulating the ultrafast, photoinduced processes on a computer very similar to the way that they occur in nature. These state-of-the-art theoretical tools offered a comprehensive picture of a variety of electron transfer processes that occur at the interface, including electron injection from the chromophore to the semiconductor, electron relaxation and delocalization inside the semiconductor, back-transfer of the electron to the chromophore and to the electrolyte, and regeneration of the neutral chromophore by the electrolyte. The ab initio time-domain modeling is particularly valuable for understanding these dynamic features of the ultrafast electron transfer processes, which cannot be represented by a simple rate description. We demonstrated using symmetry adapted cluster theory with configuration interaction (SAC-CI) that charging of small PbSe nanocrystals (NCs) greatly modifies their electronic states and optical excitations. Conduction and valence band transitions that are not available in neutral NCs dominate

  20. Optimizing and extending light-sculpting microscopy for fast functional imaging in neuroscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupprecht, Peter; Groessl, Florian; Haubensak, Wulf E; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2015-01-01

    A number of questions in systems biology such as understanding how dynamics of neuronal networks are related to brain function require the ability to capture the functional dynamics of large cellular populations at high speed. Recently, this has driven the development of a number of parallel and high speed imaging techniques such as light-sculpting microscopy, which has been used to capture neuronal dynamics at the whole brain and single cell level in small model organism. However, the broader applicability of light-sculpting microscopy is limited by the size of volumes for which high speed imaging can be obtained and scattering in brain tissue. Here, we present strategies for optimizing the present tradeoffs in light-sculpting microscopy. Various scanning modalities in light-sculpting microscopy are theoretically and experimentally evaluated, and strategies to maximize the obtainable volume speeds, and depth penetration in brain tissue using different laser systems are provided. Design-choices, important par...

  1. Design and Synthesis of Plasmonic Core/Shell Nanorods for Light Trapping in Organic Photo-Voltaics, Non-Linear Optics and Photo-Thermal Tumor Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jankovic, Vladan

    2013-01-01

    Plasmon-enhanced solar energy conversion in organic bulkoption for solar energy conversion. Early research inand down- conversion luminescence." Solar Energy Materials

  2. Spatial and temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the Fraser River, Canada : a coupled organic-inorganic perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voss, Britta Marie

    2014-01-01

    The great geologic and climatic diversity of the Fraser River basin in southwestern Canada render it an excellent location for understanding biogeochemical cycling of sediments and terrigenous organic carbon in a relatively ...

  3. Dynamic modeling and control strategies for a micro-CSP plant with thermal storage powered by the Organic Rankine cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Melissa Kara

    2014-01-01

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are gaining ground as a means of effectively providing sustainable energy. Coupling small-scale ORCs powered by scroll expander- generators with solar thermal collectors and storage can ...

  4. Modulating light with light via giant nano-opto-mechanical nonlinearity of plasmonic metamaterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Jun-Yu; Zhang, Jianfa; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    From the demonstration of saturable absorption by Vavilow and Levshin in 1926, and with invention of the laser, unavailability of strongly nonlinear materials was a key obstacle for developing optical signal processing, in particular in transparent telecommunication networks. Today, most advanced photonic switching materials exploit gain dynamics and near-band and excitonic effects in semiconductors, nonlinearities in organic media with weakly-localized electrons and nonlinearities enhanced by hybridization with metamaterials. Here we report on a new type of artificial nonlinearity that is nano-opto-mechanical in nature. It was observed in an artificial metamaterial array of plasmonic meta-molecules supported by a flexible nano-membrane. Here nonlinearity is underpinned by the reversible reconfiguration of its structure induced by light. In a film of only 100 nanometres thickness we demonstrated modulation of light with light using milliwatt power telecom diode lasers.

  5. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  6. Smart Lighting Controller!! Smart lighting!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Betty Lise

    'll build the circuit! We'll use an LED to represent the room lights! #12;4! Block diagram! Battery! Rail! #12;23! LED: light-emitting diode! Diode conducts current in only one direction! When current flows1! Smart Lighting Controller!! #12;2! Smart lighting! No need to spend energy lighting the room if

  7. Apply: Solid-State Lighting Advanced Technology R&D - 2014(DE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Through research and development of solid-state lighting (SSL),including both light-emitting diode (LED) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) technologies, the objectives of...

  8. Selective Host-Guest Interaction between Metal Ions and Metal-Organic Frameworks using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Wang, Lin-Lin; Goh, Tian Wei; Xiao, Chaoxian; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Johnson, Duane D; Pruski, Marek; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-08

    The host–guest interaction between metal ions (Pt2+ and Cu2+) and a zirconium metal–organic framework (UiO-66-NH2) was explored using dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 15N{1H} CPMAS NMR spectroscopy supported by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional calculations. The combined experimental results conclude that each Pt2+ coordinates with two NH2 groups from the MOF and two Cl? from the metal precursor, whereas Cu2+ do not form chemical bonds with the NH2 groups of the MOF framework. Density functional calculations reveal that Pt2+ prefers a square-planar structure with the four ligands and resides in the octahedral cage of the MOF in either cis or trans configurations.

  9. Multistability, ionic doping, and charge dynamics in electrosynthesized polypyrrole, polymer-nanoparticle blend nonvolatile memory, and fixed p-i-n junction polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Daniel Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .and W. Y. Lee. Electrochemistry of conducting polypyr- roleand M. Oberst. Organic electrochemistry in the solid state-

  10. Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J.

    Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

  11. Light Quark Mass Reweighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Liu; Norman H. Christ; Chulwoo Jung

    2012-06-01

    We present a systematic study of the effectiveness of light quark mass reweighting. This method allows a single lattice QCD ensemble, generated with a specific value of the dynamical light quark mass, to be used to determine results for other, nearby light dynamical quark masses. We study two gauge field ensembles generated with 2+1 flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions with light quark masses m_l=0.02 (m_\\pi=620 MeV) and m_l=0.01 (m_\\pi=420 MeV). We reweight each ensemble to determine results which could be computed directly from the other and check the consistency of the reweighted results with the direct results. The large difference between the 0.02 and 0.01 light quark masses suggests that this is an aggressive application of reweighting as can be seen from fluctuations in the magnitude of the reweighting factor by four orders of magnitude. Never-the-less, a comparison of the reweighed topological charge, average plaquette, residual mass, pion mass, pion decay constant, and scalar correlator between these two ensembles shows agreement well described by the statistical errors. The issues of the effective number of configurations and finite sample size bias are discussed. An examination of the topological charge distribution implies that it is more favorable to reweight from heavier mass to lighter quark mass.

  12. Enhanced performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and OLED-based photoluminescent sensing platforms by novel microstructures and device architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Rui [Ames Laboratory

    2012-08-01

    After a general introduction to OLEDs and OLED-based PL sensors, the transient emission mechanism of guest-host OLEDs is described both experimentally and theoretically. A monolithic and easy-to-apply process is demonstrated for fabricating multicolor microcavity OLEDs (that improve the sensor platform). The outcoupling issues of OLEDs at the substrate/air interface are addressed by using a microstructured polymer film resulting from a PS and polyethylene glycol (PEG) mixture. Based on the understanding of OLEDs and their improvement, research was done in order to realize integrated all organic-based O{sub 2} and pH sensors with improved signal intensity and sensitivity. The sensor design modification and optimization are summarized

  13. COPLBI-811; NO. OF PAGES 6 Please cite this article in press as: Pawlowski WP. Chromosome organization and dynamics in plants, Curr Opin Plant Biol (2010), doi:10.1016/j.pbi.2010.09.015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    2010-01-01

    cells as well as during cell division, particularly meiosis. This research has been fueled by new organization and dynamics in plants, Curr Opin Plant Biol (2010), doi:10.1016/j.pbi.2010.09.015 Available:1­6 This review comes from a themed issue on Cell biology Edited by Christian Luschnig and Claire Grierson 1369

  14. Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LIGHT!! #12;Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c' C = 3 x 108 m/s Or 190,000 miles/second!! Light could travel around the world about 8 times in one second #12;What is light?? Light is a "wave packet" A photon is a "light particle" #12;Electromagnetic Radiation and You Light is sometimes

  15. Light-by-Light Scattering Effect in Light-Cone Supergraphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renata Kallosh; Pierre Ramond

    2010-06-24

    We give a relatively simple explanation of the light-cone supergraph prediction for the UV properties of the maximally supersymmetric theories. It is based on the existence of a dynamical supersymmetry which is not manifest in the light-cone supergraphs. It suggests that N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory is UV finite and N=8 supergravity is UV finite at least until 7 loops whereas the $n$-point amplitudes have no UV divergences at least until $L=n+3$. Here we show that this prediction can be deduced from the properties of light-cone supergraphs analogous to the light-by-light scattering effect in QED. A technical aspect of the argument relies on the observation that the dynamical supersymmetry action is, in fact, a compensating field-dependent gauge transformation required for the retaining the light-cone gauge condition $A_+=0$.

  16. Transition metal oxides on organic semiconductors Yongbiao Zhao a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    inverted organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and inverted organic solar cells (OSCs), which can improve of organic semiconductors (OSs). For example, in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) [7], they are used! Center of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic

  17. Adsorption and Separation of Light Gases on an Amino-Functionalized Metal–Organic Framework: An Adsorption and In Situ XRD Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couck S.; Stavitski E.; Gobehiya, E.; Kirschhock, C.E.A.; Serra-Crespo, P.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Martinez Joaristi, A.; Gascon, J.; Kapteijn, F.; Baron, G. V.; Denayer J.F.M.

    2012-02-29

    The NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) metal-organic framework was studied for its use in the separation of CO{sub 2} from CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} mixtures. Isotherms of methane, ethane, propane, hydrogen, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} were measured. The atypical shape of these isotherms is attributed to the breathing properties of the material, in which a transition from a very narrow pore form to a narrow pore form and from a narrow pore form to a large pore form occurs, depending on the total pressure and the nature of the adsorbate, as demonstrated by in-situ XRD patterns measured during adsorption. Apart from CO{sub 2}, all tested gases interacted weakly with the adsorbent. As a result, they are excluded from adsorption in the narrow pore form of the material at low pressure. CO{sub 2} interacted much more strongly and was adsorbed in significant amounts at low pressure. This gives the material excellent properties to separate CO{sub 2} from other gases. The separation of CO{sub 2} from methane, nitrogen, hydrogen, or a combination of these gases has been demonstrated by breakthrough experiments using pellets of NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al). The effect of total pressure (1-30 bar), gas composition, temperature (303-403 K) and contact time has been examined. In all cases, CO{sub 2} was selectively adsorbed, whereas methane, nitrogen, and hydrogen nearly did not adsorb at all. Regeneration of the adsorbent by thermal treatment, inert purge gas stripping, and pressure swing has been demonstrated. The NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) pellets retained their selectivity and capacity for more than two years.

  18. Light extraction analysis and enhancement in a quantum dot light emitting diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Light extraction analysis and enhancement in a quantum dot light emitting diode Ruidong Zhu outcoupling and angular performance of quantum dot light emitting diode (QLED). To illustrate the design principles, we use a red QLED as an example and compare its performance with an organic light emitting diode

  19. BSu3A.82.pdf Biomedical Optics and 3D Imaging OSA 2012 A novel method for measurement of dynamic light scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    light scattering phase function of particles utilizing laser-Doppler power density spectra S Wojtkiewicz (LD) power density spectra. In the clinical practice, the LD technique is used to assess tissues is the frequency shift) is equal to the measured laser Doppler power density spectrum S(f) normalized by its

  20. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  1. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  2. Lighting Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

  3. Global patterns and controls of soil organic carbon dynamics as simulated by multiple terrestrial biosphere models: Current status and future directions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Banger, Kamaljit; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Michalak, Anna M.; Cook, Robert; Ciais, Philippe; Hayes, Daniel; et al

    2015-06-05

    Soil is the largest organic carbon (C) pool of terrestrial ecosystems, and C loss from soil accounts for a large proportion of land-atmosphere C exchange. Therefore, a small change in soil organic C (SOC) can affect atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO?) concentration and climate change. In the past decades, a wide variety of studies have been conducted to quantify global SOC stocks and soil C exchange with the atmosphere through site measurements, inventories, and empirical/process-based modeling. However, these estimates are highly uncertain, and identifying major driving forces controlling soil C dynamics remains a key research challenge. This study has compiled century-longmore »(1901–2010) estimates of SOC storage and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) from 10 terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) in the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project and two observation-based data sets. The 10 TBM ensemble shows that global SOC estimate ranges from 425 to 2111 Pg C (1 Pg = 10¹? g) with a median value of 1158 Pg C in 2010. The models estimate a broad range of Rh from 35 to 69 Pg C yr?¹ with a median value of 51 Pg C yr?¹ during 2001–2010. The largest uncertainty in SOC stocks exists in the 40–65°N latitude whereas the largest cross-model divergence in Rh are in the tropics. The modeled SOC change during 1901–2010 ranges from –70 Pg C to 86 Pg C, but in some models the SOC change has a different sign from the change of total C stock, implying very different contribution of vegetation and soil pools in determining the terrestrial C budget among models. The model ensemble-estimated mean residence time of SOC shows a reduction of 3.4 years over the past century, which accelerate C cycling through the land biosphere. All the models agreed that climate and land use changes decreased SOC stocks, while elevated atmospheric CO? and nitrogen deposition over intact ecosystems increased SOC stocks—even though the responses varied significantly among models. Model representations of temperature and moisture sensitivity, nutrient limitation, and land use partially explain the divergent estimates of global SOC stocks and soil C fluxes in this study. In addition, a major source of systematic error in model estimations relates to nonmodeled SOC storage in wetlands and peatlands, as well as to old C storage in deep soil layers.« less

  4. High Efficiency Organic Light Emitting Devices for Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    So, Franky; Tansu, Nelson; Gilchrist, James

    2013-06-30

    Incorporate internal scattering layers and microlens arrays in high efficiency OLED to achieve up to 70% EQE.

  5. Enhanced Light Extraction from Organic Light Emitting Diodes - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S.Engineering Metal Impuritiesa Flywheel.Innovation

  6. New Morphological Paradigm Uncovered in Organic Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Morphological Paradigm Uncovered in Organic Solar Cells Print Organic solar cells are made of light, flexible, renewable materials; they require simple and inexpensive...

  7. Carrier Dynamics Resulting from Above and Below Gap Excitation of P3HT and P3HT/ PCBM Investigated by Optical-Pump Terahertz-Probe Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, L. Michael

    -electronic devices such as organic field-effect transistors (OFET), organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), and organic

  8. Electroluminescence in ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Shrivalli

    2011-07-12

    This thesis reports the light emission in ion gel gated, thin film organic semiconductor transistors and investigates the light emission mechanism behind these devices. We report that ion gel gated organic polymer semiconductor transistors emit...

  9. Use of Ultrafast Dispersed Pump-Dump-Probe and Pump-Repump-Probe Spectroscopies to Explore the Light-Induced Dynamics of Peridinin in Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Use of Ultrafast Dispersed Pump-Dump-Probe and Pump-Repump-Probe Spectroscopies to Explore Form: NoVember 14, 2005 Optical pump-induced dynamics of the highly asymmetric carotenoid peridinin in methanol was studied by dispersed pump-probe, pump-dump-probe, and pump-repump-probe transient absorption

  10. Cathode encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keuning, W.; Weijer, P. van de; Lifka, H.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Creatore, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, P.O. Box WAG12, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films synthesized by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) at room temperature (25 deg. C) have been tested as water vapor permeation barriers for organic light emitting diode devices. Silicon nitride films (a-SiN{sub x}:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition served as reference and were used to develop Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H stacks. On the basis of Ca test measurements, a very low intrinsic water vapor transmission rate of {<=} 2 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} and 4 x 10{sup -6} g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} (20 deg. C/50% relative humidity) were found for 20-40 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 300 nm a-SiN{sub x}:H films, respectively. The cathode particle coverage was a factor of 4 better for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films compared to the a-SiN{sub x}:H films and an average of 0.12 defects per cm{sup 2} was obtained for a stack consisting of three barrier layers (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/a-SiN{sub x}:H/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}).

  11. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    . Example of a flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) (from the Center-inch OLED television coming on the market this fall (from LG) !" + 0-vibration couplings Luminescent materials Basic concepts of light absorption

  12. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Tunesi, Simonetta (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

    1991-01-01

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light.

  13. Organic magnetoresistance from deep traps N. J. Harmon1,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    ,16 Traps that exhibit strong spin-orbit effects can enhance organic light-emitting diode (OLED) emission

  14. Organic light emitting device with conducting cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silvernail, Jeffrey; Paynter, Jason; Rajan, Kamala

    2014-07-01

    The claimed invention was made by, on behalf of, and/or in connection with one or more of the following parties to a joint university corporation research agreement: Princeton University, The University of Southern California, The University of Michigan and Universal Display Corporation. The agreement was in effect on and before the date the claimed invention was made, and the claimed invention was made as a result of activities undertaken within the scope of the agreement.

  15. Comparative study of field-dependent carrier dynamics and emission kinetics of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes grown on (112{sup ¯}2) semipolar versus (0001) polar planes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Yun; Liu, Wei; Chen, Rui; Tiam Tan, Swee; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Ju, Zhengang; Zhang, Xueliang; Sun, Handong; Wei Sun, Xiao; Erdem, Talha; Zhao, Yuji; DenBaars, Steven P. E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org; Nakamura, Shuji; Volkan Demir, Hilmi E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-04-07

    The characteristics of electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) emission from GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on (112{sup ¯}2) semipolar plane and (0001) polar plane have been comparatively investigated. Through different bias-dependent shifting trends observed from the PL and time-resolved PL spectra (TRPL) for the two types of LEDs, the carrier dynamics within the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) region is systematically analyzed and the distinct field-dependent emission kinetics are revealed. Moreover, the polarization induced internal electric field has been deduced for each of the LEDs. The relatively stable emission behavior observed in the semipolar LED is attributed to the smaller polarization induced internal electric field. The study provides meaningful insight for the design of quantum well (QW) structures with high radiative recombination rates.

  16. Lighting in the Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by your library lights E Kilowatt-hours consumed by your library lights F Annual cost of operating your library lights H Current lighting index for your library ...

  17. Light's Darkness

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Padgett, Miles [University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

    2010-01-08

    Optical vortices and orbital angular momentum are currently topical subjects in the optics literature. Although seemingly esoteric, they are, in fact, the generic state of light and arise whenever three or more plane waves interfere. To be observed by eye the light must be monochromatic. Laser speckle is one such example, where the optical energy circulates around each black spot, giving a local orbital angular momentum. This talk with report three on-going studies. First, when considering a volume of interfering waves, the laser specs map out threads of complete darkness embedded in the light. Do these threads form loops? Links? Or even knots? Second, when looking through a rapidly spinning window, the image of the world on the other side is rotated: true or false? Finally, the entanglement of orbital angular momentum states means measuring how the angular position of one photons sets the angular momentum of another: is this an angular version of the EPR (Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen) paradox?

  18. Types of Lights Types of Lights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Types of Lights Types of Lights q So far we have studied point lights ­ Radiate in all direc7ons q Other lights ­ Direc7onal lights (posi7on-independent) ­ Spotlights #12;2 Direc1onal Lights q Shine in a single, uniform direc7on q All rays

  19. Micro-focused Brillouin light scattering study of the magnetization dynamics driven by Spin Hall effect in a transversely magnetized NiFe nanowire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madami, M; Moriyama, T; Tanaka, K; Siracusano, G; Carpentieri, M; Finocchio, G; Tacchi, S; Ono, T; Carlotti, G

    2015-01-01

    We employed micro-focused Brillouin light scattering to study the amplification of the thermal spin wave eigenmodes by means of a pure spin current, generated by the spin-Hall effect, in a transversely magnetized Pt(4nm)/NiFe(4nm)/SiO2(5nm) layered nanowire with lateral dimensions 500x2750 nm2. The frequency and the cross section of both the center (fundamental) and the edge spin wave modes have been measured as a function of the intensity of the injected dc electric current. The frequency of both modes exhibits a clear redshift while their cross section is greatly enhanced on increasing the intensity of the injected dc. A threshold-like behavior is observed for a value of the injected dc of 2.8 mA. Interestingly an additional mode, localized in the central part of the nanowire, appears at higher frequency on increasing the intensity of the injected dc above the threshold value. Micromagnetic simulations were used to quantitatively reproduce the experimental results and to investigate the complex non-linear d...

  20. Light Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-10-13

    A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

  1. Light Harvesting and Blue-Green Light Induced Non-Photochemical Quenching in Two Different CPhycocyanin Mutants of Synechocystis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Light Harvesting and Blue-Green Light Induced Non-Photochemical Quenching in Two Different: Cyanobacteria are oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms that harvest sunlight and convert excitation energy into chemical energy. Most of the light is absorbed by large light harvesting complexes called phycobilisomes

  2. Regularizing future cosmological singularities with varying speed of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Shojai; A. Shojai; M. Sanati

    2015-07-09

    Cosmological models may result in future singularities. We show that, in the framework of dynamical varying speed of light theories, it is possible to regularize those singularities.

  3. Organic electrophosphorescence device having interfacial layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choulis, Stelios A. (San Jose, CA); Mathai, Mathew (Santa Clara, CA); Choong, Vi-En (San Jose, CA); So, Franky (Gainesville, FL)

    2010-08-10

    Techniques are described for forming an organic light emitting diode device with improved device efficiency. Materials having at least one energy level that is similar to those of a phosphorescent light emitting material in the diode are incorporated into the device to directly inject holes or electrons to the light emitting material.

  4. Surface plasmon polariton mediated energy transfer from external antennas into organic photovoltaic cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidel, Timothy David

    2006-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in recent years, the tradeoff between light absorption and charge separation efficiency remains pervasive; increasing light absorption by ...

  5. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0 Averagequestionnaires 7tniLighting Sign In

  6. LED Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light-Emitting diodes (LEDs) efficiently produce light in a fundamentally different way than any legacy or traditional source of light.

  7. Aluminum (l5Onm) Organic Layers (lOOnm)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    in OLED structures has resulted [1] in significant improvements in both light output (brightness________________________ ITO (l8Onm) Glass (1.1mm) Fabrication of natural DNA-containing organic light emitting diodes Eliot F, Ohio 45433-7707 USA ABSTRACT The process of creating natural DNA-containing bio-organic light emitting

  8. OLEDS FOR GENERAL LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anil Duggal; Don Foust; Chris Heller; Bill Nealon; Larry Turner; Joe Shiang; Nick Baynes; Tim Butler; Nalin Patel

    2004-02-29

    The goal of this program was to reduce the long term technical risks that were keeping the lighting industry from embracing and developing organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology for general illumination. The specific goal was to develop OLEDs for lighting to the point where it was possible to demonstrate a large area white light panel with brightness and light quality comparable to a fluorescence source and with an efficacy comparable to that of an incandescent source. it was recognized that achieving this would require significant advances in three area: (1) the improvement of white light quality for illumination, (2) the improvement of OLED energy efficiency at high brightness, and (3) the development of cost-effective large area fabrication techniques. The program was organized such that, each year, a ''deliverable'' device would be fabricated which demonstrated progress in one or more of the three critical research areas. In the first year (2001), effort concentrated on developing an OLED capable of generating high illumination-quality white light. Ultimately, a down-conversion method where a blue OLED was coupled with various down-conversion layers was chosen. Various color and scattering models were developed to aid in material development and device optimization. The first year utilized this approach to deliver a 1 inch x 1 inch OLED with higher illumination-quality than available fluorescent sources. A picture of this device is shown and performance metrics are listed. To their knowledge, this was the first demonstration of true illumination-quality light from an OLED. During the second year, effort concentrated on developing a scalable approach to large area devices. A novel device architecture consisting of dividing the device area into smaller elements that are monolithically connected in series was developed. In the course of this development, it was realized that, in addition to being scalable, this approach made the device tolerant to the most common OLED defect--electrical shorts. This architecture enabled the fabrication of a 6 inch x 6 inch OLED deliverable for 2002. A picture of this deliverable is shown and the performance metrics are listed. At the time, this was the highest efficiency, highest lumen output illumination-quality OLED in existence. The third year effort concentrated on improving the fabrication yield of the 6 inch x 6 inch devices and improving the underlying blue device efficiency. An efficiency breakthrough was achieved through the invention of a new device structure such that now 15 lumen per watt devices could be fabricated. A 2 feet x 2 feet OLED panel consisting of sixteen 6 inch x 6 inch high efficiency devices tiled together was then fabricated. Pictures of this panel are shown with performance metrics listed. This panel met all project objectives and was the final deliverable for the project. It is now the highest efficiency, highest lumen output, illumination-quality OLED in existence.

  9. Effect of Dispersant on Asphaltene Suspension Dynamics: Aggregation and Sedimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    processes, most involving scat- tering, either dynamic light scattering, static light scattering, or neutron on this aggregation behavior through the use of dynamic light scattering, showing that both the amount of dispersant asphaltene suspensions. The light scattering results match well with those obtained through the macroscopic

  10. Sandia Energy - (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting: Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting: Science, Technology, Economic Perspectives Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting:...

  11. Comparative study of field-dependent carrier dynamics and emission kinetics of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes grown on (11 2 2) semipolar versus (0001) polar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Articles you may be interested in Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam light-emitting diodes prepared on ( 11 2 ¯ 2 ) -plane GaN J. Appl. Phys. 100, 113109 (2006); 10.1063/1.2382667 Demonstration of a semipolar ( 10 1 ¯ 3 ¯ ) In Ga N Ga N green light emitting diode Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 231110

  12. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  13. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hamby, Jr., Clyde (Harriman, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  14. Sustainable Office Lighting Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

  15. Light source comprising a common substrate, a first led device and a second led device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choong, Vi-En (Carlsbad, CA)

    2010-02-23

    At least one stacked organic or polymeric light emitting diode (PLEDs) devices to comprise a light source is disclosed. At least one of the PLEDs includes a patterned cathode which has regions which transmit light. The patterned cathodes enable light emission from the PLEDs to combine together. The light source may be top or bottom emitting or both.

  16. A mutation in ?-tubulin alters microtubule dynamics and organization and is synthetically lethal with the kinesin-like protein Pkl1p

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluh, Janet L.; Nogales, Eva; Oakley, Berl R.; McDonald, Kent; Pidoux, Alison; Cande, W.Z.

    2000-04-01

    ., 1999). Human g-tubulin can replace the endogenous protein in fission yeast (Horio and Oakley, 1994), suggesting that key aspects of g-tubulin function are broadly conserved. Microtubule motors play important roles in spindle as- sembly and dynamics. A.... The following strains and plasmids were kind gifts: mad22 strain (h2 ade6-M210, leu1-32, ura4-D18, mad2::ura41) from Dr. Shelly Sazar (Verna and Marrs McLean Departments of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; He et al., 1997...

  17. Enhancement of pump efficiency of a visible wavelength organic distributed feedback laser by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Brian

    , "Optically-pumped lasing in hybrid organic- inorganic light-emitting diodes," Adv. Funct. Mater. 19(13), 2130

  18. Solid-state lighting technology perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2006-08-01

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

  19. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Tunesi, S.; Xu, Q.

    1991-07-30

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light. 3 figures.

  20. Lighting Options for Homes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.S.

    1991-04-01

    This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

  1. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  2. Transformations in Lighting: The Sixth Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 400 SSL technology leaders from industry, research organizations, universities, national laboratories, manufacturing, energy efficiency organizations, utilities and municipalities gathered in San Francisco, CA to participate in the "Transformations in Lighting" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on February 3-5, 2009. The workshop, hosted by DOE, with sponsors BetaLED, Echelon, Pacific Gas & Electric, and Southern California Edison, was the sixth annual DOE meeting to accelerate SSL technology advances and guide market introduction of quality SSL products. The workshop brought together a diverse gathering of participants - from the R&D community to lighting designers and architects - to share insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  3. Role of surface profiles in surface plasmon-polariton-mediated emission of light through a thin metal film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    such as organic light-emitting diodes. 1. Introduction The field of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs, several research laboratories have begun to explore top-emitting OLEDs where light is emitted through of topical concern [5, 6]. Light is produced in OLEDs when excitons formed by the injection of opposite

  4. Photochemical deterioration of the organic/metal contacts in organic optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Qi; Williams, Graeme; Aziz, Hany; Tsui Ting

    2012-09-15

    We study the effect of exposure to light on a wide range of organic/metal contacts that are commonly used in organic optoelectronic devices and found that irradiation by light in the visible and UV range results in a gradual deterioration in their electrical properties. This photo-induced contact degradation reduces both charge injection (i.e., from the metal to the organic layer) and charge extraction (i.e., from the organic layer to the metal). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements reveal detectable changes in the interface characteristics after irradiation, indicating that the photo-degradation is chemical in nature. Changes in XPS characteristics after irradiation suggests a possible reduction in bonds associated with organic-metal complexes. Measurements of interfacial adhesion strength using the four-point flexure technique reveal a decrease in organic/metal adhesion in irradiated samples, consistent with a decrease in metal-organic bond density. The results shed the light on a new material degradation mechanism that appears to have a wide presence in organic/metal interfaces in general, and which likely plays a key role in limiting the stability of various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic light emitting devices, organic solar cells, and organic photo-detectors.

  5. Fermilab | About | Organization | Fermilab Organization | Explanation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Symbols Line Organization: sectors, divisions, sections Line Organization Matrix Organization: centers, projects and programs utilizing resources spanning the entire...

  6. Forty-four years of studying light adaptation using the probed-sinewave paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Forty-four years of studying light adaptation using the probed-sinewave paradigm Columbia-sinewave experiments investigating the dynamics of light adaptation. We also briefly examine four models that have been-sinewave, light adaptation, computational models, temporal dynamics, flicker Introduction Over the past 44 years

  7. Practical image based lighting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaemin

    2003-01-01

    information is lighting. Image based lighting that is developed to recover illumination information of the real world from photographs has recently been popular in computer graphics. In this thesis we present a practical image based lighting method. Our...

  8. Light in the city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Kavita, 1976-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis focuses on enhancing the awareness of light for the pedestrian,and using light as a way of revealing the structure of the city and its relation to the cosmos. It proposes that aesthetic qualities of light inform ...

  9. Advances in Lighting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumber, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Increasing electricity costs have made a significant impact on lighting. The Illuminating Engineering society (I.E.S.) and the lighting industry are producing new standards, procedures and products to make lighting more appropriate and energy...

  10. Natural lighting and skylights 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Benjamin Hampton

    1961-01-01

    There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work...

  11. Specific light in sculpture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, John William

    1989-01-01

    Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

  12. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  13. Simultaneous monitoring of singlet and triplet exciton variations in solid organic semiconductors driven by an external static magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Baofu Alameh, Kamal

    2014-07-07

    The research field of organic spintronics has remarkably and rapidly become a promising research area for delivering a range of high-performance devices, such as magnetic-field sensors, spin valves, and magnetically modulated organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Plenty of microscopic physical and chemical models based on exciton or charge interactions have been proposed to explain organic magneto-optoelectronic phenomena. However, the simultaneous observation of singlet- and triplet-exciton variations in an external magnetic field is still unfeasible, preventing a thorough theoretical description of the spin dynamics in organic semiconductors. Here, we show that we can simultaneously observe variations of singlet excitons and triplet excitons in an external magnetic field, by designing an OLED structure employing a singlet-exciton filtering and detection layer in conjunction with a separate triplet-exciton detection layer. This OLED structure enables the observation of a Lorentzian and a non-Lorentzian line-shape magnetoresponse for singlet excitons and triplet excitons, respectively.

  14. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, Jie; Li, Quan; Paterson, Daniel A; Storey, John M D; Imrie, Corrie T; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal(heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic right-angle helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, from ultraviolet to visible and infrared (360-1520 nm for the same chemical composition) by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect exists in a wide temperature range (including the room temperatures) and thus can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of electromagnetic waves, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, reflective color display, and transparent see-through displays.

  15. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Xiang; Yannian Li; Quan Li; Daniel A. Paterson; John M. D. Storey; Corrie T. Imrie; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2015-03-30

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal(heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic right-angle helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, from ultraviolet to visible and infrared (360-1520 nm for the same chemical composition) by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect exists in a wide temperature range (including the room temperatures) and thus can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of electromagnetic waves, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, reflective color display, and transparent see-through displays.

  16. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

  17. Efficient Lighting Design and Office Worker Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Carol C.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2004-08-22

    This paper provides an overview of the research findings that will be used as the basis for changing customer buying behaviors and a recipe for success for lighting solutions that will yield both energy savings and non-energy benefits. The lighting energy savings of these new systems compared to strategies of the past is analyzed, along with a recommended market penetration strategy using market research and the dynamics of the construction market.

  18. Poly(p-phenylene vinylene)/tris(8-hydroxy) quinoline aluminum heterostructure light emitting diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poly(p-phenylene vinylene)/tris(8-hydroxy) quinoline aluminum heterostructure light emitting diode are presented from polymer/molecular organic heterostructure light emitting diodes composed of a layer,2 organic light emitting diodes OLEDs utilizing fluorescent molecules have attracted considerable interest

  19. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    are also under consideration. Outside the DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency's Green Lights program promotes energy-efficient lighting as a means to reducing...

  20. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Motivation and Computation of Lighting Measures Floorspace by Lighting Equipment Configuration As described in Appendix A, for each building b, the CBECS data set has the total...

  1. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    more comprehensive understanding of commercial lighting and the potential for lighting energy savings. Steps to build on this analysis can be taken in many directions. One...

  2. Leavenworth Tree Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Join HERO for our annual Leavenworth Tree Lighting Ceremony & Shopping SATURDAY DECEMBER 12, 2015 Leavenworth Christmas Lighting Festival Visitors return year after year for some...

  3. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, which causes the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce. High-Efficiency Ballast (HEB): A lighting conservation feature...

  4. Exciting White Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Windows that emit light and are more energy efficient? Universal Display’s PHOLED technology enables windows that have transparent light-emitting diodes in them.

  5. Method of doping organic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kloc, Christian Leo (Constance, DE); Ramirez, Arthur Penn (Summit, NJ); So, Woo-Young (New Providence, NJ)

    2012-02-28

    A method includes the steps of forming a contiguous semiconducting region and heating the region. The semiconducting region includes polyaromatic molecules. The heating raises the semiconducting region to a temperature above room temperature. The heating is performed in the presence of a dopant gas and the absence of light to form a doped organic semiconducting region.

  6. Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controls Lighting Controls Use lighting controls to automatically turn lights on and off as needed, and save energy. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.comMaliketh. Use lighting...

  7. Electronic processes in organic optoelectronics : insights gained through modeling and magnetic field effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hontz, Eric Richard

    2015-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are organic optoelectronics offering a number of unique benefits that may play an important role in the future of clean energy generation and efficient ...

  8. Theoretical characterization of excitation energy transfer in chlorosome light-harvesting antennae from green sulfur bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Chlorosomes are the largest and most efficient natural light-harvesting antenna systems. They contain thousands of pigment molecules - bacteriochlorophylls (BChls)- that are organized into supramolecular aggregates and form a very efficient network for excitonic energy migration. Here, we present a theoretical study of excitation energy transfer (EET) in the chlorosome based on experimental evidence of the molecular assembly. Our model for the exciton dynamics throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular structure, and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. The simulation results reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to se...

  9. Memory-assisted exciton diffusion in the chlorosome light-harvesting antenna of green sulfur bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takatoshi Fujita; Jennifer C. Brookes; Semion K. Saikin; Alan Aspuru-Guzik

    2012-06-25

    Chlorosomes are likely the largest and most efficient natural light-harvesting photosynthetic antenna systems. They are composed of large numbers of bacteriochlorophylls organized into supramolecular aggregates. We explore the microscopic origin of the fast excitation energy transfer in the chlorosome using the recently-resolved structure and atomistic-detail simulations. Despite the dynamical disorder effects on the electronic transitions of the bacteriochlorophylls, our simulations show that the exciton delocalizes over the entire aggregate in about 200 fs. The memory effects associated to the dynamical disorder assist the exciton diffusion through the aggregates and enhance the diffusion coefficients as a factor of two as compared to the model without memory. Furthermore, exciton diffusion in the chlorosome is found to be highly anisotropic with the preferential transfer towards the baseplate, which is the next functional element in the photosynthetic system.

  10. Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N. J.; Koltai, R. N.; McGowan, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    The GATEWAY program followed two pedestrian-scale lighting projects that required multiple mockups – one at Stanford University in California and the other at Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. The report provides insight into pedestrian lighting criteria, how they differ from street and area lighting criteria, and how solid-state lighting can be better applied in pedestrian applications.

  11. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizingOrganizing

  12. LIGHT CURVES OF 32 LARGE TRANSNEPTUNIAN OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benecchi, Susan D.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2013-05-15

    We present observations of 32 primarily bright, newly discovered Transneptunian objects (TNOs) observable from the Southern Hemisphere during 39 nights of observation with the Irenee du Pont 2.5 m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Our dataset includes objects in all dynamical classes, but is weighted toward scattered objects. We find 15 objects for which we can fit periods and amplitudes to the data, and place light curve amplitude upper limits on the other 17 objects. Combining our sample with the larger light curve sample in the literature, we find a 3{sigma} correlation between light curve amplitude and absolute magnitude with fainter objects having larger light curve amplitudes. We looked for correlations between light curve and individual orbital properties, but did not find any statistically significant results. However, if we consider light curve properties with respect to object dynamical classification, we find statistically different distributions between the classical-scattered and classical-resonant populations at the 95.60% and 94.64% level, respectively, with the classical objects having larger amplitude light curves. The significance is 97.05% if the scattered and resonant populations are combined. The properties of binary light curves are largely consistent with the greater TNO population except in the case of tidally locked systems. All the Haumea family objects measured so far have light curve amplitudes and rotation periods {<=}10 hr, suggesting that they are not significantly different from the larger TNO population. We expect multiple factors are influencing object rotations: object size dominates light curve properties except in the case of tidal, or proportionally large collisional interactions with other TNOs, the influence of the latter being different for each TNO sub-population. We also present phase curves and colors for some of our objects.

  13. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  14. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, E.

    1995-05-23

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

  15. Green exciplex emission from a bilayer light-emitting diode containing a rare earth ternary complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanyi

    Green exciplex emission from a bilayer light-emitting diode containing a rare earth ternary complex form 18 October 2001 Abstract A bilayer organic light-emitting diode using a blue-fluorescent yttrium

  16. Materials and architectures for efficient harvesting of singlet and triplet excitons for white light emitting OLEDs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E; Forrest, Stephen

    2015-02-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  17. Polymer OLED White Light Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homer Antoniadis; Vi-En Choong; Stelios Choulis; Brian Cumpston; Rahul Gupta; Mathew Mathai; Michael Moyer; Franky So

    2005-12-19

    OSRAM Opto Semiconductors (OSRAM) successfully completed development, fabrication and characterization of the large area, polymer based white light OLED prototype at their OLED Research and Development (R&D) facility in San Jose, CA. The program, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), consisted of three key objectives: (1) Develop new polymer materials and device architectures--in order to improve the performance of organic light emitters. (2) Develop processing techniques--in order to demonstrate and enable the manufacturing of large area, white light and color tunable, solid state light sources. (3) Develop new electronics and driving schemes for organic light sources, including color-tunable light sources. The key performance goals are listed. A world record efficiency of 25 lm/W was established for the solution processed white organic device from the significant improvements made during the project. However, the challenges to transfer this technology from an R&D level to a large tile format such as, the robustness of the device and the coating uniformity of large area panels, remain. In this regard, the purity and the blend nature of the materials are two factors that need to be addressed in future work. During the first year, OSRAM's Materials and Device group (M&D) worked closely with the major polymer material suppliers to develop the polymer emissive technology. M&D was successful in demonstrating a 7-8 lm/W white light source which was based on fluorescent materials. However, it became apparent that the major gains in efficiency could only be made if phosphorescent materials were utilized. Thus, in order to improve the performance of the resulting devices, the focus of the project shifted towards development of solution-processable phosphorescent light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) and device architectures. The result is a higher efficiency than the outlined project milestone.

  18. Exotic hybrid mesons with light quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Bernard; Tom Blum; Thomas A. DeGrand; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs. M. Heller; Jim Hetrick; Craig McNeile; Kari Rummukainen; Bob Sugar; Doug Toussaint; Matt Wingate

    1996-07-12

    Hybrid mesons, made from a quark, an antiquark and gluons, can have quantum numbers inaccessible to conventional quark-antiquark states. Confirmation of such states would give information on the role of "dynamical" color in low energy QCD. We present preliminary results for hybrid meson masses using light Wilson valence quarks.

  19. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tips: Lighting Tips: Lighting Lighting choices save you money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Lighting choices save you money....

  20. Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes from First Principles and Classical Reactive Molecular Dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lithium...

  1. Smoke buildup and light scattering in a cylindrical cavity above a uniform flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upadhyay, Rochan; Ezekoye, Ofodike

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and aerosol dynamics modeling to investigate the buildup of smoke and light scattering in a cylindrical cavity geometry, considered to be an idealized representation ...

  2. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muindi, Fanuel

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. ...

  3. Deficiencies of Lighting Codes and Ordinances in Controlling Light Pollution from Parking Lot Lighting Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal, Emily

    2012-05-31

    The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of light pollution from parking lot electric lighting installations and highlight the deficiencies of lighting ordinances in preventing light pollution. Using an industry-accepted lighting...

  4. Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganization Chart Organization Charts

  5. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout EventsOrganizing

  6. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing Committee

  7. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing

  8. OpenGL Lighting 13. OpenGL Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Perry

    OpenGL Lighting 13. OpenGL Lighting · Overview of Lighting in OpenGL In order for lighting to have an effect in OpenGL, two things are required: A light An object to be lit Lights can be set to any color determine how they reflect the light which hits them. The color(s) of an object is determined

  9. CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS MEETING

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    There is a lot of buzz today about the Internet of Things and the convergence of intelligent controllable light sources, communication networks, sensors, and data exchange in future lighting...

  10. Fast Light, Fast Neutrinos?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Cahill

    2011-10-10

    In certain media, light has been observed with group velocities faster than the speed of light. The recent OPERA report of superluminal 17 GeV neutrinos may describe a similar phenomenon.

  11. Kyler Nelson Light Timer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    designated by the user, the Arduino board will dim the light to save energy. The user designates the time instance, the light is dimmed using pulse width modulation (PWM) in the Arduino's pin number 11

  12. Automatic lighting controls demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Lighting and Daylight Harvesting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bos, J.

    2011-01-01

    in 1992 to serve the lighting design needs of the architectural and interior design communities. With over fifty years of combined experience, our areas of expertise range from architectural and theatrical lighting to custom fixture design. Bos... Lighting Design We are active members of the International Association of Lighting Designers, the American Institute of Architects, the Illuminating Engineering Society, International Dark Skies Association and the United States Green Building Council...

  14. LED Lighting Retrofit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw-Meadow, N.

    2011-01-01

    kWh is the one that never gets used? ?Dedicated to making environmentally responsible products? Ringdale Introduction LED Roadway Lighting Better Light, Fewer Watts. Period. Nathan Shaw-Meadow LED Lighting Specialist Ringdale ActiveLED ESL.../exponential efficiency growth often deters investment today 7 Challenges to Implementation ESL-KT-11-11-57 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 ? Municipal Street Light Case Study 8 ? Replaced 400W High Pressure Sodium fixtures with 52W Active...

  15. 278 JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 1, NO. 2, DECEMBER 2005 Coupling Efficiency Enhancement in Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the OLED. Index Terms--Coupling efficiency, microlens array, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), soft lithography. I. INTRODUCTION HIGH efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are required for display and solid-state lighting ap- plications. The external quantum efficiency of an OLED is determined

  16. Light emitting device comprising phosphorescent materials for white light generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    2014-07-22

    The present invention relates to phosphors for energy downconversion of high energy light to generate a broadband light spectrum, which emit light of different emission wavelengths.

  17. And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.......

  18. Method and system for reducing device performance degradation of organic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teague, Lucile C.

    2014-09-02

    Methods and systems for reducing the deleterious effects of gate bias stress on the drain current of an organic device, such as an organic thin film transistor, are provided. In a particular aspect, the organic layer of an organic device is illuminated with light having characteristics selected to reduce the gate bias voltage effects on the drain current of the organic device. For instance, the wavelength and intensity of the light are selected to provide a desired recovery of drain current of the organic device. If the characteristics of the light are appropriately matched to the organic device, recovery of the deleterious effects caused by gate bias voltage stress effects on the drain current of the organic device can be achieved. In a particular aspect, the organic device is selectively illuminated with light to operate the organic device in multiple modes of operation.

  19. Polymer and small molecule based hybrid light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choong, Vi-En (Carlsbad, CA); Choulis, Stelios (Nuremberg, DE); Krummacher, Benjamin Claus (Regensburg, DE); Mathai, Mathew (Monroeville, PA); So, Franky (Gainesville, FL)

    2010-03-16

    An organic electroluminescent device, includes: a substrate; a hole-injecting electrode (anode) coated over the substrate; a hole injection layer coated over the anode; a hole transporting layer coated over the hole injection layer; a polymer based light emitting layer, coated over the hole transporting layer; a small molecule based light emitting layer, thermally evaporated over the polymer based light emitting layer; and an electron-injecting electrode (cathode) deposited over the electroluminescent polymer layer.

  20. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design Lighting Design Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of...

  1. Materials for solid state lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.G.; Simmons, J.A.

    2002-03-26

    Dramatic improvement in the efficiency of inorganic and organic light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs) within the last decade has made these devices viable future energy efficient replacements for current light sources. However, both technologies must overcome major technical barriers, requiring significant advances in material science, before this goal can be achieved. Attention will be given to each technology associated with the following major areas of material research: (1) material synthesis, (2) process development, (3) device and defect physics, and (4) packaging. The discussion on material synthesis will emphasize the need for further development of component materials, including substrates and electrodes, necessary for improving device performance. The process technology associated with the LEDs and OLEDs is very different, but in both cases it is one factor limiting device performance. Improvements in process control and methodology are expected to lead to additional benefits of higher yield, greater reliability and lower costs. Since reliability and performance are critical to these devices, an understanding of the basic physics of the devices and device failure mechanisms is necessary to effectively improve the product. The discussion will highlight some of the more basic material science problems remaining to be solved. In addition, consideration will be given to packaging technology and the need for the development of novel materials and geometries to increase the efficiencies and reliability of the devices. The discussion will emphasize the performance criteria necessary to meet lighting applications, in order to illustrate the gap between current status and market expectations for future product.

  2. Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Induction lighting is one of the best kept secrets in energy-efficient lighting. Simply stated, induction lighting is essentially a fluorescent light without electrodes or filaments, the items that...

  3. Study of surface enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy of chromophores on unaggregated plasmonically active nanoparticles / Surface-enhanced Raman study of the interaction of the PEDOT:PSS and P3HT/PCBM components of organic polymer solar cells with plasmonically active nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavytska-Barba, Marina Valeriyivna

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid Plasmonic Organic Solar Cells with Ag Nanoparticles.a Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cell. Opt. Express 2010,Light Collection in Organic Solar Cells. Appl. Phys. Lett.

  4. Lighting the Night: Technology, Urban Life and the Evolution of Street Lighting [Light in Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Alfred

    1992-01-01

    Electrical 16. "Highway Lighting by So­ dium Vapor Lamps,"Possibilities of Street: Lighting Improve­ ments," TheLaunches Broad Street Lighting Promotion Campaign," The

  5. ECE 466: LED Lighting Systems -Incandescent lightings rise and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    ECE 466: LED Lighting Systems - Incandescent lightings rise and demise via government policy - Alternative Fluorescent light sources and compact fluorescent lights (CFL) to incandescents - Alternative LED light sources - Color index as well as Watts to Lumens efficiency available from all three light sources

  6. Lighting and Surfaces 11.1 Introduction to Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, John P.

    Chapter 11 Lighting and Surfaces 11.1 Introduction to Lighting Three-dimensional surfaces can react to light, and how computer graphics simulates this. There are three species of light (or "illumination models"): 1. Intrinsic (self-emitting) 2. Ambient light (sometimes called "diffuse light") 3

  7. P-230 / X. Yu P-230: Novel Electrical-Chemically Polished Stainless Steel Anode Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roughness reached 1.93nm. Then Organic Light Emission Devices (OLEDs) were fabricated on it with Alq3 under better condition. Keywords: electrical-chemically polishing, stainless steel, OLEDs, lighting 1. Introduction One big advantage for OLEDs being used as lighting source is: its emitted light could be tuned

  8. Sandia Energy - Light Creation Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light Creation Materials Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Light Creation Materials Light Creation MaterialsAlyssa Christy2015-03-26T16:28:52+00...

  9. Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Summaries ELEMENT 2: ADVANCE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT 2.1 LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED light emitting diodes (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp

  10. Dynamical principles in neuroscience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Varona, Pablo; Selverston, Allen I.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2006-10-15

    Dynamical modeling of neural systems and brain functions has a history of success over the last half century. This includes, for example, the explanation and prediction of some features of neural rhythmic behaviors. Many interesting dynamical models of learning and memory based on physiological experiments have been suggested over the last two decades. Dynamical models even of consciousness now exist. Usually these models and results are based on traditional approaches and paradigms of nonlinear dynamics including dynamical chaos. Neural systems are, however, an unusual subject for nonlinear dynamics for several reasons: (i) Even the simplest neural network, with only a few neurons and synaptic connections, has an enormous number of variables and control parameters. These make neural systems adaptive and flexible, and are critical to their biological function. (ii) In contrast to traditional physical systems described by well-known basic principles, first principles governing the dynamics of neural systems are unknown. (iii) Many different neural systems exhibit similar dynamics despite having different architectures and different levels of complexity. (iv) The network architecture and connection strengths are usually not known in detail and therefore the dynamical analysis must, in some sense, be probabilistic. (v) Since nervous systems are able to organize behavior based on sensory inputs, the dynamical modeling of these systems has to explain the transformation of temporal information into combinatorial or combinatorial-temporal codes, and vice versa, for memory and recognition. In this review these problems are discussed in the context of addressing the stimulating questions: What can neuroscience learn from nonlinear dynamics, and what can nonlinear dynamics learn from neuroscience?.

  11. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout Events

  12. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout

  13. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  15. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic probe for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe's distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device.

  16. Faster Than Light?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Geroch

    2010-05-10

    It is argued that special relativity remains a viable physical theory even when there is permitted signals traveling faster than light.

  17. Comparing Light Bulbs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this exercise, students will use a light to demonstrate the difference between being energy-efficient and energy-wasteful, and learn what energy efficiency means.

  18. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illuminance Assignments for CBECS Building Activity Categories Illuminance ranges were adopted from the 1987 Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) Lighting Handbook. The IES...

  19. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from the engineering literature, based on CBECS building activity.) 4. Efficacy: an energy efficiency measure. Technically, the amount of light produced per unit of energy...

  20. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (CEC), March 1990. Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines (ALTAG), Building and Appliance Efficiency Office. 3. Dubin, F.S., Mindell, H.L., and Bloome, S., 1976....

  1. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    energy are presented in this section. Statistics are presented by subgroups based on building characteristics, and by subgroups based on lighting equipment. The three sets of...

  2. Quantum Dot Light Enhancement Substrate for OLED Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Perkins; Matthew Stevenson; Gagan Mahan; Seth Coe-Sullivan; Peter Kazlas

    2011-01-21

    With DOE Award No. DE-EE00000628, QD Vision developed and demonstrated a cost-competitive solution for increasing the light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with efficient and stable color rendering index (CRI) for solid state lighting (SSL). Solution processable quantum dot (QD) films were integrated into OLED ITO-glass substrates to generate tunable white emission from blue emitting OLED) devices as well as outcouple light from the ITO film. This QD light-enhancement substrate (QD-LED) technology demonstrated a 60% increase in OLED forward light out-coupling, a value which increases to 76% when considering total increase in multi-directional light output. The objective for the first year was an 80% increase in light output. This project seeks to develop and demonstrate a cost-competitive solution for realizing increased extraction efficiency organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with efficient and stable color rendering index (CRI) for SSL. Solution processible quantum dot (QD) films will be utilized to generate tunable white emission from blue emitting phosphorescent OLED (Ph-OLED) devices.

  3. Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmund G. Brown Jr. Governor LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: SMART LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE LIGHTING's Future: Smart LightEmitting Diode Lighting in Residential Fans. California Energy Commission, PIER

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryutov, D.

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results ...

  5. Heavy-light quarks interactions in QCD vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirzayusuf Musakhanov

    2015-03-20

    QCD vacuum instantons induce very strong interactions between light quarks, which generate large dynamical light quark mass M for initially almost massless quarks and can bound these quarks to produce almost massless pions in accordance with the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry (S\\chiSB). On the other hand, the QCD vacuum instantons generate heavy-light quark interactions terms, which are responsible for the effects of S\\chiSB in a heavy-light quark system. Summing the re-scattering series that lead to the total light quark propagator and making few further steps, we get the fermionized representation of low-frequencies light quark determinant in the presence of the quark sources, which is relevant for our problems. The next important step in the line of this strategy is to derive the equation and calculate the heavy quark propagator in the instanton media and in the presence of light quarks. This one provide finally the heavy and N_f light quarks interaction term. As an example, we derive heavy quark-light mesons interaction term for the N_f=2 case. If we take the average instanton size \\rho=0.35 fm, and average inter-instanton distance R=0.856 fm from our previous estimates, we obtain at LO on 1/N_c expansion dynamical light quark mass M = 570 MeV and instanton media contribution to heavy quark mass \\Delta M=148 MeV. These factors define the coupling between heavy and light quarks and, certainly, between heavy quarks and light mesons. We will apply this approach to heavy quark and heavy-light quark systems.

  6. High efficiency light emitting diode with anisotropically etched GaN-sapphire interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High efficiency light emitting diode with anisotropically etched GaN- sapphire interface M. H. Lo and optimization of a light-emitting diode projection micro-stereolithography three-dimensional manufacturingGaN micro-light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 231110 (2012) A bright cadmium-free, hybrid organic

  7. Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Sajeev

    Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells Stephen Foster1,* and Sajeev John1,2 1 demonstrate numerically a 2-D nanostructured design for light trapping in a low band-gap polymer solar cell, "Light harvesting improvement of organic solar cells with self- enhanced active layer designs," Opt

  8. Sustainable Development and Globalization: New Challenges and Opportunities for Work Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between industrialization and its effects on the environment has captured the serious attention of national governments and international organizations, especially in light of increasing globalization. ...

  9. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  10. Light intensity compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  11. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stupp, S.I.; Son, S.; Lin, H.C.

    1995-05-02

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidenephenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl)-4{prime}-[(4{prime}-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it. 4 figs.

  12. Light-front chiral effective field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathiot, J.-F. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire (France); Tsirova, N. A., E-mail: ntsirova@ssu.samara.ru [Samara State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    We propose a general framework to calculate the nonperturbative structure of relativistic bound state systems. The state vector of the bound state is calculated in the covariant formulation of light-front dynamics. In this scheme, the state vector is defined on the light front of general position {omega} {center_dot} x = 0, where {omega} is an arbitrary light-like four-vector. This enables a strict control of any violation of rotational invariance. The state vector is then decomposed in Fock components. Our formalism is applied to the description of the nucleon properties at low energy, in chiral perturbation theory. We also show that the use of a recently proposed regularization scheme, the so-called Taylor-Lagrange regularization scheme, is very adequate in order to treat divergences in this nonperturbative framework.

  13. ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which...

  14. Stable, High-Efficiency White Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent|

  15. LCLS Users' Organization Executive Committee | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and JobLCLS Operating Schedule AugustUserUsers'

  16. Structured organic materials and devices using low-energy particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vardeny, Z. Valy; Li, Sergey; Delong, Matthew C.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2005-09-13

    Organic materials exposed to an electron beam for patterning a substrate (1) to make an optoelectronic organic device which includes a source, a drain, gate dielectric layer (4), and a substrate for emitting light.

  17. Liquid-phase and vapor-phase dehydration of organic/water solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu (Palo Alto, CA); Ly, Jennifer (San Jose, CA); Aldajani, Tiem (San Jose, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2011-08-23

    Processes for dehydrating an organic/water solution by pervaporation or vapor separation using fluorinated membranes. The processes are particularly useful for treating mixtures containing light organic components, such as ethanol, isopropanol or acetic acid.

  18. Lighting affects appearance LightSource emits photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    1 Lighting affects appearance #12;2 LightSource emits photons Photons travel in a straight line). And then some reach the eye/camera. #12;3 Reflectance Model how objects reflect light. Model light sources Algorithms for computing Shading: computing intensities within polygons Determine what light strikes what

  19. VIRTUAL LIGHT: DIGITALLY-GENERATED LIGHTING FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    VIRTUAL LIGHT: DIGITALLY-GENERATED LIGHTING FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING APPLICATIONS Andrea Basso method to improve the lighting conditions of a real scene or video sequence. In particular we concentrate on modifying real light sources intensities and inserting virtual lights into a real scene viewed from a fixed

  20. LightBox -Exploring Interaction Modalities with Colored Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of light to very subtle animations, transitions and dimmed lighting effects. Implementation LightBox is housed in an aluminum suitcase measuring 48x38x25cm. The lid of the suitcase contains a panel of 12x12 Design. Figure 1. An animated lighting sequence visualized on the hi-power LEDs of LightBox #12

  1. Indoor positioning algorithm using light-emitting diode visible light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavehrad, Mohsen

    Indoor positioning algorithm using light- emitting diode visible light communications Zhou Zhou of Use: http://spiedl.org/terms #12;Indoor positioning algorithm using light-emitting diode visible light. This paper proposes a novel indoor positioning algorithm using visible light communications (VLC

  2. Second user workshop on high-power lasers at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heimann, Phil; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-05-28

    The second international workshop on the physics enabled by the unique combination of high-power lasers with the world-class Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser beam was held in Stanford, CA, on October 7–8, 2014. The workshop was co-organized by UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratories. More than 120 scientists, including 40 students and postdoctoral scientists who are working in high-intensity laser-matter interactions, fusion research, and dynamic high-pressure science came together from North America, Europe, and Asia. The focus of the second workshop was on scientific highlights and the lessons learned from 16 newmore »experiments that were performed on the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument since the first workshop was held one year ago.« less

  3. Universal light-switchable gene promoter system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quail, Peter H.; Huq, Enamul; Tepperman, James; Sato, Sae

    2005-02-22

    An artificial promoter system that can be fused upstream of any desired gene enabling reversible induction or repression of the expression of the gene at will in any suitable host cell or organisms by light is described. The design of the system is such that a molecule of the plant photoreceptor phytochrome is targeted to the specific DNA binding site in the promoter by a protein domain that is fused to the phytochrome and that specifically recognizes this binding site. This bound phytochrome, upon activation by light, recruits a second fusion protein consisting of a protein that binds to phytochrome only upon light activation and a transcriptional activation domain that activates expression of the gene downstream of the promoter.

  4. Solid-State lighting ReSeaRch & development at Sandia national laboRatoRieS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &d Technology snapshoT SSL uses inorganic or organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs or OLEDs)--which are solid

  5. Theory and simulation of amorphous organic electronic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madigan, Conor (Conor Francis), 1978-

    2006-01-01

    The electronic properties of amorphous organic thin films are of great interest due to their application in devices such as light emitting devices, solar cells, photodetectors, and lasers. Compared to conventional inorganic ...

  6. Hybrid organic/quantum dot thin film structures and devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coe-Sullivan, Seth (Seth Alexander)

    2005-01-01

    Organic light emitting diodes have undergone rapid advancement over the course of the past decade. Similarly, quantum dot synthesis has progressed to the point that room temperature highly efficient photoluminescence can ...

  7. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  8. Green Light Pulse Oximeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharf, John Edward (Oldsmar, FL)

    1998-11-03

    A reflectance pulse oximeter that determines oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using two sources of electromagnetic radiation in the green optical region, which provides the maximum reflectance pulsation spectrum. The use of green light allows placement of an oximetry probe at central body sites (e.g., wrist, thigh, abdomen, forehead, scalp, and back). Preferably, the two green light sources alternately emit light at 560 nm and 577 nm, respectively, which gives the biggest difference in hemoglobin extinction coefficients between deoxyhemoglobin, RHb, and oxyhemoglobin, HbO.sub.2.

  9. Lakeview Light and Power- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lakeview Light and Power offers a commercial lighting rebate program. Rebates apply to the installation of energy efficient lighting retrofits in non-residential buildings. The rebate program is...

  10. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01

    A U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Gateway Report on a Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting in Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon.

  11. Application of admittance spectroscopy to evaluate carrier mobility in organic charge transport materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Shu K.

    of high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes OLEDs in 1980s has triggered extensive research on organic semiconductors and devices.1 The OLED is now a recognized contender for flat-panel displays. Besides OLEDs, organic field-effect transistors, and organic photo- voltaic cells are showing very

  12. Columbia Water & Light- HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain...

  13. Peninsula Light Company- Commercial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Peninsula Light Company (PLC) offers a rebate program for commercial customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient lighting. Participating customers must be served by PLC commercial service....

  14. Light Vector Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Milov

    2008-12-21

    This article reviews the current status of experimental results obtained in the measurement of light vector mesons produced in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at different energies. The review is focused on two phenomena related to the light vector mesons; the modification of the spectral shape in search of Chiral symmetry restoration and suppression of the meson production in heavy ion collisions. The experimental results show that the spectral shape of light vector mesons are modified compared to the parameters measured in vacuum. The nature and the magnitude of the modification depends on the energy density of the media in which they are produced. The suppression patterns of light vector mesons are different from the measurements of other mesons and baryons. The mechanisms responsible for the suppression of the mesons are not yet understood. Systematic comparison of existing experimental results points to the missing data which may help to resolve the problem.

  15. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lamp produces about 1750 lumens. Footcandle: a lumen of light distributed over a 1-square-foot (0.09-square-meter) area. Ideal Illumination: the minimum number of footcandles...

  16. Solid State Lighting Reliability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid State Lighting Reliability 2015Building Technologies Office Peer Review Lynn Davis, PhD RTI International ldavis@rti.org --- 919-316-3325 Project Summary Timeline: Start...

  17. The Facts of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Berthold K.P.

    This is a random collection of facts about radiant and luminous energy. Some of this information may be useful in the design of photo-diode image sensors, in the set-up of lighting for television microscopes and the ...

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  19. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.2 152.6 160.5 54.6 Assembly Health Care Lodging Office 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Energy Information Administration Energy Consumption Series: Lighting in Commercial...

  20. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  1. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  2. Variable Light-Cone Theory of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. T. Drummond

    1999-08-20

    We show how to reformulate Variable Speed of Light Theories (VSLT) in a covariant fashion as Variable Light-Cone Theories (VLCT) by introducing two vierbein bundles each associated with a distinct metric. The basic gravitational action relates to one bundle while matter propagates relative to the other in a conventional way. The variability of the speed of light is represented by the variability of the matter light-cone relative to the gravitational light-cone. The two bundles are related locally by an element M, of SL(4,R). The dynamics of the field M is that of a SL(4,R)-sigma model gauged with respect to local (orthochronous) Lorentz transformations on each of the bundles. Only the ``massless'' version of the model with a single new coupling, F, that has the same dimensions as Newton's constant $G_N$, is considered in this paper. When F vanishes the theory reduces to standard General Relativity. We verify that the modified Bianchi identities of the model are consistent with the standard conservation law for the matter energy-momentum tensor in its own background metric. The implications of the model for some simple applications are examined, the Newtonian limit, the flat FRW universe and the spherically symmetric static solution.

  3. Neutron and light scattering studies of light-harvesting photosynthetic antenna complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blankenship, Robert E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2011-06-28

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been employed in studying the structural information of various biological systems, particularly in systems without high-resolution structural information available. In this report, we briefly present some principles and biological applications of neutron scattering and DLS, compare the differences in information that can be obtained with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and then report recent studies of SANS and DLS, together with other biophysical approaches, for light-harvesting antenna complexes and reaction centers of purple and green phototrophic bacteria.

  4. Spin-dependent dynamics of polaron pairs in organic semiconductors D. R. McCamey,*, S.-Y. Lee, S.-Y. Paik, J. M. Lupton, and C. Boehme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCamey, Dane

    utilize the results obtained to set an upper limit on intersystem crossing rates by inspecting data from. Arguably, the most important of these applications is electricity-light conversion, when the material­13 There is also particular uncertainty regarding the magnitude of the PP intersystem crossing time, with estimates

  5. Light and Plants Plants use light to photosynthesize. Name two places that light can come from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Light and Plants Plants use light to photosynthesize. Name two places that light can come from: 1 (CO2, a gas) from the air and turn it into SUGARS (food). This process is powered by energy from light plants) for energy. Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) is a combination of red light and blue

  6. LED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    focusing light in ways that are useful in homes and commercial settings. The light-emitting diode (LED) is one of today's most energy-efficient and rapidly-developing lighting...

  7. Energy Conservation in Industrial Lighting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meharg, E.

    1979-01-01

    were identified. Savings in power and cost were quantified for typical examples as follows: Task lighting, high light source efficacy, high luminaire mounting height, efficient luminaires, surroundings painted a light color, regular luminaire cleaning...

  8. Higher order light propagation volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy Ly; Martin, Timothy Ly

    2012-01-01

    1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . 1.2 Light Propagation4.1.1 Injection of Virtual Point Lights and Geometryof the Stanford bunny, lit by an area light, rendered using

  9. Light as a Healing Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    S. (1991). Meridians conduct light. Moskow: Raum and Zeit.the bod’ys absorption of light. Explore, 9(2), doi: https://01). The healing use of light and color. Health Care Design

  10. Lighting and the Bottom Line 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, M.

    1981-01-01

    A discussion of the cost of light and how it relates to the cost of people. The new Illuminating Engineering Society recommended method of determining lighting levels will be explained. Also several ways of providing good lighting to increase...

  11. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C...

  12. Sandia Energy - Scattering Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Scattering Dynamics Scattering DynamicsAshley...

  13. New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krailo, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    and lighting systems. Table 2 shows the development of four-foot energy-saving retrofit lamps. By utilizing new cathode designed and different gas fills, 34-watt energy-saving lamps were developed that operate on existing rapid start ballasts and afford... of fluorescent lamps, two watts of system power are consumed in heating the lamp cath odes. The shedding of cathode heating wattage was the next lamp efficiency improvement to be introduced. One available sy tern dis connects the lamp cathodes from...

  14. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Falcone, Roger

    2010-01-08

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  15. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2004 101 Polymer Electrophosphorescent Light-Emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    obtained by harvesting both singlet and triplet excitons in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) doped Polymer Electrophosphorescent Light-Emitting Diode Using Aluminum Bis(2-Methyl-8-Quinolinato) 4, Senior Member, IEEE, and Hoi-Sing Kwok, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--The characteristics of organic light

  16. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as part of your whole-house design -- an approach for building an energy-efficient home. Indoor Lighting Design When designing indoor lighting for energy efficiency,...

  17. GATEWAY Demonstrations: LED Street Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Tyson; Shackelford, Jordan; Pang, Terrance Pang

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes an assessment project conducted to study the performance of light emitting diode (LED) luminaires in a street lighting application in San Francisco, CA.

  18. Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covered a basic understanding of lighting, different types of lamps and luminaries, importance of energy efficiency in lighting, and knowledge of where to find financial resources.

  19. 2010 US Lighting Market Characterization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization January 2012 Prepared for: Solid-State Lighting Program Building Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  20. Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fluorescent lighting fixtures rather than replace them. Dimmers and LEDs Some light-emitting diode (LED) lightbulbs can be used with dimmers. LED bulbs and fixtures must be...

  1. Lighting affects appearance LightSource emits photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    1 Lighting affects appearance #12;2 LightSource emits photons Photons travel in a straight line). And then some reach the eye/camera. #12;3 Basic fact: Light is linear Double intensity of sources, double photons reaching eye. Turn on two lights, and photons reaching eye are same as sum of number when each

  2. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  3. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  4. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia, PA Royer, Michael P.; Tuenge, Jason R.; Poplawski, Michael E. Roadway Lighting; Solid-state lighting; LED lighting; SSL; LED; GATEWAY Roadway...

  5. Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Principles and Terms Lighting Principles and Terms Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of

  6. Testimonials - Partnerships in LED Lighting - Philips Lumileds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LED Lighting - Philips Lumileds Lighting, LLC Testimonials - Partnerships in LED Lighting - Philips Lumileds Lighting, LLC Addthis An error occurred. Try watching this video on...

  7. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-12-31

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  8. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, Donald W

    2011-06-03

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: 1. Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today’s state-ofthe- art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle 2. Develop & design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements. 3. Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class. 4. Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: ? A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target ? An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle – Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine ? Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated. ? The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing. ? The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment. ? The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment ? Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines) ? Key subsystems developed include – sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light- Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  9. Method of photocatalytic conversion of C-H organics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Camaioni, D.M.; Lilga, M.A.

    1998-01-13

    The present invention is the addition of a semiconductor material and energy to the reaction mixture of organic, acid (for example, trifluoroacetate), and oxygen. A transition metal ion may be added to the reaction mixture. The semiconductor material converts energy to oxidants thereby promoting oxidation of the organic. Alternatively, using metal in combination with exposure to light may be used.

  10. Method of photocatalytic conversion of C-H organics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Camaioni, Donald M. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is the addition of a semiconductor material and energy to the reaction mixture of organic, acid (for example, trifluoroacetate), and oxygen. A transition metal ion may be added to the reaction mixture. The semiconductor material converts energy to oxidants thereby promoting oxidation of the organic. Alternatively, using metal in combination with exposure to light may be used.

  11. Analytical extraction of the recombination zone location in organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tessler, Nir

    Analytical extraction of the recombination zone location in organic light-emitting diodes from emission patterns produced by organic LEDs (OLEDs). The method is based on derivation of the closed-form expressions for OLED-radiated power developed in previous work and formulation of the analytical relations

  12. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  13. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of organic semiconductors with varying backbone conformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrasekhar, Meera

    to the -orbital overlap of neighboring molecules. Commercial availability of organic light-emitting diodes OLED is the primary consideration in devices such as OLED, mechanisms that change the PLQY are crucial interest for organic displays since blue light can easily be converted into red and green by color

  14. Are Light Gluinos Dead?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    1997-07-25

    Not yet. ALEPH's recent exclusion limit employs an aggressive determination of theoretical uncertainties using a simplified application of the Bayesian method. The validity of their analysis can be evaluated by its further implications, such as contradicting the existence a b quark and requiring relations between hadronic event-shape observables which are not observed. Traditional error estimation methods result in a much larger estimate for the theoretical uncertainties. This puts the ALEPH and also Csikor-Fodor limits at the $\\sim 1~ \\sigma$ level for the very light gluino scenario. A recent astrophysical result implies direct searches will be more difficult than previously anticipated, adding to the importance of reducing the QCD uncertainty in predictions sensitive to indirect effects of light gluinos. Some possible indications in favor of a light gluino are noted.

  15. Light harvesting arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2002-01-01

    A light harvesting array useful for the manufacture of devices such as solar cells comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  16. Pupillary efficient lighting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Jewett, Don L. (Mill Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination.

  17. Sneaky light stop

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Duemore »to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.« less

  18. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  19. Radioluminescent lighting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The glow-in-the-dark stereotype that characterizes the popular image of nuclear materials is not accidental. When the French scientist, Henri Becquerel, first discovered radioactivity in 1896, he was interested in luminescence. Radioluminescence, the production of light from a mixture of energetic and passive materials, is probably the oldest practical application of the unstable nucleus. Tritium-based radioluminescent lighting, in spite of the biologically favorable character of the gaseous tritium isotope, was included in the general tightening of environmental and safety regulations. Tritium light manufacturers would have to meet two fundamental conditions: (1) The benefit clearly outweighed the risk, to the extent that even the perceived risk of a skeptical public would be overcome. (2) The need was significant enough that the customer/user would be willing and able to afford the cost of regulation that was imposed both in the manufacture, use and eventual disposal of nuclear materials. In 1981, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were investigating larger radioluminescent applications using byproduct nuclear material such as krypton-85, as well as tritium. By 1982, it appeared that large source, (100 Curies or more) tritium gas tube, lights might be useful for marking runways and drop zones for military operations and perhaps even special civilian aviation applications. The successful development of this idea depended on making the light bright enough and demonstrating that large gas tube sources could be used and maintained safely in the environment. This successful DOE program is now in the process of being completed and closed-out. Working closely with the tritium light industry, State governments and other Federal agencies, the basic program goals have been achieved. This is a detailed report of what they have learned, proven, and discovered. 91 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (JF)

  20. Light is Heavy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mark, M B

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's relativity theory appears to be very accurate, but at times equally puzzling. On the one hand, electromagnetic radiation must have zero rest mass in order to propagate at the speed of light, but on the other hand, since it definitely carries momentum and energy, it has non-zero inertial mass. Hence, by the principle of equivalence, it must have non-zero gravitational mass, and so, light must be heavy. In this paper, no new results will be derived, but a possibly surprising perspective on the above paradox is given.

  1. Nonlinear and Complex Dynamics in Real Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, William A.; Serletis, Apostolos; Serletis, Demitre

    2006-06-01

    In this article we provide a review of the literature with respect to fluctuations in real systems and chaos. In doing so, we contrast the order and organization hypothesis of real systems to nonlinear chaotic dynamics and discuss some techniques...

  2. Dynamics of spectral algorithms for distributed routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maymounkov, Petar (Petar Borissov)

    2012-01-01

    In the past few decades distributed systems have evolved from man-made machines to organically changing social, economic and protein networks. This transition has been overwhelming in many ways at once. Dynamic, heterogeneous, ...

  3. Transformations in Lighting: The Fifth Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 300 SSL technology leaders from industry, research organizations, universities, and national laboratories gathered in Atlanta, GA, along with representatives from efficiency programs, utilities, and the lighting design community to participate in the DOE SSL R&D Workshop on January 29-31, 2008. DOE SSL Program Manager James Brodrick kicked off the workshop by highlighting recent signs of the progress and pace of SSL advances: the New Year's Eve debut of the new Times Square Ball, lit with Philips Luxeon LEDs; the first DOE Gateway demonstration of Beta LED streetlights in Oakland, CA; and the LR6 downlight from LED Lighting Fixtures, Inc., Grand Prize Winner in the 2007 Lighting for Tomorrow competition.

  4. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic to their complex and dynamic chemical composition. We introduce a novel Computational Brewing Application (COBRA

  5. Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-03-30

    The article discusses solid state lighting technologies. This topic was covered in two previous ASHRAE Journal columns (2010). This article covers advancements in technologies and the associated efficacies. The life-cycle, energy savings and market potential of these technologies are addressed as well.

  6. Optoelectronic properties of poly(fluorene) co-polymer light-emitting devices on a plastic substrate*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanicki, Jerzy

    displays. Thus far, most of the organic light-emitting device (OLED) displays are fabri- cated on rigidOptoelectronic properties of poly(fluorene) co-polymer light-emitting devices on a plastic of red, green, and blue poly(fluorene) co-polymer light- emitting devices (PLEDs) on a plastic substrate

  7. Data management system for organic soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinnette, P.

    1999-07-01

    A Data Management System for Organic Soil (DMSOS) has been developed that enables the acquisition, management and analysis of organic soil data as well as the presentation of results to be conducted effectively through a common interface. This development was in response to the data management needs of research investigating the engineering properties of organic soil and its extension to the stabilization of organic soil through dynamic replacement (DR). It is shown how the above functions are implemented efficiently using Windows-based software to perform comprehensive data management and analysis of data gathered from both laboratory and field tests. When the engineering properties of a given organic soil deposit are needed, a build-in Computer Advisor for Organic Soil Projects (CAOSP) predicts the properties from DMSOS based correlations. A unique and useful feature of the CAOSP is its ability to estimate the anticipated ultimate settlement of an organic soil deposit given the loading conditions and the moisture or organic content. Also incorporated in the DMSOS is a quality control system that utilizes computerized data acquisition/data management techniques in order to evaluate the degree of improvement of an organic soil layer at a given stage of treatment using DR.

  8. Deep optical penetration dynamics in photo-bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Corbett; Chen Xuan; Mark Warner

    2015-07-07

    We model both the photo-stationary state and dynamics of an illuminated, photo-sensitive, glassy liquid crystalline sheet. To illustrate the interplay between local tilt $\\theta$ of the sheet, effective incident intensity, curvature and dynamics, we adopt the simplest variation of local incident light intensity with angle, that is $\\cos\\theta$. The tilt in the stationary state never overshoots the vertical, but maximum curvature could be seen in the middle of the sheet for intense light. In dynamics, overshoot and self-eclipsing arise, revealing how important moving fronts of light penetration are. Eclipsing is qualitatively as in the experiments of Ikeda and Yu (2003).

  9. Departmental Organization and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-06-10

    Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

  10. Pedestrian, Crowd, and Evacuation Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    This contribution describes efforts to model the behavior of individual pedestrians and their interactions in crowds, which generate certain kinds of self-organized patterns of motion. Moreover, this article focusses on the dynamics of crowds in panic or evacuation situations, methods to optimize building designs for egress, and factors potentially causing the breakdown of orderly motion.

  11. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Roadway Lighting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New York Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Roadway Lighting on the FDR Drive in New York, New York This a report about a...

  12. Light Dance : light and the nature of body movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riskin, Seth

    1989-01-01

    Light Dance is a conscious transfiguration of the body, its movement and the encompassing space; a transposition of matter to light exalted in the dance. This corresponds to the conceptualized spirit of the performer whose ...

  13. Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis and creation of solar fuel By Jo Napolitano * September 1, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Refined by nature over a...

  14. Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

    2012-04-16

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively in situ at 467 and 530 nm. Closure modeling with the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) refractive index model was able to capture the increasing absorption trend with RH indicating that the droplets were heterogeneously mixed while containing dispersed insoluble absorbing material within those droplets. Seven other refractive index mixing models including LVA did not adequately describe the measurements for OC. Mixing the biomass OC aerosol with select mass fractions of ammonium sulfate ranging from 25 to 36% and sodium chloride ranging from 21 to 30% resulted in an increase in light scattering and extinction with RH and inorganic mass fraction. However, no detectable difference in light absorption behavior in comparison to pure biomass OC was observed. The main finding of this research is a measured increase in absorption with increasing RH, which is currently not represented in radiative transfer models even though biomass burning produces most of the primary OC aerosol in the atmosphere.

  15. PAPER www.rsc.org/loc | Lab on a Chip High-sensitivity, disposable lab-on-a-chip with thin-film organic electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klotzkin, David

    -on-a-chip with a thin-film organic light-emitting diode (OLED) excitation source and an organic photodiode (OPD a fluorescent dye emission spectrum. The excitation light from the OLED was linearly polarized and used candidate for disposable LOC applications. Broadband OLED light sources can excite many different dyes

  16. Standard Measurement and Verification Plan for Lighting Retrofit Projects for Buildings and Building Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2012-10-31

    This document provides a framework for standard measurement and verification (M&V) of lighting retrofit and replacement projects. It was developed to provide site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. It includes details on all aspects of effectively measuring light levels of existing and post-retrofit projects, conducting power measurement, and developing cost-effectiveness analysis. This framework M&V plan also enables consistent comparison among similar lighting projects, and may be used to develop M&V plans for non--lighting-technology retrofits and new installations.

  17. Solid-State Lighting Research and Development: Multi-Year Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of reaching these performance levels. * LG Chem has commercialized organic light-emitting diode (OLED) panels with efficacy levels of 60 lmW and a color rendering index of...

  18. A pattern of light : a new library for Newton and an analysis of the building type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flavin, Colin

    1985-01-01

    Natural light can add clarity to the organization of buildings by distinguishing areas of occupation with varying quantities and qualities of illumination. Libraries are good to study in this regard because of their varying ...

  19. Fusion pumped light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  20. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.