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1

RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of5 of5 RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-EE0000139 GF0-10-604 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA CompUance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: cx, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

2

Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State The solid waste handling permit exemption W This factsheet briefly reviews the role of co-digestion within anaerobic digestion (AD), explains the potential Digestion and the Role of Co-Digestion Anaerobic digestion is increasingly used to treat livestock manure

Collins, Gary S.

3

Anaerobic digestion of the liquid fraction of dairy manure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors tested several solid liquid separation systems suitable for processing dairy manure prior to anaerobic digestion. None of the systems tried have completely satisfied the requirements. Evaluated effects of separation on biogas production. Unseparated dairy manure produced more biogas than the liquid fraction.

Haugen, V.; Dahlberg, S.; Lindley, J.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A mixed plug flow anaerobic digester for dairy manure  

SciTech Connect

In 1982, a ''mixed plug-flow'' anaerobic digester has been built to produce biogas from the manure of 350 dairy cows and, subsequently, to produce electricity for on-farm use only. This paper describes the digester and presents the main results of one year of technical follow-up.

Cournoyer, M.S.; Delisle, U.; Ferland, D.; Chagnon, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Economic implications of anaerobic digesters on dairy farms in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, air and water have been considered common property resources and, therefore, over utilized as waste receptors. Dairy waste is a leading environmental concern in the North Bosque River watershed in Texas. Changing societal attitudes are forcing dairies and policymakers to balance environmental concerns with farm profitability. Dairies are entering a realm filled with technologies to combat waste concerns. Anaerobic digester technology may play a role in helping dairies balance profit and the environment. Digesters capture methane from livestock waste and transform it into electricity which can be sold to utilities or used on-farm. Because a digester facility is confined, air and water pollution can be reduced. Technological advancement and institutional factor changes allowing the sale of on-farm produced electricity and green power requirements have increased the economic feasibility of digesters. The study of the economic implications of anaerobic digesters for Texas dairies provides producers and policymakers with information to make good decisions concerning adoption and subsidization of this technology. At the beginning of this study, no digesters were operating in Texas. Dairies operating digesters in four states, therefore, were interviewed on-site to provide necessary data. The expected net present value, E(NPV), of a plug-flow digester is negative with and without selling electricity, indicating it should not be constructed based strictly on its financial contribution. At the current electricity-selling price, digesters are less economically feasible than current waste management strategies, lagoons, even after considering potential environmental penalties. However, selling electricity and capturing by-product heat for cost savings makes the digester's E(NPV) less negative than lagoons. The E(NPV) of a covered lagoon digester is positive. This indicates digesters are a potentially feasible waste management strategy. For plug-flow digesters to show a positive E(NPV), the selling price needs to be approximately 82.38% higher than the current price. The breakeven selling price is 12% higher than the current price. Below the breakeven price, lagoons have a larger E(NPV) than plug-flow digesters, therefore making lagoons the preferred waste management strategy. Results suggest changes in rules and technology efficiency make digesters economically competitive with current waste management systems.

Jackson, Randy Scott, Jr.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Biochar Produced from Anaerobically Digested Fiber Reduces Phosphorus in Dairy Lagoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the use of biochar produced from anaerobic digester dairy fiber (ADF) to sequester phosphorus (P) from dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air-dried to Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort. The potential of biochar to reduce P in the anaerobic digester effluent (ADE) was assessed in small-scale filter systems through which the effluent was circulated. Biochar sequestered an average of 381 mg L?1 P from the ADE, and 4 g L?1 ADF was captured as a coating on the biochar. There was an increase of total (1.9 g kg?1), Olsen (763 mg kg?1), and water-extractable P (914 mg kg?1) bound to the biochar after 15 d of filtration. This accounted for a recovery of 32% of the P in the ADE. The recovered P on the biochar was analyzed using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance for P speciation, which confirmed the recovery of inorganic orthophosphate after liquid extraction of the biochar and the presence of inextractable Ca-P in the solid state. The inorganic phosphate was sequestered on the biochar through physical and weak chemical bonding. Results indicate that biochar could be a beneficial component to P reduction in the dairy system.

Streubel, Jason D.; Collins, Harold P.; Tarara, Julie M.; Cochran, Rebecca L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Report on the design and operation of a full-scale anaerobic dairy manure digester. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full-scale anaerobic digester on the Monroe State Dairy Farm was operated and monitored for 24 months with funding provided by the United States Department of Energy, Fuels from Biomass Systems Branch. During the period of operation, operating parameters were varied and the impact of those changes is described. Operational experiences and system component performance are discussed. Internal digester mixing equipment was found to be unnecessary, and data supporting this conclusion are given. An influent/effluent heat exchanger was installed and tested, and results of the tests are included. Recommendations for digester design and operation are presented. Biological stability was monitored, and test results are given. Gas production rates and system net energy are analyzed. The economics of anaerobic digestion are evaluated based on various financing options, design scales, and expected benefits. Under many circumstances digesters are feasible today, and a means of analysis is given.

Coppinger, E.; Brautigam, J.; Lenart, J.; Baylon, D.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Characterization of Biogas from Anaerobically Digested Dairy Waste for Energy Use .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the third largest dairy producer in the United States, New York is faced with the critical issue of agricultural waste management. The environmental impacts… (more)

Bothi, Kimberly L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Location and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic and aerobic granular sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. However, anaerobic digestion is not effective for nutrient removal and should be followed by a processLocation and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic different operating conditions. Three dairy wastewater effluents, from three different upflow anaerobic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

10

Anaerobic Digesters Design and Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public awar'eness of the need to develop systems for producing energy from readilyrenewable sources, as an alternative to energy from expensive and diminishing supplies of fossil fuels, led to research at The Pennsylvania State University on systems for methane production by anaerobic digestion of animal manures. Experiences with design, construction, and operation of a two-stage heated continuous-feed digester for a herd of 100 dairy cows are reported in this Bulletin. The publication contains discussions of the microbiological processes involved in the anaerobic digestion of organic materials;

S. P. E. Persson; R. W. Regan

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Anaerobic Digestion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases,...

12

CX-005171: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71: Categorical Exclusion Determination 71: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005171: Categorical Exclusion Determination Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.8, B5.1 Date: 02/02/2011 Location(s): Lynden, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Washington Department of Commerce would allocate $1,044,000 ($731,000 loan / $313,000 grant) in State Energy Program funding to Van Dyk Dairy for purchase and installation of an anaerobic digester at the dairy located in Lynden, Washington. The project involves installation of the following components with a footprint of about 1/4 acre: ? Anaerobic digester ? Combined heat and power unit ? Composter ? Solids dryer. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005171.pdf More Documents & Publications

13

Effects of corn stover as carbon supplement on an integrated anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated anaerobic digestion (AD) and ethanol fermentation process on a mixed feedstock of dairy manure and corn stover was performed to investigate the influence of corn stover on biogas production

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Energy Basics: Anaerobic Digestion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Biofuels Biopower Anaerobic Digestion Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Anaerobic Digestion Anaerobic digestion is a...

15

Anaerobic Digesters in the Agricultural Sector: A Distributed Energy Resources Market Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory pressure is creating a need for agricultural animal operations to better handle animal organic waste products. One option available to dairies, hog farms, and other operations to address these challenges is to develop anaerobic digesters. A by-product of anaerobic digesters is a methane rich gas that can be used for electric power generation and/or meeting thermal needs. This report explores the market potential for anaerobic digesters in the agricultural sector, and the role that electric pow...

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Arnold Schwarzenegger ANAEROBIC DIGESTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor ANAEROBIC DIGESTER IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES Phase I - A Survey of U concrete steps to install an anaerobic digestion (AD) facility and documentation of the factors technology. Keywords Anaerobic digester, biogas, electricity production, manure management #12;4 Table

17

Arnold Schwarzenegger ANAEROBIC DIGESTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor ANAEROBIC DIGESTER IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES Phase II - A Survey who took concrete steps to install an anaerobic digestion (AD) facility and documentation samples are overwhelmingly in favor of AD technology. Keywords Anaerobic digester, biogas, electricity

18

Dairy methane generator. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of the work completed under this contract are presented. During the winter of 1979-80 three students enrolled, in the Mechanical Design Engineering Technology program at the Pennsylvania State University's Capitol Campus (Middletown, PA), undertook a feasibility study for the utilization of the manure generated by the dairy cows located on Mr. Thomas B. Williams farm for the generation and use of methane gas. The results of their effort was the design of an Anaerobic Digester/Electric Generation System. This preliminary designed system was later changed and improved by another group of P.S.U. MDET students in the spring of 1980. The final design included working drawings and an economic analysis of the estimated investment necessary to complete the Methane Generator/Electric Power Generation System.

Williams, T.B.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Organic dairy production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis was to gain further knowledge about the performance of cows in organic dairy production and their ability to adapt to… (more)

Ahlman, Therese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Direct uses of hot water (geothermal) in dairying  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Digital computer simulation was used to investigate the peak, steady energy utilization of a geothermal energy-supported dairy. A digital computer program was also written to assess the lifetime economics of the dairy operation. A dynamic simulation program was written to design water storage tanks under diurnal transient loading. The geothermal site specified is the artesian spring named Hobo Wells near Susanville, California. The dairy configuration studies are unique, but consist of conventional processing equipment. In the dairy, cattle waste would be used to generate methane and carbon dioxide by anaerobic digestion. Some carbon dioxide would be removed from the gas stream with a pressurized water scrubber to raise the heating value. The product gas would be combusted in a spark ignition engine connected to an electric generator. The electrical power produced would be used for operation of fans, pumps, lights and other equipment in the dairy. An absorption chiller using a geothermal water driven generator would provide milk chilling. Space heating would be done with forced air hot water unit heaters.

Barmettler, E.R.; Rose, W.R. Jr.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Integrated dairy Farm System in Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principles of energy-integrated farming were applied to the Rio Canas Dairy Farm, a privately-owned dairy farm and one of the largest dairy farms in Puerto Rico with a milking herd of 400 cows. Animal wastes were fed to two anaerobic digesters where methane gas was produced by bacterial degradation of organic material. The methane gas fueled an engine-generator to produce electricity for farm use and for sale to the public utility. The Wastes were partially stabilized by bacterial action with the digesters and the digester effluent passed to a liquid-solid separator. Solid fraction was composted and either used as bedding material for the cows or marketed as soil conditioner. The liquid fraction flowed to a storage pond and was used in the Greenfeed subsystem to fertilize forage crops for the cows. Estimated energy savings of the system were 1705 MBtu for the first two subsystems and 7,718 MBtu's for all three subsystems. Simple payback for the first two subsystems was very long (20 years) because facilities for effective manure recovery did not exist on the farm at the outset of the project, operational costs for manure collection were charged against the project, and system components were oversized. Including the Greenfeed subsystem, simple payback for the project was 8.2 years. Assuming that manure collection facilities and practices already existed and assuming proper sizing of all components, simple payback for the Anaerobic Digestion and Electrical Production subsystem and the Farm Waste Management subsystem was 5.8 years. Using data from this project, an estimate of the return on investment was projected for different herd sizes. Results suggested that for dairy farms with less than 500 cows, anaerobic digester systems are only marginally profitable.

Sasscer, D.S.; Morgan, T.O.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Anaerobic Digestion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from - Anaerobic Digestion) Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

24

Anaerobic Digestion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAnaerobicDigestion&oldid267145"...

25

Anaerobic thermophilic culture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Wiegel, Jurgen K. W. (Gottingen, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Energy Basics: Anaerobic Digestion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic decomposition of organic materials. It is...

27

Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) Prototype System User Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a user manual for the Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) model. DANA provides an analysis of dairy anaerobic digestion technology and allows users to calculate biogas production, co-product valuation, capital costs, expenses, revenue and financial metrics, for user customizable scenarios, dairy and digester types. The model provides results for three anaerobic digester types; Covered Lagoons, Modified Plug Flow, and Complete Mix, and three main energy production technologies; electricity generation, renewable natural gas generation, and compressed natural gas generation. Additional options include different dairy types, bedding types, backend treatment type as well as numerous production, and economic parameters. DANA’s goal is to extend the National Market Value of Anaerobic Digester Products analysis (informa economics, 2012; Innovation Center, 2011) to include a greater and more flexible set of regional digester scenarios and to provide a modular framework for creation of a tool to support farmer and investor needs. Users can set up scenarios from combinations of existing parameters or add new parameters, run the model and view a variety of reports, charts and tables that are automatically produced and delivered over the web interface. DANA is based in the INL’s analysis architecture entitled Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems (GEMS) , which offers extensive collaboration, analysis, and integration opportunities and greatly speeds the ability construct highly scalable web delivered user-oriented decision tools. DANA’s approach uses server-based data processing and web-based user interfaces, rather a client-based spreadsheet approach. This offers a number of benefits over the client-based approach. Server processing and storage can scale up to handle a very large number of scenarios, so that analysis of county, even field level, across the whole U.S., can be performed. Server based databases allow dairy and digester parameters be held and managed in a single managed data repository, while allows users to customize standard values and perform individual analysis. Server-based calculations can be easily extended, versions and upgrades managed, and any changes are immediately available to all users. This user manual describes how to use and/or modify input database tables, run DANA, view and modify reports.

Sam Alessi; Dennis Keiser

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

29

Anaerobic thermophilic culture system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Wiegel, Jurgen K. W. (Gottingen, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dairy Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. dairy industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in milk production and processing. Because of the different processes involved, the characteristics of energy consumption at milk production and processing facilities vary by facility. Most energy used in milk production is in the form of diesel fuel, followed by electricity and then by petroleum products such as gasoline an...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Anaerobic Digestion Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As fuel resources become scarcer, it has become more important to identify and harness alternative energy sources. Currently, 24 states have renewable portfolio standards (RPS), requiring electricity providers to obtain a minimum percentage of their power from renewable energy sources, with the purpose of becoming less dependent on fossil fuels, reducing waste and greenhouse gas emissions, and decreasing costs as fuel prices increase. Anaerobic digestion (AD) has proven itself a viable alternative techno...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

32

Anaerobic digestion process  

SciTech Connect

An algae culture grown on the water from the digested slurry of a biogasification plant serves as a means of removing CO/sub 2/ from the methane stream while purifying the wastewater and providing more biomass for the anaerobic digestion plant. Tested on a sewage-sludge digestion system, the proposed process improved the methane yield by 32% and methane concentration by 53-98 vol % while lowering the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the final water.

Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

1982-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Anaerobic digestion of equine waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goals of this project were to determine the methane production potential of horse manure during anaerobic digestion; to examine the effect of softwood chip… (more)

Wartell, Brian A., 1984-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of studies designed to evaluate the potential of rapidly improving the technology of anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues and methods of implementing it in existing agricultural operations are reported. The main objectives of this study were to: identify simple and low cost anaerobic fermentor design criteria that would be appropriate in small agricultural operations, develop high rate fermentor concepts that would enable multiple product recovery from the reactor, expand the information base particularly in the area of temperature influence on the process, and to review sociological and economic issues relating to implementation of fermentation technology. This study has identified several major anaerobic fermentation concepts which illustrate that the technology may be rapidly improved. A simple reactor design utilizing an unmixed plug flow concept was shown to be comparable to the more complex completely mixed reactor when using dairy cow residue. A high rate thermophilic reactor designed to encourage flotation of particulate solids illustrated that liquid, solid, and gaseous products can be generated within the anaerobic fermentor thus eliminating an additional dewatering unit process. A third reactor concept involved extension of the anaerobic attached microbial film expanded bed to the treatment of cow manure slurries. A high rate of methane generation was recorded. Comprehensive thermophilic fermentation studies (60/sup 0/C) indicated that the increased temperature resulted in little improvement in total quantity or the rate of yield of gas over that obtained with mesophilic fermentation with reactor retention periods greater than 10 days. Finally, other areas where preliminary date were obtained are noted.

Jewell, W. J.; Capener, H. R.; Dell'orto, S.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Anaerobic digestion of livestock manures: A current opportunities casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growth and concentration of the livestock industry creates new opportunities for proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products, including a renewable fuel. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, based on estimates of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return are developed from the evaluations. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes}, are provided as a reality check.

Lusk, P.D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Data For Anaerobic Digestion of Various Types ofMARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OFMARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VOLUME 63 , NUMBER 2 Anaerobic digestion systems could berates (USDA 2004). Anaerobic digestion systems (cov- eredtreatment stand- point, anaerobic digestion systems could be

Mitloehner, Frank M; Sun, Huawei; Karlik, John F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to conventional anaerobic digestion systems used forly, was treated by anaerobic digestion to remove from 65 to

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Towards sustainable land stewardship : reframing development in Wisconsin's dairy gateway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changing economic realities in the dairy industry have profoundly affected the viability of the dairy farming community in Wisconsin. In addition they face mounting local opposition to dairy modernization and expansion, ...

Finlayson, Ian James, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Economic evaluation of breeding strategies for improvement of dairy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 10, 2010 ... used for genetic improvement of dairy cattle in Kenya. The breeding ... Although Kenya has created nucleus dairy herds from imported breeds ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dairy Market News Search | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dairy Market News Search Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities Agriculture Data...

42

Brookside Dairy Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Facility Brookside Dairy Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Indiana County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.6850762, -79.1096901 Loading map......

43

Automatic blood sampling in dairy cows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loose housing systems for dairy cows are becoming increasingly common, raising new questions in the area of animal health and welfare. Some of these questions can be addressed by studying the variation in blood parameters, such as glucocortistioids. ... Keywords: Blood, Dairy cows, IceSampler, Sampling, Stress

Anders Fřnss; Lene Munksgaard

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary  

SciTech Connect

At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

Feasibility of Fuel Cells for Energy Conversion on the Dairy Farm: Proposal to NYSERDA: On-farm Agricultural Innovation Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells running on digester biogas appear to be a missing piece of the sustainable dairy farming puzzle. This was indicated in the technical feasibility part of this thesis which showed that the production of electricity and heat from a fuel cell as well as the utilization of liquid and solid effluent streams from an anaerobic digester (which produces the biogas) form the basis for operating a total resource recovery (TRR) and integrated farm energy system. The results of the economic feasibility part suggest that large dairy farms (>500 cows) are a niche market for fuel cells. Because manure-derived biogas is pivotal for operating a fuel cell on the dairy farm, a moving coordinate model for predicting biogas production from a plug flow digester was developed. The model accurately predicted the approximately 1,274 m 3 /day (45,000 ft 3 /day) of biogas produced at AA Dairy, and does a better job of predicting real time biogas production than the popular or commonly used model. Modelling biogas production is the first phase toward defining each component in an integrated farm energy system. With about 2,549 m 3 /day (90,000 ft 3 /day) of biogas, produced by digesting the

Stefan Jason Minott

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Anaerobic Digestion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases, which can be used to produce electricity or heat. Methane and Anaerobic Bacteria Methane is a gas that contains molecules of methane with one atom of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen (CH4). It is the major component of the natural gas used in many homes for cooking and heating. It is odorless, colorless, and yields about 1,000 British thermal units (Btu) [252 kilocalories (kcal)] of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic

47

Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues: potential for improvement and implementation. Tenth quarter progress report, September 16, 1978--December 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the tenth quarter progress report describing the activities of an on-going three-year research effort to facilitate the development of new and/or improved technology that will result in the widespread implementation of anaerobic fermentation as a source of renewable energy for small-scale agriculture. The progress of events in the last three months contributing to the continued demonstration of the simplified reactor concept at the full-scale level in the conversion of dairy farm manure residues to methane is described.

Jewell, W.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

49

Thermo-chemical conversion of dairy waste based biomass through direct firing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing rates of manure produced from large dairies have increased concern for the environmental quality of nearby streams and watersheds. Typically the manure from the freestalls on these dairies is flushed with water to a mechanical separator. Here, flushed dairy biomass (DB) is parted into separated solids and separated liquid. The separated liquid is discharged into lagoons for treatment and eventual land application. This thesis proposes thermodynamic models for firing DB in small scale boiler systems that would eliminate land application and lagoons, which are being claimed to be the source of nutrient leaching and overloading. Fuel analysis of flushed DB from a dairy in central Texas show that it contains 93%moisture (%M), 3%ash (%A), and 4%combustibles (%Cb), while separated DB solids contain 81%M, 2%A, and 17%Cb. The dry, ash-free higher heating value of DB is approximately 20,000 kJ/kg. Using dry, ash-free results, computations can be made over ranges of %M and %A. For example, DB containing 70%M requires 9.74%Cb to vaporize all moisture and produce gaseous products of combustion at 373 K, but requires 17.82%Cb to burn in a regenerative combustor with a flame temperature of 1200 K. Separated solids that are pressed in an auger to 70%M (3%A and 27%Cb) can burn at 1200 K with exhaust temperatures of up to 1130 K and a minimum required heat exchanger effectiveness of 15%. Pressed solids can thus be fired in a boiler, where the remaining separated liquid can be used as feed water. The pressed solids only can release about 30% of the heat required to vaporize the remaining unclean feed water. However, pressed DB solids can be blended with drier fuels to vaporize almost all the unclean water. The low quality steam produced from the unclean water can be used in thermal processes on the farm. A similar system can be developed for vacuumed DB without the need to vaporize unclean feed water. As for large dairies with anaerobic digester systems already installed, directly firing the produced biogas in a small scale boiler system may be another way to similarly vaporize the remaining effluent.

Carlin, Nicholas Thomas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

CX-005219: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19: Categorical Exclusion Determination 19: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005219: Categorical Exclusion Determination Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.8, B5.1 Date: 02/16/2011 Location(s): Lynden, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office On September 22, 2010, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) issued a C12 Determination for this project, based on information available to DOE at that time. After reviewing more detailed project information subsequently provided by the project proponent, including a Determination of Nonsignificance (DNS) issued by the Whatcom County Planning and Development Service. DOE determines that the proposed action is consistent with the categorical exclusions listed above. Proposed Project: Washington

51

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2011 24, 2011 CX-005322: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subtask 2.1 Maui Site: National Marine Renewable Energy Center in Hawaii CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Maui, Hawaii Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office February 16, 2011 CX-005219: Categorical Exclusion Determination Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.8, B5.1 Date: 02/16/2011 Location(s): Lynden, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office February 16, 2011 CX-005217: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program American Reinvestment and Recovery Act Sirti -Demand Energy -Energy Storage System Tied to Solar on Commercial Facility CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B5.1 Date: 02/16/2011 Location(s): Liberty Lake, Washington

52

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 3910 of 31,917 results. 01 - 3910 of 31,917 results. Download EA-196 Minnesota Power, Inc http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-196-minnesota-power-inc Download EIS-0286: Record of Decision Solid Waste Program, Hanford Site, Richland, WA: Storage and Treatment of Low-Level Waste and Mixed Low-Level Waste; Disposal of Low-Level Waste and Mixed Low-Level Waste, and Storage, Processing, and Certification of Transuranic Waste for Shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0286-record-decision Download CX-005219: Categorical Exclusion Determination Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.8, B5.1 Date: 02/16/2011 Location(s): Lynden, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005219-categorical-exclusion-determination

53

DEPARTl\lENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJ ~C T MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTl\lENT OF ENERGY DEPARTl\lENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJ ~C T MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\IINATION RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce PROJECT TITLE : Van Dyk Dairy Anaerobic Digester Page 1 01'4 STATE : WA .'unding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0000139 NEPA Control Number em Number GFO-10-604 0 Based on my rev iew of the information concerning the proposed ac" tion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under ODE Order 4SJ.lA),1 ha ve made the followinj! determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

54

Energy integrated dairy farm: Phase 1 report for the period 1 May 1982 to 30 June 1982  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of the project is to evaluate the use of integrated farm energy systems for dairy farms in the southeastern United States (Phase I); select and design alternative energy systems which are economically feasible for use on the Mathis farm (Phase I); install the selected systems (Phase II); and operate and monitor performance of the systems (Phase III). This report covers Phase I. Results of the Phase I work indicate that the most technically and economically appropriate alternative energy systems for the farm are: (1) anaerobic digestion of dairy cattle manure to produce a methane-rich biogas and to use the manure as a source of cattle bedding material and as a fertilizer; (2) use of the biogas to fuel a spark ignition engine coupled to an induction generator, producing a major portion of the electricity needed on the farm and all of the thermal energy required in the dairy operation; and (3) implementation of energy conservation measures, including waste heat recovery from the bulk milk refrigeration system, water conservation, irrigation scheduling, and minimum tillage.

Combes, R.S.; Lamade, R.M.; Ross, C.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Siting Requirements for Anaerobic Lagoons (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute provides regulations for required distances between anaerobic lagoons and residences or public use areas. The separation distances may be waived or reduced with the agreement of the...

56

Trichloroethene Removal From Waste Gases in Anaerobic Biotrickling Filters Through Reductive Dechlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1) during thermophilic anaerobic digestion for production ofa keen interest in anaerobic digestion as well, and it wasfor thermophilic anaerobic digestion, and should stimulate

Popat, Sudeep Chandrakant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

58

Anaerobic treatment of gasifier effluents. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed during the quarter ending December 30, 1981. The major efforts have been directed toward the continued acclimation of two anaerobic treatment systems, start up of a third anaerobic treatment system, GC/MS characterization of the coal gasification wastewater, data acquisition for determination of distribution coefficients for the extraction of phenol from the wastewater using MIBK, and preliminary design of a solvent extraction system for wastewater pretreatment. The progress of these efforts are depicted in the Gannt Chart, along with project expenditures for the above contract, and are presented in detail in the following sections.

Cross, W.H.; Chian, E.S.K.; Pohland, F.G.; Giabbai, M.; Harper, S.R.; Kharkar, S.; Cheng, S.S.; Shuey, P.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Anaerobic digestion of industrial activated aerobic sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Eastman Company manufactures a variety of organic chemicals, plastics and fibers at their Kingsport Tennessee Facility. The wastewater generated during the manufacture of these compounds is currently treated using an activated sludge process. The objective of the project is to evaluate the economic potential of an anaerobic digestion process to convert industrial sludge at the Tennessee Eastman Company into biogas. The evaluation will require collection and analysis of experimental data on the anaerobic digestion of industrial sludge obtained from Kingsport. Although the experiments will be conducted using Tennessee Eastman sludge, these results should be also generally applicable to similar industrial sludge.

Goodloe, J.G.; Roberts, R.S.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effect of Trace Elements on Anaerobic Digestion of Coking Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pretreatment of coking wastewater using ASBR was conducted at 35? in this paper. The addition of trace elements to the anaerobic reactor has positive effect on the anaerobic treatment of coking wastewater, but too much or too little of it will ... Keywords: trace elements, anaerobic digestion, coking wastewater

Yu-ying Li; Bing Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Integrated Pest Management of Flies in Texas Dairies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication identifies and gives management strategies for various species of flies infesting Texas dairies, including houseflies, stable flies, horn flies, garbage flies and blow flies.

Stevenson, Douglas; Cocke, Jesse

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

Brown midrib sorghum as warm season forage for dairy cattles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy and its utilization is important in dairy production in order to maximize voluntary intake and productive potential of the cows for increase profit. This… (more)

Lim, Jonathan Membrot

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

Wiegel, J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

(Anaerobic O-demethylation of phenylmethylethers)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers progress made during the last 8--20 month interval. Topics covered include: the in vitro assay for anaerobic O-demethylation; fractionation of cell-free extracts; optimization of cellular AOD levels and structure-activity relationships; and analysis of corrinoid involvement in AOD. (JL)

Frazer, A.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters Webinar April 16, 2013 1:00PM MDT Webinar This free webinar will be held on April 16, 2013, from 1-2:15 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. It will provide information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's anaerobic digester project. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation will provide background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics from more than 8,000 businesses in the city. Phase one of the Zero Waste

66

Current developments of microfiltration technology in the dairy industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Current developments of microfiltration technology in the dairy industry Luciana V. SABOYAa of them just patented, in the dairy industry. Combination of the use of uniform trans- membrane hydraulic porosity gradient and of new ceramic membrane materials allows nowa- days to get a differential separation

Recanati, Catherine

67

DESIGN OF SOFTWARE SENSORS FOR UNMEASURABLE VARIABLES OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF SOFTWARE SENSORS FOR UNMEASURABLE VARIABLES OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION PROCESSES Simeonov, I variables of anaerobic digestion processes. For this purpose, different mathematical models of anaerobic on a pilot-scale anaerobic bioreactor with computer monitoring system. Key words: Anaerobic digestion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

Anaerobic O-demethylation of phenylmethylethers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic O-demethylation (AOD) of phenylmethylethers is a process of both basic and applied significance. The aryl-O-methyl ethers are abundant in natural products, particularly as components of lignin. They are present as methoxylated lignin monomers in anaerobic environments and can be completely degraded there by mixed microbial populations. AOD is an essential early step in this process, and it is also a key reaction in the utilization of the O-methyl substituent as a C-one substrate by acetogens. An understanding of the AOD reaction mechanism might suggest new ways in which chemicals could be derived from lignocellulosic materials. The biochemical mechanism for the anaerobic cleavage of the aryl-O-methyl ether bond is an intriguing, but relatively unexplored process. In contrast to aerobic O-demethylating enzymes, AOD appears to involve methyl group transfer. Thus, novel biochemical information on an important biotransformation reaction will be gained from the research proposed. Recently, we have shown that AOD activity is inducible and have developed an assay for detecting AOD activity in cell-free extracts of Acetobacterium woodii. AOD activity is stimulated in vitro by the addition of ATP (1mM) and pyruvate (30 mM), the K{sub M} for vanillate being 0.4 mM. In collaboration with protein purification experts, we proposed to purify the AOD enzyme and characterize the protein(s) and the enzymatic reaction involved. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Frazer, A.C.; Young, L.Y.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

List of Anaerobic Digestion Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Anaerobic Digestion Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 285 Anaerobic Digestion Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 285) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Program (Ohio) Industry Recruitment/Support Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government

70

Optimization of running strategies based on anaerobic energy and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 13, 2013 ... We extend this analysis, based on the equation of motion and aerobic energy, to include a balance of anaerobic energy (or accumulated ...

71

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synthetic natural gas (SNG) via anaerobic decomposition byof algal substrate for an SNG process involves increasingof characteristics for SNG production. Limiting factors in

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Biogeochemistry of Isoprenoid Production and Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Biodgeradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is an exploration of microbial isoprenoid production and destruction by anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation. Isoprenoids are methyl-branched hydrocarbons, and include biomarkers from all three… (more)

Dawson, Katherine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Xylose anaerobic conversion by open-mixed cultures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

methane-rich biogas production. An alternative anaerobic process could aim for the production of intermediates in the methanogenic process from complex ...

74

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive Incentive Type State Rebate Program Applicable Sector Agricultural, Commercial, Industrial, Institutional,...

75

User's Manual for BEST-Dairy: Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants. Publication of this manual benefits from BarbaraLBNL Report User’s Manual for BEST-Dairy: Benchmarking andSathaye (2011). User’s Manual for BEST-Dairy: Benchmarking

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effect of organic loading rate on bio-hydrogen production from sweet sorghum syrup by anaerobic mixed cultures in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This present study reported the effect of 4 organic loading rates (OLR) varied from 25-40 g hexose/L-d on bio-hydrogen production from sweet sorghum syrup by anaerobic mixed cultures in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor. The optimum OLR was found to ... Keywords: anaerobic mixed cultures, anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, organic loading rate, sweet sorghum syrup

Piyawadee Saraphirom; Alissara Reungsang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of Particulate Matter R degradation, chemostat, models, growth rate, equilibrium, bistability. 1. INTRODUCTION Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

78

Saturated Zone Denitrification at California Dairies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Denitrification can effectively mitigate the problem of high nitrate concentrations in groundwater under dairy operations by reducing nitrate to N{sub 2} gas, at sites where biogeochemical conditions are favorable. We present results from field studies at central California dairies that document the occurrence of saturated-zone denitrification in shallow groundwater using biomolecular indicators, stable isotope compositions of nitrate, and measurements of dissolved excess N{sub 2} gas. Excess N{sub 2} concentrations provide a measure of the extent to which nitrate in groundwater has been partially or completely denitrified. Abundant excess N{sub 2} and young {sup 3}H/{sup 3}He apparent groundwater ages indicate high denitrification rates near manure lagoons where multiple lines of evidence indicate seepage of lagoon water into the groundwater system. Natural tracers of lagoon water include high chloride and dissolved organic carbon concentrations, distinctive trace organic compounds, and high groundwater {delta}{sup 18}O values (relative to other recharge sources). Proximal to the lagoons, NH{sub 4}{sup +} may be present in groundwater, but is strongly adsorbed on to sediment particles. Bubble formation in the lagoons causes the exsolution of other gases (N{sub 2}, Ar, Ne, He, etc.), which partition into the gas phase and strip the lagoon water of its dissolved gas load, providing a unique tracer of lagoon seepage in groundwater.

Singleton, M J; Esser, B K; Moran, J E; McNab, W W; Beller, H R

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

79

Experimental study on rheological characteristics of high solid content sludge and it is mesophilic anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared to conventional low solid content anaerobic digestion high solid content anaerobic digestion can offer attractive advantages such as higher biogas generation and smaller reactor volume demand. However

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (1) enrichment of anaerobic microbial consortia in a coal fed chemostat, (2) characterization of biocoal products and examination of liquefaction potential, (3) isolation of decarboxylating organisms and evaluation of the isolated organisms for decarboxylation. The project began on September 12, 1990. 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the â??Cattle Feeding Capital of the Worldâ?ť, producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure /year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOâ??s), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Wacoâ??the primary source of potable water for Wacoâ??s 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 â?? Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 â?? Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological & Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and Califor

John M. Sweeten, Kalyan Annamalai Brent Auvermann Saqib Mukhtar Sergio C. Capareda Cady Engler Wyatte Harman J.N. Reddy, Robert DeOtte David B. Parker Dr. B.A. Stewart

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the 'Cattle Feeding Capital of the World', producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure/year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO's), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Waco - the primary source of potable water for Waco's 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 - Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 - Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A and M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass) and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and California, cofiring of low quality CB with high quality coal, emission results and ash fouling beh

Kalyan Annamalai, John M. Sweeten, Brent W. Auvermann, Saqib Mukhtar, Sergio Caperada Cady R. Engler, Wyatte Harman Reddy JN Robert Deotte

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tillamook County PUD - Dairy Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tillamook County PUD - Dairy Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Tillamook County PUD - Dairy Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Tillamook County PUD - Dairy Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Tillamook County PUD Tillamook PUD offers the Dairy Lighting Retrofit Program for its agricultural members to save energy on lighting in eligible barns/facilities. Tillamook PUD completes a lighting audit of the facility to calculate the energy savings and rebate amount. Incentives are provided for the replacement of existing mercury vapor, incandescent, and T12 fluorescent fixtures with new ORION AG9000 3-lamp T8 fluorescent fixtures. This rebate is available for retrofits only, new construction is not

84

Anaerobic Digestion Process Identification Using Recurrent Neural Network Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the use of a Recurrent Neural Network Model (RNNM) for decentralized and centralized identification of an aerobic digestion process, carried out in a fixed bed and a recirculation tank anaerobic wastewater treatment system. The analytical ... Keywords: Recurrent neural network model, backpropagation learning, decentralized model, centralized model, system identification, anaerobic digestion bioprocess

Rosalba Galvan-Guerra; Ieroham S. Baruch

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NSERC-Laflche Industrial Research Chair Advanced Anaerobic Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. LANDFILL BIOREACTORS EXSITU ANAEROBIC DIGESTION Apply stand alone reactor technology to digest solidNSERC- Laflèche Industrial Research Chair Advanced Anaerobic Treatment Residuals to Energy R2E 6133. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Digestion Time

Petriu, Emil M.

86

RECIPIENT:WA Department of Commerce STATE: WA PROJECT Van Dyk...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digester would be routed to the combined heat and power (CHP) unit consisting of a biogas-fired reciprocating engine and generator capable of producing 425 kW of electrical...

87

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Texas Panhandle is regarded as the �Cattle Feeding Capital of the World�, producing 42% of the fed beef cattle in the United States within a 200-mile radius of Amarillo generating more than 5 million tons of feedlot manure /year. Apart from feedlots, the Bosque River Region in Erath County, just north of Waco, Texas with about 110,000 dairy cattle in over 250 dairies, produces 1.8 million tons of manure biomass (excreted plus bedding) per year. While the feedlot manure has been used extensively for irrigated and dry land crop production, most dairies, as well as other concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO�s), the dairy farms utilize large lagoon areas to store wet animal biomass. Water runoff from these lagoons has been held responsible for the increased concentration of phosphorus and other contaminates in the Bosque River which drains into Lake Waco�the primary source of potable water for Waco�s 108,500 people. The concentrated animal feeding operations may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. Manure-based biomass (MBB) has the potential to be a source of green energy at large coal-fired power plants and on smaller-scale combustion systems at or near confined animal feeding operations. Although MBB particularly cattle biomass (CB) is a low quality fuel with an inferior heat value compared to coal and other fossil fuels, the concentration of it at large animal feeding operations can make it a viable source of fuel. The overall objective of this interdisciplinary proposal is to develop environmentally benign technologies to convert low-value inventories of dairy and beef cattle biomass into renewable energy. Current research expands the suite of technologies by which cattle biomass (CB: manure, and premature mortalities) could serve as a renewable alternative to fossil fuel. The work falls into two broad categories of research and development. Category 1 � Renewable Energy Conversion. This category addressed mostly in volume I involves developing. Thermo-chemical conversion technologies including cofiring with coal, reburn to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO, N2O, NOx, etc.) and Hg emissions and gasification to produce low-BTU gas for on-site power production in order to extract energy from waste streams or renewable resources. Category 2 � Biomass Resource Technology. This category, addressed mostly in Volume II, deals with the efficient and cost-effective use of CB as a renewable energy source (e.g. through and via aqueous-phase, anaerobic digestion or biological gasification). The investigators formed an industrial advisory panel consisting fuel producers (feedlots and dairy farms) and fuel users (utilities), periodically met with them, and presented the research results; apart from serving as dissemination forum, the PIs used their critique to red-direct the research within the scope of the tasks. The final report for the 5 to 7 year project performed by an interdisciplinary team of 9 professors is arranged in three volumes: Vol. I (edited by Kalyan Annamalai) addressing thermo-chemical conversion and direct combustion under Category 1 and Vol. II and Vol. III ( edited by J M Sweeten) addressing biomass resource Technology under Category 2. Various tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume I were performed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering (a part of TEES; see Volume I), while other tasks and sub-tasks addressed in Volume II and IIII were conducted by Texas AgriLife Research at Amarillo; the TAMU Biological & Agricultural Engineering Department (BAEN) College Station; and West Texas A&M University (WTAMU) (Volumes II and III). The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys a

John M. Sweeten, Kalyan Annamalai Brent Auvermann Saqib Mukhtar Sergio C. Capareda Cady Engler Wyatte Harman J.N. Reddy, Robert DeOtte David B. Parker Dr. B.A. Stewart

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

88

Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production Accepted 24 May 2013 Available online Keywords: Anaerobic digestion Ammonia Bioenergy Bioammonia Hydrogen Anaerobic digestion-bioammonia to hydrogen (ADBH) a b s t r a c t During anaerobic digestion, organic matter

89

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols in anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion of organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input. 8 figs.

Weaver, P.F.

1989-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Original paper: An integrated model for simulation of border-check irrigated dairy pasture production systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Border-check irrigation is the predominant method of applying water to dairy pastures in Australia. Dairy pastures consume 40% of total irrigation water in Australia and, with irrigation water security in Australia under threat from climate variability/change ... Keywords: Dairy pasture systems, Integrated modeling tools, Surface irrigation hydraulics

P. Douglas; K. B. Dassanayake; D. F. Chapman; I. R. Johnson; M. Khanna; H. Malano

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Bio-Terre Cook Farm Anaerobic Digester Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the preliminary research and construction of a novel low temperature earthen cell for anaerobic digestion and biogas production facility at Cook Feeders Ltd., a 6,000 head swine finisher operation, located in central Manitoba, Canada.

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cascade Fuzzy Logic Controller for an Anaerobic Digester  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cascade controller is introduced for operating Up flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) digesters efficiently. The Upper-level controller is a Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) and the Lower-level controller is a conventional PI controller. The inner loop ...

Albino Martinez-Sibaja; Ruben Posada-Gomez; Alejandro Alvarado-Lassman; Angel Sebastia-Cortes

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas 907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas EA-1907: Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE and USDA to provide funding to Western Plains Energy, LLC (WPE) to construct, purchase equipment, and operate a new Biogas Anaerobic Digester at WPE's existing Ethanol Facility, located at 3022 County Road 18, Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas. The proposed facility will include a receiving building, digester, and related infrastructure. Based on the analysis in USDA's Final EA and FONSI, DOE has determined that DOE's proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human or natural environment.

95

Stabilization of a nonlinear anaerobic wastewater treatment model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear anaerobic digester model of wastewater treatment plants is considered. The stabilizability of the dynamic system is studied and a continuous stabilizing feedback, depending only on an on-line measurable variable, is proposed. Computer simulations ...

Neli S. Dimitrova; Mikhail I. Krastanov

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ammonia Emissions from Anaerobic Swine Lagoons: Model Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concentrated animal production may represent a significant source for ammonia emissions to the environment. Most concentrated animal production systems use anaerobic or liquid/slurry systems for wasteholding; thus, it is desirable to be able to ...

A. De Visscher; L. A. Harper; P. W. Westerman; Z. Liang; J. Arogo; R. R. Sharpe; O. Van Cleemput

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 10–25 days. In the acidogenic reactor

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Anaerobic digestion as a waste disposal option for American Samoa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tuna sludge and municipal solid waste (MSW) generated on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, represent an ongoing disposal problem as well as an emerging opportunity for use in renewable fuel production. This research project focuses on the biological conversion of the organic fraction of these wastes to useful products including methane and fertilizer-grade residue through anaerobic high solids digestion. In this preliminary study, the anaerobic bioconversion of tuna sludge with MSW appears promising.

Rivard, C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Apparatus for the anaerobic digestion of natural organic waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The title system consists of a feed tank, from which sewage is provided to a digester tank at an adjustable continuous weight, in which the sewage is anaerobically digested. The gas produced in the anaerobic digester is collected at the top and pumped to a diffuser at the bottom of the digester. The supernatent from the treated sewage is transferred to an outlet tank, and sludge is removed from the bottom of the digester tank.

Hawkes, D.L.; Horton, R.; Stafford, D.A.

1980-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

100

Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

Lopez Torres, M. [National Center for Scientific Researcher (CNIC), Environmental Pollution Department (DECA), Ave. 25 y 158, Cubanacan, Playa, Havana City (Cuba)], E-mail: matilde.lopez@cnic.edu.cu; Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C. [National Center for Scientific Researcher (CNIC), Environmental Pollution Department (DECA), Ave. 25 y 158, Cubanacan, Playa, Havana City (Cuba)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smith Dairy Deploys Natural Gas Vehicles and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Smith Dairy Deploys Smith Dairy Deploys Natural Gas Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in the Midwest to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smith Dairy Deploys Natural Gas Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in the Midwest on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smith Dairy Deploys Natural Gas Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in the Midwest on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smith Dairy Deploys Natural Gas Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in the Midwest on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smith Dairy Deploys Natural Gas Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in the Midwest on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Smith Dairy Deploys Natural Gas Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure in the Midwest on Digg

102

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i PREFACE The California Energy Commission’s Public Interestdairy/dairy_data.html California Energy Commission. 2004a.Code. Sacramento, California: California Energy Commission.

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CPUC_GHG_Model.html> Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU).1998. Reducing Energy costs in dairies- a guide toimproved profitability. Energy Efficiency Best Practice

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Freeze Concentration of Dairy Products, Phase Three and Phase Four  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freeze concentration offers substantially increased electricity demand while providing dairy processors with new and improved products. Pilot testing demonstrates the smoother and creamier taste of freeze concentrated milk products. Economic analyses indicate that this technology can produce superior products competitive with state-of-the-art evaporation technology.

2001-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

User's Manual for BEST-Dairy: Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This User's Manual summarizes the background information of the Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2, 2011), including'Read Me' portion of the tool, the sections of Introduction, and Instructions for the BEST-Dairy tool that is developed and distributed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Xu, T.; Ke, J.; Sathaye, J.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Cassava Stillage Treatment by Thermophilic Anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper assesses the performance of a thermophilic anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) in the treatment of cassava stillage under various organic loading rates (OLRs) without suspended solids (SS) separation. The reactor was seeded with mesophilic anaerobic granular sludge

Gang Luo; Li Xie; Zhonghai Zou; Qi Zhou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns

Columbia University

108

Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors for treatment of wastewater from the brewery industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion can be utilized to convert industrial wastewater into clean water and energy. The goal of this project was to set up lab-scale anaerobic digesters to collect data that will be used to develop and validate ...

Scampini, Amanda C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate Total Incentive: $2 million (combined production and capacity incentives) Fixed Base + Capacity Incentive: varies, limited to the total maximum incentive of $2 million minus the applicable performance incentive Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge; NYPA Expiration Date 01/31/2013 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Fixed Base Incentive: varies Capacity Incentive: varies Production Incentive: $0.025/kWh production payment for new systems for up

110

Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics Ecovation Inc formerly AnAerobics Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecovation Inc (formerly AnAerobics) Place Victor, New York Zip 14564 Product The company build and operate organic waste management systems. Coordinates 38.15924°, -81.034233° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.15924,"lon":-81.034233,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

111

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community-Scale Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters (text version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters," originally presented on April 16, 2013. Operator: The broadcast is now starting. All attendees are in listen-only mode. Sarah Busche: Good afternoon, everyone, and welcome to today's webinar sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. I'm Sarah Busche, and I'm here with Devin Egan, and we're broadcasting live from a very snowy National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Thank you so much for joining us today. We're going to give folks a few minutes to call in and log on, but while we wait Devin will go over some logistics, and then we'll get started with

112

Thermochemical Pretreatment for Anaerobic Digestion of Sorted Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of alkaline hydrothermal pre?treatment for anaerobic digestion of mechanically?sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) and source?sorted waste was studied. Waste was hydrothermally pre?treated in dilute alkali solution. Hydrolysis product was incubated in 500 ml saline bottle to determine methane potential (MP) under mesospheric anaerobic conditions. Optimum reaction condition obtained in the study is 170?°C at the dose of 4 g NaOH/100 g solid for one hour. Soluble COD was 13936 mg/L and methane yield was 164 ml/g VS for 6 days incubation at optimum conditions. More than 50% biogas increase was achieved over the control

W. Hao; W. Hongtao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Analysis, anaerobic treatment and ozonation of wool scouring wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Wool scouring effluents (WSE) were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS), and then exposed to anaerobic biological treatment using laboratory scale fixed-bed filters. This resulted in a nearly 50% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). Ozonation of the effluent from the biological step led to an even further decrease in total organic carbon (TOC). The fatty acid content of the WSE was affected by both biological treatment and ozonation. Finally, steroids in the WSE underwent reduction reactions when exposed to the anaerobic biological treatment.

Monteverdi, A.; Rindone, B.; Sorlini, C. (Univ. di Milano (Italy)); Andreoni, V. (Univ. di Torino (Italy)); Rozzi, A. (Inst. di Ingegneria Sanitaria del Politechnico di Milano (Italy))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

Buelter, Thomas (Denver, CO); Meinhold, Peter (Denver, CO); Feldman, Reid M. Renny (San Francisco, CA); Hawkins, Andrew C. (Parker, CO); Urano, Jun (Irvine, CA); Bastian, Sabine (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Frances (La Canada, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS OF PARTICULATE MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS-SupAgro MISTEA, 2 p. Viala 34060 Montpellier, France, fekih@supagro.inra.fr Introduction. Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

116

Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting and Anaerobic Digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Anaerobic Digestion Frederick C. Michel, Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering Zhongtang Yu, Animal concluded that both anaerobic digestion and composting--especially at elevated temperatures--are effective effectiveness of anaerobic digestion and composting at high temperatures is of interest to industry

Jones, Michelle

117

Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled Terence Bayen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled process Terence Bayen , Francis by light and an anaerobic digester. The mathematical model for the dynamics of the reactors takes for sustainable energy production [2]. Anaerobic digestion can be applied to recover the energy stored

Recanati, Catherine

118

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 2 Abstract The Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 (ADM1., 2005). Anaerobic digestion process involves many interactions between species that may not all have

119

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce volume, remove pathogens, and to gain energy. Anaerobic digestion is by far the most commonRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N treatment in a wastewater treatment plant. They therefore proceed directly to the anaerobic post treatment

120

Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering Fall 2011 Small Scale Anaerobic Digestion by PENERGY Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by wood-fired boilers. By generating biogas through anaerobic digestion of swine manure, fuel can: A mechanical anaerobic digester to handle organic farm waste. A complete biogas collection system with hookPENNSTATE Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering Fall 2011 Small Scale Anaerobic

Demirel, Melik C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The dynamics of this process are the ones of standard anaerobic digestion, and depend on the type of organic is devoted to the description of the model of the specific anaerobic digestion processA dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater

122

An integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through the internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manages the problem. Keywords Anaerobic digestion, automation, control, fault detection and isolationAn integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through of the anaerobic wastewater treatment plants that do not benefit from a local expert in wastewater treatment

Bernard, Olivier

123

Bifurcation and stability analysis of a two step model for monitoring anaerobic digestion processes$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bifurcation and stability analysis of a two step model for monitoring anaerobic digestion processes in simulation. Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, biotechnology, steady state analysis, $ This work was supported the phenomenologic behavior of anaerobic digestion systems following the idea that all the available information

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

124

Research review paper1 Anaerobic digestion of microalgae as a necessary step to make3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Research review paper1 2 Anaerobic digestion of microalgae as a necessary step to make3 of residual biomass and the17 high amounts of fertilizers must be considered. Anaerobic digestion is a key and concentrate methane is discussed.31 32 33 Keywords: anaerobic digestion, microalgae, biochemical methane

125

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an unstable biological process used for wastewater treat- ment. This anaerobic digestion ecosystem can have steady-state to another. This is especially the case for the anaerobic digestion process: a more and more There exists numerous dynamical models for anaerobic digestion, from the basic ones considering only one

Bernard, Olivier

126

THE RUMEN ANAEROBIC FUNGI : COLONIZERS OF PLANT FIBRE Applied Biochemistry Division, DSIR, Palmerston North, New Zealand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

» fraction that the rumen anaerobic fungi are to be found. Digestion of cellulose and related plant fibrousTHE RUMEN ANAEROBIC FUNGI : COLONIZERS OF PLANT FIBRE T. BAUCHOP Applied Biochemistry Division, DSIR, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Large numbers of anaerobic phycomyce- tous fungi colonize plant

Recanati, Catherine

127

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM, Singapore 639798 (E-mail: jwlim3@e.ntu.edu.sg) Abstract The anaerobic digestion of brown water (BW), food in a decentralized reactor via anaerobic digestion. The bio-methane potential of these substrates at different feed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

128

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by co-disposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Pu(IV)-EDTA is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds. Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) is likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions and the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV), the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA, how the Pu(III)-EDTA competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, soluble Pu(III)-EDTA under anaerobic conditions would require anaerobic degradation of the EDTA to limit Pu(III) transport. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have never been isolated. Recent results have shown that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(IV) was provided as insoluble PuO2. The highest rate of Pu(IV) reduction was with the addition of AQDS, an electron shuttle. Of the total amount of Pu solubilized (i.e., soluble through a 0.36 nm filter), approximately 70% was Pu(III). The amount of soluble Pu was between 4.8 and 3.2 micromolar at day 1 and 6, respectively, indicating rapid reduction. The micromolar Pu is significant since the drinking water limit for Pu is 10{sup -12} M. On-going experiments are investigating the influence of EDTA on the rate of Pu reduction and the stability of the formed Pu(III). We have also begun to enrich and isolate bacteria capable of aerobic and anaerobic degradation of EDTA. Environmental samples (e.g., sludges, river sediments) were incubated aerobically and anaerobically with EDTA or NTA as the sole carbon and energy source. Aerobic enrichment with EDTA has not resulted in any cultures, but NTA has provided several isolates. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence and sequence comparison identified four separate strains closely related to Microbacterium oxydans, Aminobacter sp., Achromobacter sp., Aminobacter sp., respectively. Anaerobic enrichments with either EDTA or NTA are still in progress since metabolism and growth is relatively slow. In addition to the biotransformation experiments, studies are underway to determine/validate complexation constants of Pu(III) with EDTA and the influence of competing ions on Pu(III)-EDTA complexes. These data are being obtained through solubility studies of PuPO{sub 4}(s) and Pu(OH){sub 3}(s) as a function of time, pH, and EDTA and competing ion concentrations. These results have begun to fill-in knowledge gaps of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu transport in groundwater at DOE sites.

Bolton, H., Jr.; Bailey, V.L.; Plymale, A.E.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF UPGRADING DAIRY MANURE-DERIVED BIOGAS FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the current technical and economical feasibility of processing dairy manure-derived biogas to natural gas quality for injection… (more)

Saikkonen, Kelly

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Anaerobic fermentation of beef cattle manure. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research to convert livestock manure and crop residues into methane and a high protein feed ingredient by thermophilic anaerobic fermentation are summarized. The major biological and operational factors involved in methanogenesis were discussed, and a kinetic model that describes the fermentation process was presented. Substrate biodegradability, fermentation temperature, and influent substrate concentration were shown to have significant effects on CH/sub 4/ production rate. The kinetic model predicted methane production rates of existing pilot and full-scale fermentation systems to within 15%. The highest methane production rate achieved by the fermenter was 4.7 L CH/sub 4//L fermenter day. This is the highest rate reported in the literature and about 4 times higher than other pilot or full-scale systems fermenting livestock manures. Assessment of the energy requirements for anaerobic fermentation systems showed that the major energy requirement for a thermophilic system was for maintaining the fermenter temperature. The next major energy consumption was due to the mixing of the influent slurry and fermenter liquor. An approach to optimizing anaerobic fermenter designs by selecting design criteria that maximize the net energy production per unit cost was presented. Based on the results, we believe that the economics of anaerobic fermentation is sufficiently favorable for farm-scale demonstration of this technology.

Hashimoto, A.G.; Chen, Y.R.; Varel, V.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters April 16, 2013 Webinar: Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters This webinar was held April 16, 2013, and provided information on San Jose, California's, commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community's (FCPC) anaerobic digester project. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 125 MB), or view the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Implementing Anaerobic Digestion in San Jose's Integrated Processing Infrastructure This presentation provided background on San Jose, California's, leading-edge program using the nation's first commercial-scale, high solids dry fermentation anaerobic digestion system to process commercial organics

132

On the use of a laser methane detector in dairy cows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the ability of a recently developed, proprietary, laser methane detector (LMD) to estimate enteric methane output in dairy cows without any disturbance to the normal activity of the cows was examined. Measurements were taken on ... Keywords: Dairy cows, Enteric methane, Laser methane detector

M. G. G. Chagunda; D. Ross; D. J. Roberts

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY USING BIOMASS FROM DAIRY AND BEEF ANIMAL PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The three volume report covers the following results: fuel properties of low ash and high ash CB (particularly DB) and MB (mortality biomass and coals, non-intrusive visible infrared (NVIR) spectroscopy techniques for ash determination, dairy energy use surveys at 14 dairies in Texas and Califor

John M. Sweeten, Kalyan Annamalai

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

134

The dynamic North Florida dairy farm model: A user-friendly computerized tool for increasing profits while minimizing N leaching under varying climatic conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the computer implementation of the Dynamic North Florida Dairy farm model (DyNoFlo Dairy). The DyNoFlo Dairy is a decision support system that integrates nutrient budgeting, crop, and optimization models created to assess nitrogen ... Keywords: Climate, Dairy, Florida, Leaching, Markov chains, Optimization, User friendly

Victor E. Cabrera; Norman E. Breuer; Peter E. Hildebrand; David Letson

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu transport in groundwater at DOE sites.

Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

136

Turkey Hill Dairy: Where Energy is Not Left Flapping in the Wind |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turkey Hill Dairy: Where Energy is Not Left Flapping in the Wind Turkey Hill Dairy: Where Energy is Not Left Flapping in the Wind Turkey Hill Dairy: Where Energy is Not Left Flapping in the Wind December 21, 2011 - 11:26am Addthis These two General Electric wind turbines, erected in January 2011 on the Frey Farm landfill adjacent to Turkey Hill Dairy's ice cream and sweet iced tea plant in Lancaster County, Penn., are expected to produce 7.5 million kWh of electricity annually. | Photo courtesy of Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority. These two General Electric wind turbines, erected in January 2011 on the Frey Farm landfill adjacent to Turkey Hill Dairy's ice cream and sweet iced tea plant in Lancaster County, Penn., are expected to produce 7.5 million kWh of electricity annually. | Photo courtesy of Lancaster County Solid

137

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage in existing markets and cheese-making plants The compiled informationenergy policy options (such as strategies, incentives, and programs) can be established based upon new energy information, dairy markets,

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage in existing markets and cheese-making plants The compiled informationenergy policy options (such as strategies, incentives, and programs) can be established based upon new energy information, dairy markets,

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Single stage anaerobic digester at Tarleton State University. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and operation of the demonstration plant facilities at Tarleton State University to produce methane in a single stage anaerobic digester are described. A combination of manures from hogs and poultry are used as feedstock. Uses for the methane, cost of the digester, and value of the energy produced are discussed. During the 21 months of operation, 310 people have visited the project. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Metagenome of an Anaerobic Microbial Community Decomposing Poplar Wood Chips  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to lignin-modification or depolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L. L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S. Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

Hu, Haiyan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL] [ORNL; Tomanicek, Stephen J [ORNL] [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Liquidization of dewatered organic sludge and anaerobic treatment  

SciTech Connect

Dewatered sewage sludge was thermochemically liquidized at 175 {degrees}C and the liquidized sludge was separated by centrifugation to 58% (w/w) supernatant and 42% precipitate. The amount of proteins in the liquidized sludge slightly decreased through the liquidization process, however, that of lipids increased. The supernatant separated from the sludge liquidized with dewatered sewage sludge was successfully anaerobically digested. Biogas yield from the supernatant from dewatered sewage sludge at organic loading concentrations of 1.9-2.2 g VS/l during 9 days incubation was 440 ml/g-added VS and digestion ratio was 66% (w/w). Biogas yield in the case of dewatered sewage sludge was 257 ml/g-added VS and digestion ratio was 45%. Similar results were obtained in the case of the anaerobically digested with sewage sludge and dewatered sludge. Anaerobic digestion of the supernatants from the liquidized sludges resulted in high biogas productivity and high digestion ratio compared with these of the original sludges. Moreover, the precipitates contained lower moisture, therefore, they can be incinerated easier than the respective original sludges.

Sawayama, Shigeki; Inoue, Seiichi; Ogi, Tomoko [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log{sub 10} reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms.

Smith, S.R. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk; Lang, N.L. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cheung, K.H.M. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Spanoudaki, K. [Centre for Environmental Control and Waste Management, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Investigation of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic codigestion of algae and sewage sludge for wastewater treatment facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main goals of this research are to investigate the anaerobic digestibility of algae and to investigate the effects of growth media on the growth… (more)

Wang, Meng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community- A Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented by Jason Rieth, Industrial Construction Executive at Miron Construction at the April 16, 2013, Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters CommRE Webinar.

146

Pretreatment of Pulp Mill Wastewater Treatment Residues to Improve Their Anaerobic Digestion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion of excess biological wastewater treatment sludge (WAS) from pulp mills has the potential to reduce disposal costs and to generate energy through biogas… (more)

Wood, Nicholas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Modeling Hydrogen Sulfide Adsorption by Activated Carbon made from Anaerobic Digestion By-product.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas, produced from anaerobic digestion of cattle manure, is an attractive alternative energy source as it is rich in methane. However, it is necessary to… (more)

Ho, Natalie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Treatment program of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program for processing of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) provides financial assistance to municipalities and the private sector for the installation of...

149

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACILLUS MOJAVENSIS STRAIN JF-2 FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our work focuses on the use of microorganisms to recover petroleum hydrocarbons that remain entrapped after current recovery technologies reach their economic limit. Capillary forces between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are largely responsible for trapping the hydrocarbons in the pores of the rock and large reductions in the interfacial tension between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (1-3, 10, 11). Microorganisms produce a variety of biosurfactants (4), several of which generate the ultra low interfacial tensions needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (4, 5, 8). In particular, the lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 reduces the interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and aqueous phases to very low levels (herring sperm DNA, E. coli DNA or synthetic DNA (single or double stranded) to Medium E all supported anaerobic growth of JF-2. Further, we found that JF-2 required all four deoxyribonucleosides (deoxyadeonosine, deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine) for growth under strict anaerobic conditions. The requirement for the deoxyribonucleosides did not occur under aerobic growth conditions. DNA was not used as a sole energy source; sucrose was required for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production in DNA-supplemented Medium E. In addition to DNA or deoxyribonucleosides, nitrate, amino acids and vitamins were all required for anaerobic growth of JF-2. Bacillus mojavensisT (ABO21191), Bacillus mojavensis, strain ROB2 also required DNA or deoxyribonucleosides for anaerobic growth. The improved anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 was a prerequisite for studies that will lead to improved anaerobic biosurfactant production.

M.J. McInerney; M. Folmsbee; D. Nagle

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

McInerney, M.J.

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Deploying anaerobic digesters: Current status and future possibilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unmanaged pollutants from putrescible farm, industrial, and municipal wastes degrade in the environment, and methane emitted from their decomposition may contribute to global climate change. Under modern environmental regulations, these wastes are becoming difficult to dispose of using traditional means. One waste management system, anaerobic digestion or AD, not only provides pollution prevention but can also convert a disposal problem into a new profit center. This report is drawn from a special session of the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Lusk, P. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France); Wheeler, P. [ETSU (United Kingdom); Rivard, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Tumble-mix anaerobic digestion of dry beef manure  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion of beef manure at an influent total solids concentration of 26% was demonstrated using an innovative tumble-mix fermenter. At an organic loading rate of 4.7 kg VS m-/sup 3/ d-/sup 1/ and a 23% VS influent concentration, a 54% volatile solids reduction was achieved. The average biogas production was 1.37 m/sup 3/ m-/sup 3/ d-/sup 1/ with a gas quality of 54% CH/sub 4/.

Kottwitz, D.; Schulte, D.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

155

1190 J. ENVIRON. QUAL., VOL. 26, JULY-AUGUST 1997 Proc. lnt. Symp. on Anaerobic Digestion of Soild Waste, Venice,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1190 J. ENVIRON. QUAL., VOL. 26, JULY-AUGUST 1997 Proc. lnt. Symp. on Anaerobic Digestion of Soild USSR. Chemosphere 26:401-417. Orlygsson, J., F.P. Houwen, and B.H. Svensson. 1993. Anaerobic

Fischlin, Andreas

156

We Energies- Livestock and Dairy Farm Electrical Re-wiring Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Any We Energies dairy farm customer can apply for assistance with a re-wiring project. We Energies would pay the first $1,000 of the project and 50 percent of remaining costs up to a total grant of...

157

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intake, calculated using NRC (2001) recommended formula.lactation and growth (NRC 2001). ND = not detected. http://J Dairy Sci 88:3721–33. [NRC] National Research Council.

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Port of Tillamook Bay (POTB); Methane Energy Agriculture Development (MEAD); Dairy Digester Project  

SciTech Connect

The Tillamook Digester is a fully operational demonstration project that will identify the components necessary to bring the concept to a financially viable alternative for handling waste manure from dairy operations in Tillamook County.

Jack Crider

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Turkey Hill Dairy: Where Energy is Not Left Flapping in the Wind...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

erected in January 2011 on the Frey Farm landfill adjacent to Turkey Hill Dairy's ice cream and sweet iced tea plant in Lancaster County, Penn., are expected to produce 7.5...

160

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at a U.S. DOE sponsored energy audit of a Land O’Lakes dairy2002a). Similarly, in energy audits of seven fresh fruit andguide for consistency. Energy audits carried out at seven

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effects of Fe2+ on the Anaerobic Digestion of Chicken Manure: A Batch Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trace elements are considered to be essential for anaerobic process. Laboratory-scale batch studies were undertaken to evaluate the effect of Fe2+on the biogas production from chicken manure at mesophilic condition (37 ±1°C). The biogas production ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, chicken manure, dynamics, iron, stimulation and inhibition

Zhang Wanqin; Guo Jianbin; Wu Shubiao; Dong Renjie; Zhou Jie; Lang Qianqian; Li Xin; Lv Tao; Pang Changle; Chen Li; Wang Baozhi

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

On differential algebraic decision methods for the estimation of anaerobic digestion models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring and control of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes by microorganisms are parts of actual world efforts to preserve environment. The anaerobic digestion is a biochemical process in which microorganisms (or bacteria) biodegrade organic matters ... Keywords: characteristic set, differential algebra, differential algebraic decision methods, dynamic systems, observability, software sensors

Elena Chorukova; Sette Diop; Ivan Simeonov

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Presented by Jason Rieth, P.E., LEED AP BD + C Industrial Construction Executive Miron Construction Co., Inc. 715.841.4029 | jason.rieth@miron-construction.com * Overview of the FCPC Renewable Generation Facility

164

Literature analysis of anaerobic wastewater treatment in China from 1998 to 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the bibliometric method, this paper analyzes statistically the research papers on anaerobic wastewater treatment in China collected by China Journal Whole-length Database of National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) published during the period ... Keywords: anaerobic treatment, bibliometric method, literature, wastewater

Liu Min; Huang Zhan-bin; Huang Zhen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Compartmental anaerobic baffled reactor kinetic model for treatment of dilute aircraft deicing fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-compartment, anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) incorporating granular sludge biomass (GSB) was operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) in the range of 3 to 24 hours using dilute aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) with different chemical ... Keywords: anaerobic, baffled reactor, deicing fluid

Juan Marin; Kevin J. Kennedy; Cigdem Eskicioglu; Mohamed F. Hamoda

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Operation of a 200-kW PAFC Unit on Anaerobic Digestor Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anaerobic digestor process used by over 90% of wastewater treatment plants generates methane-rich gas as a byproduct. This report describes the initial phases of a twelve-month demonstration project in which a fuel cell power plant in Yonkers, New York, is being successfully run on anaerobic digestor gas (ADG).

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS BY STRICTLY ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF GNOTOXENIC MICE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS BY STRICTLY ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF « GNOTOXENIC » MICE. INHIBITORY EFFECT ON SHIGELLA FLEXNERI Various strains of strictly anaerobic bacteria of holoxenic animals, were implanted in the digestive tract of axenic mice. The in vivo production of VFA

Recanati, Catherine

168

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates and concentrations of bacteria for the anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the estimator performance. I. Introduction Anaerobic digestion is a biotechnological process with a promisingDynamic estimation of specific growth rates and concentrations of bacteria for the anaerobic digestion S. Diop1 and I. Simeonov2 Abstract-- The paper proposes an observability anal- ysis and estimation

169

Centralized Indirect Control of an Anaerobic Digestion Bioprocess Using Recurrent Neural Identifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper proposed to use a Recurrent Neural Network Model (RNNM) and a dynamic Backpropagation learning for centralized identification of an anaerobic digestion bioprocess, carried out in a fixed bed and a recirculation tank of a wastewater treatment ... Keywords: Recurrent neural network model, anaerobic digestion bioprocess, backpropagation learning, distributed parameter system, sliding mode control, systems identification, wastewater treatment bioprocess

Ieroham S. Baruch; Rosalba Galvan-Guerra; Boyka Nenkova

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Analysis of the Changing Microbial Phase in an Underground River Anaerobic Digestion Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underground river anaerobic fermentation system was adopted in this experiment was that a pipeline buried underground just like an underground river. The hydrolysis, acidification and degradation of initial fermentation were carried out when raw ... Keywords: underground river anaerobic digestion reactor, microbial phase, methane-producing bacteria, dominant bacteria

Bingbing Li; Xiao Bo; Zhiquan Hu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Colonisation of the sheep rumen with polycentric anaerobic fungi isolated from cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colonisation of the sheep rumen with polycentric anaerobic fungi isolated from cattle MW Phillips, GLR Gordon CSIRO Animal Production, Locked Bag 1, Blacktown, New South Wales 2148, Australia Anaerobic suggests that these organisms play an important role in the digestion of diets high in fibre (Gordon

Recanati, Catherine

172

High Solid Anaerobic Co-digestion Pilot Scale Experiment of Kitchen Waste and Cow-dung  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under mesophilic condition (37°C), a bench-scale experiment based on high solid anaerobic digestion process was conducted in a fed-batch single phase reactor. The result shows: (1) According to gas production and ph value change, there are mainly ... Keywords: Kitchen waste, Cow-dung, High solid, Anaerobic co-digestion, Pilotsate

Lei Feng; Yan Chen; Rundong Li; Jie Xu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Effects of Different Anaerobic Fermentation Temperature on Biogas Fermentation of Swine Manure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas yields and methane productivity were studied at different temperatures (15ˇć, 20ˇć, 25ˇć, 30ˇć and 35ˇć) by the way of anaerobic fermentation experiment which takes wine manure as biogas fermentation raw material, and ... Keywords: Temperature, Biogas, Swine manure, Anaerobic fermentation

Zhu Zongqiang; Cheng Guanwen; Zhu Yinian; Zeng Honghu; Wei Rongrong; Wei Caichun

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Energy integrated dairy farm system in Georgia: Technical manual, Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm, Social Circle, Georgia. [Cogeneration using biogas; heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes a project sponsored to optimize energy generation and utilization in the agricultural or food processing industry. The particular project involves the Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm located in Social Circle, Georgia (about 60 miles east of Atlanta). The farm is designed for a 550 milking cow herd and produces certified raw milk for sale to a processing plant located in Atlanta. The project converted the Mathis/P and and M Dairy into an energy integrated dairy farm system (EIDFS) in which the interaction of the subsystems and components are modified such that the energy resources of the farm are optimized. This manual is a description of the system, subsystems and components composing the Mathis EIDFS and is primarily intended for farmers, extension agents, and equipment manufacturers who might be involved in future EIDFS projects. Cogeneration using biogas from manures and heat recovery from the refrigeration machinery were among the options chosen.

Walsh, J.L. Jr.; Ross, C.C.; Lamade, R.M.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal for a mid-size city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal and processes on composting and anaerobic digestion are compiled, showing the versatility and multivariable of the compost. In addition, anaerobic decomposition followed by vermicomposting is pointed as one of the best

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

176

Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor and limestone powder: High shear Wet Granulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ă?Ă? Ă? Ă?Ă?Ă? Ă? Ă?Ă? Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor.M. Walker, Alternative method for producing organic fertiliser from anaerobic digestion liquor and limestone method for producing organic fertiliser from Anaerobic Digestion liquor and limestone powder: High Shear

Paxton, Anthony T.

177

Effects of temperature and temperature shock on the performance and microbial community structure of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the biological wastewater treatment performance and stability. Anaerobic digestion can be conducted., 2004). Earlier studies investigating effect of temperature on the anaerobic digestion process have of the mesophilic anaerobic digestion were re- cently studied (Chae et al., 2008). Some of the studies were only

Qin, Wensheng

178

Can we assess the model complexity for a bioprocess ? Theory and example of the anaerobic digestion process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can we assess the model complexity for a bioprocess ? Theory and example of the anaerobic digestion the bioreactor. This provides the dimension of K. The method is applied to data from an anaerobic digestion can be obtained with 2 biomasses. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; Bioreactors; Modelling; Nonlinear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

179

ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM DIFFERENT CARBON SOURCES USING ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED AND WETOXIDISED MANURE AS NUTRIENT AND WATER SUPPLY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM DIFFERENT CARBON SOURCES USING ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED AND WETOXIDISED. The nutrients in anaerobically digested manure are sufficient for yeast fermentation, which means that the cost at 121o C was chosen as the most suitable method for pretreating anaerobically digested manure. Moreover

180

Fate of neptunium in an anaerobic, methanogenic microcosm.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neptunium is found predominantly as Np(IV) in reducing environments, but Np(V) in aerobic environments. However, currently it is not known how the interplay between biotic and abiotic processes affects Np redox speciation in the environment. In order to evaluate the effect of anaerobic microbial activity on the fate of Np in natural systems, Np(V) was added to a microcosminoculated with anaerobic sediments from a metal-contaminated fresh water lake. The consortium included metal-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms, and acetate was supplied as the only exogenous substrate. Addition of more than 10{sup {minus}5} M Np did not inhibit methane production. Total Np volubility in the active microcosm, as well as in sterilized control samples, decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude. A combination of analytical techniques, including VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy and XANES, identified Np(IV) as the oxidation state associated with the sediments. The similar results from the active microcosm and the abiotic controls suggest that microbian y produced Mn(II/HI) and Fe(II) may serve as electron donors for Np reduction.

Banaszak, J. E.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A mass transfer model of ammonia volatilisation from anaerobic digestate  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion (AD) is becoming increasingly popular for treating organic waste. The methane produced can be burned to generate electricity and the digestate, which is high in mineral nitrogen, can be used as a fertiliser. In this paper we evaluate potential losses of ammonia via volatilisation from food waste anaerobic digestate using a closed chamber system equipped with a sulphuric acid trap. Ammonia losses represent a pollution source and, over long periods could reduce the agronomic value of the digestate. Observed ammonia losses from the experimental system were linear with time. A simple non-steady-state partitioning model was developed to represent the process. After calibration, the model was able to describe the behaviour of ammonia in the digestate and in the trap very well. The average rate of volatilisation was approximately 5.2 g N m{sup -2} week{sup -1}. The model was used to extrapolate the findings of the laboratory study to a number of AD storage scenarios. The simulations highlight that open storage of digestate could result in significant losses of ammonia to the atmosphere. Losses are predicted to be relatively minor from covered facilities, particularly if depth to surface area ratio is high.

Whelan, M.J., E-mail: m.j.whelan@cranfield.ac.u [School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, College Road, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Everitt, T.; Villa, R. [School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, College Road, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Anaerobic digestion analysis model: User`s manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Anaerobic Digestion Analysis Model (ADAM) has been developed to assist investigators in performing preliminary economic analyses of anaerobic digestion processes. The model, which runs under Microsoft Excel{trademark}, is capable of estimating the economic performance of several different waste digestion process configurations that are defined by the user through a series of option selections. The model can be used to predict required feedstock tipping fees, product selling prices, utility rates, and raw material unit costs. The model is intended to be used as a tool to perform preliminary economic estimates that could be used to carry out simple screening analyses. The model`s current parameters are based on engineering judgments and are not reflective of any existing process; therefore, they should be carefully evaluated and modified if necessary to reflect the process under consideration. The accuracy and level of uncertainty of the estimated capital investment and operating costs are dependent on the accuracy and level of uncertainty of the model`s input parameters. The underlying methodology is capable of producing results accurate to within {+-} 30% of actual costs.

Ruth, M.; Landucci, R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rate of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 .mu.moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 .mu.moles ml.sup.-1 hr.sup.-1. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland (Wading River, NY); Chendrayan, Krishnachetty (Coimbatore Tamil Nadu, IN); Quinby, Helen L. (Cambridge, MD)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention related to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rat of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 ..mu..moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 ..mu..moles m1/sup /-/1/ hr/sup /-/1/. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of the strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.; Quinby, H.L.

1987-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

Crystallization and Solidification Properties of LipidsChapter 18 Emulsion Partial Coalescence and Structure Formation in Dairy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystallization and Solidification Properties of Lipids Chapter 18 Emulsion Partial Coalescence and Structure Formation in Dairy Systems Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry   ...

186

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACILLUS MOJAVENSIS STRAIN JF-2 FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

Our work focuses on the use of microorganisms to recover petroleum hydrocarbons that remain entrapped after current recovery technologies reach their economic limit. Capillary forces between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are largely responsible for trapping the hydrocarbons in the pores of the rock and large reductions in the interfacial tension between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (1-3, 10, 11). Microorganisms produce a variety of biosurfactants (4), several of which generate the ultra low interfacial tensions needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (4, 5, 8). In particular, the lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 reduces the interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and aqueous phases to very low levels (<0.016 mN/m) (8) (9). B. mojavensis JF-2 grows under the environmental conditions found in many oil reservoirs, i. e., anaerobic, NaCl concentrations up to 80 g l{sup -1}, and temperatures up to 45 C (6, 7), making it ideally suited for in situ applications. However, anaerobic growth of B. mojavensis JF-2 was inconsistent and difficult to replicate, which limited its use for in situ applications. Our initial studies revealed that enzymatic digests, such as Proteose Peptone, were required for anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2. Subsequent purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose Peptone resulted in the identification of the growth-enhancing factor as DNA or deoxyribonucleosides. The addition of salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, E. coli DNA or synthetic DNA (single or double stranded) to Medium E all supported anaerobic growth of JF-2. Further, we found that JF-2 required all four deoxyribonucleosides (deoxyadeonosine, deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine) for growth under strict anaerobic conditions. The requirement for the deoxyribonucleosides did not occur under aerobic growth conditions. DNA was not used as a sole energy source; sucrose was required for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production in DNA-supplemented Medium E. In addition to DNA or deoxyribonucleosides, nitrate, amino acids and vitamins were all required for anaerobic growth of JF-2. Bacillus mojavensisT (ABO21191), Bacillus mojavensis, strain ROB2 also required DNA or deoxyribonucleosides for anaerobic growth. The improved anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 was a prerequisite for studies that will lead to improved anaerobic biosurfactant production.

M.J. McInerney; M. Folmsbee; D. Nagle

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of solubilizing lead, in the form of lead oxide, found in industrial wastes, before these wastes are dumped into the environment. The lead is solubilized by dissolving the lead oxide in the wastes through contact with an anaerobic bacterial culture containing the bacterium ATCC No. 53464. The solubilized lead can then be removed from the wastes by chemical separation. It could also be removed by extending the contact period with the bacterial culture. As the culture grows, the solubilized lead is removed from the wastes by bioaccumulation by the microorganism or by immobilization by a polymer-like material produced by the microorganism. At this point, the lead is then removed from the wastes when the waste material is separated from the bacterial culture. If desired, the bacterial culture could be digested at this point to yield relatively pure lead for further industrial use.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.

1986-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues: potential for improvement and implementation. Twelfth quarter progress report, 16 March 1979-15 June 1979 and Addendum describing project activities, 16 June 1979-15 October 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Five different types of anaerobic fermentor reactor designs were operated, with the majority of effort focused on two full scale reactors (both about 35m/sup 3/), each designed to process the manure residues from up to 65 dairy cows. Three pilot units (5m/sup 3/ volume) are being operated to determine the limits of operation variables - temperature, labor inputs, mixing, and bedding composition. The low-cost full scale plug flow reactor has now been operated for more than one year, including the winter with the lowest temperature for the longest period recorded for the northern New York area. During the twelfth quarter the full scale plug flow and conventional control reactors were tested in parallel at new conditions of 15 days and 10 days HRT, 35/sup 0/C and 10 to 12% TS manure feed. Steady state results for the 15 day HRT condition once more indicated a more efficient solids conversion with the plug flow design (34.1% TVS destruction efficiency) than with the completely mixed full scale system (27.8% TVS destruction efficiency) when operated on dairy manure (13% TS) at 35/sup 0/C. No serious operational problems have been encountered with either full scale reactor during the twelfth quarter. Thermal data from the plug flow reactor has now been obtained for a full year cycle. The apparent overall efficiency of the boiler and reactor heating systems varied between 40 and 55%. In order to translate the temperature and operating data of the plug flow unit into a comprehensible energy balance, a computer model for the prediction of energy production and for the description of conducted heat losses and feed heating requirements was developed. Data analysis and the development of certain sections of the final report were given considerable attention throughout the twelfth quarter. The preparation of the farmer's feasibility manual was also initiated during this period.

Jewell, W.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Methods of predicting milk yield in dairy cows-Predictive capabilities of Wood's lactation curve and artificial neural networks (ANNs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study is focused on the capability of artificial neural networks to forecast milk yield for both full and standardised lactations. We used a dataset of 108,931 daily milk yields (dataset A) collected from three lactations of dairy cows managed in ... Keywords: 305-d lactation, Artificial neural networks, Daily yields, Dairy cows, Wood's model

Wilhelm Grzesiak; Piotr B?aszczyk; René Lacroix

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Simulation of chemical reaction fronts in anaerobic digestion of solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study for parallelisation of a code for a nonlinear system of evolution equations is presented. It describes the propagation of reaction fronts in anaerobic waste digestion. These occur as a consequence of heterogeneous initial distributions of ...

Hermann J. Eberl

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Culturing Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria and Mammalian Cells with a Microfluidic Differential Oxygenator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this manuscript, we report on the culture of anaerobic and aerobic species within a disposable multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device with an integrated differential oxygenator. A gas-filled microchannel ...

Lam, Raymond H. W.

192

Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria ...

Zaks, David P. M.

193

Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA  

SciTech Connect

The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

Xun, Luying

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lebanon County, PA PA Green Energy Works Targeted Grant - Biogas- Anergy Dairy Farm Biodigesters Installation of compact anaerobic digestors at 3 dairy farms. Each will require...

195

Anaerobic Digestion of Corn Ethanol Thin Stillage for Biogas Production in Batch and By Downflow Fixed Film Reactor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion (AD) of corn thin stillage (CTS) offers the potential to reduce corn grain ethanol production energy consumption. This thesis focuses on results collected… (more)

Wilkinson, Andrea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Introduction to a Large-Scale Biogas Plant in a Dairy Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a large-scale biogas plant in a dairy farm located in the Tongzhou District of Beijing. It is has a treatment capacity of 30t manure and 30t wastewater per day, a total of 60t/d with a residence time of 20 days. Input material ... Keywords: Large scale biogas plant, CHP, Biogas storage within digestor

Xiaolin Fan; Zifu Li; Tingting Wang; Fubin Yin; Xin Jin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Effects of rapeseed oil duodenal infusion on dairy cow performances and blood metabolites during early lactation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of rapeseed oil duodenal infusion on dairy cow performances and blood metabolites during, Argentina; 3 Laboratoire d'Etude du Métabolisme Energédque, INRA Theix, 63122 Ceyrat, France Rapeseed-oil), respectively. Oil-free dry matter intake was lower in group 0 (12.7 vs 15.2 kg/d, P

Recanati, Catherine

198

Effects of timing of rumen energy supply on food intake in lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of timing of rumen energy supply on food intake in lactating dairy cows P Faverdin, N of this experiment was to compare the effects of energy supply to the rumen before or during a meal on dry matter of rumen fill on food intake occurs directly whereas the effect of energy supply is delayed and probably

Recanati, Catherine

199

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

Zhang Lei, E-mail: wxzyfx@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Dalian 116024 (China); Jahng, Deokjin, E-mail: djahng@mju.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Myongji University, San 38-2, Namdong, Cheoin-Gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Anaerobic fermentation of simulated in-situ oil shale retort water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of removing soluble organics from oil shale retort water by anaerobic digestion with methane production was experimentally investigated. The following conclusions were made. The retort water studied had to be pretreated to remove toxic and add deficient constituents before it could be successfully treated with the anaerobic fermentation process. Pretreatment included pH adjustment to 7, ammonia reduction, and nutrient addition. A digested sludge from a conventional municipal sewage treatment plant was successfully acclimated to the retort water studied. A major fraction of the organics in the retort water studied was stabilized by conversion to CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ using the anaerobic fermentation process. BOD/sub 5/ and COD removal efficiences were 76 to 80 percent. The effluent from anaerobic fermentation of the retort water studied (BOD/sub 5/ : 530 to 580 mg/l) may be suitable for treatment by conventional aerobic processes. The growth of the methane formers, which stabilize the organics, is nutrient limited in the retort water studied. The pretreatment of the retort water studied removed 49 percent of the BOD/sub 5/. This was probably due to the reduction in solubility of high molecular weight fatty acids at neutral pHs. A major component removed from the retort water studied during anaerobic fermentation was fatty acids. The long hydraulic residence time used in this study would not be used in practice.

Ossio, E.A.; Fox, J.P.; Thomas, J.F.; Poulson, R.E.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Removal of polychlorinated phenols in sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scrap vehicle tire chips were used as packing material for sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors to remove persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons. Adsorption capacity of scrap tires was greater under acidic conditions than under basic conditions. However, it was only approximately 0.04 to 0.3% of that of activated carbon. The amount of biomass that attached to the surface of scrap tires was 3.16 and 3.72 mg volatile suspended solids/cm{sup 2} after 14 and 37 days, respectively. Two laboratory-scale, down-flow anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips were operated to remove 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 4-chlorophenol (CP). More than 98% of DCP was dehalogenated to CP in the anaerobic reactor, 70 to 98% of which was subsequently degraded in the aerobic reactor. Scrap tires did not cause any operational problems when used as biofilter media.

Shin, H.S.; Yoo, K.S.; Park, J.K.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Correlation between Organic Matter Degradation and the Rheological Performance of Waste Sludge During Anaerobic Digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion has demonstrated to be a good possibility to reduce the organic matter contents in waste activated sludge resulting in the effluents treatment. An anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 3.5 L reactor at 35?°C for a period of 20 days. An electronic thermostat controlled the temperature. The reactor was agitated at a rate of 200 rpm. The study of the rheological behavior of the waste activated sludge was done with an Anton Paar™ rheometer model MCR301 with a peltier plate for temperature control. Four?blade vane geometry was used with samples of 37 mL for determining rheological properties. Sampling (two samples) was taken every four days of anaerobic digestion through a peristaltic pump. The samples behavior was characterized by the Herschel?Bulkley model

Evangelina S. Morel; José A. Hernández?Hernándes; Juan M. Méndez?Contreras; Denis Cantú?Lozano

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Production of Clostridium difficile toxin in a medium totally free of both animal and dairy proteins or digests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the hope of developing a vaccine against Clostridium difficile based on its toxin(s), we have developed a fermentation medium for the bacterium that results in the formation of Toxin A and contains no meat or dairy ...

Demain, Arnold L.

205

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 8 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Milk and Dairy Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 8 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Milk and Dairy Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutriti

206

Treatment of Wine Distillery Wastewater Using an Anaerobic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor with Low Density of Polyethylene Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor filled with small and low density polyethylene support as biofilm carrier was operated to treat wine distillery wastewater for nearly 8 months. The support packed in the reactor is Bioflow 30 with density 0.92g/cm3 ... Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, moving bed biofilm reactor, low density polyethylene support, wine distillery wastewater

Chai Sheli; Rene Moletta

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Use of 18S-rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for detection and quantification of anaerobic fungi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of 18S-rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for detection and quantification of anaerobic fungi Clermont-Ferrand-Theix, 63122 Saint-Genès-Champanelle, France Strictly anaerobic fungi are natural the subject of numerous studies (Fonty and Joblin, 1991, in: Physio- logical aspects of digestion

Recanati, Catherine

208

Isolation of High-Efficient Low-Temperature Methanogen and Comparation on Flora in Anaerobic Fermentation Production Biogas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Hun gate anaerobic techniques, a low-temperature methanogen strain was isolated from sludge in De Qing Alpine region from Tibet, named XZF21. The colony is white, not transparent, Gram-negative, uses formate as the substrate forCH4 formation, ... Keywords: methane, purification, sludge, anaerobic fermentation, biogas

Fan Tingting; Wang Jinhua; Lei Yanmin; Liu Siying; Wang Zhi; Wang Yongze

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A, GRAETZ, AND K. R. REDDY2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A to produce CH4 or added to soil directly as an amendment.In this study, fresh and anaerobically digested digested plant biomass in soil. J. En- viron. Qual. 16:25-28. Anaerobic digestion of organic materials

Florida, University of

210

Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled process Terence Bayen1,4 and Francis Mairet2 and Pierre Martinon3 and Matthieu Sebbah4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizing the anaerobic digestion of microalgae in a coupled process Terence Bayen1,4 and Francis the production of methane in a bioreactor coupling an anaerobic digester and a culture of micro-algae limited as an attractive alternative for sustainable energy production [2]. Anaerobic digestion can be applied to convert

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

211

Anaerobic Digestion of Algal Biomass Residues with Nutrient Recycle Microalgae are currently considered as a renewable source of liquid and gaseous biofuels and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;1 Anaerobic Digestion of Algal Biomass Residues with Nutrient Recycle Background Microalgae a lower- value use and simpler processing approach representative of anaerobic digestion (AD) (Sialve et-in replacements of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel (Jones & Mayfield, 2012; Regalbuto, 2009), and anaerobically

Collins, Gary S.

212

Development of an ammonia emission protocol and preliminary emission factor for a central Texas dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A protocol was developed to measure ammonia emission concentrations from dairies using an isolation flux chamber. A hybrid dairy in Comanche county, Texas, was measured for one week each during August 2002 and January 2003. Sixty total ammonia samples were taken from the free stall barn, open lot, mixing tank, separated solids, compost, and two lagoons using the developed protocol. The ammonia concentration measurements were made using a chemiluminescence analyzer located inside a mobile laboratory. From the emission concentrations recorded, it was estimated that 9.68 metric tons of ammonia were produced from this dairy per year. An emission factor of 13.34 ± 28.80 kilograms per day per thousand head of cattle (kg/day/1000 head) was estimated for this dairy (±95% confidence intervals) during summer conditions. For winter conditions the emission factor was 12.05 ± 12.89 kg/day/1000 head. The 11% difference of the emission factors from summer to winter conditions was predominantly from the change in ambient and control volume temperatures (a mean difference of approximately 25 degrees Celsius), differences in source temperatures, and seasonal variability in husbandry. The adsorption of ammonia onto different polymer tubing used in pollutant stream conveyance was researched for possible systematic losses. Teflon and low density polyethylene (LDPE) were tested for ammonia losses with treatments of: temperature, length, and inlet concentration. Inlet concentration and temperature were significant factors used to describe ammonia adsorption for Teflon, whereas LDPE was also affected by tubing length. These factors were used to create a model to correct the summer dairy measurements for ammonia losses, resulting in an emission factor increase of 8.3% over the original value obtained from the flux chamber. A nitrogen mass balance was performed to estimate the amount of nitrogen available for ammonia formation as excreted - 177.5 kilograms per year per animal (wet basis). The amount of ammonia excreted per year was also estimated to be 26.63 kilograms per year. The measured ammonia emitted from the dairy was five times less than the ammonia excreted and thirty-six times less than the total nitrogen excreted.

Rose, Adam Joseph

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Genomic Differences Between Highly Fertile and Sub-Fertile Holstein Dairy Heifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infertility in dairy cattle remains a major economic loss to dairy producers. Identifying dairy cattle with superior genetic potential for improved fertility would increase dairy farm profitability. Dairy heifers were classified into two groups based upon services per conception (SPC); those animals with a single SPC were determined to be highly fertile and animals with greater than or equal to 4 SPC were classified as sub-fertile. Whole genome association analysis was performed on 20 individual heifers from each group utilizing a 777K highly density (HD) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Genomic data were evaluated utilizing PLINK, a whole genome association analysis toolset, and 570,620 SNP were available for analysis with a total of 39 samples being analyzed. Forty-four SNP were determined to be associated with fertility classification (P <= 0.00001) and were located on Bos taurus chromosome (BTA) 2, 4, 9, 19, and 26. The SNP and ranges between SNP were analyzed using BLAST-Like Alignment Tool (BLAT); SNP were associated with 5 candidate genes for reproduction. The SNP on BTA 2 were located within the region coding for the non-imprinted Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 2 (NIPA2) gene, which is involved in gestational magnesium transport. Also on BTA 2, SNP were identified within the region encoding for cytoplasmic fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) interaction protein 1 (CYFIP1). The CYFIP1 gene is involved with the functionality of FMR1 and has been linked to premature ovarian failure in humans. Additionally, 3 SNP on BTA 9 were located near monofunctional C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase (MTHFD1L), which has been linked to neural tube defects during gestation in humans A difference in allele frequency was observed between the two groups for SNP located on BTA19 in proximity to two genes, zinc finger 18 (ZNF18) and mitogen activated protein kinase 4 (MAP2K4). The ZNF18 motif and MAP2K4 were found to be involved in heart development of the early embryo and associated with toll-like receptors (TLR) involved in gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) signaling, respectively. The involvement of one or all of these genes may further explain reduced fertility in dairy cattle.

Navarrette, Ashley Elizabeth

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Column Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on CT transformations in Hanford soil. This work assessed the potential for in situ CT biotransColumn Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material a column reactor system containing Hanford Aquifer material in order to assess the potential of in situ

Semprini, Lewis

215

Analysis of microbial diversity and optimal conditions for enhanced biogas production from swine waste anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swine wastewater pretreated by solid–liquid separation was optimized for biogas production and water purification. Dynamic diversity of the bacterial community in the anaerobic plug flow reactor was investigated under various temperatures and hydraulic retention times (HRT). Results of batch experiments indicated that under optimal operating conditions

Hsiao-Hsien Lin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Complete Genome Sequence of the Anaerobic Halophilic Alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LFT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The genome of the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophiles consists of one chromosome and two plasmids.The present study is the first to report the completely sequenced genome of polyextremophile and the harboring genes harboring genes associated with roles in regulation of intracellular osmotic pressure, pH homeostasis, and thermophilic stability.

Mesbah, Noha [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wiegel, Juergen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

An environmental assessment of recovering methane from municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of an experimental process which produces synthetic natural gas (SNG) or biogas by anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is evaluated. This technology, if implemented, would be utilized in lieu of incineration or directly landfilling waste. An environmental assessment describing the principal impacts associated with operating the MSW anaerobic digestion process is presented. Variations in process configurations provide for SNG or electricity production and digester residue incineration, composting, or landfilling. Four process configuration are compared to the conventional solid waste disposal alternative of mass burn incineration and landfilling. Emissions are characterized, effluents quantified, and landfill areas predicted. The quantity of SNG and electricity recovered, and aluminum and ferrous metals recycled is predicted along with the emissions and effluents avoided by recovering energy and recycling metals. Air emissions are the primary on-site concern with the anaerobic digestion process. However, when compared to mass burn incineration, the projected particulate emissions for the anaerobic digestion process range from 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.6 {times} {sup 10{minus}5} pounds per ton of waste vs. 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} pounds per ton for mass burn. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and PCCD emissions have a similar relationship.

O'Leary, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Compost filters for H/sub 2/S removal from anaerobic digestion and rendering exhausts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for the disposal of anaerobic digester gas from meat waste treatment plants has been developed as an alternative to atmospheric disposal. Hydrogen sulfide waste gases are filtered through by-product compost. Operation and effectiveness of such a treatment process are detailed. (2 diagrams, 5 references, 4 tables)

Rands, M.B.; Cooper, D.E.; Woo, C.; Fletcher, G.C.; Rolfe, K.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) for Alkali-minimization Dyeing-printing Wastewater Biodegradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was investigated by the use of granular sludge to treat alkali-minimization and dyeing-printing wastewater (ADW-water). The experiment showed that the start-up of reactor was completed ... Keywords: ABR, ADW-water, Granular sludge, UV254, VFA

Qijun Zhong; Bo Yang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Manual of procedures for the operation of bench-scale anaerobic digesters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful operation of any laboratory-scale biological system is often a difficult and frustrating experience. This is especially true when dealing with the anaerobic digestion process. Because of the stringent environmental requirements associated with anaerobic digesters, efficient operation of bench-scale units requires rigid monitoring and control. The purpose of this manual is to present the methods and procedures which are followed in bench-scale anaerobic digestion studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Among the topics discussed are operating parameters, a description of the experimental system, typical digestion substrates, operational procedures, analytical techniques, and safety considerations. The document serves as a technical guide to PNL personnel assigned to a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored program evaluating the effect of powdered activated carbon on the anaerobic digestio of sewage sludge. It should be noted that the methods described in this manual do not necessarily represent the best or only means of conducting the research. They are merely procedures that have been found to be successful at PNL. It is hoped that this information may be useful to other researchers who are contemplating or pursuing bench-scale studies of their own.

Spencer, R.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Study on Biogas from Anaerobic Digestion with the Distiller's Grains via Lactic Acid Fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methane production of the distiller’s grains via lactic acid fermentation (shorter for the fermentation residue) was investigated, and the variable trend of pH values, alkali concentration and volatile fatty acids were examined. The results ... Keywords: the residue of distillers' grains via lactic acid fermentation, biomass wastes, anaerobic digestion, volatile fatty acids, biogas production

Li-Hong Wang; Wang Qunhui; Sun Xiaohong; Xin Zhao

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Water as a leaching medium for hydrolysis of sorghum in anaerobic digestion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of using water to leach hydrolysis products from sorghum used as an anaerobic digestion feedstock. The pH of the leachate had no effect on the cumulative COD measured in the leachate. Milling the sorghum with a three roll mill prior to leaching appeared to slightly increase the hydrolysis of structural carbohydrates in the sorghum.

Egg, R.; Coble, C.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Study of the Electrical Energy Usage Patterns of a Texas Dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A one-year study was done on a modern dairy operation located in Hopkins County, Texas to determine the load patterns and total energy use of the major electrical loads in the dairy. It was found that the vacuum pumps for the milking machines consumed the most energy, followed by the water heater and milk coolers. Consumption for water heating and milk cooling was found to vary seasonally. Peak demands for the dairy occurred at 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. throughout the year during the morning and afternoon milkings. The morning peak occurred two hours prior to Texas Power & Light Company's winter peak hour, and the evening peak is coincident with TP&L's summer peak hour. It was estimated that a savings of approximately 33% on water heating kWh was attained through a waste heat recovery system connected to the milk coolers. The water heating load was found to have the highest load factor coincident with TP&L's summer peak of any of the loads monitored.

Schneider, K. C.; Pollard, K. W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

Kheradmand, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Jashni, A., E-mail: akarimi@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sartaj, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 841568311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Enhanced biogas production by increasing organic load rate in mesophilic anaerobic digestion with sludge recirculation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? For enhancing anaerobic sludge digestion and biogas recovery, an increase in organic load rate (OLR) from 1.0 to 3.0kgVS/(m3·day) was imposed upon a new… (more)

Huang, Zhanzhao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

227

Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

228

Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano Beach anaerobic digestion facility. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Municipal solid wastes contain numerous substances of potential environmental concern. While some understanding of the composition of raw municipal waste and its leachate products is available, no information regarding characteristics of solid, liquid and gaseous outputs from anaerobic digestion exists. If centralized anaerobic digestion plants are to be environmentally viable, the characteristics and environmental effects of effluents from these plants must be acceptable. The environmental concerns are particularly acute where ground water supplies are precariously low and the water table is high, South Florida is such a location. A characterization and environmental study was initiated by the Resource Recovery Group on August 1978. The specific objectives are: (1) systematic characterization of solid, liquid and gaseous inputs and outputs; (2) investigations of leaching characteristic of output solid and liquid effluents, and the transport of pollutants to and through ground water systems; and (3) analysis of environmental and process parameters to obtain causal relationships.

Sengupta, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Nemerow, N; Daly, Jr, E L; Farooq, S; Chriswell, C

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Methanogenic Population Dynamics during Start-Up of Anaerobic Digesters Treating Municipal Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: An aggressive start-up strategy was used to initiate codigestion in two anaerobic, continuously mixed bench-top reactors at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The digesters were inoculated with mesophilic anaerobic sewage sludge and cattle manure and were fed a mixture of simulated municipal solid waste and biosolids in proportions that reflect U.S. production rates. The design organic loading rate was 3.1 kg volatile solids/m 3 /day and the retention time was 20 days. Ribosomal RNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were used to determine the methanogenic community structure in the inocula and the digesters. Chemical analyses were performed to evaluate digester performance. The aggressive start-up strategy was successful for the thermophilic reactor, despite the use of a

Biosolids; Matt E. Griffin; Katherine D. Mcmahon; Roderick I. Mackie; Lutgarde Raskin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Full scale field demonstration of unheated anaerobic contact stabilization. Project status report, October 1980-February 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study reported here is to demonstrate that municipal sewage sludges can be anaerobically digested with little or no heating. To this end, two digesters at the Jackson Pike Wastewater Treatment Plant in Columbus, Ohio, have been converted to the anaerobic contact stabilization process. This, it is hoped, will permit positive and independent control of the solids retention time (SRT) in the system, so that solids may be retained long enough to ensure substantially complete digestion even at reduced temperatures. Digestion at a temperature of 71/sup 0/F and an SRT of 33 days produces results similar to digestion at a temperature of 91/sup 0/F and an SRT of 11 days. There is no evidence of impaired or unstable digestion at the lower temperature. (DMC)

Sykes, R.M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Digestion of frozen/thawed food waste in the hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid system  

SciTech Connect

The hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid (HASL) system, which is a modified two-phase anaerobic digester, is to be used in an industrial scale operation to minimize disposal of food waste at incineration plants in Singapore. The aim of the present research was to evaluate freezing/thawing of food waste as a pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system. The hydrolytic and fermentation processes in the acidogenic reactor were enhanced when food waste was frozen for 24 h at -20 deg. C and then thawed for 12 h at 25 deg. C (experiment) in comparison with fresh food waste (control). The highest dissolved COD concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 16.9 g/l on day 3 in the control and 18.9 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The highest VFA concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 11.7 g/l on day 3 in the control and 17.0 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The same volume of methane was produced during 12 days in the control and 7 days in the experiment. It gave the opportunity to diminish operational time of batch process by 42%. The effect of freezing/thawing of food waste as pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system was comparable with that of thermal pre-treatment of food waste at 150 deg. C for 1 h. However, estimation of energy required either to heat the suspended food waste to 150 deg. C or to freeze the same quantity of food waste to -20 deg. C showed that freezing pre-treatment consumes about 3 times less energy than thermal pre-treatment.

Stabnikova, O. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)], E-mail: costab@ntu.edu.sg; Liu, X.Y.; Wang, J.Y. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Microwave Thermal Hydrolysis Of Sewage Sludge As A Pretreatment Stage For Anaerobic Digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article focuses on the effects of microwave thermal hydrolysis on sewage sludge anaerobic digestion. Volatile suspended solid (VSS) and COD solubilization of treated sludge were investigated. It was found that the microwave hydrolysis provided a rapid and efficient process to release organics from sludge. The increase of organic dissolution ratio was not obvious when holding time was over 5 min. The effect of the VSS solubilization was mainly dependent on temperature. The highest value of VSS dissolving ratio

W. Qiao; W. Wang; R. Xun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Enhanced anaerobic treatment of CSTR-digested effluent from chicken manure: The effect of ammonia inhibition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced anaerobic treatment of CSTR-digested effluent from chicken manure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SCOD/TAN (soluble COD/total ammonia nitrogen) ratio was key controlling factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The threshold of the SCOD/TAN ratio was 2.4 at an influent pH of 8.5-9. - Abstract: The effect of ammonia inhibition was evaluated during the enhanced anaerobic treatment of digested effluent from a 700 m{sup 3} chicken-manure continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). A 12.3 L internal circulation (IC) reactor inoculated with an anaerobic granular sludge and operated at 35 {+-} 1 Degree-Sign C was employed for the investigation. With a corresponding organic loading rate of 1.5-3.5 kg-COD/m{sup 3} d over a hydraulic retention time of 1.5 d, a maximum volumetric biogas production rate of 1.2 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3} d and TCOD (total COD) removal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80% was achieved. However, the continual increase in the influent TAN content led to ammonia inhibition in the methanogenesis system. The SCOD/TAN (soluble COD/total ammonia nitrogen) ratio was presented to be the key controlling factor for the anaerobic treatment of semi-digested chicken manure, and further validation through shock loading and ammonia inhibition experiments was conducted. The threshold value of the SCOD/TAN ratio was determined to be 2.4 (corresponding to a TAN of 1250 mg/L) at an influent pH of 8.5-9.

Liu Zhanguang; Zhou Xuefei [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Water Environment of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Pollution and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Yalei, E-mail: zhangyalei2003@163.com [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Water Environment of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory of Pollution and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhu Hongguang [Institute of Modern Agricultural Science and Engineering, National Engineering Research Center of Protected Agriculture, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

The metagenome of an anaerobic microbial community decomposing poplar wood chips  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to lignin-modification or depolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

van der Lelie D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L.-L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S.-Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Anaerobic treatment of sludge from a nitrification-denitrification landfill leachate plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of anaerobic digestion of sludge from a MSW landfill leachate treatment plant, with COD values ranging between 15,000 and 19,400 mg O{sub 2} dm{sup -3}, in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was studied. The reactor employed had a useful capacity of 9 l, operating at mesophilic temperature. Start-up of the reactor was carried out in different steps, beginning with diluted sludge and progressively increasing the amount of sludge fed into the reactor. The study was carried out over a period of 7 months. Different amounts of methanol were added to the feed, ranging between 6.75 and 1 cm{sup 3} dm{sup -3} of feed in order to favour the growth of methanogenic flora. The achieved biodegradation of the sludge using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket Reactor was very high for an HRT of 9 days, obtaining decreases in COD of 84-87% by the end of the process. Purging of the digested sludge represented {approx}16% of the volume of the treated sludge.

Maranon, E. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain)]. E-mail: emara@uniovi.es; Castrillon, L. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, Y. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, E. [COGERSA, 33697 Serin, Gijon (Spain)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Anaerobic co-digestion of aquatic flora and quinoa with manures from Bolivian Altiplano  

SciTech Connect

Quinoa stalk (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from agricultural crop residue, totora (Schoenoplectus tatora) and o-macrophytes (aquatic flora) from Lake Titicaca (on the Bolivian Altiplano) were studied in a wet anaerobic co-digestion process together with manure from llama, cow and sheep. Anaerobic semi-continuous experiments were performed in (10) 2-l reactors at a temperature of 25 deg. C with 30 days of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.8 kg VS m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. Totora was found to be the best co-substrate. In mixture ratios of 1:1 (VS basis), it increased the biogas productivity by 130% for llama manure, 60% for cow manure, and 40% for sheep manure. It was possible to use up to 58% (VS basis) of totora in the substrate. Higher concentrations (including pure totora) could not be digested, as that caused acidification problems similar to those caused by other lignocellulosic materials. When quinoa and o-macrophytes were used as co-substrates, the increase in biogas productivity was slightly less. However, these co-substrates did not cause any operational problems. An additional advantage of quinoa and o-macrophytes was that they could be used in any proportion (even in pure form) without causing any destabilization problems in the anaerobic digestion process.

Alvarez, Rene [IIDEPROQ, UMSA, Plaza del Obelisco 1175, La Paz (Bolivia)], E-mail: Rene.alvarez@iideproq.org; Liden, Gunnar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Anaerobic High-Throughput Cultivation Method for Isolation of Thermophiles Using Biomass-Derived Substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow cytometry (FCM) techniques have been developed for sorting mesophilic organisms, but the difficulty increases if the target microbes are thermophilic anaerobes. We demonstrate a reliable, high-throughput method of screening thermophilic anaerobic organisms using FCM and 96-well plates for growth on biomass-relevant substrates. The method was tested using the cellulolytic thermophiles Clostridium ther- mocellum (Topt = 55 C), Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis (Topt = 78 C) and the fermentative hyperthermo- philes, Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt = 100 C) and Thermotoga maritima (Topt = 80 C). Multi-well plates were incubated at various temperatures for approximately 72 120 h and then tested for growth. Positive growth resulting from single cells sorted into individual wells containing an anaerobic medium was verified by OD600. Depending on the growth substrate, up to 80 % of the wells contained viable cultures, which could be transferred to fresh media. This method was used to isolate thermophilic microbes from Rabbit Creek, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming. Substrates for enrichment cultures including crystalline cellulose (Avicel), xylan (from Birchwood), pretreated switchgrass and Populus were used to cultivate organisms that may be of interest to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Case history studies of energy conservation improvements in the dairy industry  

SciTech Connect

Presented are ten case histories about energy-efficient technologies implemented by the dairy industry. For each case is presented: the name and location of the company, and its product line; energy consumption and costs at the plant before and after implementation of energy-conserving technology; the factors that prompted the investment; and product quality as a result of the new equipment. The measures presented are: refrigeration compressor replacement, turbulators in boiler tubes, stack exchange on boilers, reverse osmosis, six-effect evaporator, multi-effect evaporator with thermal vapor recompressor, spray dryer heat recovery, efficient compressor operations, mechanical vapor recompression evaporator, preheated spray dryer air with recoverable waste heat. (LEW)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

H2A Biomethane Model Documentation and a Case Study for Biogas From Dairy Farms  

SciTech Connect

The new H2A Biomethane model was developed to estimate the levelized cost of biomethane by using the framework of the vetted original H2A models for hydrogen production and delivery. For biomethane production, biogas from sources such as dairy farms and landfills is upgraded by a cleanup process. The model also estimates the cost to compress and transport the product gas via the pipeline to export it to the natural gas grid or any other potential end-use site. Inputs include feed biogas composition and cost, required biomethane quality, cleanup equipment capital and operations and maintenance costs, process electricity usage and costs, and pipeline delivery specifications.

Saur, G.; Jalalzadeh, A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The effect of sulfide inhibition and organic shock loading on anaerobic biofilm reactors treating a low-temperature, high-sulfate wastewater.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In order to assess the long-term treatment of sulfate- and carbon- rich wastewater at low temperatures, three anaerobic biofilm reactors were operated at 20°C,… (more)

McDonald, Heather Brown

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Life Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins, Dr. Alissa Kendall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

displacement. The cost of wastewater treatment using the ATS was estimated to be $1.23 per m3 wastewater Wastewater Processing Algae Processing Biogas Processing Equipment and Material Data Sources Fixed filmLife Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins

California at Davis, University of

242

A simple model to assess the sensitivity of grassland dairy systems to scenarios of seasonal biomass production variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent decades, dairy herds of the peri-Mediterranean area have coped with high climatic variability, which has contributed to weakening their economic equilibrium. Survey studies highlighted that climatic impact depends on the strategies of farmers, ... Keywords: Biomass production variability, Cattle farming system, Modelling, System sensitivity

A. Lurette; C. Aubron; C. -H. Moulin

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Simulation of forage management strategies considering farm-level land diversity: Example of dairy farms in the Auvergne  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land diversity is a characteristic of low-input farming systems. Land diversity can refer to between-field diversity of grassland vegetation types that are a result of management practices (fertilisation, grazing, cutting), and environmental factors ... Keywords: Farmland diversity, Forage practices, Livestock dairy farm, Simulation model

Nadine Andrieu; Christophe Poix; Etienne Josien; Michel Duru

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, June 1991--November 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 {mu}M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 {mu}M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K{sub i} for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

McInerney, M.J.

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fixed Bed Countercurrent Low Temperature Gasification of Dairy Biomass and Coal-Dairy Biomass Blends Using Air-Steam as Oxidizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrated animal feeding operations such as cattle feedlots and dairies produce a large amount of manure, cattle biomass (CB), which may lead to land, water, and air pollution if waste handling systems and storage and treatment structures are not properly managed. However, the concentrated production of low quality CB at these feeding operations serves as a good feedstock for in situ gasification for syngas (CO and H2) production and subsequent use in power generation. A small scale (10 kW) countercurrent fixed bed gasifier was rebuilt to perform gasification studies under quasisteady state conditions using dairy biomass (DB) as feedstock and various air-steam mixtures as oxidizing sources. A DB-ash (from DB) blend and a DB-Wyoming coal blend were also studied for comparison purposes. In addition, chlorinated char was also produced via pure pyrolysis of DB using N2 and N2-steam gas mixtures. The chlorinated char is useful for enhanced capture of Hg in ESP of coal fired boilers. Two main parameters were investigated in the gasification studies with air-steam mixtures. One was the equivalence ratio ER (the ratio of stochiometric air to actual air) and the second was the steam to fuel ratio (S:F). Prior to the experimental studies, atom conservation with i) limited product species and ii) equilibrium modeling studies with a large number of product species were performed on the gasification of DB to determine suitable range of operating conditions (ER and S:F ratio). Results on bed temperature profile, gas composition (CO, CO2, H2, CH4, C2H6, and N2), gross heating value (HHV), and energy conversion efficiency (ECE) are presented. Both modeling and experimental results show that gasification under increased ER and S:F ratios tend to produce rich mixtures in H2 and CO2 but poor in CO. Increased ER produces gases with higher HHV but decreases the ECE due to higher tar and char production. Gasification of DB under the operating conditions 1.59less than0.8 yielded gas mixtures with compositions as given below: CO (4.77 - 11.73 %), H2 (13.48 - 25.45%), CO2 (11-25.2%), CH4 (0.43-1.73 %), and C2H6 (0.2- 0.69%). In general, the bed temperature profiles had peaks that ranged between 519 and 1032 degrees C for DB gasification.

Gordillo Ariza, Gerardo

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Biogas generation by two-phase anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organic fraction of municipal solid waste can be a significant energy source for renewable energy generation. The total production of municipal solid waste in Turkey was 25?×?106 tones per year. Anaerobic digestion (AD) process may be a solution to the problems of energy demand and waste management since it provides biomethanation along with waste stabilization. AD can be operated in single or two phase configurations. Two-phase processes have some advantages over one phase systems in terms of selection of microorganisms

Eylem Dogan; Göksel N. Demirer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

248

Gasification of Low Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass with Enriched Air Mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass is one of the renewable and non-conventional energy sources and it includes municipal solid wastes and animal wastes in addition to agricultural residue. Concentrated animal feeding operations produce large quantities of cattle biomass which might result in land and water pollution if left untreated. Different methods are employed to extract the available energy from the cattle biomass (CB) which includes co-firing and gasification. There are two types of CB: Feedlot biomass (FB), animal waste from feedlots and dairy biomass (DB), animal waste from dairy farms. Experiments were performed in the part on gasification of both FB and DB. Earlier studies on gasification of DB with different steam-fuel ratios resulted in increased production of hydrogen. In the present study, dairy biomass was gasified in a medium with enriched oxygen percentage varying from 24% to 28%. The effect of enriched air mixture, equivalence ratio and steam-fuel ratio on the performance of gasifier was studied. Limited studies were done using a mixture of carbon dioxide and oxygen as the gasification medium and also a methodology was developed to determine the gasification efficiency based on mass and heat contents of gas. The results show that the peak temperature within the bed increases with increase in oxygen concentration in the gasification medium. Also carbon dioxide concentration in the mixture increases with corresponding decrease in carbon monoxide with increase in oxygen concentration of the incoming gasification medium. The peak temperature increased from 988°C to 1192°C as the oxygen concentration increased from 21% to 28% at ER=2.1. The upper limit on oxygen concentration is limited to 28% due to high peak temperature and resulting ash agglomeration. Higher heating value (HHV) of the gases decreases with increase in equivalence ratio. The gases produced using carbon dioxide and oxygen mixture had a higher HHV when compared to that of air and enriched air gasification. Typically the HHV of the gases increased from 2219 kJ/mł to 3479 kJ/mł when carbon dioxide and oxygen mixture is used for gasification instead of air at ER=4.2 in the absence of steam.

Thanapal, Siva Sankar

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training activities on the Fort Hood Military Installation have imposed serious impacts to its grass-dominated landscape. Six decades of tracked vehicle impacts have caused soil compaction and vegetation reduction which has lead to severe surface erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted dairy manure may increase vegetation, while contour ripping may decrease discharge, both of which will lead to a decrease in erosion. Three small 0.30 ha watersheds were established on Fort Hood in January 2005. Each watershed had 0.46 m berms installed on all four sides with a 0.305 m H-flume and was equipped with automated storm sampling equipment. Soil samples were collected prior to any treatments, and twice after compost applications. Discharge and precipitation was collected continuously on each watershed. Stormwater samples were collected during storm events and analyzed for water quality parameters. Water quality samples, discharge and precipitation records were collected between January 2005 and July 2007. Three composted dairy manure application rates at 0, 28 and 57 m3 ha-1 were applied on watersheds C0, C1 and C2, respectively; watersheds were evaluated for effects on NO3 and soluble reactive phosphates (SRP) concentrations and loadings in storm events and on stormwater discharge. Twenty two months after the initial compost application, the two previously composted watersheds (C1 and C2) were treated with contour ripping and C2 received a second compost application. The compost application caused the spikes in NO3 and SRP concentrations and loads immediately after application. Both NO3 and SRP concentrations decreased as the number of days from application increased. Compost application did not appear to have an effect on the discharge from watersheds. Contour ripping had a significant effect on stormwater discharge. Contour ripping decreased discharge by 74 and 80% on C1 and C2, respectively when compared to the untreated control (C0).

Prcin, Lisa J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

Study of the operational conditions for anaerobic digestion of urban solid wastes  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an experimental evaluation of anaerobic digestion technology as an option for the management of organic solid waste in developing countries. As raw material, a real and heterogeneous organic waste from urban solid wastes was used. In the first experimental phase, seed selection was achieved through an evaluation of three different anaerobic sludges coming from wastewater treatment plants. The methanization potential of these sludges was assessed in three different batch digesters of 500 mL, at two temperature levels. The results showed that by increasing the temperature to 15 deg. C above room temperature, the methane production increases to three times. So, the best results were obtained in the digester fed with a mixed sludge, working at mesophilic conditions (38-40 deg. C). Then, this selected seed was used at the next experimental phase, testing at different digestion times (DT) of 25, 20 and 18 days in a bigger batch digester of 20 L with a reaction volume of 13 L. The conversion rates were registered at the lowest DT (18 days), reaching 44.9 L/kg{sup -1} of wet waste day{sup -1}. Moreover, DT also has a strong influence over COD removal, because there is a direct relationship between solids removal inside the reactor and DT.

Castillo M, Edgar Fernando [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9a Carrera 27, Aptdo. Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)]. E-mail: efcastil@uis.edu.co; Cristancho, Diego Edison [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9a Carrera 27, Aptdo. Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Victor Arellano, A. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9a Carrera 27, Aptdo. Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Bacterial and Archaeal Lipid Biomarkers from Anaerobically Digested Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was used in the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinone (RQ), bacterial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and archaeal phospholipid ether lipid (PLEL) from anaerobically digested sludge. Bacterial RQ were determined using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Determination of bacterial PLFA and archaeal PLEL was simultaneously performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of pressure, temperature, and modifier concentration on the total amounts of RQ, PLFA, and PLEL were investigated by 23 experiments with five settings chosen for each variable. The optimal extraction conditions that were obtained through a multiple-response optimization included a pressure of 23.6 MPa, temperature of 77.6 °C, and 10.6 % (v/v) of methanol as the modifier. Thirty nine components of microbial lipid biomarkers were identified in the anaerobically digested sludge. Overall, the SFE method proved to be more effective, rapid, and quantitative for simultaneously extracting bacterial and archaeal lipid biomarkers, compared to conventional organic solvent extraction. This work shows the potential application of SFE as a routine method for the comprehensive analysis of microbial community structures in environmental assessments using the lipid biomarkers profile. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13 3023

Muhammad Hanif; Yoichi Atsuta; Koichi Fujie; Hiroyuki Daimon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Chicken Processing Wastewater and Crude Glycerol from Biodiesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this thesis was to study the anaerobic digestion (AD) of wastewater from a chicken processing facility and of crude glycerol from local biodiesel operations. The AD of these substrates was conducted in bench-scale reactors operated in the batch mode at 35°C. The secondary objective was to evaluate two sources of glycerol as co-substrates for AD to determine if different processing methods for the glycerol had an effect on CH? production. The biogas yields were higher for co-digestion than for digestion of wastewater alone, with average yields at 1 atmosphere and 0°C of 0.555 and 0.540 L (g VS added)?ą, respectively. Another set of results showed that the glycerol from an on-farm biodiesel operation had a CH? yield of 0.702 L (g VS added)?ą, and the glycerol from an industrial/commercial biodiesel operation had a CH? yield of 0.375 L (g VS added)?ą. Therefore, the farm glycerol likely had more carbon content than industrial glycerol. It was believed that the farm glycerol had more impurities, such as free fatty acids, biodiesel and methanol. In conclusion, anaerobic co-digestion of chicken processing wastewater and crude glycerol was successfully applied to produce biogas rich in CH?.

Foucault, Lucas Jose

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Anaerobic biprocessing of low rank coals. Final technical report, September 12, 1990--August 10, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Coal solubilization under aerobic conditions results in oxygenated coal product which, in turn, makes the coal poorer fuel than the starting material. A novel approach has been made in this project is to remove oxygen from coal by reductive decarboxylation. In Wyodak subbituminous coal the major oxygen functionality is carboxylic groups which exist predominantly as carboxylate anions strongly chelating metal cations like Ca{sup 2+} and forming strong macromolecular crosslinks which contribute in large measure to network polymer structure. Removal of the carboxylic groups at ambient temperature by anaerobic organisms would unravel the macromoleculer network, resulting in smaller coal macromolecules with increased H/C ratio which has better fuel value and better processing prospects. These studies described here sought to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. Efforts were made to establish anaerobic microbial consortia having decarboxylating ability, decarboxylate coal with the adapted microbial consortia, isolate the organisms, and characterize the biotreated coal products. Production of CO{sup 2} was used as the primary indicator for possible coal decarboxylation.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.

1993-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Dairy Industry under New Zealand's Emissions Trading Scheme: Analysis of Farmers' Attitudes towards Climate Change: The Expense Created by the NZETS and the Point that Farmers will Begin to Reduce Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Adaptation to actual climate change and contingency planning to reduce vulnerability from likely climate change effects is crucial for the New Zealand dairy industry. Thus… (more)

Fowles, Craig

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Study on the Methane Production Capacity and Energy Output of Different Temperatures during Anaerobic Digestion of Swine Manure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was carried out by experimenting with the self-manufactured digestion devices which were fed with swine manure as material with a domesticated inoculums added as yeast. The experiment was on the condition of 6.6% mass fraction of total solid, ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, methane production capacity, temperature, energy, swine manure

Rong-rong Wei; Guan-wen Cheng; Jie-jun Luo; Liang Ling; Zong-qiang Zhu; Xu Shan; Wen-yuan Wei

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Estimation dynamical model of an anaerobic digestion of shrimp culture pond sediment in a biogas process using genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is one type of renewable energy which is important to the energy and environmental planning of Thailand. The study and analysis of the dynamical model of the biogas process can be explained the variables that affect biogas process and optimization. ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, artificial intelligence, biogas process, mass balance equation, system identification

Jiraphon Srisertpol; Prasit Srinakorn; Adtavirod Kheawnak; Kontorn Chamniprasart; Arthit Srikaew

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Microbiological characterization and specific methanogenic activity of anaerobe sludges used in urban solid waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the microbiological characterization of the anaerobic sludge used in a two-stage anaerobic reactor for the treatment of organic fraction of urban solid waste (OFUSW). This treatment is one alternative for reducing solid waste in landfills at the same time producing a biogas (CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) and an effluent that can be used as biofertilizer. The system was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Rio Frio Plant in Bucaramanga-Colombia) and a methanogenic anaerobic digester for the treatment of pig manure (Mesa de los Santos in Santander). Bacterial populations were evaluated by counting groups related to oxygen sensitivity, while metabolic groups were determined by most probable number (MPN) technique. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) for acetate, formate, methanol and ethanol substrates was also determined. In the acidogenic reactor (R1), volatile fatty acids (VFA) reached values of 25,000 mg L{sup -1} and a concentration of CO{sub 2} of 90%. In this reactor, the fermentative population was predominant (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} MPN mL{sup -1}). The acetogenic population was (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and the sulphate-reducing population was (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}). In the methanogenic reactor (R2), levels of CH{sub 4} (70%) were higher than CO{sub 2} (25%), whereas the VFA values were lower than 4000 mg L{sup -1}. Substrate competition between sulphate-reducing (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and methanogenic bacteria (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) was not detected. From the SMA results obtained, acetoclastic (2.39 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and hydrogenophilic (0.94 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) transformations as possible metabolic pathways used by methanogenic bacteria is suggested from the SMA results obtained. Methanotrix sp., Methanosarcina sp., Methanoccocus sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were identified.

Sandoval Lozano, Claudia Johanna [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9A Carrera 27, Aptdo Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)], E-mail: ceiam@uis.edu.co; Vergara Mendoza, Marisol; Carreno de Arango, Mariela; Castillo Monroy, Edgar Fernando [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9A Carrera 27, Aptdo Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Continuous high-solids anaerobic co-digestion of organic solid wastes under mesophilic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > High-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion is attracting a lot of attention these days. > One reactor was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste. > Maximum biogas production rate of 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d was achieved at HRT 40 d and 40% TS. > The other reactor was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW). > Until a 40% LW content increase, the reactor exhibited a stable performance. - Abstract: With increasing concerns over the limited capacity of landfills, conservation of resources, and reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions, high-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste (OSW) is attracting a great deal of attention these days. In the present work, two dry anaerobic co-digestion systems fed with different mixtures of OSW were continuously operated under mesophilic conditions. Dewatered sludge cake was used as a main seeding source. In reactor (I), which was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste (PW), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid content were controlled to find the maximum treatability. At a fixed solid content of 30% total solids (TS), stable performance was maintained up to an HRT decrease to 40 d. However, the stable performance was not sustained at 30 d HRT, and hence, HRT was increased to 40 d again. In further operation, instead of decreasing HRT, solid content was increased to 40% TS, which was found to be a better option to increase the treatability. The biogas production rate (BPR), CH{sub 4} production yield (MPY) and VS reduction achieved in this condition were 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, 0.25 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and 80%, respectively. Reactor (II) was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW), and LW content was increased during the operation. Until a 40% LW content increase, reactor (II) exhibited a stable performance. A BPR of 1.7 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, MPY of 0.26 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and VS reduction of 72% was achieved at 40% LW content. However, when the LW content was increased to 60%, there was a significant performance drop, which was attributed to free ammonia inhibition. The performances in these two reactors were comparable to the ones achieved in the conventional wet digestion and thermophilic dry digestion processes.

Kim, Dong-Hoon [Wastes Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 102, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sae-Eun, E-mail: saeun@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, San 16-1, Duckmyoung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cooperative Approaches for Implementation of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;Abstract Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while offering environmental benefits. Dairy farmer use of anaerobic digesters is not widespread due to various returns from energy and byproduct sales. Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, biogas, cooperatives, carbon

Laughlin, Robert B.

264

PolicyMatters Journal ENERGYANDENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deployment. What Is Biogas? Biogas is produced by the anaerobic digestion or fermentation of biodegradable discusses biogas derived from the anaerobic digestion of dairy manure and the use of that biogas anaerobic digesters. Each of these dairies used the biogas produced by the digester to fuel a generator

Kammen, Daniel M.

265

Intermediate-Scale High-Solids Anaerobic Digestion System Operational Development  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. During the first 1.5 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements, which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using ,the NREL high-solids digester design are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C. J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Operational characteristics of anaerobic digesters at selected municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale and pilot plant studies at PNL have shown that powdered activated carbon is effective in improving volatile solids destruction and gas production in anaerobic digesters that are operating at less than normally expected levels of efficiency. To evaluate the applicability of this technology to digesters in the United States, digester operating characteristics at 60 facilities were surveyed and the number of stressed digesters estimated. The results show that although median values of the operating parameters conformed with those of a well-operated digester, 30% of the digesters surveyed were stressed with regard to at least one important parameter. Of the 30 largest treatment plants in the U.S., 7 fell into this category. Digester gas production and usage were then examined to determine the importance of methane off-gas as an energy source. A conservative estimate is that the gas produced nationally represents a heating value of about 2.36 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year with a present value of $40 million. Of this amount, an estimated 75% is used either onsite or sold. Onsite uses include heating digesters and buildings, incinerating sludge, operating equipment, and generating electricity. The other 25% is flared and the energy value lost. The present value of the flared gas is about $10 million/year. Natural gas prices are projected to increase 150% over the next 7 years. If the present utilization ratio continues, the flared gas will be worth approximately $27 million in 1985. Presently, digester gas is mainly used for process heating and operating equipment. The technical and economic feasibility of recovering digester gas for electrical power generation, onsite equipment operation, and sales to other consumers (utilities, private companies) should be thoroughly investigated. If fuel gas recovery and utilization are found to be desirable, consideration should be given to expanding and upgrading anaerobic digester facilities in the U.S.

Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Coates, J.A.; Ahlstrom, S.B.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano Beach anaerobic digestion facility. Semi-annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion of municipal waste has been demonstrated to be feasible in bench scale experiments by Pfeffer (1974). Approximately, 50% reduction in mass and production of 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas/ton have been estimated. The gas composition is estimated to be 50% methane and 50% carbon monoxide. The technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion with an ultimate objective of commercialization are discussed. A plant has been built at Pompano Beach, Florida on an existing shredding and landfill operation site. The plant design capacity is 100 tons/day. Two digesters have been constructed to be used in parallel. The process consists of primary shredding, metal separation, secondary shredding, air classification and digestion of light fraction. Sewage sludge was used to seed the initial mixture in the digester. The output slurry is vacuum filtered and the filter cake disposed on an existing landfill. The filtrate is recycled. Excess filtrate is sprayed on the landfill. At present the output gas is being flared. A flow chart for the plant is presented. It is imperative that environmental investigations be conducted on new energy technology prior to commercialization. A project was initiated to characterize all input and output streams and to assess the potential for ground water contamination by landfill disposal of effluents. Detailed chemical, biological and physical characterization efforts supported by leaching and modelling studies are being conducted to achieve the stated objectives. Some mutagenic studies were also conducted. The environmental investigations were started in August 1978. Sengupta et al (1979a) reported the first year's efforts.

Sengupta, S; Farooq, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Daly, Jr, E L; Chriswell, C

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Enhancement of methane production in the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of powdered activated carbon on stressed anaerobic digesters utilizing a sewage sludge substrate was evaluated. The addition of carbon resulted in increased methanee production and greater process stability. The degree of enhancement appeared to be proportional to carbon concentration over the dose range studied (500-10,000 mg/l). A maximum increase in methane production of about 150% was observed at the highest carbon dose. The effect of 1500 mg/l carbon, 4000 mg/l coal, and 4000 mg/l flyash on relatively unstressed digesters was also examined. Units using a sewage sludge substrate were operated at 10 and 20 day SRT's. A 12% increase in methane production was observed in a carbon dosed digester functioning at a 10 day detention time. Enhancement was not evident with carbon at a 20 day SRT. No significant improvement in methane production was obtained in any of the digesters using coal or flyash as additives. Using the experimental data, a technique was developed for estimating the efficiencies of the methane forming and acid forming steps in the anaerobic digestion process. The results indicated that in stressed systems both stages of the digestion process were enhanced by the addition of powdered carbon. In the relatively unstressed systems, when enhancement did occur, only the scid forming step was affected. This information will supplement current research at determining the mechanism(s) by which carbon enhances the digestion process.Based on the results of this study, it appears that the benefits of carbon addition are greatest in stressed systems. Only very moderate increases in methane production would probably be attainable in well operating digesters. Coal and flyash do not seem to be effective in enhancing gas production in unstressed systems. However, their effectiveness has not been tested in stressed situations.

Spencer, R.R.

1978-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Anaerobic digestion of pressed off leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly polluted liquid ('press water') was obtained from the pressing facility for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in a composting plant. Methane productivity of the squeezed-off leachate was investigated in batch assays. To assess the technical feasibility of 'press water' as a substrate for anaerobic digestion, a laboratory-scale glass column reactor was operated semi-continuously at 37 {sup o}C. A high methane productivity of 270 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} COD{sub added} or 490 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} VS{sub added} was achieved in the batch experiment. The semi-continuously run laboratory-scale reactor was initially operated at an organic loading rate of 10.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The loading was increased to finally 27.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, corresponding to a reduction of the hydraulic retention time from initially 20 to finally 7.7 days. During the digestion, a stable elimination of organic material (measured as COD elimination) of approximately 60% was achieved. Linearly with the increment of the OLR, the volumetric methane production of the reactor increased from 2.6 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1} to 7.1 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The results indicated that 'press water' from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was a suitable substrate for anaerobic digestion which gave a high biogas yield even at very high loading rates.

Nayono, Satoto E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Yogyakarta State University, Campus UNY Karangmalang Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia); Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Winter, Josef, E-mail: josef.winter@iba.uka.d [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gallert, Claudia [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Microbial dechlorination of PCBs in vitro studies using an anaerobic environmental isolate. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An earlier progress report, prepared in September 1990, gave an account of the scientific concepts on which this research project is based. It described the design and initial results of an experiment that was carried out to examine this important scientific question. The question, on which scientific and technical personnel of the Oak Ridge Research Institute (ORRI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been collaborating, is whether there are microbial isolates whose metabolism may be harnessed for the biodegradation of complex organic molecules containing chlorine, such as PCBs. These compounds have been shown to have a persistent long-term presence in the environment and to represent a health hazard to the populations. The demonstration that certain strains of microorganisms have the capability to degrade these complex organic molecules would be important because of the difficulty of remediating PCB-polluted environmental sites by other noninvasive methods. The adaptability of microbial metabolism is key to the concept that bacteria isolated from contaminated sites may be the most likely candidates for strains that could have developed the capability to either tolerate or possibly metabolize the organic contaminants. Consequently, a number of bacterial strains have been isolated from PCB-contaminated sites on the Department of Energy (DOE) reservation and screened for possible PCB dechlorination activity. The subject of the experiment described herein is an isolate designated ES-3 (an obligate anaerobe isolated from a PCB-contaminated site), which is considered on initial screening to possess possible PCB dechlorination ability. The experiment described in this report involved the incubation of aliquots of this isolate in an anaerobic environment for up to eight weeks with various concentrations, separately, of either of the Arochlors 1016 or 1260.

Reyis, N.W.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Reductive Disslocation of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. Under Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anaerobic, gram positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium sp., common in soils and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), and U(VI) to U(IV), reduced Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Addition of 242Pu (IV)-nitrate to the bacterial growth medium at pH 6.4 resulted in the precipitation of Pu as amorphous Pu(OH)4 due to hydrolysis and polymerization reactions. The Pu (1 x 10-5 M) had no effect upon growth of the bacterium as evidenced by glucose consumption; carbon dioxide and hydrogen production; a decrease in pH of the medium from 6.4 to 3.0 due to production of acetic and butyric acids from glucose fermentation; and a change in the Eh of the culture medium from +50 to -180 mV. Commensurate with bacterial growth, Pu was rapidly solubilized as evidenced by an increase in Pu concentration in solution which passed through a 0.03 {mu}m filtration. Selective solvent extraction of the culture by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) indicated the presence of a reduced Pu species in the soluble fraction. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (XANES) analysis of Pu in the culture sample at the Pu LIII absorption edge (18.054 keV) showed a shift of -3 eV compared to a Pu(IV) standard indicating reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). These results suggest that, although Pu generally exists as insoluble Pu(IV) in the environment, under appropriate conditions, anaerobic microbial activity could affect the long-term stability and mobility of Pu by its reductive dissolution.

Francis,A.; Dodge, C.; Gillow, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cofiring of coal and dairy biomass in a 100,000 btu/hr furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dairy biomass (DB) is evaluated as a possible co-firing fuel with coal. Cofiring of DB offers a technique of utilizing dairy manure for power/steam generation, reducing greenhouse gas concerns, and increasing financial returns to dairy operators. The effects of cofiring coal and DB have been studied in a 30 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) burner boiler facility. Experiments were performed with Texas Lignite coal (TXL) as a base line fuel. The combustion efficiency from co-firing is also addressed in the present work. Two forms of partially composted DB fuels were investigated: low ash separated solids and high ash soil surface. Two types of coal were investigated: TXL and Wyoming Powder River Basin coal (WYO). Proximate and ultimate analyses were performed on coal and DB. DB fuels have much higher nitrogen (kg/GJ) and ash content (kg/GJ) than coal. The HHV of TXL and WYO coal as received were 14,000 and 18,000 kJ/kg, while the HHV of the LA-PC-DBSepS and the HA-PC-DB-SoilS were 13,000 and 4,000 kJ/kg. The HHV based on stoichiometric air were 3,000 kJ/kg for both coals and LA-PC-DB-SepS and 2,900 kJ/kg for HA-PC-DB-SoilS. The nitrogen and sulfur loading for TXL and WYO ranged from 0.15 to 0.48 kg/GJ and from 0.33 to 2.67 for the DB fuels. TXL began pyrolysis at 640 K and the WYO at 660 K. The HA-PC-DB-SoilSs began pyrolysis at 530 K and the LA-PC-DB-SepS at 510 K. The maximum rate of volatile release occurred at 700 K for both coals and HA-PC-DB-SoilS and 750K for LA-PC-DB-SepS. The NOx emissions for equivalence ratio (?) varying from 0.9 to 1.2 ranged from 0.34 to 0.90 kg/GJ (0.79 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for pure TXL. They ranged from 0.35 to 0.7 kg/GJ (0.82 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for a 90:10 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend and from 0.32 to 0.5 kg/GJ (0.74 to 0.12 lb/mmBTU) for a 80:20 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend over the same range of ?. In a rich environment, DB:coal cofiring produced less NOx and CO than pure coal. This result is probably due to the fuel bound nitrogen in DB is mostly in the form of urea which reduces NOx to non-polluting gases such as nitrogen (N2).

Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Louisville, KY Led by Debbie Grusenmeyer (Extension Associate/ PRO-DAIRY Youth Specialist) and Matt Young (Cornell Animal Science '02) a team of New York 4-H youth recently won the National 4-H  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and Matt Young (Cornell Animal Science '02) a team of New York 4-H youth recently won the National 4-H Dairy Quiz Bowl Championship title for the 10th time. The 33rd annual North American Invitational 4-H Dairy Quiz Bowl Contest was held at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville

Keinan, Alon

274

Influence of Mechanical Processing on Utilization of Corn Silage by Lactating Dairy Cows 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conducted three experiments to determine the influence of mechanical processing on corn silage utilization by lactating dairy cows. Total mixed rations contained either unprocessed or processed corn silage harvested between 1/4 and 3/4 milk line. In trial 1, 12 multiparous Holstein cows were used in a replicated double switchback design with 21-d periods. Intake of dry matter (DM) was increased 1.2 kg/d by processing, but milk yield was unaffected. Processing did not affect apparent total-tract DM digestibility, but processing tended to lower starch and corn excretion in feces and reduced concentration of sieved corn kernel particles in feces. In trial 2, 42 Holstein cows were used in an 18-wk randomized complete-block design. Intake of DM and milk yield were unaffected by processing, but milk fat percent was increased 0.35 percentage units by processing. Processing tended to increase total-tract digestibility of starch, but reduced organic matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber digestibilities. In trial 3, 30 Holstein cows were used in a 15-wk randomized complete block design. There was no influence of mechanical processing on intake or lactation performance in this trial. Despite indications of increased starch digestion in two trials and increased DM intake in one trial, effects of processing corn silage on lactation performance were minimal with corn silage at the maturity and moisture contents used in these trials.

T. R. Dhiman; M. A. Bal; Z. Wu; V. R. Moreira; R. D. Shaver; L. D. Satter; K. J. Shinners; R. P. Walgenbach

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Fnr (EtrA) acts as a fine-tuning regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EtrA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model organism for study of adaptation to varied redox niches, shares 73.6% and 50.8% amino acid sequence identity with the oxygen-sensing regulators Fnr in E. coli and Anr in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively; however, its regulatory role of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella spp. is not well understood. The expression of the nap genes, nrfA, cymA and hcp was significantly reduced in etrA deletion mutant EtrA7-1; however, limited anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction occurred, suggesting that multiple regulators control nitrate reduction in this strain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fumarate reductase gene expression was down regulated at least 2-fold and the EtrA7-1 mutant grew poorly with fumarate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), suggesting both respiratory pathways are under EtrA control. Transcript analysis further suggested a role of EtrA in prophage activation and down regulation of genes implicated in aerobic metabolism. In contrast to previous studies that attributed a minor regulatory role to EtrA in Shewanella spp., this study demonstrates that EtrA acts as a global transcriptional regulator and confers physiological advantages to strain MR-1 under certain growth conditions. In conjunction with other regulators, EtrA fine-tunes the expression of genes involved in anaerobic metabolism in S. oneidensis strain MR-1.

Cruz-Garza, Claribel; Murray, Alison E.; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; McCue, Lee Ann; Romine, Margaret F.; Loffler, F. E.; Tiedje, James M.

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and related anaerobic thermophiles. Final report, September 1992--June 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The short term goals of this application were to characterize hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles on the biochemical and molecular level to extend the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophilic bacteria. This objective includes the following tasks: (1) Traditional purification and biochemical/biophysical characterization of xylanases from the newly isolated, slightly alkalitolerant strain NDF190, and the slightly acid-tolerant strain YS485, both with high xylanolytic activities, and of the 4-O-methyl glucuronidase and arabinosidase from strain NDF190 and the acetyl (xylan) esterase from T. ethanolicus. This also includes determining the N-terminal sequences and obtaining gene probes. (2) Elucidation of the regulation of hemicellulolytic enzymes in anaerobic thermophiles. (3) To clone into E. coli and identify the multiplicity of the enzymes involved in hemicellulose degradation by T. ethanolicus and other suitable organisms. (4) To purify and characterize the recombinant enzymes with the goal of identifying the best enzymes for cloning into the ethanologenic T. ethanolicus to obtain an optimized hemicellulose utilization by this bacterium.

Wiegel, J.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Effect of community structure on the kinetics of anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. Progress report, March 1989--June 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physiology of fatty acid metabolism and the kinetics of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic bacteria were studied. We have shown that: a threshold for benzoate degradation by a syntrophic coculture of Syntrophus buswellii and Desulfovibrio strain G11 exists and the value of the threshold depends on the amount of benzoate and acetate suggesting a thermodynamic limitation. Syntrophomonas wolfei has the enzymatic ability to produce formate and that low levels of formate are made during growth in pure culture with crotonate or in coculture with butyrate. However, the high specific activities of hydrogenase compared to formate dehydrogenase indicate that hydrogen rather than formate is the intermediate involved in the interspecies transfer of reducing equivalents. We have isolated Syntrophus buswellii and a novel anaerobic bacteria that catalyzes an aryl-ether cleavage reaction using crotonate as the energy source. Several novel obligately halophilic anaerobes from hypersaline oil reservoir brines were isolated and characterized. Two of these degraded pyrogallate with the production of acetate. We have shown that S. wolfei synthesizes poly-{beta}hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) by two routes, directly from a {beta}-oxidation intermediate without cleaving a C-C bond and by the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. The formation of D-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA needed for PHA synthesis occurs by the activity of a acetoacetyl-CoA reductase rather than a enoyl-CoA hydratase. The genes for PHA synthesis in S. wolfei have been cloned into Escherichia coli.

McInerney, M.J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

photovoltaic installation along California Highway 50 and anaerobic digestion and biogas production at two separate dairies, at a wastewater treatment facility, and at a...

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281

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumberland County, PA PA Energy Harvest Mined Project Grants - Mains Dairy Farm Biogas Project Install an anaerobic digester (12' diameter, 35' tall) to improve manure...

282

Natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes by anaerobic reductive dechlorination coupled with aerobic cometabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorinated solvents and their daughter products are the most common contaminants of groundwater at industrial and military facilities in the United States. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents is a promising alternative to traditional pump and treat methods but has not been well understood or widely accepted. This modeling study investigated the ability of TCE to completely degrade under various aquifer conditions and rate order constants. It also examined a case study of a former landfill site at Moody AFB. The author found unusually high flow of ground water by advection or dispersion inhibits the complete degradation of TCE. High concentrations of sulfate or nitrate inhibit the creation of methanogenic conditions and therefore inhibit reductive dechlorination of TCE. He also found an electron donor co-contaminant a critical factor for the complete destruction of TCE because it creates anaerobic conditions. The model illustrated a possible explanation for the lack of down gradient contaminants at the landfill site may be the coupling of reductive dechlorination and cometabolism naturally attenuation the contaminants.

Veerkamp, D.D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration  

SciTech Connect

Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Two-phase anaerobic digestion within a solid waste/wastewater integrated management system  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase, wet anaerobic digestion process was tested at laboratory scale using mechanically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MSW) as the substrate. The proposed process scheme differs from others due to the integration of the MSW and wastewater treatment cycles, which makes it possible to avoid the recirculation of process effluent. The results obtained show that the supplying of facultative biomass, drawn from the wastewater aeration tank, to the solid waste acidogenic reactor allows an improvement of the performance of the first phase of the process which is positively reflected on the second one. The proposed process performed successfully, adopting mesophilic conditions and a relatively short hydraulic retention time in the methanogenic reactor, as well as high values of organic loading rate. Significant VS removal efficiency and biogas production were achieved. Moreover, the methanogenic reactor quickly reached optimal conditions for a stable methanogenic phase. Studies conducted elsewhere also confirm the feasibility of integrating the treatment of the organic fraction of MSW with that of wastewater.

De Gioannis, G. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy); Diaz, L.F. [CalRecovery, Inc., 2454 Stanwell Drive, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Muntoni, A. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy)], E-mail: amuntoni@unica.it; Pisanu, A. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effect of seasonal changes in quantities of biowaste on full scale anaerobic digester performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 750,000 l digester located in Roppen/Austria was studied over a 2-year period. The concentrations and amounts of CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S and several other process parameters like temperature, retention time, dry weight and input of substrate were registered continuously. On a weekly scale the pH and the concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N and volatile fatty acids (acetic, butyric, iso-butyric, propionic, valeric and iso-valeric acid) were measured. The data show a similar pattern of seasonal gas production over 2 years of monitoring. The consumption of VFA and not the hydrogenotrophic CH{sub 4} production appeared to be the limiting factor for the investigated digestion process. Whereas the changes in pH and the concentrations of most VFA did not correspond with changes in biogas production, the ratio of acetic to propionic acid and the concentration of H{sub 2} appeared to be useful indicators for reactor performance. However, the most influential factors for the anaerobic digestion process were the amount and the quality of input material, which distinctly changed throughout the year.

Illmer, P. [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Microbiology, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: Paul.Illmer@uibk.ac.at; Gstraunthaler, G. [Abfallbeseitigungsverband Westtirol, Breite Mure, A-6426 Roppen (Austria)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Energy recovery from agroindustrial wastes with prevalently solute pollutants using fixed-bed anaerobic reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for anaerobic digestion of agroindustrial wastes containing mainly soluble pollutants was developed utilizing fixed-bed reactors. A pilot plant at a sugar refinery with two reactors in parallel, respectively of 10 and 50 m/sup 3/ operating volume, has functioned successfully in treating wastes produced in regenerating ion-exchange columns used to purify the sugar juices. With an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of less than one day, a maximum gas production of 11.5 volumes per operating volume of reactor per day was obtained together with a reduction of up to 80% of the biological oxygen demand for five days (BOD5), and volatile solids and up to 70% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). The gas contained from 70 to 75% methane. On the basis of these results, a full-scale industrial plant was built which produced up to 7500 m/sup 3/ a day of biogas. The process has been found suitable for a large number of industrial wastes, especially when plants are seasonally operated.

Sanna, P.; Camilli, M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Kinetics and advanced digester design for anaerobic digestion of water hyacinth and primary sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research program centered around a facility located at Walt Disney World (WDW) is in progress to evaluate the use of water hyacinth (WH) for secondary and tertiary wastewater treatment, to optimize growth of WH under these conditions, and to convert the resultant primary sludge (PS) and WH to methane via anaerobic digestion. This article describes the status of the biogasification component of this program, which includes baseline and advanced digestion experiments with individual feeds and blends and the design of an experimental test unit (ETU) to be installed at WDW. Experiments with several blends demonstrated that methane yields can be predicted from the fractional content and methane yield of each component. The process was found to adhere to the Monod kinetic model for microbial growth, and associated kinetic parameters were developed for various feed combinations. A novel upflow digester is achieving significantly higher conversion than a stirred-tank digester. Of several pretreatment techniques used, only alkaline treatment resulted in increased biodegradability. A larger scale (4.5 m/sup 3/) experimental test unit is being designed for installation at WDW in 1982. 13 figures, 4 tables.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Dolenc, D.A.; Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Jerger, D.E.; Srivastava, V.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Processing high solids concentration of municipal solid waste by anaerobic digester for methane production  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosic solids are pretreated by calcium hydroxide to produce salts of volatile orangic acids and other water-soluble substances. Pure cellulose, sawdust, and waste paper are used as model substances for the study of alkaline degradation. It is found that sawdust is more difficult to degrade than the other two substances. The cooking conditions for high conversion of model substances and high yeild of orangic acids are found to be 275/degree/C to 300/degree/C with the corresponding reaction time from 30 minutes to 15 minutes. The cooking liquor can be readily fermented in an anaerobic fluidized-bed digester for methane production. The cooking liquor from different reaction conditions can all be digested by the methanogens. Higher than 90% of COD can be removed under the conditions of low organic loading rate (<2.0 g COD/1/day) and low hydraulic retention time (1.5 to 2.0 days). 14 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Tsao, G.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excessive phosphorus (P) in runoff contributes to eutrophication of fresh water bodies. Studies have shown that manure and effluent applied from animal feeding operations to waste application fields (WAFs) have contributed to excess P in segments of the North Bosque River in east central Texas. There is a growing need for environmentally sound, economically viable, and easy to establish best management practices to control such pollution. Vegetative buffer strips offer a potential solution for reducing runoff P from WAFs by extracting it from soil and by reducing sediment P delivery (due to reduced runoff and soil erosion) to streams. In a field study, ten plots (5m x 5m) were assigned to five replicated treatments, namely control (bare, without having any plant cover), cool season grass, warm season forb, warm season grass, and warm season legume to assess their efficacy of runoff sediment control and P sequestration potential from soil. These plots were established on a coastal Bermuda grass WAF that received dairy lagoon effluent. A runoff collection system, a 1m x 1m sub-plot with a runoff conveyance and collection apparatus, was installed on the upstream and downstream margins of each plot. Natural rainfall runoff samples were collected and analyzed subsequently for total P, soluble P, and total suspended solids in the laboratory. Additionally, the total mass of runoff collected from each sub-plot was calculated. Results suggested that the warm season forb and warm season grass were the most effective vegetative covers for the reduction of runoff P, followed by coastal Bermuda and cool season grass, respectively. The lesser amount of runoff total P in these two treatments was due to lesser runoff mass and lesser sediments in the runoff due to initial interception of rain and less raindrop impact on soil because of denser vegetative cover in both treatments compared to all other treatments.

Giri, Subhasis

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). One suggested Best Management Practice (BMP) is the export of phosphorus (P) through turfgrass sod produced with composted dairy manure from an impaired rural watershed to an urban watershed. The manure-grown sod releases P slowly and would not require additional P fertilizer for up to 20 years in the receiving watershed. This would eliminate P application to the sod and improve the water quality of urban streams. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to model a typical suburban watershed that would receive the transplanted sod. The objective of the modeling was to determine the water quality changes due to the import of sod transplanted from turf fields and grown with composted dairy manure. The SWAT model was calibrated to simulate historical flow and sediment and nutrient loading to Mary's Creek. The total P stream loading to Mary's Creek was lower when manure-grown sod was imported instead of commercial sod grown with inorganic fertilizers. Yet, flow, sediment yield, and total N yield increased equally for both cases at the watershed outlet. The SWAT simulations indicate that a turfgrass BMP can be used effectively to import manure P into an urban watershed and reduce in-stream P levels when compared to sod grown with inorganic fertilizers.

Richards, Chad Edward

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effects of composted dairy manure on soil chemical properties and forage yield and nutritive value of coastal Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research was conducted to compare the effects of composted dairy manure and raw dairy manure alone, or in combination with supplemental inorganic fertilizer, on soil chemical properties and Coastal bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] yield and nutritive value. Composted dairy manure was surface applied at rates of 14 (125 kg N ha-1), 29 (250 kg N ha-1) and 57 (500 kg N ha-1) Mg dry matter (DM) ha-1, and raw dairy manure was surface applied at a rate of 54 (420 kg N ha-1) Mg DM ha-1 to established bermudagrass. Selected compost and manure plots received supplemental inorganic N at rates of 56, 84 and 112 kg ha-1 cutting-1 or 112 kg ha-1 cutting-1 of supplemental N with supplemental inorganic phosphorus or potassium at rates of 112 kg P2O5 ha-1 yr-1 and 112 kg K2O ha-1 cutting-1, respectively. Composted dairy manure (29 and 57 Mg DM ha-1) or raw manure alone increased cumulative forage yields compared to the untreated check in both years of the study, but were less than those obtained using only inorganic fertilizer. Application of 56 kg N ha-1 cutting-1 or more of supplemental N to compost (29 and 57 Mg DM ha-1) or iv manure produced forage yields that were equal to or greater than those obtained using inorganic fertilizer alone. However, increasing compost rate did not increase tissue N concentrations regardless of supplemental inorganic N rate. Yield and tissue K concentrations were increased in the second growing season when supplemental inorganic K was applied to 29 Mg ha-1 of compost or 54 Mg ha-1 of raw dairy manure. No yield response was observed when supplemental inorganic P was applied to compost or manure. Soil pH and concentrations of NH4, NO3, K, Ca, Mg and Mn were increased by application of compost or manure. Soil P concentrations in the 0 to 5-cm zone exceeded 200 mg kg-1 when compost was applied at the high rate. Dairy manure compost was an effective nutrient source for bermudagrass hay production, but will require the use of supplemental N and, in some cases, K to achieve yields comparable to inorganic fertilizer.

Helton, Thomas J.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Interspecies acetate transfer influences the extent of anaerobic benzoate degradation by syntrophic consortia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Benzoate degradation by an anaerobic, syntrophic bacterium, strain SB, in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G-11 reached a threshold value which depended on the amount of acetate added, and ranged from about 2.5 to 29.9 {mu}M. Increasing acetate concentrations also uncompetitively inhibited benzoate degradation. The apparent V{sub max} and K{sub m} for benzoate degradation decreased with increasing acetate concentration, but the benzoate degradation capacity (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of cell suspensions remained comparable. The addition of an acetate-using bacterium to cocultures after the threshold was reached resulted in the degradation of benzoate to below the detection limit. Mathematical simulations showed that the benzoate threshold was not predicted by the inhibitory effect of acetate on benzoate degradation kinetics. With nitrate instead of sulfate as the terminal electron acceptor, no benzoate threshold was observed in the presence of 20 mM acetate even though the degradation capacity was lower with nitrate than with sulfate. When strain SB was grown with a hydrogen-using partner that had a 5-fold lower hydrogen utilization capacity, a 5 to 9-fold lower the benzoate degradation capacity was observed compared to SB/G-11 cocultures. The Gibb`s free energy for benzoate degradation was less negative in cell suspensions with threshold compared to those without threshold. These studies showed that the threshold was not a function of the inhibition of benzoate degradation capacity by acetate, or the toxicity of the undissociated form of acetate. Rather a critical or minimal Gibb`s free energy may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation.

Warikoo, V.; McInerney, M.J.; Suflita, J.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chemical and microbiological hazards associated with recycling of anaerobic digested residue intended for agricultural use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, three full-scale biogas plants (BGP) were investigated for the concentration of heavy metals, organic pollutants, pesticides and the pathogenic bacteria Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli in the anaerobically digested residues (ADR). The BGPs mainly utilize source-separated organic wastes and industrial food waste as energy sources and separate the ADR into an ADR-liquid and an ADR-solid fraction by centrifugation at the BGP. According to the Norwegian standard for organic fertilizers, the ADR were classified as quality 1 mainly because of high zinc (132-422 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and copper (23-93 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations, but also because of high cadmium (0.21-0.60 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations in the liquid-ADR. In the screening of organic pollutants, only DEHP (9.7-62.1 mg kg{sup -1}) and {Sigma} PAH 16 (0.2-1.98 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were detected in high concentrations according to international regulations. Of the 250 pesticides analyzed, 11 were detected, but only imazalil (<0.30-5.77 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and thiabendazol (<0.14-0.73 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were frequently detected in the ADR-fiber. Concentrations of imazalil and thiabendazol were highest during the winter months, due to a high consumption of citrus fruits in Norway in this period. Ten percent of the ADR-liquid samples contained cereulide-producing B. cereus, whereas no verotoxigenic E. coli was detected. The authors conclude that the risk of chemical and bacterial contamination of the food chain or the environment from agricultural use of ADR seems low.

Govasmark, Espen, E-mail: espen.govasmark@bioforsk.no [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Soil and Environment, Fredrik A. Dahlsvei 20, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Staeb, Jessica [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Siedlungswasserbau, Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft, Abteilung Hydrochemie, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Buesnau) (Germany); Holen, Borge [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Plant Health, Hogskoleveien 7, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Hoornstra, Douwe [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland); Nesbakk, Tommy [Mjosanlegget AS, Roverudmyra Miljostasjon, Asmarkveien 301, NO-2600 Lillehammer (Norway); Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor  

SciTech Connect

A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200 l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 deg. C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50 mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

Nopharatana, Annop [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology, Thonburi, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Pullammanappallil, Pratap C. [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Clarke, William P. [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: billc@cheque.uq.edu.au

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Methane and carbon dioxide production from simulated anaerobic degradation of cattle carcasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates methane and carbon dioxide production after land burial of cattle carcasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disposal of animal mortalities is often overlooked in evaluating the environmental impacts of animal production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer we quantify annual emissions from cattle carcass disposal in the United States as 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. - Abstract: Approximately 2.2 million cattle carcasses require disposal annually in the United States. Land burial is a convenient disposal method that has been widely used in animal production for disposal of both daily mortalities as well as during catastrophic mortality events. To date, greenhouse gas production after mortality burial has not been quantified, and this study represents the first attempt to quantify greenhouse gas emissions from land burial of animal carcasses. In this study, anaerobic decomposition of both homogenized and unhomogenized cattle carcass material was investigated using bench-scale reactors. Maximum yields of methane and carbon dioxide were 0.33 and 0.09 m{sup 3}/kg dry material, respectively, a higher methane yield than that previously reported for municipal solid waste. Variability in methane production rates were observed over time and between reactors. Based on our laboratory data, annual methane emissions from burial of cattle mortalities in the United States could total 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. Although this represents less than 1% of total emissions produced by the agricultural sector in 2009, greenhouse gas emissions from animal carcass burial may be significant if disposal of swine and poultry carcasses is also considered.

Yuan Qi; Saunders, Samuel E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Peter Kiewit Institute, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States); Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L., E-mail: sbartelt2@unl.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Peter Kiewit Institute, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Archaeal community composition affects the function of anaerobic co-digesters in response to organic overload  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of methanogens are necessary to respond successfully to perturbation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diversity of methanogens correlates with the VFA concentration and methane yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aggregates indicate tight spatial relationship between minerals and microorganisms. - Abstract: Microbial community diversity in two thermophilic laboratory-scale and three full-scale anaerobic co-digesters was analysed by genetic profiling based on PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes. In parallel operated laboratory reactors a stepwise increase of the organic loading rate (OLR) resulted in a decrease of methane production and an accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). However, almost threefold different OLRs were necessary to inhibit the gas production in the reactors. During stable reactor performance, no significant differences in the bacterial community structures were detected, except for in the archaeal communities. Sequencing of archaeal PCR products revealed a dominance of the acetoclastic methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila, while hydrogenotrophic methanogens were of minor importance and differed additionally in their abundance between reactors. As a consequence of the perturbation, changes in bacterial and archaeal populations were observed. After organic overload, hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanospirillum hungatei and Methanoculleus receptaculi) became more dominant, especially in the reactor attributed by a higher OLR capacity. In addition, aggregates composed of mineral and organic layers formed during organic overload and indicated tight spatial relationships between minerals and microbial processes that may support de-acidification processes in over-acidified sludge. Comparative analyses of mesophilic stationary phase full-scale reactors additionally indicated a correlation between the diversity of methanogens and the VFA concentration combined with the methane yield. This study demonstrates that the coexistence of two types of methanogens, i.e. hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens is necessary to respond successfully to perturbation and leads to stable process performance.

Lerm, S.; Kleyboecker, A. [International Centre for Geothermal Research (ICGR), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Miethling-Graff, R. [International Centre for Geothermal Research (ICGR), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Johann Heinrich von Thuenen Institut, Bundesforschungsinstitut fuer Laendliche Raeume, Wald und Fischerei Institut fuer Biodiversitaet, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Alawi, M.; Kasina, M.; Liebrich, M. [International Centre for Geothermal Research (ICGR), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Wuerdemann, H., E-mail: wuerdemann@gfz-potsdam.de [International Centre for Geothermal Research (ICGR), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluation of alfalfa leaf meal for dairy cows. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of laboratory tests and two feeding experiments were conducted to determine the quality and evaluate the feeding value of alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) for dairy cows. An experiment was also conducted to enhance the protein value of ALM for ruminants. The fiber content of 6 different samples obtained from the processing plant from November 1996 to August 1997 were variable, ranging from 28.8 to 44.5% of DM for NDF, and from 16.0 to 28.6% of DM for ADF. Ash content ranged from 10.1 to 13.8% of the DM. The protein content of ALM was fairly constant and ranged from 21.8 to 23.6% of DM. Amino acids comprise at least 70% of the total CP in ALM, but essential amino acids comprise only about 35% of the total CP. The amino acid profile of ALM is similar to that of alfalfa hay, but markedly different from that of soybean meal. Overall, ALM produced to date is similar in nutrient content to prime alfalfa hay. In one of the feeding trials, ALM pellets were used to replace part of the hay in diets for early lactation cows. The results indicate that ALM pellets can make up as much as 16% of the diet DM in replacement of an equivalent amount of high quality chopped alfalfa hay without adverse effects on production or rumen health. In an other study, ALM replaced soybean meal to supply up to 3 3 % of the total CP in the diet without any detrimental effect on production. However, in each study, dry matter intake was reduced when ALM was included in the diet at or above 15 to 16% of the DM. Although this reduction in feed intake did not influence milk production over the short duration of these studies, it is not known what would happen if ALM was fed over long periods of time. Also, these results should not be interpreted to suggest either that ALM may used to replace all the hay in the diets or that ALM in meal form may be used to replace hay in the diets. Moreover, feed consumption by cows used in these experiments was rather high and somewhat atypical of most cows.

Akayezu, J.M.; Jorgensen, M.A.; Linn, J.G.; Jung, H.J.G. [USDA, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Heat treatment of organics for increasing anaerobic biodegradability. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to evaluate thermochemical pretreatment as a method for increasing the anaerobic biodegradability of organic materials so that they can be more completely fermented to methane gas, a potential source of fuel. The current study has four specific phases: (1) biological conversion of lignocellulose to methane, (2) biodegradation of lignin and lignin fractions, (3) pretreatment of nitrogenous organics for increasing biodegradability, (4) biodegradation of lignin aromatic compounds, and (5) biochemical methane potential and toxicity testing. Results are reported for phases one, two, and three. No new information is available for phases four and five at this time.

Stuckey, D.; Colberg, P.J.; Baugh, K.; Young, L.Y.; McCarty, P.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Quantitative Herd-level Evaluation of a Commercially Available Vaccine for Control of Salmonella in Dairy Cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salmonella continues to threaten public health as well as negatively impact dairy producers on multiple levels. Efficacious solutions to control Salmonella among dairy cattle have long been sought to alleviate these problems. A novel vaccine technology has been developed based on purified siderophore receptors and porin proteins (SRP®) derived from Salmonella Newport. When vaccinated with these SRP® cattle are stimulated to produce antibodies which act in concert with host defenses to disrupt iron acquisition of pathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of this technology, a prospective cohort study was designed utilizing herds (n = 11) that practiced whole herd vaccination with the SRP® vaccine (vaccinated cohort) and herds (n = 11) that had not used the SRP® vaccine. Samples were collected during four rounds at approximately six week intervals from June through October 2009. Samples were transported to the laboratory at West Texas A&M University and cultured for the prevalence of Salmonella using selective enrichment methods. Salmonella isolates were evaluated for antimicrobial susceptibility and serotype. Data was analyzed using commercially available software to evaluate the herd-level effects of vaccination. Salmonella was ubiquitous throughout the Texas Panhandle and Eastern New Mexico, within-herd animal level estimates of prevalence ranged from 0.0 – 92%, over the length of the study period. Overall all rounds vaccinated herds had decreased (P = 0.012) Salmonella prevalence (15.3 vs. 27.5%). Vaccinated herds had numerically fewer Salmonella isolates belonging to the Newport serotype. Salmonella Typhimurium isolates were recovered approximately equally from vaccinated and non-vaccinated herds. Isolates from vaccinated herds were resistant to fewer antimicrobials throughout the study period. The ACSSuT(resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulphisoxazole, and tetracycline) and MDR-AmpC (ACSSuT resistance plus resistance to ceftiofur and amoxicillin/clavulanate) resistant phenotypes were more frequently observed among non-vaccinated herds and none of the isolates from vaccinated or non-vaccinated herds were resistant to nalidixic acid, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, or amikacin. These findings indicate vaccine efficacy for the reduction of Salmonella prevalence. Dairy operators along with herd veterinarians are encouraged to utilize this data with other herd specific factors in determining whether to use this specific vaccine.

Farrow, Russell Lee

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Modeling The NOx Emissions In A Low NOx Burner While Fired With Pulverized Coal And Dairy Biomass Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New regulations like the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) will pose greater challenges for Coal fired power plants with regards to pollution reduction. These new regulations plan to impose stricter limits on NOX reduction. The current regulations by themselves already require cleanup technology; newer regulations will require development of new and economical technologies. Using a blend of traditional fuels & biomass is a promising technology to reduce NOX emissions. Experiments conducted previously at the Coal and Biomass energy lab at Texas A&M reported that dairy biomass can be an effective Reburn fuel with NOX reduction of up to 95%; however little work has been done to model such a process with Feedlot Biomass as a blend with the main burner fuel. The present work concerns with development of a zero dimensional for a low NOx burner (LNB) model in order to predict NOX emissions while firing a blend of Coal and dairy biomass. Two models were developed. Model I assumes that the main burner fuel is completely oxidized to CO,CO2,H20 and fuel bound nitrogen is released as HCN, NH3, N2; these partially burnt product mixes with tertiary air, undergoes chemical reactions specified by kinetics and burns to complete combustion. Model II assumes that the main burner solid fuel along with primary and secondary air mixes gradually with recirculated gases, burn partially and the products from the main burner include partially burnt solid particles and fuel bound nitrogen partially converted to N2, HCN and NH3. These products mix gradually with tertiary air, undergo further oxidation-reduction reactions in order to complete the combustion. The results are based on model I. Results from the model were compared with experimental findings to validate it. Results from the model recommend the following conditions for optimal reduction of NOx: Equivalence Ratio should be above 0.95; mixing time should be below 100ms. Based on Model I, results indicate that increasing percentage of dairy biomass in the blend increases the NOx formation due to the assumption that fuel N compounds ( HCN, NH3) do not undergo oxidation in the main burner zone. Thus it is suggested that model II must be adopted in the future work.

Uggini, Hari

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Optimization criteria for the stabilization of sewage sludge and biogas production through anaerobic digestion: an example of an environmental biotechnology application  

SciTech Connect

According to environmental protection and energy conservation principles, anaerobic digestion of activated sludges should have two main purposes: to stabilize the sludge within allowable limits and to increase biogas production as much as possible, in order to meet ecological requirement without neglecting a particular energy source. This implies optimization procedures for the design of the process, based upon its actual kinetics. This optimization has been developed in the present paper on the basis of experimental results on anaerobic digestion kinetics achieved in previous research.

Ferraiolo, G.; Del Borghi, M.; Gardi, R.; Solisio, C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A., E-mail: alberto.fdezguelfo@uca.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alvarez-Gallego, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sales, D. [Department of Environmental Technologies, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Romero Garcia, L.I. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles during Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Post-Treatment Processing of Sewage Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid development and commercialization of nanomaterials will inevitably result in the release of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment. As NPs often exhibit physical and chemical properties significantly different from those of their molecular or macrosize analogs, concern has been growing regarding their fate and toxicity in environmental compartments. The wastewater-sewage sludge pathway has been identified as a key release pathway leading to environmental exposure to NPs. In this study, we investigated the chemical transformation of two ZnO-NPs and one hydrophobic ZnO-NP commercial formulation (used in personal care products), during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. Changes in Zn speciation as a result of postprocessing of the sewage sludge, mimicking composting/stockpiling, were also assessed. The results indicated that 'native' Zn and Zn added either as a soluble salt or as NPs was rapidly converted to sulfides in all treatments. The hydrophobicity of the commercial formulation retarded the conversion of ZnO-NP. However, at the end of the anaerobic digestion process and after postprocessing of the sewage sludge (which caused a significant change in Zn speciation), the speciation of Zn was similar across all treatments. This indicates that, at least for the material tested, the risk assessment of ZnO-NP through this exposure pathway can rely on the significant knowledge already available in regard to other 'conventional' forms of Zn present in sewage sludge.

Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Turney, Terence W.; Naidu, Ravi; Miller, Bradley W.; Scheckel, Kirk G. (U. South Australia); (EPA); (Monash)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively.

Yazdani, Ramin, E-mail: ryazdani@sbcglobal.net [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@eos.ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Augenstein, Don, E-mail: iemdon@aol.com [Institute for Environmental Management, Inc., Palo Alto, CA 94306 (United States); Kayhanian, Masoud, E-mail: mdkayhanian@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Tchobanoglous, George, E-mail: gtchobanoglous@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Environmental Assessment for the Methane Energy and Agricultural Development Port of Tillamook Bay Dairy Digester Project Tillamook County, Oregon (01/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT METHANE ENERGY and AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PORT of TILLAMOOK BAY DAIRY DIGESTER PROJECT TILLAMOOK COUNTY, OREGON January 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for the construction and start-up of a manure digester at the Port of Tillamook Bay (POTB) Industrial Park, Tillamook County, Oregon. If approved, DOE would provide funding to construct this dairy digester that would produce the following marketable products; 295 kW of electric power from biogas, hot water used to maintain the temperature of the digester, and about 30 cubic yards per year of solids for composting.

307

Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

Van Passel, Mark W.J. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Kant, Ravi [University of Helsinki; Palva, Airi [University of Helsinki; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; De Vos, Willem M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Smidt, Hauke [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Zoetendal, Erwin G. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico Keywords: Methane flux Mass spectrometer Brine pool Methane oxidation Gulf of Mexico a b s t r a c t Deep report direct measurements of methane concentrations made in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool located

Girguis, Peter R.

309

High rate mesophilic, thermophilic, and temperature phased anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge: A pilot scale study  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High temperatures were tested in single and two-stage anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increased temperature demonstrated the possibility of improving typical yields of the conventional mesophilic process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature phased anaerobic digestion process (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) showed the best performances with yields of 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia and phosphate released from solids destruction determined the precipitation of struvite in the reactor. - Abstract: The paper reports the findings of a two-year pilot scale experimental trial for the mesophilic (35 Degree-Sign C), thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) and temperature phased (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. During the mesophilic and thermophilic runs, the reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 20 days. In the temperature phased run, the first reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 15 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 2 days while the second reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 18 days (20 days for the whole temperature phased system). The performance of the reactor improved with increases in temperature. The COD removal increased from 35% in mesophilic conditions, to 45% in thermophilic conditions, and 55% in the two stage temperature phased system. As a consequence, the specific biogas production increased from 0.33 to 0.45 and to 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed} at 35, 55, and 65 + 55 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The extreme thermophilic reactor working at 65 Degree-Sign C showed a high hydrolytic capability and a specific yield of 0.33 gCOD (soluble) per gVS{sub fed}. The effluent of the extreme thermophilic reactor showed an average concentration of soluble COD and volatile fatty acids of 20 and 9 g/l, respectively. Acetic and propionic acids were the main compounds found in the acids mixture. Because of the improved digestion efficiency, organic nitrogen and phosphorus were solubilised in the bulk. Their concentration, however, did not increase as expected because of the formation of salts of hydroxyapatite and struvite inside the reactor.

Bolzonella, David, E-mail: david.bolzonella@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Cavinato, Cristina, E-mail: cavinato@unive.it [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Computer Science and Statistics, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Fatone, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.fatone@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Pavan, Paolo, E-mail: pavan@unive.it [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Computer Science and Statistics, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Cecchi, Franco, E-mail: franco.cecchi@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Controlling the pH of acid cheese whey in a two-stage anaerobic digester with sodium hydroxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. The biogas, as an energy source, could be used to reduce the consumption of traditional fuels in the cheese plant. However, as a result of little or no buffering capacity of whey, the pH of the anaerobic digester drops drastically and the process is inhibited. In this study, the effect of controlling the pH of the second chamber of a two-stage, 150 L anaerobic digester operating on cheese whey on the quality and quantity of biogas and the pollution potential reduction, was investigated using sodium hydroxide. The digester was operated at a temperature of 35 C and a hydraulic retention time of 15 days for three runs (no pH control, pH control with no reseeding, and ph control with reseeding) each lasting 50 days. The results indicated that operating the digester without pH control resulted in a low pH (3.3) which inhibited the methanogenic bacteria. The inhibition was irreversible and the digester did not recover (no methane production) when the pH was restored to 7.0 without reseeding, as the observed increased gas production was a false indication of recovery because the gas was mainly carbon dioxide. The addition of base resulted in a total alkalinity of 12,000 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}. When the system was reseeded and the pH controlled, the total volatile acid concentration was 15,100 mg/L (as acetic acid), with acetic (28%), propionic (21%), butyric (25%), valeric (8%), and caproic (15%) acids as the major constituents. The biogas production was 62.6 L/d (0.84 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d) and the methane content was 60.7%. Reductions of 27.3, 30.4 and 23.3% in the total solids, chemical oxygen demand and total kjeldahl nitrogen were obtained, respectively. The ammonium nitrogen content increased significantly (140%).

Ghaly, A.E.; Ramkumar, D.R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Biological Engineering Dept.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated.

Lenly J. Weathers; Lynn E. Katz

2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

312

Complete genome sequence of the bile-resistant pigment- producing anaerobe Alistipes finegoldii type strain (AHN2437T)  

SciTech Connect

Alistipes finegoldii Rautio et al. 2003 is one of five species of Alistipes with a validly pub- lished name: family Rikenellaceae, order Bacteroidetes, class Bacteroidia, phylum Bacteroidetes. This rod-shaped and strictly anaerobic organism has been isolated mostly from human tissues. Here we describe the features of the type strain of this species, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. A. finegoldii is the first member of the genus Alistipes for which the complete genome sequence of its type strain is now available. The 3,734,239 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 68 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Stackebrandt, Erko [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

L. van Dyk, L. Lorenzen, S. Miachon, and J.-A. Dalmon, Xylene isomerization in an extractor type Catalytic Membrane Reactor, Catal. Today, 104 (2005) 274. Page 1 / 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Rabinovich, N. Alexeev, Plasma catalytic reforming of methane, International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, 24

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues: potential for improvement and implementation. Seventh quarter progress report, December 16, 1977--March 15, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the seventh progress report of an on-going three year research effort to contribute to the development of a new and/or improved technology that will result in wide spread use of an anaerobic fermentation in agriculture to generate a renewable clean energy source. Activities are now concentrating on full-scale and pilot-scale demonstration of simplified fermentors for manures. Activities for the seventh quarter year, extending from December 16, 1977 to March 15, 1978, have included the following: completion of construction of the full scale conventional control fermenter; completion of construction, testing and startup of the random mix fermenter; installation of feed and effluent lines, electrical wiring, boilers, gas lines and controls; successful testing of the ram pump; conclusion of the 35/sup 0/C studies with the pilot scale plug flow fermenter and the initiation of the low temperature (25/sup 0/C) studies; and preparation of a detailed outline to the design manual. As of March 15, 1978, the overall progress achieved with the major components of the project was estimated to be about 2.5 months behind the work plan schedule. As detailed in the last progress report, much of this delay has been due to the winter weather (i.e., cold temperatures, snow, frozen ground, etc.) which has interfered with excavation and other outdoor construction activities.

Jewell, W.J.; Guest, R.W.; Loehr, R.C.; Price, D.R.; Gunkel, W.W.; Van Soest, P.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Full scale field demonstration of unheated anaerobic contact stabilization. Quarterly project status report, April-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of Columbus provided funds for the preliminary shakedown of the anaerobic contact stabilization system. During the shakedown period, the sludge recycle system was tested, and the temperature control system was refurbished. At temperatures as low as 82/sup 0/F there is no noticeable loss in gas production for SRT's over 14 days. Some of the preliminary data on the overflow and underflow liquors from unit 6E suggested that substantial amounts of VS were not settling in 6E and, consequently, were not being recycled. Therefore, an examination of the settleability of the transfer sludge (4E to 6E) is underway. Some typical preliminary results are shown. The occurence of gasification in the scum layer raises the issue of where the mathanogenic bacteria are to be found in the settler (6E). Some preliminary tests have been conducted to answer this question, and a typical set of results demonstrate the relative population densities of methanogens in scum and settled digested solids. It is clear that if scum is not retained in the system, significant losses of system biomass will occur via the settler overflow.

Sykes, R.M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Semi-continuous anaerobic co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge and fat, oil and grease  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) with fat, oil and grease (FOG). > Co-digestion of TWAS and FOG at 64% VS increased biogas production by 137%. > FOG addition ratio at 74% of total VS caused inhibition of the anaerobic digestion process. > Micronutrients addition did not significantly improve the biogas production and digestion stabilization. - Abstract: Co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) and fat, oil and grease (FOG) was conducted semi-continuously under mesophilic conditions. The results showed that daily methane yield at the steady state was 598 L/kg VS{sub added} when TWAS and FOG (64% of total VS) were co-digested, which was 137% higher than that obtained from digestion of TWAS alone. The biogas composition was stabilized at a CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} content of 66.8% and 29.5%, respectively. Micronutrients added to co-digestion did not improve the biogas production and digestion stabilization. With a higher addition of FOG (74% of total VS), the digester initially failed but was slowly self-recovered; however, the methane yield was only about 50% of a healthy reactor with the same organic loading rate.

Wan Caixia; Zhou Quancheng; Fu Guiming [Department of Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University/Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691-4096 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University/Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691-4096 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste activated sludge in China: Effect of organic loading rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) was examined on a pilot-scale reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System performance and stability under OLR of 1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6.0 and 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and HRT of 15d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing OLRs, pH values, VS removal rate and methane concentration decreased and VFA increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The changing of biogas production rate can be a practical approach to monitor and control anaerobic digestion system. - Abstract: The effects of organic loading rate on the performance and stability of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated on a pilot-scale reactor. The results showed that stable operation was achieved with organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.2-8.0 kg volatile solid (VS) (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}, with VS reduction rates of 61.7-69.9%, and volumetric biogas production of 0.89-5.28 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and hydraulic retention time of 15 days. With increasing OLRs, the anaerobic reactor showed a decrease in VS removal rate, average pH value and methane concentration, and a increase of volatile fatty acid concentration. By monitoring the biogas production rate (BPR), the anaerobic digestion system has a higher acidification risk under an OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. This result remarks the possibility of relating bioreactor performance with BPR in order to better understand and monitor anaerobic digestion process.

Liu Xiao, E-mail: liuxiao07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Wei; Shi Yunchun; Zheng Lei [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao Xingbao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Qiao Wei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhou Yingjun [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nisikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN EXTENSION PUBLICATION A3794Whole-Farm Nutrient Management on Dairy Farms to Improve Profitability and Reduce Environmental Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

body of knowledge exists about livestock waste and nutrient management, but that the development and implementation of manure and animal waste best management practices is limited by lack of integration of research and extension information. A collaborative project was initiated to define and evaluate nutrient management tools developed and used in New York and Wisconsin that are applicable across regions, and tools or models that are region specific but whose approach and structure may be applicable across regions. This document is the final report of the project. It contains outlines of nine nutrient management tools used in New York or Wisconsin and provides readers with comparative reviews of the tools to aid in tool selection. Model developers and agricultural educators can use this information to improve their nutrient management research and teaching efforts. In addition to software evaluations, this project report describes the dairy production systems and state regulatory environments and gives an overview of three university courses developed to address nutrient management issues in New York and Wisconsin. The primary audiences for this project are researchers, extension personnel and other professionals that generate knowledge and provide assistance to dairy farmers in issues related to feed, fertilizer and manure management. Find out more about this project by visiting:

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment were studied to enhance anaerobic digestion of organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The whole waste pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C or 145 Degree-Sign C had the highest biogas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas production of the whole waste decreased at 175 Degree-Sign C due to formation of refractory compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment to 145 Degree-Sign C and 175 Degree-Sign C were the best when considering only the free liquid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment had a lag phase and the biogas production was not higher than MW pretreated samples. - Abstract: In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175 Degree-Sign C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C and 145 Degree-Sign C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175 Degree-Sign C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145 Degree-Sign C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8 days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

Shahriari, Haleh, E-mail: haleh.shahriari@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Warith, Mostafa [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Hamoda, Mohamed [Department of Environmental Technology and Management, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Kennedy, Kevin J. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant biomass without pretreatment by the 9 thermophilic anaerobe, Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6725  

SciTech Connect

Very few cultivated microorganisms can degrade lignocellulosic biomass without chemical pretreatment. We show here that 'Anaerocellum thermophilum' DSM 6725, an anaerobic bacterium that grows optimally at 75 C, efficiently utilizes various types of untreated plant biomass, as well as crystalline cellulose and xylan. These include hardwoods such as poplar, low-lignin grasses such as napier and Bermuda grasses, and high-lignin grasses such as switchgrass. The organism did not utilize only the soluble fraction of the untreated biomass, since insoluble plant biomass (as well as cellulose and xylan) obtained after washing at 75 C for 18 h also served as a growth substrate. The predominant end products from all growth substrates were hydrogen, acetate, and lactate. Glucose and cellobiose (on crystalline cellulose) and xylose and xylobiose (on xylan) also accumulated in the growth media during growth on the defined substrates but not during growth on the plant biomass. A. thermophilum DSM 6725 grew well on first- and second-spent biomass derived from poplar and switchgrass, where spent biomass is defined as the insoluble growth substrate recovered after the organism has reached late stationary phase. No evidence was found for the direct attachment of A. thermophilum DSM 6725 to the plant biomass. This organism differs from the closely related strain A. thermophilum Z-1320 in its ability to grow on xylose and pectin. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 (optimum growth temperature, 70 C), a close relative of A. thermophilum DSM 6725, grew well on switchgrass but not on poplar, indicating a significant difference in the biomass-degrading abilities of these two otherwise very similar organisms.

Yang, Sung-Jae [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irina [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Doeppke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Functional Description of CymA, an Electron Transfer Hub Supporting Anaerobic Respiratory Flexibility in Shewanella  

SciTech Connect

CymA is a member of the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases. Essential for the anaerobic respiratory flexibility of shewanellae, CymA transfers electrons from menaquinol to various dedicated systems for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors including fumarate and insoluble minerals of Fe(III). Spectroscopic characterization of CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 identifies three low-spin His/His coordinated c-hemes and a single high-spin c-heme with His/H{sub 2}O coordination lying adjacent to the quinol binding site. At pH 7, binding of the menaquinol analogue, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, does not alter the mid-point potentials of the high-spin (ca. {approx}240 mV) and low-spin (ca. {approx}110, {approx}190 and {approx}265 mV) hemes that appear biased to transfer electrons from the high- to low-spin centres following quinol oxidation. CymA is reduced with menadiol (E{sub m} = {approx} 80 mV) in the presence of NADH (E{sub m} = {approx} 320 mV) and an NADH:menadione oxidoreductase, but not by menadiol alone. In cytoplasmic membranes reduction of CymA may then require the thermodynamic driving force from NADH, formate or H{sub 2} oxidation as the redox poise of the menaquinol pool in isolation is insufficient. Spectroscopic studies suggest that CymA requires a nonheme cofactor for quinol oxidation and that the reduced enzyme forms a 1:1 complex with its redox partner Fcc{sub 3}. The implications for CymA supporting the respiratory flexibility of shewanellae are discussed.

Marritt, Sophie; Lowe, Thomas G.; Bye, Jordan; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Cheesman, Myles R.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Microbial dynamics in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor granules in response to short-term changes in substrate feed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity and diversity of the microbial communities in biogranules from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor were determined in response to short-term changes in substrate feeds. The reactor was fed simulated brewery wastewater (SBWW) (70% ethanol, 15% acetate, 15% propionate) for 1.5 months (phase 1), acetate / sulfate for 2 months (phase 2), acetate-alone for 3 months (phase 3), and then a return to SBWW for 2 months (phase 4). Performance of the reactor remained relatively stable throughout the experiment as shown by COD removal and gas production. 16S rDNA, methanogen-associated mcrA and sulfate reducer-associated dsrAB genes were PCR amplified, then cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis of 16S clone libraries showed a relatively simple community composed mainly of the methanogenic Archaea (Methanobacterium and Methanosaeta), members of the Green Non-Sulfur (Chloroflexi) group of Bacteria, followed by fewer numbers of Syntrophobacter, Spirochaeta, Acidobacteria and Cytophaga-related Bacterial sequences. Methanogen-related mcrA clone libraries were dominated throughout by Methanobacter and Methanospirillum related sequences. Although not numerous enough to be detected in our 16S rDNA libraries, sulfate reducers were detected in dsrAB clone libraries, with sequences related to Desulfovibrio and Desulfomonile. Community diversity levels (Shannon-Weiner index) generally decreased for all libraries in response to a change from SBWW to acetate-alone feed. But there was a large transitory increase noted in 16S diversity at the two-month sampling on acetate-alone, entirely related to an increase in Bacterial diversity. Upon return to SBWW conditions in phase 4, all diversity measures returned to near phase 1 levels.

Kovacik, William P.; Scholten, Johannes C.; Culley, David E.; Hickey, Robert; Zhang, Weiwen; Brockman, Fred J.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective  

SciTech Connect

Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

Bernstad, A., E-mail: Anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Metabolic analysis of the soil microbe Dechloromonas aromatica str. RCB: indications of a surprisingly complex life-style and cryptic anaerobic pathways for aromatic degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial interest in Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB arose from its ability to anaerobically degrade benzene. It is also able to reduce perchlorate and oxidize chlorobenzoate, toluene, and xylene, creating interest in using this organism for bioremediation. Little physiological data has been published for this microbe. It is considered to be a free-living organism. The a priori prediction that the D. aromatica genome would contain previously characterized 'central' enzymes involved in anaerobic aromatic degradation proved to be false, suggesting the presence of novel anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways in this species. These missing pathways include the benzyl succinyl synthase (bssABC) genes (responsible for formate addition to toluene) and the central benzoylCoA pathway for monoaromatics. In depth analyses using existing TIGRfam, COG, and InterPro models, and the creation of de novo HMM models, indicate a highly complex lifestyle with a large number of environmental sensors and signaling pathways, including a relatively large number of GGDEF domain signal receptors and multiple quorum sensors. A number of proteins indicate interactions with an as yet unknown host, as indicated by the presence of predicted cell host remodeling enzymes, effector enzymes, hemolysin-like proteins, adhesins, NO reductase, and both type III and type VI secretory complexes. Evidence of biofilm formation including a proposed exopolysaccharide complex with the somewhat rare exosortase (epsH), is also present. Annotation described in this paper also reveals evidence for several metabolic pathways that have yet to be observed experimentally, including a sulphur oxidation (soxFCDYZAXB) gene cluster, Calvin cycle enzymes, and nitrogen fixation (including RubisCo, ribulose-phosphate 3-epimerase, and nif gene families, respectively). Analysis of the D. aromatica genome indicates there is much to be learned regarding the metabolic capabilities, and life-style, for this microbial species. Examples of recent gene duplication events in signaling as well as dioxygenase clusters are present, indicating selective gene family expansion as a relatively recent event in D. aromatica's evolutionary history. Gene families that constitute metabolic cycles presumed to create D. aromatica's environmental 'foot-print' indicate a high level of diversification between its predicted capabilities and those of its close relatives, A. aromaticum str EbN1 and Azoarcus BH72.

Salinero, Kennan Kellaris; Keller, Keith; Feil, William S.; Feil, Helene; Trong, Stephan; Di Bartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

Heat treatment of organics for increasing anaerobic biodegradability. Annual progress report, June 1, 1976-May 31, 1977. Civil engineering technical report No. 222  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report represents the results of the first year of study on the heat treatment of organics to increase its biodegradability by anaerobic bacteria for the microbial production of methane. The purpose of this study is to develop a means for increasing the yield and reducing the cost of methane, a useful energy source. The procedures being evaluated are heat treatment at temperatures up to 250/sup 0/C, under pH ranges of 1 to 13. Included in this report are results on: (1) lignocellulose digestion and acclimation to its products from heat treatment; (2) the fate of waste activated sludge and its cellular nitrogenous compounds; and (3) the biodegradability of model compounds likely to be formed during heat treatment.

Healy, J.B. Jr.; Owen, W.F.; Stuckey, D.C.; Young, L.Y.; McCarty, P.L.

1977-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

Trzcinski, Antoine P., E-mail: a.trzcinski05@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stuckey, David C., E-mail: d.stuckey@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Agricultural Economists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion of dairy manure produces biogas that can be captured and used for fuel while offering environmental benefits. Dairy farmer use of anaerobic digesters is not widespread due to various challenges, including high costs and inadequate return. A cooperative approach could address the challenges through improved negotiating strength; technical assistance for digester design, installation, and operation; management and marketing services; and/or financial guidance and assistance. Cooperative efforts may allow milk producers to remain focused on milk production

Carolyn Betts Liebr; K. Charles Ling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Operational experience from three full scale methane digesters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three full scale anaerobic digesters are described and operational experience is discussed. The digesters are located in Monroe, Washington on a 200 head dairy; in Bartow, Florida on a 10,000 head feedlot; and in Bedford, Virginia on a 100 head dairy. 11 refs.

Coppinger, E.R.; Richter, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste with FOG waste from a sewage treatment plant: Recovering a wasted methane potential and enhancing the biogas yield  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion is applied widely to treat the source collected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (SC-OFMSW). Lipid-rich wastes are a valuable substrate for anaerobic digestion due to their high theoretical methane potential. Nevertheless, although fat, oil and grease waste from sewage treatment plants (STP-FOGW) are commonly disposed of in landfill, European legislation is aimed at encouraging more effective forms of treatment. Co-digestion of the above wastes may enhance valorisation of STP-FOGW and lead to a higher biogas yield throughout the anaerobic digestion process. In the present study, STP-FOGW was evaluated as a co-substrate in wet anaerobic digestion of SC-OFMSW under mesophilic conditions (37 {sup o}C). Batch experiments carried out at different co-digestion ratios showed an improvement in methane production related to STP-FOGW addition. A 1:7 (VS/VS) STP-FOGW:SC-OFMSW feed ratio was selected for use in performing further lab-scale studies in a 5 L continuous reactor. Biogas yield increased from 0.38 {+-} 0.02 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} to 0.55 {+-} 0.05 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} as a result of adding STP-FOGW to reactor feed. Both VS reduction values and biogas methane content were maintained and inhibition produced by long chain fatty acid (LCFA) accumulation was not observed. Recovery of a currently wasted methane potential from STP-FOGW was achieved in a co-digestion process with SC-OFMSW.

Martin-Gonzalez, L., E-mail: lucia.martin@uab.ca [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Colturato, L.F. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Font, X.; Vicent, T. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambiental (ICTA) Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

A study of the kinetics and mechanism of the adsorption and anaerobic partial oxidation of n-butane over a vanadyl pyrophosphate catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of n-butane with a ((VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}) catalyst has been investigated by temperature-programmed desorption and anaerobic temperature-programmed reaction. n-Butane has been shown to adsorb on the (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} to as a butyl-hydroxyl pair. When adsorption is carried out at 223 K, upon temperature programming some of the butyl-hydroxyl species recombine resulting in butane desorption at 260 K. However, when adsorption is carried out at 423 K, the hydroxyl species of the butyl-hydroxyl pair migrate away from the butyl species during the adsorption, forming water which is detected in the gas phase. Butane therefore is not observed to desorb at 260 K after the authors lowered the temperature to 223 K under the butane/helium from the adsorption temperature of 423 K prior to temperature programming from that temperature to 1100 K under a helium stream. Anaerobic temperature-programmed oxidation of n-butane produces butene and butadiene at a peak maximum temperature of 1000 K; this is exactly the temperature at which, upon temperature programming, oxygen evolves from the lattice and desorbs as O{sub 2}. This, and the fact that the amount of oxygen desorbing from the (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} at {approximately}1000 K is the same as that required for the oxidation of the n-butane to butene and butadiene, strongly suggests (1) that lattice oxygen as it emerges at the surface is the selective oxidant and (2) that its appearance at the surface is the rate-determining step in the selective oxidation of n-butane. The surface of the (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} catalyst on which this selective oxidation takes place has had approximately two monolayers of oxygen removed from it by unselective oxidation of the n-butane to CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O between 550 and 950 K and has had approximately one monolayer of carbon deposited on it at {approximately}1000 K. It is apparent, therefore, that the original crystallography of the (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} catalyst will not exist during this selective oxidation and that theories that relate selectivity in partial oxidation to the (100) face of the (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} catalyst cannot apply in this case.

Sakakini, B.H.; Taufiq-Yap, Y.H.; Waugh, K.C.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

Early-warning process/control for anaerobic digestion and biological nitrogen transformation processes: Batch, semi-continuous, and/or chemostat experiments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and test an early-warning/process control model for anaerobic sludge digestion (AD). The approach was to use batch and semi-continuously fed systems and to assemble system parameter data on a real-time basis. Specific goals were to produce a real-time early warning control model and computer code, tested for internal and external validity; to determine the minimum rate of data collection for maximum lag time to predict failure with a prescribed accuracy and confidence in the prediction; and to determine and characterize any trends in the real-time data collected in response to particular perturbations to feedstock quality. Trends in the response of trace gases carbon monoxide and hydrogen in batch experiments, were found to depend on toxicant type. For example, these trace gases respond differently for organic substances vs. heavy metals. In both batch and semi-continuously feed experiments, increased organic loading lead to proportionate increases in gas production rates as well as increases in CO and H{sub 2} concentration. An analysis of variance of gas parameters confirmed that CO was the most sensitive indicator variable by virtue of its relatively larger variance compared to the others. The other parameters evaluated including gas production, methane production, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methane concentration. In addition, a relationship was hypothesized between gaseous CO concentration and acetate concentrations in the digester. The data from semicontinuous feed experiments were supportive.

Hickey, R. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic, anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium utilizing short- and long-chain fatty acids in syntrophic coculture with a methanogenic archaeum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three strains of an anaerobic thermophilic organoheterotrophic lipolytic alkalitolerant bacterium, Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/VS-264{sup T}; DSM 11003) were isolated from alkaline hot springs of Lake Bogoria (Kenya). The cells were nonmotile, non-spore forming, straight or slightly curved rods. At 60{degrees}C, the pH range for growth determined at 25{degrees}C [pH{sup 25{degrees}C}] was 7.15 to 9.5, with an optimum between 8.1 and 8.9 (pH{sup 60{degrees}C} of 7.6 and 8.1). At a pH{sup 25{degrees}C} of 8.5 temperature range for growth was from 52 to 70{degrees}C, with an optimum between 60 and 66{degrees}C. The shortest doubling time was around 1 h. In pure culture the bacterium grew in a mineral base medium supplemented with yeast extract, tryptone, Casamino Acids, betaine, and crotonate as carbon sources, producing acetate as a major product and constitutively a lipase. During growth in the presence of olive oil, free long-chain fatty acids were accumulated in the medium but the pure culture syntrophic coculture (Methanobacterium strain JW/VS-M29) the lipolytic bacteria grew on triacylglycerols and linear saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 4 to 18 carbon atoms, but glycerol was not utilized. Fatty acids with even numbers of carbon atoms were degraded to acetate and methane, while from odd-numbered fatty acids 1 mol of propionate per mol of fatty acid was additionally formed. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified Syntrophospora and Syntrophomonas spp. as closest phylogenetic neighbors.

Svetlitshnyi, V.; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Rainey, F. [German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Braunschweig (Germany)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Investigation Of Synergistic NOx Reduction From Cofiring And Air Staged Combustion Of Coal And Low Ash Dairy Biomass In A 30 Kilowatt Low NOx Furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternate, cost effective disposal methods must be developed for reducing phosphorous and nitrogen loading from land application of animal waste. Cofiring coal with animal waste, termed dairy biomass (DB), is the proposed thermo-chemical method to address this concern. DB is evaluated as a cofired fuel with Wyoming Powder River Basin (PRB) sub-bituminous coal in a small-scale 29 kW_(t) low NO_(x) burner (LNB) facility. Fuel properties, of PRB and DB revealed the following: a higher heating value of 29590 kJ/kg for dry ash free (DAF) coal and 21450 kJ/kg for DAF DB. A new method called Respiratory Quotient (RQ), defined as ratio of carbon dioxide moles to oxygen moles consumed in combustion, used widely in biology, was recently introduced to engineering literature to rank global warming potential (GWP) of fuels. A higher RQ means higher CO_(2) emission and higher GWP. PRB had an RQ of 0.90 and DB had an RQ of 0.92. For comparison purposes, methane has an RQ of 0.50. For unknown fuel composition, gas analyses can be adapted to estimate RQ values. The LNB was modified and cofiring experiments were performed at various equivalence ratios (phi) with pure coal and blends of PRB-DB. Standard emissions from solid fuel combustion were measured; then NO_(x) on a heat basis (g/GJ), fuel burnt fraction, and fuel nitrogen conversion percentage were estimated. The gas analyses yielded burnt fraction ranging from 89% to 100% and confirmed an RQ of 0.90 to 0.94, which is almost the same as the RQ based on fuel composition. At the 0.90 equivalence ratio, unstaged pure coal produced 653 ppm (377 g/GJ) of NOx. At the same equivalence ratio, a 90-10 PRB:LADB blended fuel produced 687 ppm (397 g/GJ) of NO_(x). By staging 20% of the total combustion air as tertiary air (which raised the equivalence ratio of the main burner to 1.12), NO_(x) was reduced to 545 ppm (304 g/GJ) for the 90-10 blended fuel. Analysis of variance showed that variances were statistically significant because of real differences between the independent variables (equivalence ratio, percent LADB in the fuel, and staging intensity).

Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Feasibility Study of Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste in St. Bernard, Louisiana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to re-use contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former Kaiser Aluminum Landfill in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, was selected for a feasibility study under the program. Preliminary work focused on selecting a biomass feedstock. Discussions with area experts, universities, and the project team identified food wastes as the feedstock and anaerobic digestion (AD) as the technology.

Moriarty, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Anaerobic Digestion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

bacteria break down or "digest" organic material in the absence of oxygen and produce biogas as a waste product. (Aerobic decomposition, or composting, requires large amounts of...

338

Microbiology and physiology of anaerobic fermentation of cellulose. Progress report (4/30/91--4/30/92) and outline of work for the period 9/1/92--9/1/93  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors are continuing their efforts to partly dissociate the cellulolytic enzyme complex of C. thermocellum. This complex named cellulosome (also existing as polycellulosome) consists of perhaps as many as 26 different subunits. It is extremely resistant to dissociation and denaturation. Treatments with urea and SDS have little effect unless the latter treatment is at high temperature. Significantly, some of the subunits after SDS dissociation have CMCase (endoglucanase) activity but no activity toward crystalline cellulose. The only reported success of hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose by cellulosomal subunits is by Wu et al. who isolated two protein fractions labeled SL and SS which when combined exhibit a low (about 1% of the original cellulosome) activity toward crystalline cellulose. The long standing goal is still to determine the activities of the individual subunits, to characterize them, to find out how they are associated in the cellulosome, and to establish the minimum number of subunits needed for efficient hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. This report also presents the results of experiments on cellulose hydrolysis in aerobic fungi, as well as other anaerobic bacteria.

Ljungdahl, L.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Design and construction of an energy intergrated farm system in Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy-integrated, environmental-compliance farm system was designed and constructed on a dairy farm in Puerto Rico. Electrical power is produced by a motor-generator fueled by biogas obtained from the anaerobic fermentation of cow manure. This well-managed system complies with both the letter and the spirit of local environmental laws.

Sasscer, D.S.; Morgan, T.O.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Production and sale of energy and nutrients from a multi-farm digester  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investor-owned anaerobic digestion system was designed to process the wastes from several dairy farms totalling 900 cows. The resulting biogas will fuel a 97 KW engine-generator producing both electricity for sale to the utility, and waste heat for digester heating and supplemental greenhouse heating. The digested solids and liquids will be marketed as nursery soil and fertilizer, respectively.

Williams, D.W.; Howard, K.; Orrett, E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Anaerobic processing of low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (i) continuation of microbial consortia maintenance and completion of coal decarboxylation using batch reactor system, (ii) decarboxylation of model polymer, (iii) characterization of biotreated coals, and (iv) microautoclave liquefaction of the botreated coal. Progress is reported on the thermogravimetric analysis of coal biotreated in the absence of methanogens and under 5% hydrogen gas exhibits increased volatile carbon to fixed carbon ratio; that the microbial consortia developed on coal are being adapted to two different model polymers containing free carboxylic groups to examine decarboxylation ability of consortium; completion of experiments to decarboxylate two model polymers, polyacrylic acid and polymethyl methacrylate, have been completed; that the biotreated coal showed increase in THF-solubles.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Anaerobic bioprocessing of low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (1) continuation of microbial consortia development and maintenance, (2) crude enzyme study using best decarboxylating organisms, (3) decarboxylation of lignite, demineralized Wyodak coal and model polymers, and (4) characterization of biotreated coals.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Anaerobic microbial remobilization of coprecipitated metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for solubilizing coprecipitated metals. Metals in waste streams are concentrated by treatment with an iron oxide coprecipitating agent. The coprecipitated metals are solubilized by contacting the coprecipitate with a bacterial culture of a Clostridium species ATCC 53464. The remobilized metals can then be recovered and recycled. 4 figs.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

344

UNCORRECTEDPROOF Assessment of anaerobic benzene degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Ulrich and Edwards, 2003), and a dry cell weight (dcw) of 1.33 ÂĄ 10-13 g cell-1 (Bratbak, 1985) [i.e. X = (Y ÂĄ DS/dcw)]. DNA samples extracted from this consortium at time 0 (no benzene present) and 51 days and Edwards, 2003), dcw = 1. 33 ÂĄ 10-13 g cell-1 (Bratbak, 1985), and a soil bulk density (rb) of 1.6 kg l-1

Alvarez, Pedro J.

345

Quantitative Analyses of Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-generation biodiesel, ethanol, or biogas to the transport sector to be blended with fossil fuels. Still under

Timmer, Jens

346

Anaerobic treatment in decentralised and source ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and biogas production provide good biomass- wastewater contact. Reductions of total COD from sewage up to 80–90% are reported. At tem- peratures above ...

347

Renewable Combined Heat and Power Dairy Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horsepower Guascor model SFGLD-560 biogas-fired lean burn internal combustion (IC) engine and generator set and modify the existing biogas toelectricity combined heat and power (CHP) system operated at Fiscalini bacteria to remove hydrogen sulfide presented in the biogas. Source: Fiscalini Farms Term: March 2011

348

Flow meters tested on dairy lagoon water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for suspended particles. quire 110-volt power. However, theyof electromag- both also have 12-volt battery-powered neticmagmeter con- models, and a 12-volt tube magmeter is sists

Schwankl, Larry; Eagle, Alison; Frate, Carol; Nydam, Ben

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Dee Harley: Harley Farms Goat Dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can see how we use our own compost that we make from goathave our own Harley Farms compost, which we have all aroundat the soil that’s all our goat compost, and we’re about to—

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Dee Harley: Harley Farms Goat Dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is. Rabkin: Do you have interns or apprentices? Harley: Wecalls for interns and apprentices weekly, e-mails as well.

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Dee Harley: Harley Farms Goat Dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

going. And [then] Larry and Sandy Jacobs just kind of leftto language school. Larry and Sandy sent me there to learn

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

EA-1832: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1832: Final Environmental Assessment Rainier Biogas LLC Community Anaerobic Manure Digester, Enumclaw, Washington This project is located in a rural area serving rural residents. It is a proposal to construct a farm based anaerobic digester for processing dairy manure and the production of electrical power in King County. Rainier Biogas LLC plans to install an anaerobic manure digester, a concrete receiving pit, a mechanical building with an attached fiber storage area. USDA Amended Class 1 Envionmental Assessment Attachment Environmental Assessment Adopted by DOE as the Final Environmental Assessment for Rainier Biogas LLC Community Anaerobic Manure Digester, Enumclaw, Washington, DOE/EA-1832 (September 2010) More Documents & Publications

353

On-farm biogas systems information dissemination project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to study how farmers manage anaerobic digesters on three New York State dairy farms. Two years of data collected were from both plug-flow and tower-type mixed-flow digesters at regular intervals over a three-year period revealed that the financial return from the energy produced by a biogass system in the late 1980`s is marginal. Little difficulty was experienced in operation of the anaerobic digester; however, several farms utilizing congeneration to convert biogas into electricity and heat suffered from not applying maintenance to the congenerator in a timely fashion.

Campbell, J.K.; Koelsch, R.K.; Guest, R.W.; Fabian, E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Technical Resource for Dairy Manufacturers Dairy PipelineVolume 25 Number 2, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Having that capability to work together to innovate and having that public-private partnership is essential to getting

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

355

CX-007434: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007434: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program- American Recovery and Reinvestment Act · Washington State University Anaerobic Digester - Nutrient Recovery Technology - Vander Haak Dairy CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B3.9 Date: 12/07/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office DOE is proposing to provide $227,687 in State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to the Washington Department of Commerce, subrecipient Washington State University (WSU), to fund the installation of an integrated nutrient recovery system, a Class A fiber production process and an H2S scrubbing system, which works in series with dairy manure anaerobic digesters (AD). WSU proposed to install the

356

CX-006826: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006826: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Washington State University Anaerobic Digester - Nutrient Recovery Technology CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.7, B5.1 Date: 09/23/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Department of Energy is proposing to provide $272,313 in State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding to the Washington Department of Commerce, sub-recipient Washington State University (WSU), to install and operate an integrated nutrient recovery system, a Class A fiber production process and a hydrogen sulfide scrubbing system, which works in series with dairy manure anaerobic digesters, at two dairies in Washington

357

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of New York through the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has developed a suite of digester projects throughout the state to assess the potential for anaerobic digestion systems to improve manure management and concurrently produce energy through the production of heat and electrical power using the biogas produced from the digesters. Dairies comprise a significant part of the agribusiness and economy of the state of New York. Improving the energy efficiency and environmental footprint of dairies is a goal of NYSERDA. SUNY Morrisville State College (MSC) is part of a collection of state universities, dairy farms, cooperatives, and municipalities examining anaerobic digestion systems to achieve the goals of NYSERDA, the improvement of manure management, and reducing emissions to local dairy animal sites. The process for siting a digester system at the MSC’s free-stall Dairy Complex was initiated in 2002. The project involved the construction of an anaerobic digester that can accommodate the organic waste generated at Dairy complex located about a mile southeast of the main campus. Support for the project was provided through funding from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. The DOE contribution to the project provided additional resources to construct an expanded facility to handle waste generated from the existing free-stall dairy and the newly-constructed barns. Construction on the project was completed in 2006 and the production of biogas started soon after the tanks were filled with the effluent generated at the Dairy Complex. The system has been in operation since December 17, 2006. The generated biogas was consistently flared starting from December 20, 2006, and until the operation of the internal combustion engine/generator set were first tested on the 9th of January, 2007. Flaring the biogas continued until the interconnect with the power grid was approved by NYSEG (the electrical power provider) and the combined heat and power generation (CHP) system was authorized to start on February 27, 2007. The system has been in operation since February 28, 2007, and is generating 45 to 50 kW of electrical power on continuous basis. The completed project will ultimately allow for investigating the facility of utilizing organic waste from a dairy operation in a hard-top plug-flow methane digester with the ultimate goal of reducing environmental risk, increasing economic benefits, and demonstrating the viability of an anaerobic methane digestion system. Many benefits are expected as a result of the completed project including our better understanding of the anaerobic digestion process and its management as well as the facility to utilize the methane digester as a demonstration site for dairy producers, farmers, and organic waste producers in New York State and the Northeast. Additional benefits include helping current and future students in dairy science and technology, agricultural business, environmental sciences, agricultural engineering, and other disciplines develop better understanding of underutilized biomass alternative energy technologies, environmental conservation, environmental stewardship, and sustainable agriculture.

Shayya, Walid

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Financing Renewable Energy - No Pain, No Gain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

newresourcebank.com newresourcebank.com Financing Renewable Energy "No Pain, No Gain" New Resource Bank: A Radical Idea Our mission is to promote sustainable living in our community with everything we do. Where Does Your Money Spend The Night? 9/4/2012 2 Renewable Energy Projects Anaerobic Manure Digester This anaerobic manure digester improves manure management and sustainability for partner dairies while generating renewable electricity for sale to a local public utility. Anaerobic digestion is a natural process that converts a portion of the organic carbon in manure (and other waste streams) into methane and carbon dioxide. o Production of renewable energy (Biogas) o Carbon offsets o Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions o Potential pathogen reduction in manure

359

AMENDED  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

x x 1 AMENDED CLASS 1 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ATTACHMENT SEPTEMBER 1, 2010 RAINIER BIOGAS LLC COMMUNITY ANAEROBIC MANURE DIGESTER 2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION Applicant's Name: Rainier Biogas LLC 20206 436 th St. Enumclaw, WA 98022 Project Title, Size, or Capacity: Anaerobic Digester to be located in Enumclaw, WA. Project Number/Case Number: 125029042 Location: The Rainier Biogas LLC site will be situated on property located at 43218 208 th Ave. SE, Enumclaw, WA 98022 Legal Description: Located on a tract of land identified as parcel ID 202006-9001 Project Description: This project is located in a rural area serving rural residents. It is a proposal to construct a farm based anaerobic digester for processing dairy manure

360

User manual for geothermal energy assisted dairy complex computer programs: PREBLD, MODEL0, MODEL1, MODEL2, FRMAT2, PREPI2, NET2, DAIRY and DAIRY1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operation of the programs on a computer is described. The programs are divided into two parts: the simulation of the buildings and the simulation of the pipe network. (MHR)

Not Available

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

27 17. Anaerobic Digestion -29 18. Anaerobic Digestion - Municipal31 19. Anaerobic Digestion - Industrial

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Division of Oil, Gas, and Shale Technology of the U.S.Shale Retort Water by Electron Impact and Chemical Ioniz on from A Combined Gas

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Anaerobic filters: an energy plus for wastewater treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstracts are prepared for 12 papers presented at the seminar/workshop. One had previously appeared in the appropriate DOE data bases. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic energy conversion system being considered in thisEnergy Fixation and Conversion with Algal Bacterial Systems/energy producer based on current methane prices. bility of a kelp to methane conversion system

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

condensate, on the other hand, exits from the retort as steam andSteam stripping of Geokinetics retort water (initial NH3 = 3,000 mg/1) removed 90 percent of the ammonia with recycle of condensate

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check back for updates regarding future solicitations.

367

Marine biomass system: anaerobic digestion and production of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two approaches to kelp conversion to methane are described. First, a large (10.56 mi/sup 2/) oceanic farm using an artificial substrate and an upwelling system to deliver nutrient-rich deep ocean water to the kelp bed is described. This system can yield as much as 50 tons of kelp (dry ash free - DAF) per acre-year. Kelp are harvested by a specially designed 30,000 DWT ship and delivered to an onshore processing plant as a ground kelp slurry. The second system involves the use of a natrual coastal kelp bed. Growth rates in this bed are stimulated by a nutrient rich sewer outfall. A conceptual model is presented for calculation of the growth rate of kelp in this natural bed which can reach 15 tons (DAF) per acre-year. The harvest activity and processing plant are similar to those for oceanic farm system. In the next section of this report, the overall concept of kelp production and conversion to methane is discussed. In Section III the general design of the ocean farm system is presented and discussed while Section IV contains a similar description for the natural bed system. Section V presents the capital requirements and operational labor, resources and material requirements. Section VI describes the environmental residuals created by the operation of either system and, to the extent possible, quantifies the rate at which these residuals are generated. In addition to the technical data reported herein, cost data have been generated for the various processes and components utilized in each solar technology. The requirements for costing information basically arise from the need to compute parameters such as investment demands, employment patterns, material demands and residual levels associated with each technology for each of several national and regional scenarios.

Haven, K.F.; Henriquez, M.; Ritschard, R.L.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Biomass Program Perspectives on Anaerobic Digestion and Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organic Recycling and Renewable Energy Facility And Recycles the Organics Quality Compost Effluent Liquid Fertilizer Landfill Daily Cover Retail Products Bio- remediation And...

369

Kinetic analysis of anaerobic fermentation of dry beef cattle manure  

SciTech Connect

Influent total solids levels of 10, 20, 30 and 40% were tested for biogas production at 35/sup 0/C and C/N ratios of 11 and 25. Organic loading rates ranging from 5.0 to 10.6 kg VS m/sup -3/ d/sup -1/ were used and the Contois kinetic model was used to evaluate the data.

Schult, D.D.; Luis, V.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow from an on-site steam turbine to raise the kelp to 45°Ca 1200 Kw electric steam turbine/generator system. CapitalFinally, the waste steam stream from the turbine is used to

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Parameters Marine Biomass Production Sea Farmof Various Types of Biomass . Biomethanation Parameters.Proceedings, Fuels from Biomass Symposium. University of

Haven, Kendall F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater Genera ted in Shale Oil Development 9 BattelleControl Technology for Shale Oil Wastewaters 9 11 inPhyllis Fox INTRODUCTION Oil shale retorting produces from

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phyllis Fox INTRODUCTION Oil shale retorting produces fromWaste Water from Oil Shale Processing" ACS Division of FuelEvaluates Treatments for Oil-Shale Retort Water," Industrial

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Community-Scale Anaerobic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

areas. One of the first things we did is looked at infrastructure, and that will both guide the technology type that we would consider or create opportunities there, and this...

375

Microbial Ecology of Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion. Final Report  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This grant supported research on methanogenic archaea. The two major areas that were supported were conversion of acetic acid to methane and nitrogen fixation by Methanosarcina. Among the achievements of this research were the isolation of novel methanogenic cultures, elucidation of the pathways from acetate to methane, description of a specific DNA-binding complex in nitrogen fixing methanogens, and demonstration of an alternative nitrogenase in Methanosarcina.

Zinder, Stephen H.

2000-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Kinetics of inactivation of indicator pathogens during thermophilic anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in large amounts in coal and natural gas processing, petroleum industries, biogas production, and sewage

377

IMPROVING BIOGAS PRODUCTION BY ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF DIFFERENT SUBSTRATES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Global energy demand is rapidly increasing. In contrast, fossil fuel reserves are decreasing. Today, one of the major challenge is energy supply for the… (more)

Ertem, Funda Cansu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Parameter identification in dynamical models of anaerobic waste water treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remain the implementation of biogas, moving farms and implementing regulations, they could nevertheless priority on the growth of production. Two main measures are pro- moted: the development of biogas systems, of the VAC kind, usually owning a biogas digester and located outside the village. - semi-intensive "gia trai

Timmer, Jens

379

Cost Analysis and Evaluation of Syngas Synthesis through Anaerobic Digestion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Synthetic fuel, which is generated from syngas via Fischer – Tropsch synthesis, provides the world with an alternative for conventional fossil energy resources. Generating syngas… (more)

Tong, Yun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Supporting small-scale dairy farmers in increasing milk production ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 13, 2010 ... (irrigation scheme, plant supply area, national production) while alleviating the ... The recent increase in food demand and the consequences this has for prices ..... selection and management of forage crops, design of dietary.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gas emissions from dairy cow and fattening pig buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this research is to contribute to the knowledge concerning the abatement of gas emissions from livestock production. Investigations regarding the choice of… (more)

Ngwabie, Ngwa Martin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dairy-Manure Derived Biochar Effectively Sorbs Lead and Atrazine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's personal copy Commentary Biochar--One way forward for soil carbon in offset mechanisms in Africa? Thea to the region. Soil carbon sequestration through biochar projects may offer a way forward for Africa stoves Terra preta UNFCCC REDD Biochar a b s t r a c t The Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism

Ma, Lena

383

ENERGY STAR Focus on Energy Efficiency in Dairy Processing |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to main content ENERGY STAR logo Skip directly to page content Facebook Twitter YouTube Our Blog Search Search Energy Efficient Products Energy Efficient Products ENERGY STAR...

384

Dairy Outreach Program Training and Continuing Education Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication describes the training and continuing education required for those who own or operate concentrated animal feeding operations in Texas.

Mukhtar, Saqib

1999-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Private land, public interest : small town meets big dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines a grassroots effort undertaken by local residents of the communities of Nora and Warren in northwest Illinois in their attempt to prohibit the construction of a Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation ...

Thomas, Kathryn J. (Kathryn Johnson)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Health and productivity of dairy cows fed polychlorinated biphenyls  

SciTech Connect

Holstein cows were studied through a complete lactation, a nonlactating period, and 42 days of a subsequent lactation for overt and subtle responses to a commercial mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls. Dosed cows (n = 4) received consecutive 60-day periods of daily dosing with 10, 100, and 1000 mg of Aroclor 1254. Control cows (n = 6) received daily sham doses. The following were recorded: daily milk production, feed intake, and health observations; weekly body weight, temperature, heart and respiratory rates and rectal palpation; semi-monthly clinical chemistry determinations; and monthly milk fat, microbiological culture of quarter foremilk samples, and composite milk somatic cell counts. Mean daily milk production (22.4 +/- 1.1 vs 24.8 +/- 1.0 kg) and net energy of a complete lactation (1.46 +/- 0.05 vs 1.45 +/- 0.03 Mcal/kg dry matter intake) were not different (p = 0.85) for control and PCB-dosed cows. Milk production during the first 42 days of the subsequent lactation was also similar for control and dosed cows. Occurrences of injuries, dysfunctions, and general infections were not related to polychlorinated biphenyl exposure. Intramammary infections were detected for both lactations with 51 and 32 infections detected in microbiological cultures, respectively, for the control and dosed groups. Environmental pathogens were most frequently isolated from cases of clinically apparent mastitis. The majority of quarter infections detected were due to Corynebacterium bovis. Only one animal (dosed, necropsy revealed left oviduct obstructed) failed to conceive with three to six services required before conception for the other control and dosed cows. Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls resulting in maximal residues in milk fat, near 100 micrograms/g, had no apparent effect on health and productivity.

Willett, L.B.; Liu, T.T.; Durst, H.I.; Smith, K.L.; Redman, D.R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small quantity of Greenhouse gases measured enteric nitrousSC, Pain BF. 1994. Greenhouse gas emissions from intensiveE, Brose G. 2001. Greenhouse gas emissions from animal house

Mitloehner, Frank M; Sun, Huawei; Karlik, John F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Majors Family and Santa Cruz County Dairying  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there right where the flour mill was, just in a little housethe mayor. He built the first flour mill ever built in Santamill. Calciano: Did he have great big stones to grind the flour

Regional History Project, UCSC Library; Major, Thomas; Calciano, Elizabeth Spedding

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fair Oaks Farms and AMP Americas Transform Waste into Fuel | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fair Oaks Farms and AMP Americas Transform Waste into Fuel Fair Oaks Farms and AMP Americas Transform Waste into Fuel Fair Oaks Farms and AMP Americas Transform Waste into Fuel March 7, 2013 - 9:00am Addthis Learn how an Indiana dairy fuels milk delivery trucks with compressed natural gas. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts? An anaerobic digester is helping Fair Oaks Farms and AMP Americas turn agriculture waste into renewable natural gas. The natural gas will be used to fuel the fleet of trucks that transports Fair Oaks Farms' products across the country. Trucks and cows may not seem like a natural match, but a dairy farm in Indiana has found an innovative way to combine two of its biggest resources. With the support of the Energy Department and one of the three

390

CX-004655: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

655: Categorical Exclusion Determination 655: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program ? Avatar Energy - Desert Hills Dairy # 2 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/09/2010 Location(s): Yerington, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Nevada State Office of Energy is proposing to award $2,040,662 in State Energy Program funding to Avatar Energy, LLC to install an anaerobic digester and a 75 kilowatt combined heat and power generation unit at Desert Hills, an existing dairy farm in Yerington, Nevada. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004655.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003598: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003599: Categorical Exclusion Determination

391

Methane Recovery from Animal Manures The Current Opportunities Casebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Growth and concentration of the livestock industry create opportunities for the proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. Pollutants from unmanaged livestock wastes can degrade the environment, and methane emitted from decomposing manure may contribute to global climate change. One management system not only helps prevent pollution but can also convert a manure problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially viable conversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable coproducts, including a cost-effective renewable fuel for livestock production operations. This casebook examines some of the current opportunities for recovering methane from anaerobic digestion animal manures.

Lusk, P.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Investigation of the Effect of In-Situ Catalyst on the Steam Hydrogasification of Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biopower - Logging - Anaerobic digestion - Heat - Wood,offensive odors. Anaerobic digestion is widely usedstabilization. Anaerobic digestion uses microorganisms to

FAN, XIN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of carbohydrates (anaerobic digestion) and liquefaction ofvia combustion or anaerobic digestion. The geographicmethane produced by anaerobic digestion and biodiesel

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from biomass using anaerobic digestion or fermentativegas electricity anaerobic digestion electricity hydrogenproduced from anaerobic digestion. Landfill gas electricity

Rausser, Gordon C.; Papineau, Maya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (2008). "Anaerobic Digestion." Retrieved AugustRENEWABLE / BIOMASS / ANAEROBIC DIGESTION /. CaliforniaResearch: Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion." Retrieved December

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project  

SciTech Connect

In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of waste heat and better documentation of potential of carbon credits, would also improve the economic outlook. Analysis of baseline operational conditions indicated that a reduction in methane emissions and other greenhouse gas savings resulted from implementation of the project. The project results indicate that using anaerobic digestion to produce bio-methane from agricultural biomass is a promising source of electricity, but that significant challenges need to be addressed before dairy-based biomass energy production can be fully integrated into an alternative energy economy. The biomass energy facility was found to be operating undercapacity. Economic analysis indicated a positive economic sustainability, even at the reduced power production levels demonstrated during the baseline period. However, increasing methane generation capacity (via the importation of biomass codigestate) will be critical for increasing electricity output and improving the long-term economic sustainability of the operation. Dairy-based biomass energy plants are operating under strict environmental regulations applicable to both power-production and confined animal facilities and novel approached are being applied to maintain minimal environmental impacts. The use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for nitrous oxide control and a biological hydrogen sulfide control system were tested at this facility. Results from this study suggest that biomass energy systems can be compliant with reasonable scientifically based air and water pollution control regulations. The most significant challenge for the development of biomass energy as a viable component of power production on a regional scale is likely to be the availability of energy-rich organic feedstocks. Additionally, there needs to be further development of regional expertise in digester and power plant operations. At the Fiscalini facility, power production was limited by the availability of biomass for methane generation, not the designed system capacity. During the baseline study period, feedstocks included manure, sudan grass silage, and

William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Characterization of energy usage in existing markets and26 Characterization of energy usage in existing markets andregional production and energy usage in butter, concentrated

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Characterization of energy usage in existing markets and26 Characterization of energy usage in existing markets andregional production and energy usage in butter, concentrated

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

User's Manual for BEST-Dairy: Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to compile data on energy and water usage in their own dairyof increased energy and water usage in California, makingwell as water usage. The cumulative energy and water end use

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level 4.4.3.1 National Energy Consumption per Raw-milkor final energy consumption on national or plant levels, andConsumption, or Energy Use Intensity (EUI) Greenhouse Gas Gigawatt Hours Lawrence Berkeley National

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level 4.4.3.1 National Energy Consumption per Raw-milkor final energy consumption on national or plant levels, andConsumption, or Energy Use Intensity (EUI) Greenhouse Gas Gigawatt Hours Lawrence Berkeley National

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sector typically uses thermal energy (mainly natural gas)and electricity. Thermal energy (e.g. , natural gas) is usedthat mainly uses thermal energy, representing largest

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sector typically uses thermal energy (mainly natural gas)and electricity. Thermal energy (e.g. , natural gas) is usedtypically uses thermal energy (mainly natural gas) and

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Code. Sacramento, California: California Energy Commission.California Energy Commission. 2004b. NaturalCode. Sacramento, California: California Energy Commission.

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and completed alpha- and beta-testing (field testing) of theand completed alpha- and beta-testing (field testing) of theand completed alpha- and beta-testing (field testing) of the

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and completed alpha- and beta-testing (field testing) of theand completed alpha- and beta-testing (field testing) of theand completed alpha- and beta-testing (field testing) of the

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal and natural gas fired power plants for the locations ornatural gas) because there are a lot of plants that use combined heat and power (

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal and natural gas fired power plants for the locations ornatural gas) because there are a lot of plants that use combined heat and power (

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have varying distributions in electricity and fuel use.have varying distributions in electricity and fuel use. b)have varying distributions in electricity and fuel use. b)

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have varying distributions in electricity and fuel use.have varying distributions in electricity and fuel use. b)have varying distributions in electricity and fuel use. b)

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Intensity Indicator .2009). 4.3.3 Energy Intensity Indicator Energy use inwe established an energy intensity indicator (EII) that

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool: Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use (Eq. (11), energy intensity indicator (Eq. (12), PES andEnergy Intensity Indicator .2009). 4.3.3 Energy Intensity Indicator Energy use in

Xu, Tengfang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Cultivar newsletter, Spring/Summer 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jon Kersey Anaerobic Residue Digestion Offers Promise fora trial of the anaerobic residue digestion (“tarping”)

Brown, Martha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasification and anaerobic digestion of mixed waste isgasification and anaerobic digestion). • Energy crops,

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Polices for Controlling Groundwater Pollution from Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

147, 2003. D. Simpkins. Anaerobic digestion faqs. Technicalwetland treatment, or anaerobic digestion [Morse et al. ,

Wang, Jingjing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Very Fine Aerosols from the World Trade Center Collapse Piles: Anaerobic Incineration  

SciTech Connect

By September 14, three days after the initial World Trade Center collapse, efforts at fire suppression and heavy rainfall had extinguished the immediate surface fires. From then until roughly mid-December, the collapse piles continuously emitted an acrid smoke and fume in the smoldering phase of the event. Knowledge of the sources, nature, and concentration of these aerosols is important for evaluation and alleviation of the health effects on workers and nearby residents. In this paper, we build on our earlier work to ascribe these aerosols to similar processes that occur in urban incinerators. The simultaneous presence of finely powdered (circa 5 {micro}m) and highly basic (pH 11 to 12) cement dust and high levels of very fine (< 0.25 {micro}m) sulfuric acid fumes helps explain observed health impacts. The unprecedented levels of several metals in the very fine mode can be tied to liberation of those metals that are both present in elevated concentrations in the debris and have depressed volatility temperatures caused by the presence of organic materials and chlorine.

Cahill, T A; Cliff, S S; Shackelford, J; Meier, M; Dunlap, M; Perry, K D; Bench, G; Leifer, R

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

417

Anaerobic pyrite oxidation rates determined via direct volume-loss measurements: a Vertical Scanning Interferometric approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determina- tion of dissolution/precipitation kinetic rates. A VSI assessment of pyrite dissolution rates et al., 2008) with applications to oxic ARD processes. Presented here are rate data for the inorganic experiments the bulk chemical changes in the solution composition (e.g. Fe2+ /Fe3+ ) were used to determine

Benning, Liane G.

418

Microcontroller-Based Fuzzy System to Optimize the Anaerobic Digestion in Biogas Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a fuzzy-system for the optimization of the yield of biogas at biogas plants. The algorithm introduced allows the transformation of a PC supported developed fuzzy-model to a microcontroller-system. This system can be utilised as a ...

Steffen Patzwahl; Thomas Nacke; Dieter Frense; Dieter Beckmann; Klaus-Dietrich Kramer; Tobias Tautz; Gerd-Rainer Vollmer

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Computational fluid dynamics modelling of sewage sludge mixing in an anaerobic digester  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate the mechanical mixing of sewage sludge at laboratory scale is reported. The paper recommends a strategy for modelling mechanically mixed sewage sludge at laboratory ... Keywords: Biogas, CFD, Digestion, Energy, Non-Newtonian fluid, Sewage sludge, Turbulence

J. Bridgeman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics of anaerobic and aerobic yeast cultures reveals post-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improves sugar yields during the saccharification processes for bioethanol production. In their study modification. Plant J 54(4):569­581 11. Chen F, Dixon RA (2007) Lignin modification improves fermentable sugar

Shmulevich, Ilya

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Research Article Simultaneous Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Anaerobic Fermentation with Immobilized Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The effects of organic loading rates (OLRs) on fermentative productions of hydrogen and ethanol were investigated in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with attached sludge using molasses as substrate. The CSTR reactor with attached sludge was operated under different OLRs, ranging from 8 to 24 kg/m 3 ·d. The H2 and ethanol production rate essentially increased with increasing OLR. The highest H2 production rate (10.74 mmol/h·L) and ethanol production rate (11.72 mmol/h·L) were obtained both operating at OLR = 24 kg/m 3 ·d. Linear regression results show that ethanol production rate (y) and H2 production rate (x) were proportionately correlated and can be expressed as y = 1.5365x ? 5.054 (r 2 = 0.9751). The best energy generation rate was 19.08 kJ/h·L, which occurred at OLR = 24 kg/m 3 ·d. In addition, the hydrogen yield was affected by the presence of ethanol and acetic acid in the liquid phase, and the maximum hydrogen production rate occurred while the ratio of ethanol to acetic acid was close to 1. 1.

Wei Han; Zhanqing Wang; Hong Chen; Xin Yao; Yongfeng Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Utilization of alkylbenzenes during anaerobic growth of pure cultures of denitrifying bacteria on crude oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These include: Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new articles cite this article), more» Downloaded from

R Rabus; F Widdel; Ralf Rabus; Friedrich Widdel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)  

SciTech Connect

Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Anaerobic fermentation of rice straw and chicken manure to carboxylic acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, 80% lime-treated rice straw and 20% lime-treated chicken manure were used as substrates in rotary fermentors. Countercurrent fermentation was performed at various volatile solid loading rates (VSLR) and liquid residence times (LRT). The highest acid productivity of 1.69 g/(L�·d) was at a total acid concentration of 32.4 g/L. The highest conversion and yield were 0.692 g VS digested/g VS fed and 0.29 g total acids/g VS fed, respectively. The continuum particle distribution model (CPDM) was used to predict product concentrations at various VSLR and LRT. CPDM predicted the experimental total acid concentration and conversion at an average error of 6.41% and 6.55%, respectively. A fixed-bed fermentation system was designed to perform pretreatment and fermentation in the same unit. High product concentrations (~48 g/L) as well as high conversions (0.741 g VS digested/g VS fed, F4, Train B) were obtained from the same fermentor. CPDM was extended to predict product concentrations in the fixed-bed fermentation system. The model gave a good estimate of the product concentrations and retention time. After biomass fermentation, the residue can be combusted to generate heat. For pretreatment purposes, the use of ash can replace lime. A study was performed using ash as a potential pretreatment agent. Ash from raw poplar wood was effective in pretreating poplar wood; however, ash from bagasse fermentation residues was not useful in pretreating bagasse. Previous modeling studies indicate that a conversion of 95% could be achieved with bagasse using countercurrent fermentation. Because lignin constitutes 13% of the dry weight of bagasse, this means lignin would have to be digested to obtain a conversion of 95%. Experiments on the fermentation of enzymatically liberated lignin from both poplar wood and bagasse do not show that solubilized lignin was fermented to organic acids by using a mixed culture of marine microorganisms. Two buffer systems (ammonium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate) were used to compare product concentrations of carboxylic acid fermentations using office paper and chicken manure. It has been demonstrated that the total product concentration using ammonium bicarbonate is almost double the product concentration using calcium carbonate.

Agbogbo, Frank Kwesi

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Impact and abatement of siloxanes in the Bucklin Point WWTF anaerobic digestion process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The biogas produced at the Bucklin Point Wastewater Treatment Facility contained a high concentration of siloxane compounds. A manufacturer of personal care products was… (more)

Wenskowicz, Barry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The Potential of Anaerobic Digestion Technology to Treat Coffee Waste in Huatusco, Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research proposes a system that uses the waste generated by coffee processing to generate biogas and fertilizer, called AD-Coffee Waste System (AD-CWS). The biogas… (more)

Bombardiere, Ysabel Estrada

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Trichloroethene Removal From Waste Gases in Anaerobic Biotrickling Filters Through Reductive Dechlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using biofiltration to treat biogas prior to use to removeand fed with simulated biogas. Sucrose was used as the

Popat, Sudeep Chandrakant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Anaerobic processing of low-rank coals. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (i) continuation of microbial consortia maintenance and completion of coal decarboxylation using batch reactor system, (ii) decarboxylation of model polymer, (iii) characterization of biotreated coals, and (iv) microautoclave liquefaction of the botreated coal. Progress is reported on the thermogravimetric analysis of coal biotreated in the absence of methanogens and under 5% hydrogen gas exhibits increased volatile carbon to fixed carbon ratio; that the microbial consortia developed on coal are being adapted to two different model polymers containing free carboxylic groups to examine decarboxylation ability of consortium; completion of experiments to decarboxylate two model polymers, polyacrylic acid and polymethyl methacrylate, have been completed; that the biotreated coal showed increase in THF-solubles.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Anaerobic O-demethylation of phenylmethylethers. [und Acetobacterium woodii :a3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assay of O-demethylation in cell-free extracts of Acetobacterium woodii: we have shown that THF and ATP are necessary for enzyme activity and thus are probably reactants; apparent Km values were 0.65 mM for the methoxylated substrate, 0.27 mM for ATP, and 0.17 mM for DL-THF. The enzyme activity is present in the cytosol, rather than being membrane bound, and is sensitive to oxygen. There is evidence to suggest that the enzyme system involves more than one protein component. Studies using suspensions of whole cells, suggest that there are several inducible AOD systems with distinguishable substrate specificities in A. woodii. A similar phenomenon has previously been suggested for the related acetogen, Eubacterium limosum. We have developed a system for obtaining mutants that are deficient in O-demethylation (AOD{sup {minus}}) in E. limosum, by using transposon mutagenesis with Tn916. In an ancillary study, A. woodii and E. limosum, were compared with respect to their capacity to O-demethylate guaiacol and chloroguaiacols. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Frazer, A.C.; Young, L.Y.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TIlE ACIDS 5000 >- Ol 3c . EFFLUENT VOLATILE x E COD o w:c ACIDS & COD =U 600 .. on 3000 «z U« ~::'E WW ~O Uu0 lb BOD 5 /1000 ft 3 . The COD in the influent was redu ced

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Environmental Microbiology (2001) 3(4), 281287 Anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds coupled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of about 50 meters below the Baltic seabed outside the harbor. The sea depth over the site is approximately

Lovley, Derek

432

REFUSE CONVERSION TO METHANE (RefCOM) : A Proof-of-Concept Anaerobic Digestion Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and SNG for electricity generation. Environmental Science and Technology 6290­6296. Jones, C., Kammen, D

Columbia University

433

REFUSE CONVERSION TO METHANE (RefCOM): A Proof-of-Concept Anaerobic Digestion Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a commercial plant can operate at a net energy gain. REFERENCES [11 Ghosh, S. and Klass, D. L., "SNG From

Columbia University

434

Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane contributes 20% annually to increases in global warming, and is explosive at concentrations of 5-15% in air. Landfills contribute 15% to total methane emissions. This study was conducted to determine the potential decrease in methane production from landfills if organic waste is composted prior to. The quantities and rates of methane production were measured from simulated landfill cells containing composted and raw simulated refuse. The refuse was composted in an open pile and characterized by temperature, pH, ash content and C02 evolved during aerobic respiration. Assuming a 1 0% lignin content, the labile carbon fraction was reduced by an estimated 71 % during composting. Over a of six month period, simulated landfill cells filled with raw waste generated 66 M3 methane per Mg of dry refuse, while cells containing compost produced 31 M3 methane per Mg of dry compost. Per unit weight of dry raw material, composted waste placed in a landfill produced only 23% of the methane that was generated from raw refuse.

West, Margrit Evelyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Abstract Anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite to N2 (anammox) is a recently discovered microbial reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaporator Membrane evaporation is a membrane contactor process through which an aqueous solution may contactor, by providing a contact with an air stream, which collects the evaporating water through membrane concentration was found to predict the TRS reduction with high accuracy. Ultra-centrifuge was used to separate

Alvarez, Pedro J.

436

Low dimensional model of heart rhythm dynamics as a tool for diagnosing the anaerobic threshold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report preliminary results on describing the dependence of the heart rhythm variability on the stress level by using qualitative

O. L. Anosov; O. Ya. Butkovskii; J. Kadtke; Yu. A. Kravtsov; V. Protopopescu

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water co produced with shale oil and decanted from it isWater from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERCOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Alternative energy systems for Puerto Rico : analysis and comparison of anaerobic waste digestion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy prices in Puerto Rico are increasing constantly, making evident the need for alternative energy sources. Several methods to produce power have been developed as… (more)

Cuevas, Emil A. (Emil André Cuevas Meléndez)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Kinetics of Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of 6-line ferrihydrite under anaerobic flow conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). A wavelength of 0.7293 (Both beamlines at ALS and SSRL are equipped with areaEETD of LBNL and Sam Webb at SSRL for their help on TEM and

Yang, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC ReportOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Anaerobic methane oxidation in metalliferous hydrothermal sediments: influence on carbon flux and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biology, 2 Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 3 School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 01238, USA. 4 Department of Marine Sciences, University mesophilic to thermophilic AOM in hydro- thermal sediments recovered from the Middle Valley vent field

Girguis, Peter R.

443

Alternative energy systems for Puerto Rico : analysis and comparison of anaerobic waste digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy prices in Puerto Rico are increasing constantly, making evident the need for alternative energy sources. Several methods to produce power have been developed as alternatives to burning petroleum, such as solar energy ...

Cuevas, Emil A. (Emil André Cuevas Meléndez)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Trichloroethene Removal From Waste Gases in Anaerobic Biotrickling Filters Through Reductive Dechlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NJ) was continuously added to the sump at the flow rate ofNJ) was continuously added to the sump at the flow rate of

Popat, Sudeep Chandrakant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Feasibility study for anaerobic digestion of agricultural crop residues. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides cost estimates for the pretreatment/digestion of crop residues to fuel gas. Agricultural statistics indicate that the crop residues wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw are available in sufficient quantity to provide meaningful supplies of gas. Engineering economic analyses were performed for digestion of sheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw for small farm, cooperative, and industrial scales. The results of the analyses indicate that the production of fuel gas from these residues is, at best, economically marginal, unless a credit can be obtained for digester effluent. The use of pretreatment can double the fuel gas output but will not be economically justifiable unless low chemical requirements or low-cost chemicals can be utilized. Use of low-cost hole-in-the-ground batch digestion results in improved economics for the small farm size digestion system, but not for the cooperative and industrial size systems. Recommendations arising from this study are continued development of autohydrolysis and chemical pretreatment of agricultural crop residues to improve fuel gas yields in an economically feasible manner; development of a low-cost controlled landfill batch digestion process for small farm applications; and determination of crop residue digestion by-product values for fertilizer and refeed.

Ashare, E.; Buivid, M. G.; Wilson, E. H.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Feasibility study for anaerobic digestion of agricultural crop residues. Dynatech report No. 1935  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide cost estimates for the pretreatment/digestion of crop residues to fuel gas. A review of agricultural statistics indicated that the crop residues wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw are available in sufficient quantity to provide meaningful supplies of gas. Engineering economic analyses were performed for digestion of wheat straw, corn stover, and rice straw for small farm-, cooperative-, and industrial scales. The small farm scale processed the residue from an average size US farm (400 acres), and the other sizes were two and three orders of magnitude greater. The results of the analyses indicate that the production of fuel gas from these residues is, at best, economically marginal, unless a credit can be obtained for digester effluent. The use of pretreatment can double the fuel gas output but will not be economically justifiable unless low chemical requirements or low cost chemicals can be utilized. Additional development is necessary in this area. Use of low cost hole-in-the-ground batch digestion results in improved economics for the small farm size digestion system, but not for the cooperative and industrial size systems. Recommendations arising from this study are continued development of autohydrolysis and chemical pretreatment of agricultural crop residues to improve fuel gas yields in an economically feasible manner; development of a low cost controlled landfill batch digestion process for small farm applications; and determination of crop residue digestion by-product values for fertilizer and refeed.

Ashare, E.; Buivid, M. G.; Wilson, E. H.

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

The impact of trade liberalisation policies in China for the dairy and meat sectors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Throughout history China remained largely isolated from the rest of the world by closely restricting foreign activities. In the past twenty years, however, its rapid… (more)

Rasin, Shanika

448

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load factor, running time, local energy costs, and availablecosts, reduced processing time, and increased resource and energycosts and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering (2005). Industrial Refrigeration Best PracticesEngineering (2007). Industrial Refrigeration Best Practicesdatabase/. Industrial Refrigeration Consortium (IRC) (

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whey permeate to feed biogas reactor Emerging Technologies (Using whey permeate to feed biogas reactor to generate fuel.wastewater and fed into a biogas reactor. In the reactor,

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency (D-CREE) (2009). Case Study - Solar ThermalSolar thermal water preheating Backpressure turbines Table 5.4 Summary of efficiency

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam recovery. When a steam trap purges condensate from ainsulation Condensate return Blow down steam recovery Steamsteam is added to the system to make up the condensate

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a single-stage 145 ton absorption chiller that runs entirelybeing cooled by the absorption chiller is approximately

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. AmericanSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. AmericanCanada, Office of Energy Efficiency, Ottawa, Ontario. Carbon

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agency and Department of Energy (U.S. EPA/DOE) (2001). CaseAgency and Department of Energy (U.S. EPA/DOE) (2003). Bestas a whole used energy (U.S. DOE 2006b). For insight into an

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formed during compression of water vapors (Maroulis andcompression limitations and the high costs of evaporation under vacuum, vapor

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tower bleed-off Wastewater treatment High pressure low volume spraysSpray drying involves atomizing the liquid and spraying it into a tower

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA) (2004). ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual. Office ofThe U.S. EPA’s ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual (U.S. EPAthe U.S. EPA’s ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual (U.S. EPA

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cave aging with ground source heat pumps for cheese aging.along with a ground source heat pump to keep the cheese

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration: Introducing Energy Saving Opportunities forManufacturing Produces Energy-Saving Opportunities. http://Demonstration of Energy Savings of Cool Roofs. Lawrence

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dyk dairy anaerobic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Manure Management: Dairy: Industry Profiles and Marketing Tool for the State of New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal agriculture is a crucial component of the food and fiber system in the State of New York and in the United States in general. Animal agriculture also produces a significant amount of by-product in the form of manure or animal residuals. These animal residuals, which are a valuable resource containing essential plant nutrients, have the potential to replace a substantial amount of the chemical fertilizers used in the United States. Other beneficial uses of manure are as soil amendment for improving...

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy costs by implementing energy efficiency measures can2005a). Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost SavingL ABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proteins and byproducts Canola meal 50 to 75 25 to 50 Wheatn = 33. cottonseed and canola meal (table 1). Between 50%

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

panels Tri-generation Solar thermal water preheating Backpressure turbines Table 5.4 Summary of efficiency

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization: Steam Turbines. Arlington, Virginia.scale CHP systems use steam turbines. Switching to naturalsystem efficiency of a steam turbine-based CHP system (80%

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z