National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for dwellings ho tels

  1. Tel Aviv University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aviv University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tel Aviv University Place: Tel Aviv, Israel Zip: 69978 Sector: Solar Product: R&D of solar energy, fuel cells and new materials...

  2. C/O HELP PLLC, 750 SEVENTEETH STREET N.W. SUITE 900 Washington, D.C. 20006 Tel. Tel. Tel. Tel. 202-378-2300

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C/O HELP PLLC, 750 SEVENTEETH STREET N.W. SUITE 900 Washington, D.C. 20006 Tel. Tel. Tel. Tel. 202-378-2300 February 27, 2012 Submitted via email to: Brian.Mills@hq.doe.gov Mr. Brian Mills Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities, RIN 1901-AB18 Dear Mr. Mills: On behalf of WIRES (www.wiresgroup.com) I am pleased to submit

  3. Three-body dwell time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, N. G.

    2010-06-15

    The lifetime of an unstable state or resonance formed as an intermediate state in two-body scattering is known to be related to the dwell time or the time spent within a given region of space by the two interacting particles. This concept is extended to the case of three-body systems and a relation connecting the three-body dwell time with the two-body dwell times of the substructures of the three-body system is derived for the case of separable wave functions. The Kapur-Peierls formalism is revisited to discover one of the first definitions of dwell time in the literature. An extension of the Kapur-Peierls formalism to the three-body case shows that the lifetime of a three-body resonance can indeed be given by the three-body dwell time.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - 130424_Sandia_TEL_V3_1_compressed.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TEL Confidential J. Sutterlueti / TEL Solar AG / Sandia PV Systems Symposium, Santa Clara, CA / May 2 nd , 2013 CONFIDENTIAL CONFIDENTIAL Understanding PV performance based on real world data PV Systems Symposium, Sandia National Labs, May 2 nd , 2013 Juergen Sutterlueti, PV Systems Group TEL Solar AG, Switzerland 2 TEL Confidential J. Sutterlueti / TEL Solar AG / Sandia PV Systems Symposium, Santa Clara, CA / May 2 nd , 2013 CONFIDENTIAL PV Performance Which factors determine real world energy

  5. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Zero Floorplans: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell...

  6. A solid state Marx generator for TEL2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The solid-state Marx generator modulates the anode of the electron gun to produce the electron beam pulses in the second Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL2). It is capable of driving the 60 pF terminal with 600 ns pulses of up to 6 kV with a p.r.r. of 50 kHz. The rise and fall times are 150 ns. Stangenes Industries developed the unit and is working on a second version which will go to higher voltage and have the ability to vary its output in 396 ns intervals over a 5 {micro}s pulse.

  7. Tel2 structure and function in the Hsp90-dependent maturation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantitative immunoblotting showed that the abundance of Tel2 is low compared with the ... Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 2010 Research Org: Advanced Photon Source (APS), ...

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: ...

  9. YoungHo Shin | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of YoungHo Shin YoungHo Shin Principal Process Development Engineer Telephone (630) 252-4861 E-mail yshin@anl.gov

  10. Improving Building Envelope and Duct Airtightness of US Dwellings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Improving Building Envelope and Duct Airtightness of US Dwellings - the Current State of Energy Retrofits Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improving Building Envelope and...

  11. Ming-Yang Ho | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ming-Yang Ho Ming-Yang Ho Ming-Yang Ho Graduate Student E-mail: mxh504@psu.edu Website: Pennsylvania State University Graduate Students...

  12. Tel: Name: ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul 578-9351 137 Kizilkaya, Orhan 578-0325 158 Kleinpeter, David 578-9344 103 Kurtz, Richard L. 772-4029 105 Launey, Daren 578-9945 135 Malveaux, Shaloma 578-9343 136 Maten,...

  13. S3TEC Seminar - Dr. Cliff Ho, Sandia National Laboratories |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Cliff Ho, Sandia National Laboratories Seminar Wednesday Mar 2, 2016 12:00pm Location: 1-150 Speaker: Cliff Ho S3TEC welcomes Dr. Cliff Ho

  14. THE GEMINI NICI PLANET-FINDING CAMPAIGN: DISCOVERY OF A CLOSE SUBSTELLAR COMPANION TO THE YOUNG DEBRIS DISK STAR PZ Tel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biller, Beth A.; Liu, Michael C.; Wahhaj, Zahed; Dupuy, Trent J.; Ftaclas, Christ; Nielsen, Eric L.; Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared; Skemer, Andrew; Hayward, Thomas L.; Hartung, Markus; Chun, Mark; Clarke, Fraser; Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Reid, I. Neill; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; Artymowicz, Pawel

    2010-09-01

    We report the discovery of a tight substellar companion to the young solar analog PZ Tel, a member of the {beta} Pic moving group observed with high-contrast adaptive optics imaging as part of the Gemini Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager Planet-Finding Campaign. The companion was detected at a projected separation of 16.4 {+-} 1.0 AU (0.''33 {+-} 0.''01) in 2009 April. Second-epoch observations in 2010 May demonstrate that the companion is physically associated and shows significant orbital motion. Monte Carlo modeling constrains the orbit of PZ Tel B to eccentricities >0.6. The near-IR colors of PZ Tel B indicate a spectral type of M7 {+-} 2 and thus this object will be a new benchmark companion for studies of ultracool, low-gravity photospheres. Adopting an age of 12{sup +8} {sub -4} Myr for the system, we estimate a mass of 36 {+-} 6 M {sub Jup} based on the Lyon/DUSTY evolutionary models. PZ Tel B is one of the few young substellar companions directly imaged at orbital separations similar to those of giant planets in our own solar system. Additionally, the primary star PZ Tel A shows a 70 {mu}m emission excess, evidence for a significant quantity of circumstellar dust that has not been disrupted by the orbital motion of the companion.

  15. Mining User Dwell Time for Personalized Web Search Re-Ranking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Songhua; Jiang, Hao; Lau, Francis

    2011-01-01

    We propose a personalized re-ranking algorithm through mining user dwell times derived from a user's previously online reading or browsing activities. We acquire document level user dwell times via a customized web browser, from which we then infer conceptword level user dwell times in order to understand a user's personal interest. According to the estimated concept word level user dwell times, our algorithm can estimate a user's potential dwell time over a new document, based on which personalized webpage re-ranking can be carried out. We compare the rankings produced by our algorithm with rankings generated by popular commercial search engines and a recently proposed personalized ranking algorithm. The results clearly show the superiority of our method. In this paper, we propose a new personalized webpage ranking algorithmthrough mining dwell times of a user. We introduce a quantitative model to derive concept word level user dwell times from the observed document level user dwell times. Once we have inferred a user's interest over the set of concept words the user has encountered in previous readings, we can then predict the user's potential dwell time over a new document. Such predicted user dwell time allows us to carry out personalized webpage re-ranking. To explore the effectiveness of our algorithm, we measured the performance of our algorithm under two conditions - one with a relatively limited amount of user dwell time data and the other with a doubled amount. Both evaluation cases put our algorithm for generating personalized webpage rankings to satisfy a user's personal preference ahead of those by Google, Yahoo!, and Bing, as well as a recent personalized webpage ranking algorithm.

  16. DOE Tour of Zero: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development DOE Tour of Zero: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development 1 of 19 Dwell Development built this 3,140-square-foot home in Seattle, Washington, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 19 This three-story modern urban in-fill home achieved all of the certifications of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program as well as a 5-star rating from the Snohomish and King Co. Master Builders

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seattle, WA | Department of Energy Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the marine climate that got a HERS 55 without PV, or HERS 25 with PV, with 2x8 24" on center walls with R-27 dense-packed cellulose; R-20 rigid foam under

  18. Simulation of an underground solar energy storage for a dwelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourret, B.; Javelas, R. )

    1991-01-01

    The system under study consists of an underground insulated storage beneath a slab floor of an individual dwelling. The storage is charged by solar collectors via two arrays of air ducts buried horizontally in the soil at two depths: 2 m (summer working) and 0.4 m (winter working). Energy transfer from the storage to the house is made by conduction in the soil toward the slab. This system is described by a simulation model bidimensional by slices, the approach is bidimensional in the perpendicular plane to the ducts, and the authors take several slices in the direction of the ducts. The yearly storage efficiency varies from 0.53-0.83 when the thermal insulation resistance varies from 0-5 m{sup 2} kW{sup {minus}1}. The influences of soil thermal characteristic and airflow rates are also analyzed. This system presents good performances that can be compared with those of the best active solar device for private homes in a temperature climate: direct solar heating floors.

  19. Habitability and energy performance of earth sheltered dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.; Grondzik, W.T.

    1980-12-01

    The High Plains region of the central United States has become host to an emerging dwelling concept which incorporates the use of earth shelter technologies. Traditionally, inhabitants of this region have been sensitized to the need for windstorm protection. More recently, dramatic potentials for energy savings have served as a strong secondary inducement to the exploration of earth sheltered housing as an energy alternative. Habitability and passive energy design of earth sheltered structures are key focal elements being investigated at Oklahoma State University. Habitability aspects have received little treatment elsewhere, and existing passive energy design strategies have generally not considered the passive cooling benefits of earth sheltered construction. Extended questionnaires were used to obtain earth sheltered occupant responses to both habitability and energy design aspects including measured energy usage. Preliminary analysis has been completed on about 80 (eighty) projects in the State of Oklahoma, and the study is being extended to 8 (eight) additional surrounding states. Initial results indicate that occupants are generally satisfied with such attributes as structural safety, thermal comfort, and acoustical environment; but have some reservations concerning daylighting, site design, and energy design and performance. Energy usage patterns tend to indicate that, in fact, sizeable savings are being realized by owners of current generation earth shelters. However, it is anticipated that with optimized passive systems design, the presently realized savings could be further increased by perhaps a factor of two. An appropriate design balance must be realized between passive heating and passive cooling needs.

  20. General relation between density of states and dwell times in mesoscopic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iannaccone, G. Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell'Informazione: Elettronica, Informatica e Telecomunicazioni, Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa )

    1995-02-15

    A relevant relation between the dwell time and the density of states for a three-dimensional system of arbitrary shape with an arbitrary number of incoming channels is derived. This result extends the one obtained by Gasparian and co-workers for the case of a one-dimensional symmetrical potential barrier. We believe that such a strong relation is rich in physical significance because the dwell time is the most widely accepted time measure of a particle's dynamics and the density of states in a given region is one of the most relevant properties of a system in equilibrium.

  1. CONTRACT HO, AT(JO-l)-510

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    b I,: . 1 :{ - 7 ok-4 1% This document consists ofwpages. Eo.ZSIof2Scopies, Series 4. CONTRACT HO, AT(JO-l)-510 & F-J tlt-~3fjfTd1 / i /- /-&.;c-,' -.C.~ ATOMIC EKEBGY COMXISSIOB CONTRXTQR & ADDRESS: BRUSH BEBYLLIUM CCWANX/----y. 4301 Perkins Avenue Cleveland 3, Ohio SONTRACT EylR: BIESURCH, .DEVXLOPMEWl' AND PRODUCTIOH LOCATION: Cleveland, Ohio . $538250.00 AMOUET OF INITIAL COMJlISSIO19 OBLIGATIOB: Divisfon of Dlsburaement, U. S. Treasury Department, Bew York, E. Y. (Submit

  2. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  3. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dwell Development Reclaimed Modern Seattle, WA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Dwell Development, Seattle, WA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dwell Development Seattle, WA BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you superior

  5. Theoretical rate coefficients for allyl + HO2 and allyloxy decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, C. F.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Green, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics of the allyl + HO{sub 2} bimolecular reaction, the thermal decomposition of C{sub 3}H{sub 5}OOH, and the unimolecular reactions of C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O are studied theoretically. High-level ab initio calculations of the C{sub 3}H{sub 5}OOH and C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O potential energy surfaces are coupled with RRKM master equation methods to compute the temperature- and pressure-dependence of the rate coefficients. Variable reaction coordinate transition state theory is used to characterize the barrierless transition states for the allyl + HO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O + OH reactions. The predicted rate coefficients for allyl + HO{sub 2} ? C{sub 3}H{sub 5}OOH ? products are in good agreement with experimental values. The calculations for allyl + HO{sub 2} ? C{sub 3}H{sub 6} + O{sub 2} underpredict the observed rate. The new rate coefficients suggest that the reaction of allyl + HO{sub 2} will promote chain-branching significantly more than previous models suggest.

  6. National impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in single-family and small multifamily dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Balzer, R.A.; Faby, E.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1976, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has operated one of the largest energy conservation programs in the nation -- the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. The program strives to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings occupied by low-income persons in order to reduce their energy consumption, lower their fuel bills, increase the comfort of their homes, and safeguard their health. It targets vulnerable groups including the elderly, people with disabilities, and families with children. The most recent national evaluation of the impacts of the Program was completed in 1984 based on energy consumption data for households weatherized in 1981. DOE Program regulations and operations have changed substantially since then: new funding sources, management principles, diagnostic procedures, and weatherization technologies have been incorporated. Many of these new features have been studied in isolation or at a local level; however, no recent evaluation has assessed their combined, nationwide impacts to date or their potential for the future. In 1990, DOE initiated such an evaluation. This evaluation is comprised of three ``impact`` studies (the Single-Family Study, High-Density Multifamily Study, and Fuel-Oil Study) and two ``policy`` studies. Altogether, these five studies will provide a comprehensive national assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program as it existed in the 1989 Program Year (PY 1989). This report presents the results of the first phase of the Single-Family Study. It evaluates the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the Program as it has been applied to the largest portion of its client base -- low-income households that occupy single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and small (2- to 4-unit) multifamily dwellings. It is based upon a representative national sample that covers the full range of conditions under which the program was implemented in PY 1989.

  7. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klocke, S.; Faakye, O.; Puttagunta, S.

    2014-10-01

    ​While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  8. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klocke, S.; Faakye, O.; Puttagunta, S.

    2014-10-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of Consortium for Advanced Residential Building's (CARB’s) multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Challenge Home is one of 42 homes in a micro-community of ultra-modern, energy-efficient homes built by Dwell Development on an urban gray-field site in South Seattle. Every home will achieve a 5-Star Built Green rating from the regional master builders association and meet the criteria of the Northwest ENERGY STAR program, which is more strict than the national ENERGY STAR criteria. Also, the home won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the "systems builder" category.

  10. Economic analysis of a passive solar multiple-family dwelling for upstate New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laquatra, J. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the economic feasibility of passive solar energy as applied to a multiple-family dwelling in three upstate New York cities: Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse. Specifically, two passive solar applications - a Trombe wall and a direct-gain system - for a nine-unit structure designed by Total Environmental Action, Inc. were analyzed through the use of a solar economic performance code. City-specific data, including climatological information, building construction costs, utility rates, and property taxes were used, as were various economic parameters to reflect economic conditions in general and specifically those of the solar systems' owners.

  11. Electricity storage for grid-connected household dwellings with PV panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulder, Grietus; Six, Daan; Ridder, Fjo De

    2010-07-15

    Classically electricity storage for PV panels is mostly designed for stand-alone applications. In contrast, we focus in this article on houses connected to the grid with a small-scale storage to store a part of the solar power for postponed consumption within the day or the next days. In this way the house owner becomes less dependent on the grid and does only pay for the net shortage of his energy production. Local storage solutions pave the way for many new applications like omitting over-voltage of the line and bridging periods of power-line black-out. Since 2009 using self-consumption of PV energy is publicly encouraged in Germany, which can be realised by electric storage. This paper develops methods to determine the optimal storage size for grid-connected dwellings with PV panels. From measurements in houses we were able to establish calculation rules for sizing the storage. Two situations for electricity storage are covered: - the storage system is an optimum to cover most of the electricity needs; - it is an optimum for covering the peak power need of a dwelling. After these calculation rules a second step is needed to determine the size of the real battery. The article treats the aspects that should be taken into consideration before buying a specific battery like lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries. (author)

  12. Pathway structure determination in complex stochastic networks with non-exponential dwell times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xin; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Valleriani, Angelo

    2014-05-14

    Analysis of complex networks has been widely used as a powerful tool for investigating various physical, chemical, and biological processes. To understand the emergent properties of these complex systems, one of the most basic issues is to determine the structure and topology of the underlying networks. Recently, a new theoretical approach based on first-passage analysis has been developed for investigating the relationship between structure and dynamic properties for network systems with exponential dwell time distributions. However, many real phenomena involve transitions with non-exponential waiting times. We extend the first-passage method to uncover the structure of distinct pathways in complex networks with non-exponential dwell time distributions. It is found that the analysis of early time dynamics provides explicit information on the length of the pathways associated to their dynamic properties. It reveals a universal relationship that we have condensed in one general equation, which relates the number of intermediate states on the shortest path to the early time behavior of the first-passage distributions. Our theoretical predictions are confirmed by extensive Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MSmore » to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.« less

  14. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In an attempt to create a simplified tool for predicting leakage to the outside, the CARB team analyzed blower door test results from 112 attached dwelling units in four apartment complexes to investigate the correlation between building specifications and the ratio of guarded and solo test results.

  15. Cost and energy comparison study of above- and below-ground dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapira, H.B.; Cristy, G.A.; Brite, S.E.; Yost, M.B.

    1983-08-01

    Designs of earth-sheltered (ES) homes were examined and compared with identical aboveground (AG) homes. The homes are identical except where changes were necessitated by earth-sheltering and energy conservation. The study involved design, construction costing, energy analysis, and life-cycle costing (LCC). It was concluded from this study that under present market conditions, if aboveground and earth-sheltered dwellings of equal size and quality are built on similar lots, the construction cost of the earth-sheltered structure compares poorly with that of the aboveground structure. Lowered operation and maintenance costs, including the lower fuel bills of the earth-sheltered structure, are outweighed by the current high interest rates, which cause an increase in monthly payments. 24 references.

  16. HUD rehabilation energy guidelines for one-to-four family dwellings (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The guidebook and Microsoft Excel worksheet diskette allows the user to calculate which enery consevation improvements are cost-effective when properties are rehabilitated. The information is applicable for all climates, from Florida to Alaska. The information is presented in a manner so that owners of building can better assess the needs and opportunities of a particular renovation project. They will also be able to ask better question of designers, builders, and contractors. The guidebook explains how properlly rehabilitating dwellings can increase energy efficiency and reduce costs. It discusses the issues and factors that determine how much energy a building will consume, including heat flow, air leakage, insulation, and heating and cooling systems. The guide also includes the specific HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines for Dwellings with general and location-specific recommendations for energy conservation improvements. These guidelines are followed by examples of typical energy conservation measures in different climates. Each of these examples includes a Cost Effectiveness Excel Worksheet to show the overall simple payback. This easy-to-use worksheet walks through the entire evaluation process. The user simply enters in the appropriate information, much of which is menu driven. Appendicies provide a table that shows counties nationwide by climate zone, a list of resources, a glossary, and sample surveys and worksheets to help owners with their rehabilitation projects. Regulatory Background: The guidelines used in this guidebook are the Department of Housing and Urban Development`s `Standards for Cost Effective Energy Conservation` for property rehabilitation undertaken with HUD assistance. The information that used to be included in the regulations, with respect to energy efficiency, published as 24CFR39, is now contained in these guidelines.

  17. HUD rehabilitation energy guidelines for multi-family dwellings (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The guidebook and Microsoft Excel worksheet diskette allows the user to calculate which enery consevation improvements are cost-effective when properties are rehabilitated. The information is applicable for all climates, from Florida to Alaska. The information is presented in a manner so that owners of building can better assess the needs and opportunities of a particular renovation project. They will also be able to ask better question of designers, builders, and contractors. The guidebook explains how properlly rehabilitating dwellings can increase energy efficiency and reduce costs. It discusses the issues and factors that determine how much energy a building will consume, including heat flow, air leakage, insulation, and heating and cooling systems. The guide also includes the specific HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines for Dwellings with general and location-specific recommendations for energy conservation improvements. These guidelines are followed by examples of typical energy conservation measures in different climates. Each of these examples includes a Cost Effectiveness Excel Worksheet to show the overall simple payback. This easy-to-use worksheet walks through the entire evaluation process. The user simply enters in the appropriate information, much of which is menu driven. Appendicies provide a table that shows counties nationwide by climate zone, a list of resources, a glossary, and sample surveys and worksheets to help owners with their rehabilitation projects. Regulatory Background: The guidelines used in this guidebook are the Department of Housing and Urban Development`s `Standards for Cost Effective Energy Conservation` for property rehabilitation undertaken with HUD assistance. The information that used to be included in the regulations, with respect to energy efficiency, published as 24CFR39, is now contained in these guidelines.

  18. Water exchange dynamics around H?O? and OH? ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    Proton transfer in water and other solvents is a complicated process and an active research area. Conformational changes of water hydrating a proton can have a significant influence on proton dynamics. A hydrated proton leads to H?O? that forms three hydrogen bonds with neighboring water molecules. In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H?O?. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH? and find that the corresponding time scale (~50 picoseconds [ps]) is much smaller than that for H?O? (~100 ps). Results from all the rate theories are computed and compared. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  19. Theoretical study of reactions of HO{sub 2} in low-temperature oxidation of benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Mackie, John C.

    2010-07-15

    We have generated a set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the reactions involving HO{sub 2} in the very early stages of benzene oxidation at low temperatures using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, we report the rate constants for the reactions of HO{sub 2} with benzene and phenyl. The calculated reaction rate constant for the abstraction of H-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} by HO{sub 2} is found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental values. HO{sub 2} addition to benzene is found to be more important than direct abstraction. We show that the reactions of HO{sub 2} with the phenyl radical generate the propagating radical OH in a highly exoergic reaction. The results presented herein should be useful in modeling the oxidation of aromatic compounds at low temperatures. (author)

  20. HUD rehabilitation energy guidelines for one-to-four family dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Guidebook has been prepared to help people who are involved in the rehabilitation of a single-family house (or low-rise building with up to four housing units). It helps to understand the basics of residential energy conservation, and to think positively about the potential economic benefits. The Guidebook, and the HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines are designed for all climates ranging from hot and humid Florida to the northern reaches of Alaska. Chapter 1 outlines how investments in energy conservation can be `cost-effective` and actually put money into your pocket each year. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the issues and factors that determine how much energy your building will consume. Chapter 3 of the Guidebook contains the specific HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines for One-to-Four Family Dwellings. Chapter 4 provides some examples of typical energy conservation measures in various climates. Appendix A is where you will find the climate zone for the appropriate county in your state. In the back of the book, Appendix G contains a blank copy of the One-to-Four Family Cost-Effectiveness Worksheet to copy or tear out for use on your project.

  1. Building America Case Study: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  2. Itinerant and localized magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic Ho

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kuhn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; et al

    2016-06-21

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Here, tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p → 5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p → 4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3–τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flipmore » process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f–5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.« less

  3. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MS to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.

  4. New Magnetic confirguration in paramagnetic phase of HoCo2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: New Magnetic confirguration in paramagnetic phase of HoCo2 Citation ... OSTI Identifier: 1045775 Report Number(s): IS-J 7695 Journal ID: 0021-8979 DOE Contract ...

  5. The growth of Ho:YAG single crystals by Czochralski method and investigating the formed cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasani Barbaran, J. Ghani Aragi, M. R.; Javaheri, I.; Baharvand, B.; Tabasi, M.; Layegh Ahan, R.; Jangjo, E.

    2015-12-15

    Ho:YAG single crystals were grown by Czochralski technique, and investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical methods. The crystals were cut and polished in order to observe and analyze their cores. It was found that the deviation of the cores formed in the Czochralski grown Ho:YAG single crystals are resulted from non-symmetrical status of thermal insulation around the Iridium crucible.

  6. Energy Use Savings for a Typical New Residential Dwelling Unit Based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) require a substantial improvement in energy efficiency compared to the 2006 IECC. This report averages the energy use savings for a typical new residential dwelling unit based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Results are reported by the eight climate zones in the IECC and for the national average.

  7. Simultaneous, in situ measurements of OH and HO sub 2 in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimpfle, R.M.; Wennberg, P.O.; Lapson, L.B.; Anderson, J.G. )

    1990-10-01

    Stratospheric OH and HO{sub 2} radical densities have been measured between 36 and 23 using a balloon-born, in situ instrument launched from Palestine, TX on August 25, 1989. OH is detected using the laser-induced fluorescence technique (LIF) employing a Cu-vapor-laser pumped dye laser coupled with an enclosed-flow detection chamber. HO{sub 2} is detected nearly simultaneously by adding NO to the sample flow to convert ambient HO{sub 2} to OH. Observed OH and HO{sub 2} densities ranged from 8.0 {plus minus} 2.8 {times} 10{sup 6} and 1.4 {plus minus} 0.5 {times} 10{sup 7} molec cm{sup {minus}3}, respectively, at 36 km, to 1.4 {plus minus} 0.5 {times} 10{sup 6} and 3.0 {plus minus} 1.0 {times} 10{sup 6} at 23 km, where the uncertainty is {plus minus} 1{sigma}. The HO{sub 2} density exhibits a maximum in the 34-30 km region of 1.7 {plus minus} 0.6 {times} 10{sup 7}. The data were obtained over a solar zenith angle variation of 51{degree} at 36 km to 61{degree} at 23 km. O{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O densities also were measured simultaneously with separate instruments.

  8. Crystal structures and phase transitions in Ba{sub 2}HoTaO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, Brendan J. Saines, Paul J.; Kubota, Yoshiki; Minakata, Chiharu; Hano, Hiroko; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki

    2007-11-06

    The structure of the cation-ordered double perovskite Ba{sub 2}HoTaO{sub 6} was examined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction at fine temperature intervals over the range of 90-300 K. Ba{sub 2}HoTaO{sub 6} has a cubic structure in space group Fm3-barm at room temperature. A proper ferroelastic phase transition to I4/m tetragonal symmetry occurs near approximately 260 K. Analysis of the spontaneous tetragonal strain versus temperature indicated that the phase transition is second order in nature.

  9. Magnetic ordering in Ho{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susilo, R. A. Cadogan, J. M.; Cobas, R.; Hutchison, W. D.; Campbell, S. J.; Avdeev, M.

    2015-05-07

    We have used neutron diffraction and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, complemented by magnetisation and specific heat measurements, to examine the magnetic ordering of Ho{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}C. We have established that Ho{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}C orders antiferromagnetically below T{sub N} = 16(1) K with a magnetic structure involving ordering of the Ho sublattice along the b-axis with a propagation vector k=[0 0 1/2 ]. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra collected below T{sub N} show no evidence of a magnetic splitting, demonstrating the absence of long range magnetic ordering of the Fe sublattice. A small line broadening is observed in the {sup 57}Fe spectra below T{sub N}, which is due to a transferred hyperfine field—estimated to be around 0.3 T at 10 K—from the Ho sublattice.

  10. Frustrated spin correlations in diluted spin ice Ho2-xLaxTi2O7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlers, Georg; Ehlers, G.; Mamontov, E.; Zamponi, M.; Faraone, A.; Qiu, Y.; Cornelius, A.L.; Booth, C.H.; Kam, K.C.; Le Toquin, R.; Cheetham, A.K.; Gardner, J.S.

    2008-04-30

    We have studied the evolution of the structural properties as well as the static and dynamic spin correlations of spin ice Ho2Ti2O7, where Ho was partially replaced by non-magnetic La. The crystal structure of diluted samples Ho2-xLaxTi2O7 was characterized by x-ray and neutron diffraction and by Ho L-III-edge and Ti K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements. It is found that the pyrochlore structure remains intact until about x = 0.3, but a systematic increase in local disorder with increasing La concentration is observed in the EXAFS data, especially from the Ti K edge.Quasi-elastic neutron scattering and ac susceptibility measurements show that, in x<= 0.4 samples at temperatures above macroscopic freezing, the spin -spin correlations are short ranged and dynamic in nature. The main difference with pure spin ice in the dynamics is the appearance of a second, faster, relaxation process.

  11. Yu Ho (Ric) Wen > Postdoc - Archer Group > Researchers, Postdocs &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Yu Ho (Ric) Wen Postdoc - Archer Group yw563@cornell.edu Ric completed his PhD from National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan. His current research involves rheology and structure of tethered hybrid materials and their applications to lubricants

  12. Analysis of emission spectra of Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naresh, V. Buddhudu, S.

    2014-04-24

    In the present paper, we report on the absorption and emission properties of (0.1-1.5 mol %) Ho{sup 3+} doped LFBCd (Li{sub 2}O{sub ?}LiF{sub ?}B{sub 2}O{sub 3?}CdO) glasses prepared via melt quenching method. On exciting these glasses at (?{sub exci}) = 452 nm, two emissions at 556 nm ({sup 5}S{sub 2}?{sup 5}I{sub 8}; Green), 655 nm ({sup 5}F{sub 5}?{sup 5}I{sub 8}; Red) have been obtained. Upon exciting these glasses with a 980 nm diode laser, NIR emissions at 1195 nm ({sup 5}I{sub 6}?{sup 5}I{sub 8}), 1951 nm ({sup 5}I{sub 7}?{sup 5}I{sub 8}) have been measured for 1 mol % Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glass. For higher concentration beyond 1.0 mol %, emission quenching of Ho{sup 3+} glass has been noticed and which has successfully been explained in terms of an energy level diagram. From absorption cross-section data, stimulated emission cross-section has been evaluated by applying McCumber's theory and further cross-sectional gain has also been computed for the emissions at 1195 nm (?1.20 ?m) and 1951 nm (?2.0 ?m) of 1 mol % Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glass.

  13. Solid state phase equilibria and intermetallic compounds of the Al-Cr-Ho system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Mingjun; SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile Co., Ltd., Liuzhou, Guangxi 545007 ; Zhan, Yongzhong; Du, Yong

    2013-02-15

    The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C were experimentally investigated. The phase relations at 500 Degree-Sign C are governed by 14 three-phase regions, 29 two-phase regions and 15 single-phase regions. The existences of 10 binary compounds and 2 ternary phases have been confirmed. Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 2}, Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 17}Ho{sub 2} were not found at 500 Degree-Sign C. Crystal structures of Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho were determined by the Rietveld X-ray powder data refinement. Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} was found to exhibit cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m (no. 217) and lattice parameters a=0.9107(5) nm. Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} structure type with space group I4/mmm (no. 139) and lattice parameters a=0.8909(4) nm, c=0.5120(5) nm. It is concluded that the obtained Al{sub 4}Cr phase in this work should be {mu}-Al{sub 4}Cr by comparing with XRD pattern of the hexagonal {mu}-Al{sub 4}Mn compound. - Graphical abstract: The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-Cr-Ho system has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} has cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} type with space group I4/mmm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 4}Cr phase is {mu}-type at 500 Degree-Sign C.

  14. Effectiveness of solar heating and lighting in an underground concrete and glass dwelling high in the Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Div. of Design Technology)

    1993-01-01

    Solar heating and daylighting are two primary design features which can have a major impact on occupant perceptions of an underground living environment. A quantitative design analysis and evaluation of these features has been conducted for an energy conserving earth covered dwelling in a cold climate at high altitude in the Rocky Mountains. For this example, because of the solar contribution, a heating load reduction greater than 45 percent has been calculated and demonstrated on an operational basis, compared to the same earth sheltered construction without solar. The building envelope also has an effective time lag of several months which further increases the annual effectiveness. Also, depending on the sky conditions, the portion of exterior daylight reaching deep into the interior spaces easily exceeds 10 percent in the winter and can reach up to 50 percent or more. Thus, both heating and lighting by natural means are shown to be available in ample quantities in this cave-like structure. Pertinent design features to enhance such performance are highlighted.

  15. WE-A-17A-05: Differences in Applicator Configuration and Dwell Loading Between Standard and Image-Guided Tandem and Ring (T and R) HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damato, A; Cormack, R; Bhagwat, M; Buzurovic, I; Lee, L; Viswanathan, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate differences in: (i) relative location of the tandem and the ring compared to a rigid standard applicator model; and (ii) relative loading and changes in loading pattern between standard and image-guided planning. Methods: All T and R insertions performed in 2013 in our institution under CT- or MR-guidance were analyzed. Standard plans were generated using library applicator models with a fixed relationship between ring and tandem, standardized uniform dwell loading and normalization to point A. The graphic plans and the associated standard-plan dwell configurations were compared: the rings were rigidly registered, and the residual tandem shift, rotation and maximum distance between plan tandem dwell and corresponding model tandem dwell were calculated. The normalization ratio (NR = the ratio of graphic versus standard-plan total reference air kerma [TRAK]), the general loading difference (GLD = the difference between graphic and standard ratios of the tandem versus the ring TRAK), and the percent standard deviation (SD% = SD/mean) of the tandem and the ring TRAK for the graphic plan (all standard-plans SD% = 0) were calculated. Results: 71 T and R were analyzed. Residual tandem shift, rotation and maximum corresponding dwell distance were 1.2±0.8mm (0.4±0.4mm lateral, 0.9±0.8mm craniocaudal, 0.4±0.3mm anterior-posterior), 2.3±1.9deg and 3.4±2.3mm. NR was 0.86±0.11 indicating a lower overall loading of the graphic compared to the standard plans. GLD was -0.12±0.16 indicating a modest increased ring loading relative to the tandem in the graphic plans. SD% was 2.1±1.6% for tandem and 2.8±1.9% for ring, indicating small deviations from uniform loading. Conclusion: Variability in the relative locations of the tandem and the ring necessitates the independent registration of each component model for accurate digitization. Our clinical experience suggests that graphically planned T and R results on average in a lower total dose to the

  16. The generalized second law of thermodynamics in Ho?ava-Lifshitz cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Setare, M.R. E-mail: msaridak@phys.uoa.gr

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in a universe governed by Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity. Under the equilibrium assumption, that is in the late-time cosmological regime, we calculate separately the entropy time-variation for the matter fluid and, using the modified entropy relation, that of the apparent horizon itself. We find that under detailed balance the generalized second law is generally valid for flat and closed geometry and it is conditionally valid for an open universe, while beyond detailed balance it is only conditionally valid for all curvatures. Furthermore, we also follow the effective approach showing that it can lead to misleading results. The non-complete validity of the generalized second law could either provide a suggestion for its different application, or act as an additional problematic feature of Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity.

  17. Holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant in Ho?ava-Lifshitz cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M.R.; Jamil, Mubasher E-mail: mjamil@camp.nust.edu.pk

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the holographic dark energy scenario with a varying gravitational constant in a flat background in the context of Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity. We extract the exact differential equation determining the evolution of the dark energy density parameter, which includes G variation term. Also we discuss a cosmological implication of our work by evaluating the dark energy equation of state for low redshifts containing varying G corrections.

  18. Visualiser of two-micron laser radiation based on Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyapin, A A; Ryabochkina, P A; Ushakov, S N; Fedorov, P P

    2014-06-30

    The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals corresponding to the {sup 5}G{sub 4} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}G{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 3} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 4}({sup 5}S{sub 2}) ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}S{sub 2} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}I{sub 4} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}I{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}F{sub 3} ? {sup 5}I{sub 6}, {sup 5}I{sub 6} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 6}, and {sup 5}I{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7} transitions upon excitation of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level of Ho{sup 3+} ions are studied. A method for visualisation of IR radiation in the two-micron range using Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals is proposed. The energy efficiency of conversion of two-micron laser radiation to radiation in the red spectral range 620 690 nm by a 1 mol % HoF{sub 3}:CaF{sub 2} crystal is estimated to be no higher than 0.02%. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  19. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient; the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Building's (CARB) multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in three multifamily buildings.

  20. White light emitting Ho{sup 3+}-doped CdS nanocrystal ingrained glass nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Chirantan; Karmakar, Basudeb; Goswami, Madhumita

    2015-02-23

    We report the generation of white light from Ho{sup 3+} ion doped CdS nanocrystal ingrained borosilicate glass nanocomposites prepared by the conventional melt-quench method. Near visible 405?nm diode laser excited white light emission is produced by tuning the blue emission from the Ho{sup 3+} ions, green band edge, and orange-red surface-state emissions of the nanocrystalline CdS, which are further controlled by the size of the nanocrystals. The absorption and emission spectra evidenced the excitation of Ho{sup 3+} ions by absorption of photons emitted by the CdS nanocrystals. The high color rendering index (CRI?=?8489) and befitting chromaticity coordinates (x?=?0.3080.309, y?=?0.3260.338) of white light emission, near visible harmless excitation wavelength (405?nm), and high absorbance values at excitation wavelength point out that these glass nanocomposites may serve as a prominent candidate for resin free high power white light emitting diodes.

  1. Cosmological QCD phase transition in steady non-equilibrium dissipative Ho?avaLifshitz early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khodadi, M. Sepangi, H.R.

    2014-07-15

    We study the phase transition from quarkgluon plasma to hadrons in the early universe in the context of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. According to the standard model of cosmology, a phase transition associated with chiral symmetry breaking after the electro-weak transition has occurred when the universe was about 110?s old. We focus attention on such a phase transition in the presence of a viscous relativistic cosmological background fluid in the framework of non-detailed balance Ho?avaLifshitz cosmology within an effective model of QCD. We consider a flat FriedmannRobertsonWalker universe filled with a non-causal and a causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid respectively and investigate the effects of the running coupling constants of Ho?avaLifshitz gravity, ?, on the evolution of the physical quantities relevant to a description of the early universe, namely, the temperature T, scale factor a, deceleration parameter q and dimensionless ratio of the bulk viscosity coefficient to entropy density (?)/s . We assume that the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeys the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the IsraelStewart fluid, respectively. -- Highlights: In this paper we have studied quarkhadron phase transition in the early universe in the context of the Ho?avaLifshitz model. We use a flat FRW universe with the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeying the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the IsraelStewart fluid, respectively.

  2. Sample dependence of giant magnetocaloric effect in a cluster-glass system Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoizumi, Saori Tamaki, Akira; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Mamiya, Hiroaki; Terada, Noriki; Tamura, Ryo; Dönni, Andreas; Kawamura, Yukihiko; Morita, Kengo

    2015-05-07

    In order to investigate the effect of vacancy on the magnetocaloric effect in Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}, we have carried out X-ray diffraction, magnetization, and specific heat measurements in the rare-earth intermetallic compound Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2}(−0.4 ≤ x ≤ 0.4). The maximum magnetic entropy change −ΔS{sub m}{sup max}, the maximum adiabatic temperature change ΔT{sub ad}{sup max}, and the relative cooling power of Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2} take large values at x = 0−0.4 for the field change of 5 T. The paramagnetic Curie temperature θ{sub p} increases with an increase of x. This fact suggests that the enhancement of ferromagnetic coupling among the correlated spins leads to the increase of magnetocaloric effect.

  3. Negative-parity states and {beta} decays in odd Ho and Dy nuclei with A=151,153

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Khudair, Falih H.; Long Guilu; Sun Yang

    2008-03-15

    We investigated the negative-parity states and electromagnetic transitions in {sup 151,153}Ho and {sup 151,153}Dy within the framework of the interacting boson fermion model 2 (IBFM-2). Spin assignments for some states with uncertain spin are made based on this calculation. Calculated excitation energies, electromagnetic transitions, and branching ratios are compared with available experimental data and a good agreement is obtained. The model wave functions were used to study {beta} decays from Ho to Dy isotones, and the calculated logft values are close to the experimental data.

  4. AmeriFlux US-Ho2 Howland Forest (west tower)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollinger, David; Hollinger, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ho2 Howland Forest (west tower). Site Description - Closed conifer forest, minimal disturbance. References: Fernandez et al. (1993), Canadian Journal of Soil Science 73 317-328. Hollinger et al. (1999), Global Change Biology 5: 891-902. Savage KE, Davidson EA (2001), Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15 337-350. Scott et al. (2004), Environmental Management, Vol. 33, Supplement 1, pp. S9-S22. Hollinger et al. (2004), Global Change Biology 10: 1689-1706.

  5. AmeriFlux US-Ho3 Howland Forest (harvest site)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollinger, David; Hollinger, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ho3 Howland Forest (harvest site). Site Description - Closed conifer forest, minimal disturbance. References: Fernandez et al. (1993), Canadian Journal of Soil Science 73 317-328. Hollinger et al. (1999), Global Change Biology 5: 891-902. Savage KE, Davidson EA (2001), Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15 337-350. Scott et al. (2004), Environmental Management, Vol. 33, Supplement 1, pp. S9-S22. Hollinger et al. (2004), Global Change Biology 10: 1689-1706.

  6. AmeriFlux US-Ho1 Howland Forest (main tower)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollinger, David; Hollinger, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ho1 Howland Forest (main tower). Site Description - Closed conifer forest, minimal disturbance. References: Fernandez et al. (1993), Canadian Journal of Soil Science 73 317-328. Hollinger et al. (1999), Global Change Biology 5: 891-902. Savage KE, Davidson EA (2001), Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15 337-350. Scott et al. (2004), Environmental Management, Vol. 33, Supplement 1, pp. S9-S22. Hollinger et al. (2004), Global Change Biology 10: 1689-1706.

  7. Observation of large magnetocaloric effect in HoRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paramanik, Tapas Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2014-02-28

    Detailed magnetic, magnetotransport, and magnetocaloric measurements on HoRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} have been performed. In this Letter, we report presence of spin reorientation transition below paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic transition temperature (T{sub N} = 19 K). Large magnetic entropy change 9.1 J/kg K and large negative magnetoresistance ∼21% in a magnetic field of 5 T has been observed around T{sub N}, which is associated with field induced spin-flip metamagnetic transition.

  8. Mechanical behaviors and phase transition of Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystals under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Xiaozhi; Ren, Xiangting; He, Duanwei E-mail: yangwg@hpstar.ac.cn; Chen, Bin; Yang, Wenge E-mail: yangwg@hpstar.ac.cn

    2014-07-21

    Mechanical properties and phase transition often show quite large crystal size dependent behavior, especially at nanoscale under high pressure. Here, we have investigated Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystals with in-situ x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy under high pressure up to 33.5 GPa. When compared to the structural transition routine cubic -> monoclinic -> hexagonal phase in bulk Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high pressure, the nano-sized Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows a much higher onset transition pressure from cubic to monoclinic structure and followed by a pressure-induced-amorphization under compression. The detailed analysis on the Q (Q = 2π/d) dependent bulk moduli reveals the nanosized Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles consist of a clear higher compressible shell and a less compressible core. Insight into these phenomena shed lights on micro-mechanism studies of the mechanical behavior and phase evolution for nanomaterials under high pressure, in general.

  9. Magnetism of Ho1-xTbxAl₂ alloys: Critical dependence of a first-order transition on Tb concentration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khan, Mahmud; Mudryk, Ya.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2011-12-27

    HoAl₂ exhibits a first-order spin reorientation transition at 20 K, which is manifested as a sharp peak in the heat capacity. When Ho is partially replaced by only 5% of Tb, the sharp heat-capacity peak in Ho1-xTbxAl₂ (x = 0.05) disappears, and then reappears again for x ≥ 0.07. For x = 0.05, the anomaly corresponding to the spin reorientation transition is barely seen in the heat capacity, but as x exceeds 0.07 the weak anomaly transforms to a sharp peak. The spin reorientation transition temperature increases to 29 K for x = 0.05, and as x increases further themore » transition shifts to lower temperature and returns to ~20 K for x = 0.25. The transition is no longer observed when x exceeds 0.60. Temperature-dependent x-ray powder-diffraction data confirm the first-order nature of the spin reorientation transition for the alloy with x = 0.40, and indicate that the compound retains the room-temperature cubic structure within the sensitivity of the technique. Experimental observations are discussed considering the easy magnetization directions of HoAl₂ and TbAl₂.« less

  10. Thermoelectric and Structural Characterization of Ba2Ho(Cu3-xCox)O6+y

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong-Ng, W.; Li, Q.; Yang, Z.; Hu, Y.F.; Huang, Q.; Lowhorn, N.; Otani, M.; Kaduk, J.A.

    2009-03-18

    The search for thermoelectric materials for power generation and for solid-state cooling has led to increased interest of layered cobalt-containing oxides because of their thermal stability at high temperature and their desirable thermoelectric properties. This paper examines the effect of substitution of Co in the layered pervoskite Ba{sub 2}Ho(Cu{sub 3-x}Co{sub x})O{sub 6+y} (x = 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 1.0). Structural analysis using the neutron Rietveld refinement technique reveals that when x {le} 0.4, Co substitutes mainly for Cu in the 'chain sites' of the Ba{sub 2}Ho(Cu{sub 3-x}Co{sub x})O{sub 6+y} structure. As x > 0.4, Co also enters in the Cu-O 'plane sites' as well. The thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline Ba{sub 2}Ho(Cu{sub 3-x}Co{sub x})O{sub 6+y} samples were studied in the temperature range of 10-390 K. In general, as the cobalt content x increases, the resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of these samples increase while the thermal conductivity decreases. Among the five Ba{sub 2}Ho(Cu{sub 3-x}Co{sub x})O{sub 6+y} compositions, the x = 0.4 member gives the highest figure of merit ZT of {approx} 0.02 at approximately 270 K.

  11. Ultraviolet and white photon avalanche upconversion in Ho{sup 3+}-doped nanophase glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lahoz, F.; Martin, I.R.; Calvilla-Quintero, J.M.

    2005-01-31

    Ho{sup 3+}-doped fluoride nanophase glass ceramics have been synthesized from silica-based oxyfluoride glass. An intense white emission light is observed by the naked eye under near infrared excitation at 750 nm. This visible upconversion is due to three strong emission bands in the primary color components, red, green, and blue. Besides, ultraviolet signals are also recorded upon the same excitation wavelength. The excitation mechanism of both the ultraviolet and the visible emissions is a photon avalanche process with a relatively low pump power threshold at about 20 mW. The total upconverted emission intensity has been estimated to increase by about a factor of 20 in the glass ceramic compared to the precursor glass, in which an avalanche type mechanism is not generated.

  12. Clifford Ho

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clearance Adjudication The Office of Personnel and Facility Clearances and Classification (OPFCC) submits the clearance paperwork to the proper investigative agency, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) or the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Upon receipt of the investigation, the paperwork is matched to the Personnel Security File and assigned to a Personnel Security Specialist, who will adjudicate the investigation, using the Presidential Adjudicative Guidelines. If security concerns

  13. Spin structure and magnetic frustration in multiferroic RMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} (R=Tb,Ho,Dy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, G.R.; Chapon, L.C.; Radaelli, P.G.; Park, S.; Hur, N.; Cheong, S-W.; Rodriguez-Carvajal, J.

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the crystal and magnetic structures of the magnetoelectric materials RMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} (R=Tb,Ho,Dy) using neutron diffraction as a function of temperature. All three materials display incommensurate antiferromagnetic ordering below 40 K, becoming commensurate on further cooling. For R=Tb,Ho, a commensurate-incommensurate transition takes place at low temperatures. The commensurate magnetic structures have been solved and are discussed in terms of competing exchange interactions. The spin configuration within the ab plane is essentially the same for each system, and the radius of R determines the sign of the magnetic exchange between adjacent planes. The inherent magnetic frustration in these materials is lifted by a small lattice distortion, primarily involving shifts of the Mn{sup 3+} cations and giving rise to a canted antiferroelectric phase.

  14. Disorder from order among anisotropic next-nearest-neighbor Ising spin chains in SrHo2O4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wen, J. -J.; Tian, W.; Garlea, V. O.; Koohpayeh, S. M.; McQueen, T. M.; Li, H. -F.; Yan, J. -Q.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Vaknin, D.; Broholm, C. L.

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we describe why Ising spin chains with competing interactions in SrHo2O4 segregate into ordered and disordered ensembles at low temperatures (T). Using elastic neutron scattering, magnetization, and specific heat measurements, the two distinct spin chains are inferred to have Néel (↑↓↑↓) and double-Néel (↑↑↓↓) ground states, respectively. Below TN = 0.68(2)K, the Néel chains develop three-dimensional long range order (LRO), which arrests further thermal equilibration of the double-Néel chains so they remain in a disordered incommensurate state for T below TS = 0.52(2)K. SrHo2O4 distills an important feature of incommensurate low dimensional magnetism: kinetically trapped topological defectsmore » in a quasi–d–dimensional spin system can preclude order in d + 1 dimensions.« less

  15. Balancing structural distortions via competing 4f and itinerant interactions: A case of polymorphism in magnetocaloric HoCo2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mudryk, Y.; Paudyal, D.; Pathak, A. K.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.

    2016-04-13

    The nature of multiple magnetostructural transformations in HoCo2 has been studied by employing magnetic and specific heat measurements, temperature and magnetic field dependent X-ray powder diffraction, and first-principles calculations. Unexpected increase of magnetization observed below the spin-reorientation temperature (TSR) suggests that the low-temperature transition involves a reduction of Co moment. First principles calculations confirm that the paramagnetic cubic to ferrimagnetic tetragonal transformation at TC is assisted by itinerant electron metamagnetism, and that the reduction of Co moment in HoCo2 occurs in parallel with the ferrimagnetic tetragonal to the nearly ferromagnetic orthorhombic transformation at TSRvia the rearrangement of both 3d statesmore » of Co and 5d states of Ho. The ac magnetic susceptibility measurements show significant magnetic frustration below TC. Furthermore, in contrast to earlier reports neither ac nor dc magnetic susceptibilities show anomalies in the paramagnetic region obeying the Curie–Weiss law.« less

  16. Ferromagnetic and paramagnetic magnetization of implanted GaN:Ho,Tb,Sm,Tm films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryško, M. Hejtmánek, J.; Laguta, V.; Sofer, Z.; Sedmidubský, D.; Šimek, P.; Veselý, M.; Mikulics, M.; Buchal, C.; Macková, A.; Malínský, P.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2015-05-07

    The SQUID magnetic measurements were performed on the GaN films prepared by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy and implanted by Tb{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} ions. The sapphire substrate was checked by the electron paramagnetic resonance method which showed a content of Cr{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 3+} impurities. The samples 5 × 5 mm{sup 2} were positioned in the classical straws and within an estimated accuracy of 10{sup −6 }emu, no ferromagnetic moment was detected in the temperature region of 2–300 K. The paramagnetic magnetization was studied for parallel and perpendicular orientation. In the case of GaN:Tb sample, at T = 2 K, a pronounced anisotropy with the easy axis perpendicular to the film was observed which can be explained by the lowest quasi-doublet state of the non-Kramers Tb{sup 3+} ion. The Weiss temperature deduced from the susceptibility data using the Curie-Weiss (C-W) law was found to depend substantially on the magnetic field.

  17. Electronic structure and 3d-4f exchange interactions in zircon-type RCrO{sub 4} oxides (R=Dy, Ho and Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Avijeet Maitra, Tulika

    2015-06-24

    Using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations within GGA and GGA+U approximations we studied both ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases of zircon type RCrO{sub 4} (R= Dy, Ho, Gd) oxides. We estimated and compared the 3d-4f exchange interaction strengths J between the nearest neighbor R{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 5+} ions for R=Dy, Gd. Our results predict that DyCrO{sub 4}, GdCrO{sub 4} and HoCrO{sub 4} have ferromagnetic ground state which is consistent with experimental observations.

  18. Time-Resolved Quantitative Measurement of OH HO2 and CH2O in Fuel Oxidation Reactions by High Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Haifeng; Rotavera, Brandon; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-08-01

    Combined with a Herriott-type multi-pass slow flow reactor, high-resolution differential direct absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe, in situ and quantitatively, hydroxyl (OH), hydroperoxy (HO 2 ) and formaldehyde (CH 2 O) molecules in fuel oxidation reactions in the reactor, with a time resolution of about 1 micro-second. While OH and CH 2 O are probed in the mid-infrared (MIR) region near 2870nm and 3574nm respectively, HO 2 can be probed in both regions: near-infrared (NIR) at 1509nm and MIR at 2870nm. Typical sensitivities are on the order of 10 10 - 10 11 molecule cm -3 for OH at 2870nm, 10 11 molecule cm -3 for HO 2 at 1509nm, and 10 11 molecule cm -3 for CH 2 O at 3574nm. Measurements of multiple important intermediates (OH and HO 2 ) and product (CH 2 O) facilitate to understand and further validate chemical mechanisms of fuel oxidation chemistry.

  19. Fragile singlet ground-state magnetism in the pyrochlore osmates R2Os2O7 ( R=Y and Ho)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Calder, S.; Aczel, A. A.; McGuire, M. A.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D. G.; Chen, G.; Trivedi, N.; Zhou, H. D.; Yan, J. -Q.

    2016-04-25

    The singlet ground state magnetism in pyrochlore osmates Y2Os2O7 and Ho2Os2O7 is studied by DC and AC susceptibility, specific heat, and neutron powder di raction measurements. Despite the expected non-magnetic singlet in the strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) limit for Os4+ (5d4), Y2Os2O7 exhibits a spin-glass (SG) ground state below 4 K with weak magnetism, suggesting possible proximity to a quantum phase transition between the non-magnetic state in the strong SOC limit and the magnetic state in the strong superexchange limit. Ho2Os2O7 has the same structural distortion as occurs in Y2Os2O7. However, the Os sublattice in Ho2Os2O7 shows long- range magneticmore » ordering below 36 K. We find that the sharp difference of the magnetic ground state between Y2Os2O7 and Ho2Os2O7 signals the singlet ground state magnetism in R2 Os2 O7 is fragile and can be disturbed by the weak 4f—5d interactions.« less

  20. 3d-4f spin interaction and field-induced metamagnetism in RCrO{sub 4} (R?=?Ho, Gd, Lu) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Midya, A.; Khan, N.; Bhoi, D.; Mandal, P.

    2014-05-07

    We observe that the zircon-type RCrO{sub 4} (R?=?Ho, Gd, Lu) compounds exhibit complicated magnetic properties and large magnetic entropy change due to the strong competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions. For a field change of 7?T, the maximum values of entropy change and refrigerant capacity reach 28?J?kg{sup ?1}?K{sup ?1} and 740?J?kg{sup ?1}, respectively, for GdCrO{sub 4} whereas the corresponding values for HoCrO{sub 4} are 29?J?kg{sup ?1}?K{sup ?1} and 550?J?kg{sup ?1}. For GdCrO{sub 4} compound, the magnetic entropy change is quite large even at low temperatures well below the ferromagnetic transition.

  1. Disorder from order among anisotropic next-nearest-neighbor Ising spin chains in SrHo2O4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J. -J.; Tian, W.; Garlea, V. O.; Koohpayeh, S. M.; McQueen, T. M.; Li, H. -F.; Yan, J. -Q.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Vaknin, D.; Broholm, C. L.

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we describe why Ising spin chains with competing interactions in SrHo2O4 segregate into ordered and disordered ensembles at low temperatures (T). Using elastic neutron scattering, magnetization, and specific heat measurements, the two distinct spin chains are inferred to have Nel (????) and double-Nel (????) ground states, respectively. Below TN = 0.68(2)K, the Nel chains develop three-dimensional long range order (LRO), which arrests further thermal equilibration of the double-Nel chains so they remain in a disordered incommensurate state for T below TS = 0.52(2)K. SrHo2O4 distills an important feature of incommensurate low dimensional magnetism: kinetically trapped topological defects in a quasiddimensional spin system can preclude order in d + 1 dimensions.

  2. Low temperature (550-700 K) oxidation pathways of cyclic ketones: Dominance of HO2-elimination channels yielding conjugated cyclic coproducts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Welz, Oliver; Vasu, Subith S.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-04-13

    The low-temperature oxidation of three cyclic ketones, cyclopentanone (CPO; C5H8O), cyclohexanone (CHO; C6H10 O), and 2-methyl-cyclopentanone (2-Me-CPO; CH3–C5H7 O), is studied between 550 and 700 K and at 4 or 8 Torr total pressure. Initial fuel radicals R are formedvia fast H-abstraction from the ketones by laser-photolytically generated chlorine atoms. Intermediates and products from the subsequent reactions of these radicals in the presence of excess O2 are probed with time and isomeric resolution using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron ionizing radiation. For CPO and CHO the dominant product channel in the R + O2 reactions is chain-terminating HO2-eliminationmore » yielding the conjugated cyclic coproducts 2-cyclopentenone and 2-cyclohexenone, respectively. Results on oxidation of 2-Me-CPO also show a dominant contribution from HO2-elimination. Moreover, the photoionization spectrum of the co-product suggests formation of 2-methyl-2-cyclopentenone and/or 2-cyclohexenone, resulting from a rapid Dowd–Beckwith rearrangement, preceding addition to O2, of the initial (2-oxocyclopentyl)methyl radical to 3-oxocyclohexyl. Cyclic ethers, markers for hydroperoxyalkyl radicals (QOOH), key intermediates in chain-propagating and chain-branching low-temperature combustion pathways, are only minor products. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by stationary point calculations on the potential energy surfaces of the associated R + O2 reactions at the CBS-QB3 level. Furthermore, the calculations indicate that HO2-elimination channels are energetically favored and product formation via QOOH is disfavored. Lastly, the prominence of chain-terminating pathways linked with HO2 formation in low-temperature oxidation of cyclic ketones suggests little low-temperature reactivity of these species as fuels in internal combustion engines.« less

  3. The fluorite-pyrochlore transformation of Ho{sub 2-y}Nd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Richard; Hester, James R.; Kennedy, Brendan J.; Ling, Chris D.; Stampfl, Anton P.J.

    2011-08-15

    Twelve members of the Ho{sub 2-y}Nd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} series, prepared using conventional solid state methods, have been characterised by neutron powder diffraction. Ho{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} has a defect fluorite structure whereas Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} is found to adopt the ordered pyrochlore structure with the composition induced fluorite-pyrochlore transformation occurring near y=1. Rietveld analysis on the neutron data for all the compositions reveals an increase in lattice parameter as a function of y across the entire series, with a small discontinuity associated with the transformation. The neutron profile results suggest that domains of pyrochlore-type initially begin to form before crystallising into a separate phase, and therefore that anion and cation ordering processes are distinct. There is a strong correlation between the extent of disorder in the anion sublattice and the x-parameter of 48f oxygen. These results point the way to a better understanding of the stability observed in pyrochlore structures. - Graphical abstract: Neutron diffraction profiles for Nd{sub 2-y}Ho{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} type oxides reveal details of the transformation from the ordered pyrochlore structure (y=0) to the disordered fluorite structure (y=2). Highlights: > Structures of twelve members of the Ho{sub 2-y}Nd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} series studied using neutron powder diffraction. > Domains of pyrochlore-type materials form at low doping levels. > Higher doping stabilises the pyrochlore. > Anion and cation ordering processes are distinct.

  4. Measurements and modeling of HO2 formation in the reactions of n-C3H7 and i-C3H7 radicals with O2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Estupinan, Edgar Garcia; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2004-08-01

    The formation of HO{sub 2} in the reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, n-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}, and i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7} radicals with O{sub 2} is investigated using the technique of laser photolysis/long-path frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The alkyl radicals are formed by 266 nm photolysis of alkyl iodides. The formation of HO{sub 2} from the subsequent reaction of the alkyl radicals with O{sub 2} is followed by infrared frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The concentration of I atoms is simultaneously monitored by direct absorption of a second laser probe on the spin?orbit transition. The measured profiles are compared to a kinetic model taken from time-resolved master-equation results based on previously published ab initio characterizations of the relevant stationary points on the potential-energy surface. The ab initio energies are adjusted to produce agreement with the present experimental data and with available literature studies. The isomer specificity of the present results enables refinement of the model for i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7} + O{sub 2} and improved agreement with experimental measurements of HO{sub 2} production in propane oxidation.

  5. Lasing characteristics of ZrO{sub 2}Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borik, M A; Lomonova, E E; Kulebyakin, A V; Ushakov, S N; Lyapin, A A; Ryabochkina, P A; Chabushkin, A N

    2013-09-30

    The spectral dependences of the gain cross section of the {sup 5}I{sub 8} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}I{sub 7} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8} transition of Ho{sup 3+} ions in the ZrO{sub 2} 13.6 mol % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0.4 mol % Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal are calculated at different relative population inversions using the absorption and luminescence spectra of the {sup 5}I{sub 8} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7} and {sup 5}I{sub 7} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8} transitions of Ho{sup 3+} ions at T=''300'' K. Lasing of these crystals at the {sup 5}I{sub 7} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8} transition is obtained for the first time under pumping by a Tm : YLiF{sub 4} laser (?{sub p} = 1.905 ?m). The lasing wavelength is 2.17 ?m. (lasers)

  6. Photoluminescence properties of Ho{sup 3+} ion in lithium-fluoroborate glass containing different modifier oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakrishna, A. Rajesh, D. Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2014-04-24

    Trivalent holmium (0.5 mol%) doped lithium fluoro-borate glasses with the chemical compositions 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7−}20BaF{sub 2−}10NaF−20MO (where M=Mg, Ca, Cd and Pb), 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7−}20BaF{sub 2−}10NaF−10MgO−10CaO and 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7−}20BaF{sub 2−}10NaF−10CdO−10PbO were synthesized and investigated their photoluminescence properties. The variation in chemical composition by varying modifier oxides causes changes in the structural spectroscopic behavior of Ho{sup 3+} ions. These changes are examined by UV-VIS- NIR and luminescence spectroscopic techniques. The visible luminescence spectra were obtained by exciting samples at 409 nm radiation.

  7. Low temperature (550-700 K) oxidation pathways of cyclic ketones: Dominance of HO2-elimination channels yielding conjugated cyclic coproducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Welz, Oliver; Vasu, Subith S.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-04-13

    The low-temperature oxidation of three cyclic ketones, cyclopentanone (CPO; C5H8O), cyclohexanone (CHO; C6H10 O), and 2-methyl-cyclopentanone (2-Me-CPO; CH3–C5H7 O), is studied between 550 and 700 K and at 4 or 8 Torr total pressure. Initial fuel radicals R are formedvia fast H-abstraction from the ketones by laser-photolytically generated chlorine atoms. Intermediates and products from the subsequent reactions of these radicals in the presence of excess O2 are probed with time and isomeric resolution using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron ionizing radiation. For CPO and CHO the dominant product channel in the R + O2 reactions is chain-terminating HO2-elimination yielding the conjugated cyclic coproducts 2-cyclopentenone and 2-cyclohexenone, respectively. Results on oxidation of 2-Me-CPO also show a dominant contribution from HO2-elimination. Moreover, the photoionization spectrum of the co-product suggests formation of 2-methyl-2-cyclopentenone and/or 2-cyclohexenone, resulting from a rapid Dowd–Beckwith rearrangement, preceding addition to O2, of the initial (2-oxocyclopentyl)methyl radical to 3-oxocyclohexyl. Cyclic ethers, markers for hydroperoxyalkyl radicals (QOOH), key intermediates in chain-propagating and chain-branching low-temperature combustion pathways, are only minor products. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by stationary point calculations on the potential energy surfaces of the associated R + O2 reactions at the CBS-QB3 level. Furthermore, the calculations indicate that HO2-elimination channels are energetically favored and product formation via QOOH is disfavored. Lastly, the prominence of chain-terminating pathways linked with HO2 formation in low-temperature oxidation of cyclic ketones suggests little low

  8. Overcoming phase instability of RBaCo2O5+ (R = Y and Ho) by Sr substitution for application as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Young Nam, Kim; Bi, Zhonghe; Manthiram, Arumugam; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Huq, Ashfia

    2013-01-01

    Phase instabilities of the RBaCo2O5+ (R = Y and Ho) layered-perovskites and their decompositions into RCoO3 and BaCoO3-z at 800 oC in air were investigated. This will restrict their high temperature applications such as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). However, appropriate amount of Sr substitution ( 60 % for R = Y and 70 % for R = Ho) for Ba successfully stabilized the R(Ba1-xSrx)Co2O5+ phase at elevated temperatures. This can be explained by decreasing oxygen vacancies at R-O layer, decreasing R-O bonding length, and consequent improvement of structural integrity. In addition, the Sr substitution (x = 0.6 - 1.0) for Ba provided added benefit with respect to the chemical stability against Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (GDC) electrolyte, which is a critical requirement for the cathodes in SOFC. Among the various compositions investigated, the Y(Ba0.3Sr0.7)Co2O5+ + GDC composite cathode delivered the optimum electrochemical performances with a stable phase demonstrating the potential as a cathode in SOFC.

  9. Reaction of HO{sub 2} with ClO: Flow tube studies of kinetics and product formation between 215 and 298 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, G.P.; Beiderhase, T.; Helleis, F.; Moortgat, G.K.; Crowley, J.N.

    2000-03-02

    Rate coefficients for the reaction between HO{sub 2} and ClO radicals were obtained using the discharge-flow/mass-spectrometry technique at total pressures of 1.1--1.7 Torr of He, and between 298 and 215 K. The room-temperature rate constant, determined using seven different combinations of HO{sub 2} and ClO precursors, was found to be (7.1 {+-} 1.8) x 10{sup {minus}12}({+-}2{sigma})cm{sup 3}s{sup {minus}1}. The temperature-dependent overall reaction rate coefficient is described by k{sub (3)} (298--215 K) = (7.1 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup {minus}12} exp({minus}16 {+-} 17/T) cm{sub 3}s{sup {minus}1}. The previous observation of a strong negative temperature dependence in the title reaction below 298 K was not observed, resulting in a significantly lower rate coefficient at stratospheric temperatures. HOCl was the only product of the reaction, and an upper limit of 1% for the branching ratio for the formation of O{sub 3} and HCl was obtained at the low pressures of these experiments.

  10. Synthesis, properties and phase transitions of pyrochlore- and fluorite-like Ln{sub 2}RMO{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Ho; R = Lu, Sc; M = Nb, Ta)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shlyakhtina, A.V.; Belov, D.A.; Pigalskiy, K.S.; Shchegolikhin, A.N.; Kolbanev, I.V.; Karyagina, O.K.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Temperature dependences of bulk conductivity for Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} pyrochlore prepared at (1) 1400 °C, 20 h; and (2) 1200 °C, 40 h. - Highlights: • The phase formation of Ln{sub 2}RMO{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Ho; R = Lu, Sc; M = Nb, Ta) at 1200–1600 °C. • The bulk conductivity and magnetic susceptibility were measured. • The bulk conductivity of Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} has oxygen ion type at T ≥ 750 °C. • The first-order structural phase transition was observed in Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} at ∼650–700 °C. • This phase transformation is not typical for defect fluorites. - Abstract: We have studied the new compounds with fluorite-like (Ho{sub 2}RNbO{sub 7} (R = Lu, Sc)) and pyrochlore-like (Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7}) structure as potential oxide ion conductors. The phase formation process (from 1200 to 1600 °C) and physical properties (electrical, thermo mechanical, and magnetic) for these compounds were investigated. Among the niobate materials the highest bulk conductivity is offered by the fluorite-like Ho{sub 2}ScNbO{sub 7} synthesized at 1600 °C: 3.8 × 10{sup −5} S/cm at 750 °C, whereas in Sm system the highest bulk conductivity, 7.3 × 10{sup −6} S/cm at 750 °C, is offered by the pyrochlore Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} synthesized at 1400 °C. In Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} pyrochlore we have observed the first-order phase transformation at ∼650–700 °C is related to rearrangement process in the oxygen sublattice of the pyrochlore structure containing B-site cations in different valence state and actually is absent in the defect fluorites. The two holmium niobates show Curie–Weiss paramagnetic behavior, with the prevalence of antiferromagnetic coupling. The magnetic susceptibility of Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} is a weak function of temperature, corresponding to Van Vleck paramagnetism.

  11. SmartDwell | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

  12. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

    2013-07-01

    The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

  13. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado.

  14. Experimental and theoretical rate constants for CH{sub 4} + O{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3} + HO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, N.K.; Michael, J.V.; Harding, L.B.; Klippenstein, S.J.

    2007-04-15

    In this study, rate constants for the primary initiation process in low to moderate temperature CH{sub 4} oxidation CH{sub 4} + O{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3} + HO{sub 2} have been measured in a reflected shock tube apparatus between 1655 and 1822 K using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. After rapid dissociation of HO{sub 2} yielding H atoms, which are instantaneously converted to OH by H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O, the temporal concentration of OH radicals was observed as the final product from the rate-controlling title reaction. The present work utilizes 18 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of 1.6 m. This configuration gives a signal to noise ratio of unity at {proportional_to}3 x 10{sup 12} radicals cm{sup -3}. Hence, kinetics experiments could be performed at conditions of low [CH{sub 4}]{sub 0} (60-70 ppm), thereby substantially reducing secondary chemistry. Possible implications of CH{sub 4} dissociation contributing to the OH formation rates were considered. The present experimental results agree with a priori variational transition state theoretical (VTST) calculations, k{sub th}=3.37 x 10{sup -19}T{sup 2.745} exp (-26,041K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, clearly showing overlap of experiment and theory, within experimental error. The new rate constant values obtained in this study are 8-10 times higher than the values used in the popular mechanisms GRI-Mech 3.0 and Leeds Methane Mechanism, version 1.5. (author)

  15. Syntheses, structure and rare earth metal photoluminescence of new and known isostructural A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohitkar, Shrikant A.; Kalpana, G.; Vidyasagar, K.

    2011-04-15

    Nine new A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds have been synthesized by solid-state reactions. They are isostructural with six reported analogues of yttrium and other lanthanides and the monoclinic unit cell parameters of all fifteen of them vary linearly with the size of A{sup 3+} ion. Single crystal X-ray structures of eight A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds have been determined. Neat A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds exhibit characteristic rare earth metal photoluminescence. -- Graphical abstract: Among the fifteen isostructural A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=rare earth metal) molybdoantimonites, eight (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds exhibit neat characteristic lanthanide photoluminescence in the 200-800 nm range at room temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Syntheses of nine new A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds. {yields} X-ray structures of eight A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds. {yields} Photoluminescence of neat A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds.

  16. The structure, thermal expansion and phase transition properties of Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3−x}W{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0, 1.0, 2.0) solid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.Z.; Hao, L.J.; Wu, M.M.; Ma, X.B.; Chen, D.F.; Liu, Y.T.

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: A polymorph with Gd{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12}-type structure (space group: Pba2) for negative thermal expansion material Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} is observed above 700 °C, this polymorphism could be effectively supressed by W-substiution for Mo, the give the temperature dependence of Pba2 phase contents for Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3−x}W{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0.0, 1.0, 2.0). - Highlights: • The solid solution Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3−x}W{sub x}O{sub 12} was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction. • It is found that the substitution slightly influence thermal expansion property. • A polymorph of Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} with Pba2 space group was observed above 700 °C. • The W-substitution for Mo effectively suppresses this transformation. - Abstract: Three solid solutions of Ho{sub 2}Mo{sub 3−x}W{sub x}O{sub 12}(x = 0, 1.0, 2.0) were prepared by solid state reaction method, the temperature dependent in-situ X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis were performed to investigate their structure and thermal expansion. All samples have orthorhombic structure(space group Pbcn# 60) with negative thermal expansion at the room temperature. the substitution of W for Mo enlarges the lattice constant and slightly influences the negative thermal expansion. An irreversible phase transformation to the Pba2 phase(Tb{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} structure) was observed at high temperature for Mo-rich samples. This ploymorphism could be effectively suppressed by the W-substitution for Mo, this phenomenon could be explained by the lower electronegativity of W{sup 6+} than Mo{sup 6+}.

  17. Optical and magneto-optical properties of single crystals of RFe{sub 2} (R = Gd, Tb, Ho, and Lu) and GdCo{sub 2} intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.J.

    1999-02-12

    The author has studied the diagonal and off-diagonal optical conductivity of RFe{sub 2}(R = Gd, Tb, Ho, Lu) and GdCo{sub 2} single crystals grown by the flux method. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry the author has measured the dielectric function from 1.5 to 5.5 eV. The magneto-optical Kerr spectrometer at temperatures between 7 and 295 K and applied magnetic fields between 0.5 to 1.6 T. The apparatus and calibration method are described in detail. Using magneto-optical data and optical constants he derives the experimental value of the off-diagonal conductivity components. Theoretical calculations of optical conductivities and magneto-optical parameters were performed using the tight binding-linear muffin tin orbitals method within the local spin density approximation. He applied this TB-LMTO method to LuFe{sub 2}. The theoretical results obtained agree well with the experimental data. The oxidation effects on the diagonal part of the optical conductivity were considered using a three-phase model. The oxidation effects on the magneto-optical parameters were also considered by treating the oxide layer as a nonmagnetic thin transparent layer. These corrections change not only the magnitude but also the shape of the optical conductivity and the magneto-optical parameters.

  18. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    The magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  19. Optical amplification in disordered electrooptic Tm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} codoped lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate ceramics and study of spectroscopy and communication between cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Long; Sun, Fankui; Zhang, Jingwen; Chen, Xuesheng; Li, Kewen K.

    2014-02-21

    Rare earth doped electro-optic (EO) ceramics of lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) are promising in building multifunctional optical devices, by taking advantage of both EO effect and optical activity. In this work, the combination of the measured spectra of absorption and photoluminescence, the fluorescent decay, the calculated Judd-Ofelt parameters, and measured single pass gain in Tm{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+} codoped PLZT ceramics have marked them out as promising gain media in building electrically controllable lasers/optical amplifiers and other multifunctional devices. Optical energy storage was also observed in the optical amplification dynamics.

  20. Temperature dependence of the radiation tolerance of nanocrystalline pyrochlores A2Ti2O7 (A = Gd, Ho and Lu)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wen, J.; Sun, C.; Dholabhai, P. P.; Xia, Y.; Tang, M.; Chen, D.; Yang, D. Y.; Li, Y. H.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2016-03-21

    A potentially enhanced radiation resistance of nanocrystalline materials, as a consequence of the high density of interfaces and surfaces, has attracted much attention both to understand the fundamental role of these defect sinks and to develop them for high-radiation environments. Here, irradiation response of nanocrystalline A2Ti2O7 (A = Gd, Ho and Lu) pyrochlore powders with grain sizes of 20–30 nm was investigated by 1-MeV Kr2+ ion bombardment. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the critical amorphization fluence for each nanocrystalline compound at room temperature was greater than that for their coarse-grained counterparts, indicating an enhanced amorphization resistance. Themore » effect of temperature on the irradiation response of one of these compounds, nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7, was further examined by performing ion irradiation at an elevated temperature range of 480–600 K. The critical amorphization temperature (Tc) was found to be noticeably higher in nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7 (610 K) than its coarse-grained counterpart (480 K), revealing that nanocrystalline Lu2Ti2O7 is less resistant to amorphization compared to its coarse-grained phase under high temperatures. We interpret these results with the aid of atomistic simulations. Molecular statics calculations find that cation antisite defects are less energetically costly to form near surfaces than in the bulk, suggesting that the nanocrystalline form of these materials is generally less susceptible to amorphization than coarse-grained counterparts at low temperatures where defect kinetics are negligible. In contrast, at high temperatures, the annealing efficiency of antisite defects by cation interstitials is significantly reduced due to the sink properties of the surfaces in the nanocrystalline pyrochlore, which contributes to the observed higher amorphization temperature in the nano-grained phase than in coarse-grained counterpart. Altogether, these results provide new

  1. Correcting for telluric absorption: Methods, case studies, and release of the TelFit code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Kraus, Adam; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Ground-based astronomical spectra are contaminated by the Earth's atmosphere to varying degrees in all spectral regions. We present a Python code that can accurately fit a model to the telluric absorption spectrum present in astronomical data, with residuals of ∼3%-5% of the continuum for moderately strong lines. We demonstrate the quality of the correction by fitting the telluric spectrum in a nearly featureless A0V star, HIP 20264, as well as to a series of dwarf M star spectra near the 819 nm sodium doublet. We directly compare the results to an empirical telluric correction of HIP 20264 and find that our model-fitting procedure is at least as good and sometimes more accurate. The telluric correction code, which we make freely available to the astronomical community, can be used as a replacement for telluric standard star observations for many purposes.

  2. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  3. Decay properties of long-lived isomers in the odd-odd N=81 nucleus {sup 146}Tb compared to the {sup 148}Ho and {sup 150}Tm nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kownacki, J.; Kisielinski, M.; Droste, Ch.; Morek, T.; Ruchowska, E.; Grodner, E.; Lieder, R. M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Hadynska-KlePk, K.; Mierzejewski, J.; Andrzejewski, J.; Perkowski, J.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Zielinska, M.; Kordyasz, A.; Srebrny, J.; Korman, A.

    2011-02-15

    Excited states of the {sup 146}Tb nucleus have been studied using {gamma}-ray and electron spectroscopy in off-beam and in-beam modes following {sup 112}Sn({sup 40}Ar,3n3p) reaction with the use of the OSIRIS-II, HPGe detector array and the conversion electron spectrometer. The multipolarity of the 343 keV transition deexciting the (7{sup -}) level in {sup 146}Tb shows mainly an E2 nature and the first excited state above the 23 s isomer is assigned as a (5{sup -},6{sup -}) state. The log ft values have been deduced for 11 {beta}{sup +}/EC transitions populating excited states in {sup 146}Gd. The systematic behavior of spins and parities of the long-lived levels at 0+x keV and the first excited states above them in the N=81 isotones {sup 146}Tb, {sup 148}Ho, and {sup 150}Tm is discussed.

  4. Band gap tuning and orbital mediated electron–phonon coupling in HoFe{sub 1−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotnana, Ganesh; Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana

    2015-09-28

    We report on the evidenced orbital mediated electron–phonon coupling and band gap tuning in HoFe{sub 1−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) compounds. From the room temperature Raman scattering, it is apparent that the electron-phonon coupling is sensitive to the presence of both the Fe and Cr at the B-site. Essentially, an A{sub g} like local oxygen breathing mode is activated due to the charge transfer between Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} at around 670 cm{sup −1}, this observation is explained on the basis of Franck-Condon mechanism. Optical absorption studies infer that there exists a direct band gap in the HoFe{sub 1−x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) compounds. Decrease in band gap until x = 0.5 is ascribed to the broadening of the oxygen p-orbitals as a result of the induced spin disorder due to Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} at B-site. In contrast, the increase in band gap above x = 0.5 is explained on the basis of the reduction in the available unoccupied d-orbitals of Fe{sup 3+} at the conduction band. We believe that above results would be helpful for the development of the optoelectronic devices based on the ortho-ferrites.

  5. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in the RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Zhao-Jun; Shen, Jun E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn; Wu, Jian-Feng; Yan, Li-Qin; Wang, Li-Chen; Sun, Ji-rong; Shen, Bao-Gen; Gao, Xin-Qiang; Tang, Cheng-Chun E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn

    2014-02-21

    The magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds have been investigated. All these compounds possess an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-paramagnetic (PM) transition around their respective Neel temperatures. The RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compounds undergo spin-glassy behavior above Neel temperature. Furthermore, a field-induced metamagnetic transition from AFM to ferromagnetic (FM) states is observed in these compounds. The calculated magnetic entropy changes show that all RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds, especially, ErCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} exhibits large MCEs with no thermal hysteresis and magnetic hysteresis loss. The value of −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} reaches 22.8 J/Kg K for magnetic field changes from 0 to 5 T. In particular, for field changes of 1 and 2 T, the giant reversible magnetic entropy changes −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} are 8.3 and 15.8 J/kg K at 2.5 K, which is lower than the boiling point of helium. The low-field giant magnetic entropy change, together with ignorable thermal hysteresis and field hysteresis loss of ErCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compound is expected to have effective applications in low temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  6. Correlation between upconversion photoluminescence and dielectric response in Ba-substituted (Sr{sub 1?x}Ba{sub x}){sub 4}(La{sub 0.85}Ho{sub 0.025}Yb{sub 0.125}){sub 2}Ti{sub 4}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 30}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, T.; Wang, X. D.; Zhao, C. Z.; Liu, M. F.; Liu, J. M.

    2014-06-30

    The filled tetragonal tungsten bronze (Sr{sub 1?x}Ba{sub x}){sub 4}(La{sub 0.85}Ho{sub 0.025}Yb{sub 0.125}){sub 2}Ti{sub 4}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 30} (SBLTNx: Ho-Yb) ceramics with different Ba substitution levels (x) are prepared. The upconversion photoluminescence (UC-PL) and dielectric permittivity are investigated. The substitution of Sr{sup 2+} ions at the A{sub 2}-sites by larger Ba{sup 2+} ions results in substantial variation of the UC-PL intensity as a function of substitution level x. Furthermore, the dielectric response to the substitution of Sr{sup 2+} by Ba{sup 2+} suggests a close correlation between the UC-PL intensity and dielectric permittivity. The origin for this correlation is discussed based on the random stress field (RSF) model.

  7. DOE Tour of Zero: Reclaimed Modern by Dwell Development | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    a fluid-applied asphalt weather-resistant barrier that was also used for window flashing. ... house, serving as a continuous drainage plane and flashing for window and door openings

  8. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached housing, the single blower door test measures leakage to the outside. In attached housing, however, this "solo" test method measures both air leakage to the outside and air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces. Although minimizing leakage to neighboring units is highly recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly overpredicted if the solo air leakage number is used in the energy analysis. Guarded blower door testing is more appropriate for isolating and measuring leakage to the outside in attached housing. This method uses multiple blower doors to depressurize adjacent spaces to the same level as the unit being tested. Maintaining a neutral pressure across common walls, ceilings, and floors acts as a "guard" against air leakage between units. The resulting measured air leakage in the test unit is only air leakage to the outside. Although preferred for assessing energy impacts, the challenges of performing guarded testing can be daunting.

  9. Anne Arundel County- High Performance Dwelling Property Tax Credit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings if they choose to do so. In October 2010 Anne Arundel...

  10. Improving Building Envelope and Duct Airtightness of US Dwellings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION Blower door, duct blaster, fan...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Seattle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 34 without PV. This 2,000-square-foot system home has R-45 double-stud walls, an unvented flat roof with ...

  12. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings - Field Measurementsand Analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Here, durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007- 2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightnessmore » of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the ageing factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if ageing were modelled. These results imply the need to examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.« less

  13. DOE ZERH Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 30 without PV, with 2x8 24” on center walls with blown fiberglass and 4” polysio rigid foam; basement with 2” XPS interior, 4” under slab, 4” exterior of foundation wall; vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater.

  14. HUD rehabilitation energy guidelines for multi-family dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Guidebook has been prepared to help people, like yourself, involved in the rehabilitation of a multi-family building. It will help you understand the basics of residential energy conservation, and to think positively about the potential economic benefits. The Guidebook, and the HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines, are applicable to all climates from hot and humid Florida to the northern reaches of Alaska.

  15. Synthesis of nanocrystalline REBO{sub 3} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho) and YBO{sub 3}:Eu using a borohydride-based solution precursor route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkes, Amanda E.; Schaak, Raymond E.

    2008-12-15

    A solution precursor route has been used to synthesize a series of nanocrystalline rare-earth borates. Amorphous precursor powders are precipitated during an aqueous reaction between RE{sup 3+} and NaBH{sub 4}, and the isolated powders can be annealed in air at 700 deg. C to form YBO{sub 3}, NdBO{sub 3}, SmBO{sub 3}, EuBO{sub 3}, GdBO{sub 3}, and HoBO{sub 3}. YBO{sub 3}:Eu formed using this strategy shows red-orange emission properties that are similar to high-quality nanocrystals prepared by other methods. The materials have been characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, powder XRD, SEM, DSC, UV-Vis fluorimetry, and TEM with EDS and element mapping. - Graphical abstract: Amorphous nanoscopic precursor powders are formed through the aqueous reaction of RE{sup 3+} with NaBH{sub 4}. Once isolated, the powders can be annealed at 700 deg. C in air to form a series of nanocrystalline REBO{sub 3} orthoborates. Nanocrystalline YBO{sub 3}:Eu formed using this strategy shows red-orange emission properties when excited with UV light.

  16. Syntheses and properties of a family of new compounds RE{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}Co{sub 2}O{sub 14} (RE=La, Pr, Nd, Sm–Ho) with an ordered pyrochlore structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kuo; Hu, Yufei; Wang, Yingxia; Kamiyama, Takashi; Wang, Bingwu; Li, Zhaofei; Lin, Jianhua

    2014-09-15

    Isostructural compounds RE{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}Co{sub 2}O{sub 14} (RE=La, Pr, Nd, Sm–Ho) with an ordered pyrochlore structure were synthesized. The structure of La{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}Co{sub 2}O{sub 14} was solved ab initio based on powder XRD data, and refined by combining with high resolution neutron diffraction data. La{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}Co{sub 2}O{sub 14} crystallizes in the space group R-3m with the unit cell parameters a=7.52954(2) Å and c=17.59983(6) Å. The structures of other members in this family are confirmed by Rietveld refinement using powder X-ray diffraction data. The cations (RE, Sb and Co) in RE{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}Co{sub 2}O{sub 14} are orderly distributed, presenting as [RE{sub 3}Co][Sb{sub 3}Co]O{sub 14} formula, and giving rise to two distinctive Kagome lattices constructed by RE{sup 3+} and Sb{sup 5+}, respectively. Co{sup 2+} occupies 8-coordinated and 6-coordinated environments, showing low spin (S=1/2) and high spin (S=3/2) states respectively. The magnetic susceptibility and UV–visual spectroscopy supports the magnetic observation. TDDFT calculation was performed to interpret the electronic states. The compounds [RE{sub 3}Co][Sb{sub 3}Co]O{sub 14} provide a profound example in which the ideal 2D Kagome lattice is derived from the 3D pyrochlore-type structure by an ordered distribution of the metal cations. - Graphical abstract: La{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}Co{sub 2}O{sub 14} crystallizes in a pyrochlore related structure with an ordered distribution of cations, giving rise to two sets of ideal 2D Kagome lattices formed by La{sup 3+} or Sb{sup 5+} respectively. This rhombohedral pyrochlore is a tolerant structure for stable compounds composed by many light rare-earth and d-transition elements. Substituting Zn{sup 2+} or Mg{sup 2+} for Co{sup 2+} will provide a series of compounds useful for studying magnetic interactions in the rare-earth Kagome lattices. - Highlights: • Pyrochlore-type La{sub 3}Sb{sub 3}Co{sub 2}O{sub 14} shows an ordered distribution of

  17. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  18. Building America Case Study: Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    'The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deters program participants, and dissuades them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.' This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing, the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities, could easily be six times that and that's only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. The objective of the 2013 research project was to develop the model for predicting fully guarded test results (FGT), using unguarded test data and specific building features of apartment units. The model developed has a coefficient of determination R2 value of 0.53 with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.13. Both statistical metrics indicate that the model is relatively strong. When tested against data that was not included in the development of the model, prediction accuracy was within 19%, which is reasonable given that seasonal differences in blower door measurements can vary by as much as 25%.

  19. Consumer attitudes concerning construction features of an earth-sheltered dwelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKown, C. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock); Stewart, K.K.

    1980-01-01

    Consumer responses to construction features of earth-sheltered houses were collected from a volunteer sampling of visitors to an ''open house'' in South Carolina. Consumers reported they had not expected the exposed-front elevation, that skylights are needed in some of the darker areas, and that they were favorably impressed with the solar heating for space and water, the energy efficiency, and the low cost of construction and utilities. Savings of $3000 in initial costs and $300 in annual utility costs were specified as requirements for purchase by the majority. Responses were generally favorable, although only five percent had visted an earth-insulated or underground home before.

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Seattle, WA, Systems Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 34 without PV. This 2,000-square-foot system home has R-45 double-stud walls, an unvented flat roof with 2 inches of spray foam plus 18 inches blown cellulose, R-42 XPS under slab, triple-pane windows, and a ductless mini-split heat pump.

  1. Protective shell of a sea-dwelling chiton paves the way towards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so that complete images of close objects such as predatory fish are formed and processed. ... so that complete images of close objects such as predatory fish are formed and processed. ...

  2. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings: Field Measurements and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wanyu; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2015-06-01

    Durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007-2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL).

  3. Cognitive tasks in information analysis: Use of event dwell time to characterize component activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Slavich, Antoinette L.; Littlefield, Rik J.; Littlefield, Janis S.; Cowley, Paula J.

    2004-09-28

    Technology-based enhancement of information analysis requires a detailed understanding of the cognitive tasks involved in the process. The information search and report production tasks of the information analysis process were investigated through evaluation of time-stamped workstation data gathered with custom software. Model tasks simulated the search and production activities, and a sample of actual analyst data were also evaluated. Task event durations were calculated on the basis of millisecond-level time stamps, and distributions were plotted for analysis. The data indicate that task event time shows a cyclic pattern of variation, with shorter event durations (< 2 sec) reflecting information search and filtering, and longer event durations (> 10 sec) reflecting information evaluation. Application of cognitive principles to the interpretation of task event time data provides a basis for developing “cognitive signatures” of complex activities, and can facilitate the development of technology aids for information intensive tasks.

  4. Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2}-type (Gd, Tb, Dy){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} and La{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}-type (Dy, Ho){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} compounds: Crystal structure and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozkin, A.V.; Isnard, O.; Nirmala, R.; Malik, S.K.

    2015-05-15

    The crystal structure of new Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2}-type (Gd, Tb, Dy){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} (Immm, No. 71, oI10) and La{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}-type (Dy, Ho){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} (Cmce No. 64, oC20) compounds has been established using powder X-ray diffraction studies. Magnetization measurements show that the Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2}-type Gd{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} undergoes a ferromagnetic transition at ~66 K, whereas isostructural Tb{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} shows an antiferromagnetic transition at ~52 K and a field-induced metamagnetic transition at low temperatures. Neutron diffraction study shows that, in zero applied field, Tb{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} exhibits c-axis antiferromagnetic order with propagation vector K=[1/2, 0, 1/2] below its magnetic ordering temperature and Tb magnetic moment reaches a value of 8.32(5) μ{sub B} at 2 K. The La{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}-type Dy{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} exhibits ferromagnetic like transition at ~42 K with coexisting antiferromagnetic interactions and field induced metamagnetic transition below ~17 K. The magnetocaloric effect of Gd{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65}, Tb{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} and Dy{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} is calculated in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change and it reaches a maximum value of −14.3 J/kg K, −5.3 J/kg K and −10.3 J/kg K for a field change of 50 kOe near 66 K, 52 K and 42 K, respectively. Low temperature magnetic ordering with enhanced anisotropic effects in Tb{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} and Dy{sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} is accompanied by a positive magnetocaloric effect with isothermal magnetic entropy changes of +12.8 J/kg K and ~+9.9 J/kg K, respectively at 7 K for a field change of 50 kOe. - Graphical abstract: The (Gd, Tb, Dy){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.35}Si{sub 0.65} supplement the series of Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2}-type rare earth compounds, whereas the (Dy, Ho){sub 2}Ni{sub 2.5}Si{sub 0.5} supplement the series of La{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}-type rare

  5. Magnetic and magnetothermodynamic properties of Ho5Si4 (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    For a field change (DeltaH) of 50 kOe, the maximum values of isothermal magnetic entropy ... of DeltaSsub M is estimated to be -12.6 J kgsup -1 Ksup -1 for DeltaH 50 kOe. ...

  6. Saharan dust as a causal factor of hemispheric asymmetry in aerosols...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tel-Aviv Univ., Tel-Aviv (Israel). Department of Geosciences NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States) Pacific Northwest National Lab. ...

  7. Rebecca Cooper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rebecca Cooper Title: Computer Analyst 2 Office Tel. : (225) 578-4617

  8. Ronnel Jiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ronnel Jiles Title: Research Specialist 2 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9379

  9. Rupal Amin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rupal Amin, Ph.D. Title: Research Associate 4 Office Tel. : (225) 578-0097

  10. David Kleinpeter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kleinpeter Title: Research Specialist 2 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9344

  11. Dawit Yemane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawit Yemane Title: Research Associate 3 Office Tel. : (225) 578-4618

  12. Dawit Yemane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawit Yemane Title:Research Associate 3 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9946

  13. George Rupert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George Rupert Title: Facility Manager Office Tel. : (225) 578-9344

  14. Gregory Merchan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gregory Merchan Title: Research Associate 2 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9369

  15. Eizi Morikawa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eizi Morikawa, Ph.D. Title: Professor - Research Office Tel. : (225) 578-4604

  16. Varshni Singh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Varshni Singh Title:Research Associate 4 Office Tel. : (225) 578-0248

  17. Amitava Roy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amitava Roy, Ph.D. Title: Professor - Research Office Tel. : (225) 578-6706

  18. Yanshan Wang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yanshan Wang Title: Research Associate 4 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9321 Pager: 929-1675

  19. cboyet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caryl Boyet Title: Coordinator 2 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9357

  20. Orhan Kizilkaya

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Orhan Kizilkaya, Ph.D. Title: Assistant Professor - Research Office Tel. : (225) 578-032

  1. Paul Jines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul Jines Title: Computer Analyst 3 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9351 Pager: 231-3966

  2. Phil Sprunger

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phillip Sprunger, Ph.D. Title: Professor Department of Physics Office Tel. : (225) 578-12

  3. Charles Wilson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charlie Wilson Title: Radiation Safety Officer Office Tel. : (225) 578-4616 Rm. 11

  4. Shaloma Malveaux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shaloma Malveaux Title:Research Specialist 1 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9343

  5. Bradley Dorman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bradley Dorman Title: Research Specialist 1 Office Tel. : (225) 578-0095

  6. Shaloma Malveaux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shaloma Malveaux Title: Research Specialist 2 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9343

  7. Lisa Bovenkamp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lisa Bovenkamp-Langlois Title: Postdoctoral Researcher Office Tel. : (225) 578-937

  8. Kevin Morris

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kevin Morris Title: Professional in Residence Office Tel. : (225) 578-9347

  9. Kyungmin Ham

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kyungmin Ham, Ph.D. Title: Assistant Professor - Research Office Tel. :(225) 578-9318

  10. Contact Us | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 69 Menlo Park, CA 94025 Tel: 650-926-4000 Fax: 650-926-4100 SSRL Director Kelly Gaffney, SSRL Director Tel. 650-926-2382 Piero Pianetta, SSRL Deputy Director Tel: 650-926-3484 Britt Hedman, SSRL Science Director Tel: 650-926-3052 Stephanie Carlson, SSRL Business Manager Tel: 650-926-2033 Beam Line Systems Division Tom Rabedeau Tel: 650-926-3009 SR Materials Sciences Division Heads

  11. THE MERGER RATE OF BINARY WHITE DWARFS IN THE GALACTIC DISK ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (United States) School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel) Publication Date: 2012-04-10 OSTI Identifier: 22047918 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  12. Users' Executive Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab Tel: 510-495-2594 Brandy Toner, past chair (2010-2012) Department of Soil, Water, and Climate; University of Minnesota Tel: 612-624-1362 Artur Braun...

  13. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Theory Group at Texas A&M University Department of Physics Cyclotron Institute College Station, TX 77843-4242 College Station, TX 77843-3366 Tel. +1-979-845-7717 Tel. ...

  14. Logistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hotel Hilton Washington DCRockville Hotel and Executive Meeting Center 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852-1699 Tel: 1 800 445 8667 Tel: 301 468 1100 Reservations The cutoff...

  15. Craig Stevens

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Craig Stevens Title: Assistant Director for Administration Office Tel. : (225) 578-4603 Pager: 231-1192...

  16. Victor Ramirez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Victor Ramirez Title: Research Specialist 2 Office Tel. : (225) 578-9374 Fax: (225) 578-6954

  17. Daren Launey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daren Launey Title: Research Specialist Group Leader of the Accelerator Group Office Tel. : (225) 578-9945...

  18. Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wisconsin homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Wisconsin state code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wisconsin homeowners will save $2,484 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $10,733 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $149 for the 2009 IECC and $672 for the 2012 IECC.

  19. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team sought to create a well-documented design and implementation strategy for air sealing in low-rise multifamily buildings that would assist in compliance with new building infiltration requirements of the 2012 IECC.

  20. Materials Data on Ho10In20Ni9 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-20

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on HoInNi (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-21

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ni(HO)2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ho3(AlNi3)2 (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on HoNiSn (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on HoGa4Ni (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-20

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Ho(NiB)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on BaHo2CuO5 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ba2HoReO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on P(HO)4 (SG:56) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ho(SiCu)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on HoIn5Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ho(BC)2 (SG:127) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-08

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Ho3CrB7 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on HoBPd3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on B(HO)3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on HoBRh3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. The Ho-Ni-Ge system: Isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada) Institute SPIN-CNR and Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universit di ...

  18. Materials Data on HoGaPd (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on HoTlPd (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Ho2Pd2Pb (SG:127) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on HoSnPd2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ho3(GePd)4 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ho2SO2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Ho2S3 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ho2Al3Si2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on NaHoF4 (SG:141) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on HoAu4 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on HoCu2 (SG:74) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on LaHO2 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Ho2CdS4 (SG:119) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Cd(HO)2 (SG:8) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ho2CdSe4 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Sr(HO)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Ho3(SiCu)4 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Ho(Al2Fe)4 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on HoAg2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on HoInAg2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on HoFe3 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ho(FeGe)2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on KP(HO2)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Gd(HO)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ho3ScO6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ho6WO12 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Ho3InN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Al(HO)3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on CoHO2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Cr2HO4 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on NbHO3 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on V(HO)2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Mg3(HO3)2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on NaCoP2HO7 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Na4Al3Si3HO13 (SG:161) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Ca5P3HO13 (SG:173) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Te(HO)6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on MnHO2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on TaHO3 (SG:141) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. (JS)_BL13 schedule S02-S03FY15HO3FINAL.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Day Shift 6:00 3996 B Sandberg 3996 B Sandberg 3996 B Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3 0 4 Night Shift 18:00 8055 B Ogasawara 80055 B Ogasawara 8055 B Ogasawara 3996 B Sandberg 3996 B Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 2 3 2 Feb 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 Day Shift 6:00 AP AP 4247 B Graves 4247 B Graves 4247 B Graves 4247 B Graves 4247 B Graves 5 0 0 Night Shift 18:00 AP AP 4180 C Li 4180 C Li 4180 C Li 4238 A Savikhin 4238 A Savikhin

  18. Materials Data on Ho10Ti6O27 (SG:8) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Al(HO)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Li6Ho(BO3)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Ho2Ge2Os (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on CdP2(HO)4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on KP(HO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on CuP2(HO)4 (SG:61) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on KP(HO2)2 (SG:43) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on NaP(HO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on NaZnP2HO7 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Al2P3(HO3)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on KScBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on ZrP2(HO3)2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on NaZn2P2HO8 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on KVBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on MgAl2P2(HO)18 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on RbScBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on CsMnP3HO10 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on RbGaBP2HO9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on CaP2(HO2)4 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on RbZn2P2HO8 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Sc2P3(HO3)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on SrP2(HO)4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on BiP4HO12 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ga2P3(HO3)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on CaP2(HO)4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Fe2P3(HO3)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on RbP(HO)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on BaCoBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on CsGaP3HO10 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on MgFe2P2(HO)18 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on RbP(HO2)2 (SG:43) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on GaP3(HO5)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations