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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Light-duty diesel engine development status and engine needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews, assesses, and summarizes the research and development status of diesel engine technology applicable to light-duty vehicles. In addition, it identifies specific basic and applied research and development needs in light-duty diesel technology and related health areas where initial or increased participation by the US Government would be desirable. The material presented in this report updates information provided in the first diesel engine status report prepared by the Aerospace Corporation for the Department of Energy in September, 1978.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE/VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) spearheaded the development of clean diesel engine technologies for passenger vehicles in the 1990s, spurring the current reintroduction of highly efficient diesel vehicles into the passenger market. Cummins partnered with VTP to develop a diesel engine that meets the 50-state 2010 emissions standards while boosting vehicle fuel economy by 30% over comparable gasoline-powered vehicles. The Cummins engine is scheduled to debut in 2010 Chrysler sport utility vehicles and pickup trucks. VTP-sponsored research demonstrated the ability of diesel passenger vehicles with advanced aftertreatment to meet EPA's stringent Tier II Bin 5 standards, representing an 83% reduction in NOx and more than 87% reduction in

3

Heavy-duty diesel engine oil aging effects on emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel engines are highly reliable, durable and are used for wide range of applications with low fuel usage owing to its higher thermal efficiency compared… (more)

Dam, Mrinmoy.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Analysis of parasitic losses in heavy duty diesel engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel economy of large, on-road diesel engines has become even more critical in recent years for engine manufactures, vehicle OEMs, and truck operators, in view of pending CO2 emission regulations. Demands for increased ...

James, Christopher Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Performance Characterization of a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine with Bio-Diesel and Petroleum Diesel Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the wake of global warming and fossil fuel depletion, renewed attention has been paid to shifting away from the use of petroleum based fuels. The world?s energy demand is commencing its dependency on alternative fuels. Such alternative fuels in use today consist of bio-alcohols (such as ethanol), hydrogen, biomass, and natural oil/fat derived fuels. However, in this study, the focus will be on the alternative fuel derived from natural oils and fats, namely biodiesel. The following study characterizes the performance of a medium-duty diesel engine fuelled with biodiesel and conventional diesel. The objective is accomplished by taking measurements of manifold pressure and temperature, fuel flow, air flow, and torque. The study first characterizes a John Deere 4.5 liter 4 cylinder direct injection engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), common rail fuel injection, and variable turbo-charging with conventional petroleum diesel to set a reference for comparison. The study then proceeds to characterize the differences in engine performance as a result of using biodiesel relative to conventional diesel. The results show that torque decreases with the use of biodiesel by about 10%. The evaluation of engine performance parameters shows that torque is decreased because of the lower heating value of biodiesel compared to conventional diesel. The insignificant difference between the other performance parameters shows that the ECM demands the same performance of the engine regardless of the fuel being combusted by the engine.

Esquivel, Jason

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis Overview Volvo Group Powertrain Engineering is interested in increasing fuel efficiency through the reduction of parasitic friction and pumping losses. A test cell

Demirel, Melik C.

7

Durability Evaluation of Urea SCR Catalysts for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assess the potential long-term durability of various SCR catalyst formulations for mobile heavy duty diesel application.

Koshkarian, Kent

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Comparative urban drive cycle simulations of light-duty hybrid vehicles with gasoline or diesel engines and emissions controls  

SciTech Connect

Electric hybridization is a very effective approach for reducing fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles. Lean combustion engines (including diesels) have also been shown to be significantly more fuel efficient than stoichiometric gasoline engines. Ideally, the combination of these two technologies would result in even more fuel efficient vehicles. However, one major barrier to achieving this goal is the implementation of lean-exhaust aftertreatment that can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations without heavily penalizing fuel efficiency. We summarize results from comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with either stoichiometric gasoline or diesel engines that include state-of-the-art aftertreatment emissions controls for both stoichiometric and lean exhaust. Fuel consumption and emissions for comparable gasoline and diesel light-duty hybrid electric vehicles were compared over a standard urban drive cycle and potential benefits for utilizing diesel hybrids were identified. Technical barriers and opportunities for improving the efficiency of diesel hybrids were identified.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Detroit Diesel Engine Technology for Light Duty Truck Applications - DELTA Engine Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The early generation of the DELTA engine has been thoroughly tested and characterized in the virtual lab, during engine dynamometer testing, and on light duty trucks for personal transportation. This paper provides an up-to-date account of program findings. Further, the next generation engine design and future program plans will be briefly presented.

Freese, Charlie

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Investigation on Nitric Oxide and Soot of Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel using a Medium Duty Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodiesel has been suggested as an alternative fuel to the petroleum diesel fuel. It beneficially reduces regulated emission gases, but increases NOx (nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide) Thus, the increase in NOx is the barrier for potential growth of the biodiesel fuel. In general, NOx formation is dominated by flame temperature. Interestingly, soot can play a role as a heat sink as well as a heat transfer media to high temperature gases. Thus, the cooling effect of soot may change the flame temperature and therefore, NOx emissions. In this study, emphasis is placed on the relationship between soot and NO (Nitric oxide) formation. For the experimental study, a metallic fuel additive is used since barium is known to be effective to suppress soot formation during combustion. The barium additive is applied to #2D (Number 2 diesel fuel) by volume basis: 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 %-v, and to the palm olein oil by 0.25 %-v. All the tests are carried out in a four-cylinder medium duty diesel engine, 4045 DI diesel engine, manufactured by John Deere. For the analysis, an analytical model is used to estimate combustion temperature, NO concentration and soot emissivity. The results show that NO concentration does not have the expected trade-off relation with soot. Rather, NO concentration is found to be more strongly affected by ambient temperature and combustion characteristics than by soot. The results of the analytical model show the reasonable NO estimation and the improvement on temperature calculation. However, the model is not able to explain the detailed changes of soot emissivity by the different fuels since the emissivity correlation is developed empirically for diesel fuel.

Song, Hoseok

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Emissions comparison between petroleum diesel and biodiesel in a medium-duty diesel engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels have become very important topics over the past decade due to the rise in crude oil prices, fear of running out of crude oil, and environmental impact of emissions. Biodiesel is a biofuel that is made from plant seed oils, waste cooking oils, or animal fats. It has become increasingly popular and is looked at as a diesel replacement. This research characterizes the emissions of the new John Deere PowerTech Plus 4045HF285 in the Advance Engine Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University and compares the emissions of a 100 percent blended feed stock biodiesel to an ultra low sulfur diesel certification fuel. The steady state tests were conducted while holding engine speed constant at three different speeds and three different loads. The gaseous emissions, exhaust gas recirculation, fuel flow rate, and torque were monitored and recorded for 300 points per test. Four tests were performed and the results were averaged per each fuel. Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and oxides of nitrogen emissions were analyzed. The biodiesel averaged up to 12% lower torque, 5.4% more fuel, 7.5% less carbon dioxide, 29% more oxygen, and 29% more oxides of nitrogen. Overall the biodiesel produced less torque and carbon dioxide emissions, while emitting more oxygen and oxides of nitrogen.

Tompkins, Brandon T.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency (MEHE) Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. was to improve diesel engine efficiency by incorporating advanced materials to enable higher combustion pressures and temperatures necessary for improved combustion. The project scope also included novel materials for use in advanced components and designs associated with waste-heat recovery and other concepts for improved thermal efficiency. Caterpillar initially provided ORNL with a 2004 Tier 2 C15 ACERT diesel engine (designed for on-highway use) and two 600 hp motoring dynamometers. The first year of the CRADA effort was focused on establishing a heavy-duty experimental engine research cell. First year activities included procuring, installing and commissioning the cell infrastructure. Infrastructure components consisted of intake air handling system, water tower, exhaust handling system, and cell air conditioning. Other necessary infrastructure items included the fuel delivery system and bottled gas handling to support the analytical instrumentation. The second year of the CRADA focused on commissioning the dynamometer system to enable engine experimentation. In addition to the requirements associated with the dynamometer controller, the electrical system needed a power factor correction system to maintain continuity with the electrical grid. During the second year the engine was instrumented and baseline operated to confirm performance and commission the dynamometer. The engine performance was mapped and modeled according to requirements provided by Caterpillar. This activity was further supported by a Work-for-Others project from Caterpillar to evaluate a proprietary modeling system. A second Work-for-Others activity was performed to evaluate a novel turbocharger design. This project was highly successful and may lead to new turbocharger designs for Caterpillar heavy-duty diesel engines. During the third (and final) year of the CRADA, a novel valve material was evaluated to assess high temperature performance and durability. A series of prototype valves, composed of a unique nickel-alloy was placed in the engine head. The engine was aggressively operated using a transient test cycle for 200 hours. The valve recession was periodically measured to determine valve performance. Upon completion of the test the valves were removed and returned to Caterpillar for additional assessment. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the status and research results were carried out on a regular basis (meetings and telecons) which included direction for future work activities. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of information exchange and technical consultation.

Kass, M.; Veliz, M. (Caterpillar, Inc.)

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hydrocarbon and Electrical Requirements in the Plasma During Treatment of NOx in Light-Duty Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the hydrocarbon (C{sub 1}/NO{sub x} ratio) and electrical energy density (ratio of power to exhaust flow rate) requirements in the plasma during plasma-assisted catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The requirements for treatment of NO{sub x} in heavy-duty and light-duty diesel engines are compared. It is shown that, for light-duty applications, the plasma can significantly enhance the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with little fuel penalty incurred in the plasma process.

Penetrante, B.; Brusasco,R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the full useful life exhaust emission performance of a NOx (nitrogen oxides) adsorber and diesel particle filter equipped light-duty and medium-duty engine using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel.

Thornton, M.; Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Weber, P.; Webb, C.

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

17

Characteristics of Emitted Carbonyl Compounds by using Biodiesel fuel with constant H2/O2 in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The emission tests were conducted under steady-state cycle condition in a heavy-duty diesel engine using 0% to 30% ratios of biodiesel fuel with constant H2/O2… (more)

Shih, Jia-Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2002 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine Shawn Whitacre National Renewable Energy Lab (PDF 356 KB) Natural Oils -- The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? Joe Perez The...

19

Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff (The Lubrizol Corp.)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle  

SciTech Connect

In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Kokjohn, Sage [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Just the Basics: Diesel Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Today's direct-injection diesel Today's direct-injection diesel engines are more rugged, powerful, durable, and reliable than gasoline engines, and use fuel much more efficiently, as well. Diesel Engines Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Diesels are workhorse engines. That's why you find them powering heavy- duty trucks, buses, tractors, and trains, not to mention large ships, bulldozers, cranes, and other construction equipment. In the past, diesels fit the stereotype of muscle-bound behe- moths. They were dirty and sluggish, smelly and loud. That image doesn't apply to today's diesel engines, however, and tomorrow's diesels will show even greater improvements. They will be even more fuel efficient, more flexible in the fuels they can use, and also much cleaner in emissions. How Diesel Engines Work

23

Development of high temperature liquid lubricants for low-heat rejection heavy duty diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a liquid lubricant that will allow advanced diesel engines to operate at top ring reversal temperatures approaching 500 C and lubricant sump temperatures approaching 250 C. Base stock screening showed that aromatic esters and diesters has the lowest deposit level, compared to polyol esters, poly-alpha-olefins, or refined mineral oil of comparable viscosity. Classical aryl and alkyl ZDP antiwear additives are ineffective in reducing wear with aromatic esters; the phosphate ester was a much better antiwear additive, and polyol esters are more amenable to ZDP treatment. Zeolites and clays were evaluated for filtration.

Wiczynski, T.A.; Marolewski, T.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Soybean and Coconut Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Combustion Characteristics in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the effects of soybean- and coconut-derived biodiesel fuels on combustion characteristics in a 1.7-liter direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five sets of fuels were studied: 2007 ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), 5% and 20% volumetric blends of soybean biodiesel with ULSD (soybean B5 and B20), and 5% and 20% volumetric blends of coconut biodiesel with ULSD (coconut B5 and B20). In conventional diesel combustion mode, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO/dx) emissions were similar for all fuels studied except soybean B20. Soybean B20 produced the lowest PM but the highest NO/dx emissions. Compared with conventional diesel combustion mode, high efficiency clean combustion (HECC) mode, achieved by increased EGR and combustion phasing, significantly reduced both PM and NO/dx emissions for all fuels studied at the expense of higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and an increase in fuel consumption (less than 4%). ULSD, soybean B5, and coconut B5 showed no difference in exhaust emissions. However, PM emissions increased slightly for soybean B20 and coconut B20. NO/dx emissions increased significantly for soybean B20, while those for coconut B20 were comparable to ULSD. Differences in the chemical and physical properties of soybean and coconut biodiesel fuels compared with ULSD, such as higher fuel-borne oxygen, greater viscosity, and higher boiling temperatures, play a key role in combustion processes and, therefore, exhaust emissions. Furthermore, the highly unsaturated ester composition in soybean biodiesel can be another factor in the increase of NO/dx emissions.

Han, Manbae [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Aftertreatment Technologies for Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to explore a combination of advanced injection control and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to reduce the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from a Tier 2 off-highway diesel engine to Tier 3 emission targets while maintaining fuel efficiency. The engine used in this investigation was a 2004 4.5L John Deere PowerTechTM; this engine was not equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Under the original CRADA, the principal objective was to assess whether Tier 3 PM emission targets could be met solely by increasing the rail pressure. Although high rail pressure will lower the total PM emissions, it has a contrary effect to raise NOx emissions. To address this effect, a urea-SCR system was used to determine whether the enhanced NOx levels, associated with high rail pressure, could be reduced to Tier 3 levels. A key attraction for this approach is that it eliminates the need for a Diesel particulate filter (DPF) to remove PM emissions. The original CRADA effort was also performed using No.2 Diesel fuel having a maximum sulfur level of 500 ppm. After a few years, the CRADA scope was expanded to include exploration of advanced injection strategies to improve catalyst regeneration and to explore the influence of urea-SCR on PM formation. During this period the emission targets also shifted to meeting more stringent Tier 4 emissions for NOx and PM, and the fuel type was changed to ultra-low sulfur Diesel (ULSD) having a maximum sulfur concentration of 15 ppm. New discoveries were made regarding PM formation at high rail pressures and the influences of oxidation catalysts and urea-SCR catalysts. These results are expected to provide a pathway for lower PM and NOx emissions for both off- and on-highway applications. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the research results were carried out on a regular basis (annual reports and meetings) followed by suggestions for improvement in ongoing work and direction for future work. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of experimentation, data analysis, data exchange, and technical consultation.

Kass, M.D.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Evaluating heavy-duty diesel engine aftertreatment devices with a split exhaust configuration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??West Virginia University evaluated diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) and lean-NOx catalysts as part of the Diesel Emissions Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) program. In order to perform… (more)

Corrigan, Eric R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Effect of E85 on RCCI Performance and Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine - SAE World Congress  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the effect of E85 on load expansion and FTP modal point emissions indices under reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) operation on a light-duty multi-cylinder diesel engine. A General Motors (GM) 1.9L four-cylinder diesel engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline or E85. Controlling the fuel reactivity in-cylinder by the adjustment of the ratio of premixed low-reactivity fuel (gasoline or E85) to direct injected high reactivity fuel (diesel fuel) has been shown to extend the operating range of high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) compared to the use of a single fuel alone as in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) or premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The effect of E85 on the Ad-hoc federal test procedure (FTP) modal points is explored along with the effect of load expansion through the light-duty diesel speed operating range. The Ad-hoc FTP modal points of 1500 rpm, 1.0bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP); 1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP; 2000rpm, 2.0bar BMEP; 2300rpm, 4.2bar BMEP; and 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP were explored. Previous results with 96 RON unleaded test gasoline (UTG-96) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) showed that with stock hardware, the 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP modal point was not obtainable due to excessive cylinder pressure rise rate and unstable combustion both with and without the use of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency and emissions performance of RCCI operation with E85 and ULSD is explored and compared against conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and RCCI operation with UTG 96 and ULSD.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Materials - Catalysts for Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's deNOx Catalyst Begins Extensive Diesel Engine Exhaust Testing Argonne's deNOx Catalyst Begins Extensive Diesel Engine Exhaust Testing denox monolith Argonne's deNOx catalyst can be prepared as a powder or a monolith. chris marshall Principal investigator Chris Marshall shows the monolith form of the Argonne deNOx catalyst with a sensor inserted for testing. doug longman Mechanical engineer Doug Longman inserts the instrumented deNOx catalyst monolith into the aftertreatment chamber of Argonne's heavy-duty Caterpillar diesel test engine. Background Diesel engines, while efficient, produce many undesirable combustion byproducts in their exhaust. While we tend to think of the sooty exhaust products we see as the bad stuff, it is the less-visible exhaust products such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) that create bigger problems.

29

Comparative study of heavy-duty engine operation with diesel fuel and ignition-improved methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol can be made suitable for compression ignition engines by ignition-improving additives. The ignition improver demand can be minimized by increasing the compression ratio. The technical suitability of this fuel can be regarded as proven, since most of the problems connected with its use have been solved. Its economic viability, however, has still to be doubted. From an environmental point of view, ignition-improved methanol deserves great interest due to the total absence of soot in the exhaust and the considerably reduced NO/sub x/ emission.

Hardenberg, H.O.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Effect of Biodiesel Blending on the Speciation of Soluble Organic Fraction from a Light Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel was volumetrically blended with 2007 certification ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and run in a 1.7L direct-injection common rail diesel engine at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP). Engine fueling rate and injection timing were adjusted to maintain a constant load, while particulate samples were collected in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and with a dilution tunnel sampling train. The samples collected at these two locations were found to contain different levels of soluble organic fraction (SOF) and the different hydrocarbon species in the SOF. This observation indicates that traditional SOF measurements, in light of the specific sampling procedure used, may not be appropriate to DPF applications.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2003 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: Fuels and Lubrication, Part 2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) using Oil Sands Derived Fuels Stuart Neill National Research...

32

Tier 2 Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Results for a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigates the emission control system performance and system desulfurization effects on regulated and unregulated emissions in a light-duty diesel engine.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Thornton, M.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Fuel Characteristics on High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to understand fuel property effects on low temperature combustion (LTC) processes in a light-duty diesel engine. These types of combustion modes are often collectively referred to as high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A statistically designed set of research fuels, the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE), were used for this study. Engine conditions consistent with low speed cruise (1500 rpm, 2.6 bar BMEP) were chosen for investigating fuel property effects on HECC operation in a GM 1.9-L common rail diesel engine. The FACE fuel matrix includes nine combinations of fuel properties including cetane number (30 to 55), aromatic contents (20 to 45 %), and 90 % distillation temperature (270 to 340 C). HECC operation was achieved with high levels of EGR and adjusting injection parameters, e.g. higher fuel rail pressure and single injection event, which is also known as Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion. Engine performance, pollutant emissions, and details of the combustion process are discussed in this paper. Cetane number was found to significantly affect the combustion process with variations in the start of injection (SOI) timing, which revealed that the ranges of SOI timing for HECC operation and the PM emission levels were distinctively different between high cetane number (55) and low cetane number fuels (30). Low cetane number fuels showed comparable levels of regulated gas emissions with high cetane number fuels and had an advantage in PM emissions.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Han, Manbae [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

U.S. DRIVE Highlights of Technical Accomplishments 2011: Super Duty Diesel Truck with NOx Aftertreatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 U.S. DRIVE Highlight Advanced Combustion and Emission Control 2011 Super Duty Diesel Truck with NO x Aftertreatment Diesel engine aftertreatment: Minimizing NO x emissions with SCR. Ford's 2011 Super Duty diesel truck-which utilizes aftertreatment technology jointly developed by Ford and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-deliv- ered a multitude of firsts for the company. It was the first Ford diesel engine developed entirely in-house, the first to operate on B20 (a blend of 20% biofuel, 80% petroleum diesel), and the first to comply with

36

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

37

Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL/TM-200015 ORNL/TM-200015 MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions November 2000 Prepared by H. 1. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrolton, Illinois R. W. Crawford R.W. Crawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee - UT-BATTELLE -. ORNL-27 (4.00) II ORNL/TM-200015 A VECTOR APPROACH TO REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND ITS APPLICATION TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS H. T. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrollton, Illinois R. W. Crawford RWCrawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee November 2000 Prepared for Office of Energy Effkiency and Renewable Energy

38

Diesel Engine Light Truck Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program consists of two major contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). The first one under DE-FC05-97-OR22606, starting from 1997, was completed in 2001, and consequently, a final report was submitted to DOE in 2003. The second part of the contract was under DE-FC05-02OR22909, covering the program progress from 2002 to 2007. This report is the final report of the second part of the program under contract DE-FC05-02OR22909. During the course of this contract, the program work scope and objectives were significantly changed. From 2002 to 2004, the DELTA program continued working on light-duty engine development with the 4.0L V6 DELTA engine, following the accomplishments made from the first part of the program under DE-FC05-97-OR22606. The program work scope in 2005-2007 was changed to the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment. This final report will cover two major technical tasks. (1) Continuation of the DELTA engine development to demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies and to demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages, covering progress made from 2002 to 2004. (2) DPF soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment from 2005-2007.

None

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Diesel Engine Analysis Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides a thorough background on diesel engine analysis including combustion, vibration, and ultrasonic analysis theory. Interpretation of results is also provided. This guide is intended to enable nuclear utility personnel to make informed decisions regarding the nature and use of diesel engine analysis, including how to set up an effective program, how to establish analysis guidelines, how to make use of the resulting data to plan maintenance, determine the causes of off-design operating co...

1997-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Diesel Engine Alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are basically three different modes of combustion possible for use in reciprocating engines. These include, diffusion burning, as occurs in current diesel engines, flame propagation combustion such as used in conventional SI engines, and homogeneous combustion such as is used in the SwRI HCCI engine. Diesel engines currently offer significant fuel consumption benefits relative to other powerplants for on and off road applications; however, costs and efficiency may become problems as the emissions standards become even more stringent. This presentation presents a discussion of the potentials of HCCI and flame propagation engines as alternatives to the diesel engines. It is suggested that as the emissions standards become more and more stringent, the advantages of the diesel may disappear. The potential for HCCI is limited by the availability of the appropriate fuel. The potential of flame propagation engines is limited by several factors including knock, EGR tolerance, high BMEP operation, and throttling. These limitations are discussed in the context of potential for improvement of the efficiency of the flame propagation engine.

Ryan, T

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

CONTROL OF DIESEL ENGINE UREA SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A systematic nonlinear control methodology for urea-SCR systems applicable for light-to-heavy-duty Diesel engine platforms in a variety of on-road, off-road, and marine applications is developed… (more)

Hsieh, Ming-Feng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Analysis of C1, C2, and C10 through C33 particle-phase and semi-volatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engines Aftertreatment technology Diesel particulate filter Chemical speciation a b s t r a c t To meet by individual aftertreatment components using the same engine and fuel has been assessed and published engine emissions have made it necessary to implement exhaust aftertreat- ment technology to lower

Wu, Mingshen

44

Effects of a Zeolite-Selective Catalytic Reduction System on Comprehensive Emissions from a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and also from the same engine equipped with the exhaust aftertreatment system. The results have shown engine equipped with a zeolite urea-SCR aftertreatment system will be made to evaluate the effects to a baseline measurement from the same engine equipped with no exhaust aftertreatment system. The majority

Wu, Mingshen

45

NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines-Testing and Simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This feasibility study of NOx adsorbers in heavy-duty diesel engines examined three configurations (dual-leg, single-leg and single-leg-bypass) in an integrated experimental setup, composed of a Detroit Diesel Class-8 truck engine, a catalyzed diesel particulate filter and the NOx absorber system. The setup also employed a reductant injection concept, sensors and advanced control strategies.

Hakim, N; Hoelzer, J.; Liu, Y.

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Cermet Filters To Reduce Diesel Engine Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pollution from diesel engines is a significant part of our nation's air-quality problem. Even under the more stringent standards for heavy-duty engines set to take effect in 2004, these engines will continue to emit large amounts of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, both of which affect public health. To address this problem, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) invented a self-cleaning, high temperature, cermet filter that reduces heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. The main advantage of the INEEL cermet filter, compared to current technology, is its ability to destroy carbon particles and NOx in diesel engine exhaust. As a result, this technology is expected to improve our nation's environmental quality by meeting the need for heavy-duty diesel engine emissions control. This paper describes the cermet filter technology and the initial research and development effort.Diesel engines currently emit soot and NOx that pollute our air. It is expected that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will begin tightening the regulatory requirements to control these emissions. The INEEL's self-cleaning, high temperature cermet filter provides a technology to clean heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. Under high engine exhaust temperatures, the cermet filter simultaneously removes carbon particles and NOx from the exhaust gas. The cermet filter is made from inexpensive starting materials, via net shape bulk forming and a single-step combustion synthesis process, and can be brazed to existing structures. It is self-cleaning, lightweight, mechanically strong, thermal shock resistant, and has a high melting temperature, high heat capacity, and controllable thermal expansion coefficient. The filter's porosity is controlled to provide high removal efficiency for carbon particulate. It can be made catalytic to oxidize CO, H2, and hydrocarbons, and reduce NOx. When activated by engine exhaust, the filter produces NH3 and light hydrocarbon gases that can effectively destroy the NOx in the exhaust. The following sections describe cermet filter technology and properties of the INEEL filter.

Kong, Peter

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

Chan, A.K.

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

48

Engines - Emissions Control - cerium-oxide catalyst, diesel,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Control Heavy duty diesel vehicles product particulate matter emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that heavy-duty diesel vehicles have...

49

Development of Low Temperature Combustion Modes to Reduce Overall Emissions from a Medium-Duty, Four Cylinder Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low temperature combustion (LTC) is an appealing new method of combustion that promises low nitric oxides and soot emissions while maintaining or improving on engine performance. The three main points of this study were to develop and validate an engine model in GT-Power capable of implementing LTC, to study parametrically exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and injection timing effects on performance and emissions, and to investigate methods to decrease pressure rise rates during LTC operation. The model was validated at nine different operating points, 3 speeds and 3 loads, while the parametric studies were conducted on 6 of the 9 operating points, 3 speeds and 2 loads. The model consists of sections that include: cylinders, ports, intake and exhaust manifolds, EGR system, and turbocharger. For this model, GT-Power calculates the combustion using a multi-zone, quasi-dimensional model and a knock-induced combustion model. The main difference between them is that the multi-zone model is directly injected while the knock model is port injected. A variety of sub models calculate the fluid flow and heat transfer. A parametric study varying the EGR and the injection timing to determine the optimal combination was conducted using the multi-zone model while a parametric study that just varies EGR is carried out using the knock model. The first parametric study showed that the optimal EGR and injection timing combination for the low loads occurred at high levels of EGR (60 percent) and advanced injection timings (30 to 40 crank angle degrees before top dead center). The optimal EGR and injection timing combination for the high loads occurred at low levels of EGR (30 percent to 40 percent) and retarded injection timings (7.5 to 5 crank angle degrees before top dead center). The knock model determined that the ideal EGR ratio for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) operation varied from 30 percent to 45 percent, depending on the operating condition. Three methods were investigated as possible ways to reduce pressure rise rates during LTC operation. The only feasible method was the multiple injection strategy which provided dramatically reduced pressure rise rates across all EGR levels and injection timings.

Breen, Jonathan Robert

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty Vehicles? ... the automobile manufacturers probably face the largest diesel-vehicle challenges in the ...

51

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Diesel Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

52

VALIDATION AND RESULTS OF A PSEUDO-MULTI-ZONE COMBUSTION TRAJECTORY PREDICTION MODEL FOR CAPTURING SOOT AND NOX FORMATION ON A MEDIUM DUTY DIESEL ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A pseudo-multi-zone phenomenological model has been created with the ultimate goal of supporting efforts to enable broader commercialization of low temperature combustion modes in diesel engines. The benefits of low temperature combustion are the simultaneous reduction in soot and nitric oxide emissions and increased engine efficiency if combustion is properly controlled. Determining what qualifies as low temperature combustion for any given engine can be difficult without expensive emissions analysis equipment. This determination can be made off-line using computer models or through factory calibration procedures. This process could potentially be simplified if a real-time prediction model could be implemented to run for any engine platform this is the motivation for this study. The major benefit of this model is the ability for it to predict the combustion trajectory, i.e. local temperature and equivalence ratio in the burning zones. The model successfully captures all the expected trends based on the experimental data and even highlights an opportunity for simply using the average reaction temperature and equivalence ratio as an indicator of emissions levels alone - without solving formation sub-models. This general type of modeling effort is not new, but a major effort was made to minimize the calculation duration to enable implementation as an input to real-time next-cycle engine controller Instead of simply using the predicted engine out soot and NOx levels, control decisions could be made based on the trajectory. This has the potential to save large amounts of calibration time because with minor tuning (the model has only one automatically determined constant) it is hoped that the control algorithm would be generally applicable.

Bittle, Joshua A. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Jacobs, Timothy J. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by weight [6]. The potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

Boehman, Andre L.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Membrane-Based Air Composition Control for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: A Benefit and Cost Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the methodologies and results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to assess the benefits and costs of several membrane-based technologies. The technologies evaluated will be used in automotive emissions-control and performance-enhancement systems incorporated into light-duty diesel vehicle engines. Such engines are among the technologies that are being considered to power vehicles developed under the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from diesel engines have long been considered a barrier to use of diesels in urban areas. Recently, particulate matter (PM) emissions have also become an area of increased concern because of new regulations regarding emissions of particulate matter measuring 2.5 micrometers or less (PM{sub 2.5}). Particulates are of special concern for diesel engines in the PNGV program; the program has a research goal of 0.01 gram per mile (g/mi) of particulate matter emissions under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle. This extremely low level (one-fourth the level of the Tier II standard) could threaten the viability of using diesel engines as stand-alone powerplants or in hybrid-electric vehicles. The techniques analyzed in this study can reduce NO{sub x} and particulate emissions and even increase the power density of the diesel engines used in light-duty diesel vehicles.

K. Stork; R. Poola

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Fuel Sulfur Effects on a Medium-Duty Diesel Pick-Up with a NOx Adsorber, Diesel Particle Filter Emissions Control System: 2000-Hour Aging Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the emission results of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst and a diesel particle filter in a medium-duty, diesel pick-up truck.

Thornton, M.; Webb, C. C.; Weber, P. A.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Domingo, Norberto [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Utiization of alternate fuels in diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments during three years entitled The Utilization of Alternate Fuels in Diesel Engines are summarized. Experiments were designed and test equipment set-up for the purpose of evaluating the use of methanol as a fumigant for light-duty Diesel engine service. The major experimental results were obtained from a multicylinder automotive Diesel engine. However, fundamental studies employing a GC/micro-reactor and a constant volume combustion bomb were also started. The purpose of this work was to measure some of the chemical and physical properties of methanol and methanol-air mixtures. The laminar flame velocity for various mixtures has been measured in the combustion bomb and thermal degradation studies have begun in the GC/micro-reactor. An Oldsmobile 5.7 liter V/8 Diesel engine was fumigated with methanol in amounts up to 40% of the fuel energy. The primary objectives of the study were to determine the effect of methanol fumigation on fuel efficiency, smoke, nitric oxide emission, and the occurrence of severe knock. An assessment of the biological activity for samples of the raw exhaust particulate and its soluble organic extract was also made using boh the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test and the B. subtilis Comptest. Generally, methanol fumigation was found to decrease NO emission for all conditions, to have a slight effect on smoke opacity, and to have a beneficial effect on fuel efficiency at higher loads. Also at higher loads, the methanol was found to induce what was defined as knock limited operation. The biological activity of the raw particulate matter was fond to be less than that of its soluble organic extract. However, for both the fumigation of methanol did enhance the biological activity.

Lestz, S.S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

BPM Diesel Engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel Engineering" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBPMDieselEngineering&oldid342997" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations...

60

Review of Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) engine facility is under development. Recent experimental results to be discussed are: the effects of injection timing and diluent addition on late-combustion soot burnout, diesel-spray ignition and premixed-burn behavior, a comparison of the combustion characteristics of M85 (a mixture of 85% methanol and 15% gasoline) and DF2 (No.2 diesel reference fuel), and a description of our HCCI experimental program and modeling work.

Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect

Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) is currently developing four different auxiliary generator designs that are used to convert a portion (5 to 20%) of the waste heat from vehicle engines exhaust directly to electricity. The four designs range from 200 Watts to 10 kW. The furthest along is the 1 kW Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator (DTTEG) for heavy duty Class 8 Diesel trucks, which, under this program, has been subjected to 543,000 equivalent miles of bouncing and jarring on PACCARâ??s test track. Test experience on an earlier version of the DTTEG on the same track showed the need for design modifications incorporated in DTTEG Mod 2, such as a heavy duty shock mounting system and reinforcement of the electrical leads mounting system, the thermocouple mounting system and the thermoelectric module restraints. The conclusion of the 543,000 mile test also pointed the way for an upgrading to heavy duty hose or flex connections for the internal coolant connections for the TEG, and consideration of a separate lower temperature cooling loop with its own radiator. Fuel savings of up to $750 per year and a three to five year payback are believed to be possible with the 5 % efficiency modules. The economics are expected to improve considerably to approach a two year payback when the 5 kW to 10 kW generators make it to the market in a few years with a higher efficiency (20%) thermoelectric module system called Quantum Wells, which are currently under development by Hi-Z. Ultimately, as automation takes over to reduce material and labor costs in the high volume production of QW modules, a one year payback for the 5 kW to10 kW generator appears possible. This was one of the stated goals at the beginning of the project. At some future point in time, with the DTTEG becoming standard equipment on all trucks and automobiles, fuel savings from the 25% conversion of exhaust heat to useable electricity nationwide equates to a 10% reduction in the 12 to 15 million barrels per day of imported oil, that much less air pollution, and an equivalent reduction in the trade deficit, which is expected to lower the inflation rate.

N.B. Elsner; J.C. Bass; S. Ghamaty; D. Krommenhoek; A. Kushch; D. Snowden; S. Marchetti

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

OVERVIEW OF EMERGING CLEAN DIESEL ENGINE TECHNOLOGY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines are the most realistic technology to achieve a major improvement in fuel economy in the next decade. In the US light truck market, i.e. Sport Utility Vehicles , pick-up trucks and mini-vans, diesel engines can more than double the fuel economy of similarly rated spark ignition (SI) gasoline engines currently in these vehicles. These new diesel engines are comparable to the SI engines in noise levels and 0 to 60 mph acceleration. They no longer have the traditional ''diesel smell.'' And the new diesel engines will provide roughly twice the service life. This is very significant for resale value which could more than offset the initial premium cost of the diesel engine over that of the SI gasoline engine. So why are we not seeing more diesel engine powered personal vehicles in the U.S.? The European auto fleet is comprised of a little over 30 percent diesel engine powered vehicles while current sales are about 50 percent diesel. In France, over 70 percent of the luxury class cars i.e. Mercedes ''S'' Class, BMW 700 series etc., are sold with the diesel engine option selected. Diesel powered BMW's are winning auto races in Germany. These are a typical of the general North American perspective of diesel powered autos. The big challenge to commercial introduction of diesel engine powered light trucks and autos is compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 2, 2007 emissions standards. Specifically, 0.07gm/mile Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and 0.01 gm/mile particulates (PM). Although the EPA has set a series of bins of increasing stringency until the 2007 levels are met, vehicle manufacturers appear to want some assurance that Tier 2, 2007 can be met before they commit an engine to a vehicle.

Fairbanks, John

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

Alternative fuels for heavy duty engines: Status of fleet trials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of Annex 3 are to collect, assess and disseminate data on the use of methanol and natural gas in heavy duty compression ignition engines. Originally, the objective was directed at methanol, but in 1990 the mandate of Annex 3 was broadened to include natural gas. This is the latest update on field trials using these two fuels. The report outlines progress being made and identifies major trends. The more important events since the last progress report include: the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Certification of Detroit Diesel Corporation's 6V-92 methanol engine; the introduction of transit buses in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, using DDC methanol engines; an introduction of two DDC engined ethanol fueled transit buses at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada; the testing of catalytic converters, by Detroit Diesel Corporation, with alcohol powered engines; the discontinuance of methanol in MAN engines/buses at Seattle Metro; a tender for over 100 methanol powered transit buses for South Coast Rapid Transit District (SCRTD), Los Angeles, California; the potential purchase of an additional 150 methanol powered buses for SCRTD, in addition to 10 buses for Sacramento Regional Transit District; and, the expanded interest of transit properties in using natural gas in both compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) engines. 21 figs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Staged direct injection diesel engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

Baker, Quentin A. (San Antonio, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The control of NOx (NO and NO2) emissions from so-called ‘lean-burn’ vehicle engines remains a challenge. In this program, we have been developing a novel plasma/catalyst technology for the remediation of NOx under lean (excess oxygen) conditions, specifically for compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) diesel engines that have significant fuel economy benefits over conventional stoichiometric gasoline engines. Program efforts included: (1) improving the catalyst and plasma reactor efficiencies for NOx reduction; (2) studies to reveal important details of the reaction mechanism(s) that can then guide our catalyst and reactor development efforts; (3) evaluating the performance of prototype systems on real engine exhaust; and (4) studies of the effects of the plasma on particulate matter (PM) in real diesel engine exhaust. Figure 1 is a conceptual schematic of a plasma/catalyst device, which also shows our current best understanding of the role of the various components of the overall device for reducing NOx from the exhaust of a CIDI engine. When this program was initiated, it was not at all clear what the plasma was doing and, as such, what class of catalyst materials might be expected to produce good results. With the understanding of the role of the plasma (as depicted in Figure 1) obtained in this program, faujasite zeolite-based catalysts were developed and shown to produce high activity for NOx reduction of plasma-treated exhaust in a temperature range expected for light-duty diesel engines. These materials are the subject of a pending patent application, and were recognized with a prestigious R&D100 Award in 2002. In addition, PNNL staff were awarded a Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award in 2003 “For Excellence in Technology Transfer”. The program also received the DOE’s 2001 CIDI Combustion and Emission Control Program Special Recognition Award and 2004 Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Special Recognition Award.

Barlow, Stephan E.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Howden, Ken; Hoard, John W.; Cho, Byong; Schmieg, Steven J.; Brooks, David J.; Nunn, Steven; Davis, Patrick

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-duty Vehicle Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diesel and hybrid technologies each have the potential to increase light-duty vehicle fuel economy by a third or more without loss of performance, yet these technologies have typically been excluded from technical assessments of fuel economy potential on the grounds that hybrids are too expensive and diesels cannot meet Tier 2 emissions standards. Recently, hybrid costs have come down and the few hybrid makes available are selling well. Diesels have made great strides in reducing particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions, and are likely though not certain to meet future standards. In light of these developments, this study takes a detailed look at the market potential of these two powertrain technologies and their possible impacts on light-duty vehicle fuel economy. A nested multinomial logit model of vehicle choice was calibrated to 2002 model year sales of 930 makes, models and engine-transmission configurations. Based on an assessment of the status and outlook for the two technologies, market shares were predicted for 2008, 2012 and beyond, assuming no additional increase in fuel economy standards or other new policy initiatives. Current tax incentives for hybrids are assumed to be phased out by 2008. Given announced and likely introductions by 2008, hybrids could capture 4-7% and diesels 2-4% of the light-duty market. Based on our best guesses for further introductions, these shares could increase to 10-15% for hybrids and 4-7% for diesels by 2012. The resulting impacts on fleet average fuel economy would be about +2% in 2008 and +4% in 2012. If diesels and hybrids were widely available across vehicle classes, makes, and models, they could capture 40% or more of the light-duty vehicle market.

Greene, D.L.

2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty Vehicles?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The presentation explores if diesel-fueled light-duty vehicle growth in the U.S. might be large enough to create refinery constraints that would hinder that growth.

Information Center

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

68

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The presentation explores if diesel-fueled light-duty vehicle growth in the U.S. might be large enough to create refinery constraints that would hinder that growth.

69

Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development Program, final report - tasks 4-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program is a multi-year, multi-phase effort to develop and demonstrate the critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection (LHR) engine concept for the long-haul, heavy-duty truck market. The ADECD Program has been partitioned into two phases. The first phase, Phase 1, was completed in 1986, resulting in definition of the Advanced Diesel Reference Engine (ADRE)III. The second phase, Phase 11/111, examines the feasibility of the ADRE concepts for application to the on-highway diesel engine. Phase 11/111 is currently underway. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies. The work has been performed by the Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) under Contract DEN3-329 with the NASA Lewis Research Center, who provide project management and technical direction.

Kaushal, T.S.; Weber, K.E.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 © 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Engine Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on

72

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions...

73

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Compression-Ignition - diesel, fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compression Ignition Engines Clean Diesel Technologies for Greener Performance Mechanical engineer Alan Kastengren examines a diesel injection nozzle used in Argonne's X-ray spray...

74

Simulating Study of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models to simulate the impact of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty (LD) diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results indicate that utilizing PCCI combustion significantly reduces fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions for the conventional diesel-powered vehicle with NOx and particulate emissions controls. These benefits result from a favorable engine speed-load distribution over the cycle combined with a corresponding reduction in the need to regenerate the LNT and DPF. However, the current PCCI technology appears to offer less potential benefit for diesel HEVs equipped with similar emissions controls. This is because PCCI can only be activated over a relatively small part of the drive cycle. Thus we conclude that future utilization of PCCI in diesel HEVs will require significant extension of the available speed-load range for PCCI and revision of current HEV engine management strategies before significant benefits can be realized.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Combustion Commonality and Differences Between HSDI and Heavy Duty Truck Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental understanding of the diesel spray and combustion process at the fundamental level has helped advance the virtual lab simulation tools. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based simulation has been globally verified in many engines, providing substantial credibility to the use of this technology in advanced engine development. This paper highlights the common aspects and differences between the smallbore HSDI and the larger displacement heavy-duty truck engine spray and combustion processes. Implications for combustion system strategies will be delineated. Detroit Diesel integrated ''Wired'' approach will be explained with pointers towards future tool enhancements.

Chen, Rong

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck Emissions in the Austin- San Marcos Area: August Denver, CO 80208 November 1998 UNIVERSITY Of DENVER #12;Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Trucks in Austin be observed by probing the exhaust. In the process of measuring the ratios, the remote sensing unit results

Denver, University of

77

Performance evaluation of diesel particulate filters on heavy duty vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters, or DPFs, are exhaust aftertreatment devices used to reduce exhaust emissions from diesel powered vehicles. Typical designs have a wall flow filter… (more)

Rosepiler, Stephen G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, we are pleased to introduce the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The mission of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program is to develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that enable Americans to use less petroleum for their vehicles. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program supports this mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines for light-, medium-, and heavy-duty highway vehicles that meet future Federal and state emissions regulations. The primary objective of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program is to improve the brake thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines from 30 to 45 percent for light-duty applications by 2010; and 40 to 55 percent for heavy-duty applications by 2012; while meeting cost, durability, and emissions constraints. R&D activities include work on combustion technologies that increase efficiency and minimize in-cylinder formation of emissions, as well as aftertreatment technologies that further reduce exhaust emissions. Work is also being conducted on ways to reduce parasitic and heat transfer losses through the development and application of thermoelectrics and turbochargers that include electricity generating capability, and conversion of mechanically driven engine components to be driven via electric motors. This introduction serves to outline the nature, current progress, and future directions of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The research activities of this Sub-Program are planned in conjunction with the FreedomCAR Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership and are carried out in collaboration with industry, national laboratories, and universities. Because of the importance of clean fuels in achieving low emissions, R&D activities are closely coordinated with the relevant activities of the Fuel Technologies Sub-Program, also within the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies. Research is also being undertaken on hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines to provide an interim hydrogen-based powertrain technology that promotes the longer-range FreedomCAR Partnership goal of transitioning to a hydrogen-fueled transportation system. Hydrogen engine technologies being developed have the potential to provide diesel-like engine efficiencies with near-zero emissions.

None

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

A homogenous combustion catalyst for fuel efficiency improvements in diesel engines fuelled with diesel and biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] The ferrous picrate based homogeneous combustion catalyst has been claimed to promote diesel combustion and improve fuel efficiency in diesel engines. However, the… (more)

Zhu, Mingming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Diesel 8 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Digg

82

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Diesel 7 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Digg

83

High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

THE DIESEL ENGINE'S CHALLENGE IN THE NEW MILLENIUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines are the dominant propulsion engine of choice for most of the commercial surface transportation applications in the world. Consider agricultural uses: Diesel engine power is used to prepare the soil, transport the bulk seed or seedlings, pump irrigation water, and spray fertilizers, mechanically harvest some crops and distribute the produce to market. Diesel engines power virtually all of the off-highway construction equipment. Deep water commercial freighters or containerships are almost all diesel engine powered. The passenger ships are primarily either diesel or a combination of diesel and gas turbine, referred to as CODAG or CODOG.

Fairbanks, John W.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Diesel Engine Idling Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Engine Idling Test In support of the Department of Energys FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of...

87

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Diesel Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Sprays Diesel Sprays Chris Powell and fuel spray xray beamline Christopher Powell, an engine research scientist, fits a specially designed X-ray pressure window to a high-pressure chamber used in diesel spray research. These windows allow Argonne researchers to use X-rays to probe diesel sprays under the high-density conditions found in diesel engines. Diesel sprays Diesel engines are significantly more fuel-efficient than their gasoline counterparts, so wider adoption of diesels in the U.S. would decrease the nationÂ’s petroleum consumption. However, diesels emit much higher levels of pollutants, especially particulate matter and NOx (nitrogen oxides). These emissions have prevented more manufacturers from introducing diesel passenger cars. Researchers are exploring ways to reduce pollution formation in the engine

88

Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

Perez, J. M.

2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Vibrational energy transfer in a diesel engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paths of vibrational energy transfer in a diesel engine were investigated in order to obtain insight into ways of reducing this transfer to the exterior surfaces and thereby reduce the radiated noise. The engine was tested in a nonrunning condition with simulated internal forces in order to study the different transfer paths separately. Vibration response measurements were made of individual engine components and lumped?parameter models were developed to simulate this response. These models were then used to determine component design changes that would reduce the energy transfer. Two design changes were implemented in the engine and a reduction of the energy transfer was achieved as predicted.

R. G. DeJong; R. H. Lyon

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Heavy-duty diesel vehicle Nox? aftertreatment in 2010 : the infrastructure and compliance challenges of urea-SCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasingly stringent heavy-duty vehicle emission regulations are prompting the use of PM and NOx aftertreatment systems in the US, the EU and Japan. In the US, the EPA Highway Diesel Rule, which will be fully implemented ...

Bodek, Kristian M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Engineering Design of a Continuous Duty $\\gamma$ -Production Proton Target for the Contraband Detection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Design of a Continuous Duty $\\gamma$ -Production Proton Target for the Contraband Detection System

Rathke, J; Klein, J

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Utilization of alternative fuels in diesel engines:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thrust of this resarch program has been to determine the effect of various alternative and synthetic fuels on the performance and emissions from Diesel engines. The purpose of research was to investigate the various fuels for extension of existing supplies or as emergency substitutes for Diesel fuels. Thus, the work did not emphasize optimization of the engines for a given fuel;the engines were generally run at manufacturers specifications for conventional fuels. During the various studies, regulated and unregualted emissions were investigated and the biological activity of the soluble organics on the particulate emissions was determined using the Ames test procedure. During the present contract period, three experimental programs were carried out. The first program investigated the utilization of methane and propane in an indirect injection, multicylinder engine. In the other two studies, a single cylinder direct injection Diesel engine was used to investigate the performance and emission characteristics of synthetic fuels derived from tar sands and oil shale and of three fuels derived from coal by the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) process. The body of this report consists of three chapters which summarize the experimental equipment, procedures, and major results from the studies of methane and propane fumigation, of synthetic fuels from oil shale and tar sands and of the coal-derived fuels.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Argonne TTRDC - Feature - Five Myths About Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Five Myths About Diesel Engines Five Myths About Diesel Engines by Louise Lerner Steve Ciatti Steve Ciatti in the Engine Research Facility Diesel engines, long confined to trucks and ships, are garnering more interest for their fuel efficiency and reduced carbon dioxide emissions relative to gasoline engines. Argonne mechanical engineer Steve Ciatti takes a crack at some of the more persistent myths surrounding the technology. Myth #1: Diesel is dirty. "We all have this image of trucks belching out dirty black smoke," Ciatti said. This smoke is particulate matter from diesel exhaust: soot and small amounts of other chemicals produced by the engine. But EPA emissions requirements have significantly tightened, and diesel engines now have to meet the same criteria as gasoline engines. They do

94

The Intelligent Study on Diesel-LNG Dual Fuel Marine Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a diesel engine named "X6170ZC" has been converted into a dual-fuel engine of diesel and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The principle, composition and characteristics of electronic control system for the engine have been introduced. An ... Keywords: engine, dual-fuel, intelligent

Zhang Liang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Coal-liquid fuel/diesel engine operating compatibility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is intended to assess the possibilities of using coal-derived liquids (CDL) represented by a specific type (SRC II) and shale-derived distillate fuel in blends of petroleum-derived fuels in medium-speed, high-output, heavy-duty diesel engines. Conclusions are as follows: (1) Blends of solvent refined coal and diesel fuel may be handled safely by experienced diesel engine mechanics. (2) A serious corrosion problem was found in the fuel pump parts when operating with solvent refined coal blended with petroleum. It is expected that a metallurgy change can overcome this problem. (3) Proper selection of materials for the fuel system is required to permit handling coal-derived liquid fuels. (4) A medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine can be operated on blends of solvent refined coal and petroleum without serious consequences save the fuel system corrosion previously mentioned. This is based on a single, short durability test. (5) As represented by the product evaluated, 100% shale-derived distillate fuel may be used in a medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine without significant consequences. (6) The shale product evaluated may be blended with petroleum distillate or petroleum residual materials and used as a fuel for medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engines. 7 references, 24 figures, 20 tables.

Hoffman, J.G.; Martin, F.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Emissions From Various Biodiesel Sources Compared to a Range of Diesel Fuels in DPF Equipped Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of various sources of petroleum-based and bio-based diesel fuels on regulated emissions and fuel economy in diesel particulate filter (DPF) equipped diesel engines. Two model year 2008 diesel engines were tested with nine fuels including a certification ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), local ULSD, high aromatic ULSD, low aromatic ULSD, and twenty percent blends of biodiesel derived from algae, camelina, soy, tallow, and yellow grease. Regulated emissions were measured over the heavy duty diesel transient test cycle. Measurements were also made of DPF-out particle size distribution and total particle count from a 13-mode steady state test using a fast mobility particle sizer. Test engines were a 2008 Cummins ISB and a 2008 International Maxx Force 10, both equipped with actively regenerated DPFs. Fuel consumption was roughly 2% greater over the transient test cycle for the B20 blends versus certification ULSD in both engines, consistent with the slightly lower energy content of biodiesel. Unlike studies conducted on older model engines, these engines equipped with diesel oxidation catalysts and DPFs showed small or no measurable fuel effect on the tailpipe emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM). No differences in particle size distribution or total particle count were seen in a comparison of certification ULSD and B20 soy, with the exception of engine idling conditions where B20 produced a small reduction in the number of nucleation mode particles. In the Cummins engine, B20 prepared from algae, camelina, soy, and tallow resulted in an approximately 2.5% increase in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compared to the base fuel. The International engine demonstrated a higher degree of variability for NO{sub x} emissions, and fuel effects could not be resolved (p > 0.05). The group of petroleum diesel test fuels produced a range of NO{sub x} emissions very similar to that caused by blending of biodiesel. Test cycles where an active regeneration of the DPF occurred resulted in a nearly threefold increase in NO{sub x} emissions and a 15% increase in fuel consumption. The full quantification of DPF regeneration events further complicates the accurate calculation of fuel impacts on emissions and fuel consumption.

Williams, A.; Burton, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.; Tester, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

VARIABLE CHARGE MOTION FOR 2007-2010 DIESEL ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of direct injection diesel engines in US heavy duty pickup truck applications is becoming increasingly popular with over 250,000 produced in 2002. The high torque density and greatly improved fuel consumption offer distinct advantages to the end user. 2007 and 2010 emissions legislation will present another set of technical and product cost challenges to this type of powertrain. The introduction of efficient aftertreatment systems is mandatory to the success of these engines but optimization of engine-out emissions is also a critical element. Much has been written on the improvements in modern fuel systems which offer great flexibility for the direct introduction of fuel into the cylinder. This paper presents complementary technologies which allow improved air/fuel mixing processes by the additional flexibility of variable in-cylinder charge motion. This approach is particularly applicable to pick-up truck engines, which require high BMEP levels across a wide engine speed range to offer the driveability demanded by the consumer. Design solutions for 2 valve and 4 valve engines are presented along with the potential emissions and fuel consumption benefits.

Maier, J

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

Remote Sensing of In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks D A N I E L A . B U R G A R D , G A R Y A . B I this study suggest that on-road remote sensing can detect illegal, high sulfur fuel use from individual heavy,HDDvehiclesemissionshavereceivedgrowing attentioninavarietyofstudiessuchaschassisdynamometers (5, 6), in a tunnel (7), and remote sensing (8-10) as well as one critical review (4

Denver, University of

99

Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine Transportation Research PIER Transportation of natural gas vehicles as a clean alternative is currently limited to smaller engine displacements and spark ignition, which results in lower performance. A large displacement natural gas engine has

100

9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transportation sector accounts for approximately 65% of US petroleum consumption. Consumption for light-duty vehicles has stabilized in the last 10--15 years; however, consumption in the heavy-duty sector has continued to increase. For various reasons, the US must reduce its dependence on petroleum. One significant way is to substitute alternative fuels (natural gas, propane, alcohols, and others) in place of petroleum fuels in heavy-duty applications. Most alternative fuels have the additional benefit of reduced exhaust emissions relative to petroleum fuels, thus providing a cleaner environment. The best long-term technology for heavy-duty alternative fuel engines is the 4-stroke cycle, direct injected (DI) engine using a single fuel. This DI, single fuel approach maximizes the substitution of alternative fuel for diesel and retains the thermal efficiency and power density of the diesel engine. This report summarizes the results of the first year (Phase 1) of this contract. Phase 1 focused on developing a 4-stroke cycle, DI single fuel, alternative fuel technology that will duplicate or exceed diesel power density and thermal efficiency, while having exhaust emissions equal to or less than the diesel. Although the work is currently on a 3500 Series DING engine, the work is viewed as a basic technology development that can be applied to any engine. Phase 1 concentrated on DING engine component durability, exhaust emissions, and fuel handling system durability. Task 1 focused on identifying primary areas (e.g., ignition assist and gas injector systems) for future durability testing. In Task 2, eight mode-cycle-averaged NO{sub x} emissions were reduced from 11.8 gm/hp-hr (baseline conditions) to 2.5 gm/hp-hr (modified conditions) on a 3501 DING engine. In Task 3, a state-of-the-art fuel handling system was identified.

NONE

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

Clean and Efficient Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task 1 was to design study for fuel-efficient system configuration. The objective of task 1 was to perform a system design study of locomotive engine configurations leading to a 5% improvement in fuel efficiency. Modeling studies were conducted in GT-Power to perform this task. GT-Power is an engine simulation tool that facilitates modeling of engine components and their system level interactions. It provides the capability to evaluate a variety of engine technologies such as exhaust gas circulation (EGR), variable valve timing, and advanced turbo charging. The setup of GT-Power includes a flexible format that allows the effects of variations in available technologies (i.e., varying EGR fractions or fuel injection timing) to be systematically evaluated. Therefore, development can be driven by the simultaneous evaluation of several technology configurations.

None

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Engines - Particulate Studies - Revealing the True Nature of Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Nanoparticle Research: Revealing the True Nature of Diesel Particulates Engine Nanoparticle Research: Revealing the True Nature of Diesel Particulates Thermophoretic sampling device Argonne's test engine with the thermophoretic sampling device attached. Nanostructure of graphitic diesel soot under high engine load A transmission electron microscope reveals the nanostructures of graphitic diesel soot sampled under high engine loads. Morphology of particles collected from diesel combustion with iso-paraffin-enriched fuel. Morphology of particles collected from diesel combution with iso-paraffin-enriched fuel. Amorphous soot particle collected from biodiesel combustion undera low-temperature condition. Amorphous soot particle collected from biodiesel combustion under low temperature conditions. Researchers have many ideas about how to reduce the soot produced by diesel

104

Argonne TTRDC - Feature - Combining Gas and Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combining Gas and Diesel Engines Could Yield the Best of Both Worlds Combining Gas and Diesel Engines Could Yield the Best of Both Worlds by Louise Lerner Steve Ciatti Steve Ciatti in the Engine Research Facility It may be hard to believe, but the beloved gasoline engine that powers more than 200 million cars across America every day didn't get its status because it's the most efficient engine. Diesel engines can be more than twice as efficient, but they spew soot and pollutants into the air. Could researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory engineer a union between the two-combining the best of both? Steve Ciatti, a mechanical engineer at Argonne, is heading a team to explore the possibilities of a gasoline-diesel engine. The result, so far, is cleaner than a diesel engine and almost twice as efficient as a typical

105

Cummins Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins has studied requirements of the Light Truck Automotive market in the United States and believes that the proposed V-family of engines meets those needs. Design and development of the V-family engine system continues and has expanded. The engine system is a difficult one, since the combined requirements of a very fuel-efficient commercial diesel, and the performance and sociability requirements of a gasoline engine are needed. Results of testing show that the engine can meet requirements for fuel economy and emissions in the Tier 2 interim period from 2004 to 2008. Advanced results show that the full Tier 2 results for 2008 and beyond can be achieved on a laboratory basis.

John H. Stang; David E. Koeberlein; Michael J. Ruth

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Proceedings of the 1998 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop [DEER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop was held July 6--9, 1998 in Castine, Maine. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on reduction of diesel engine emissions. Attention was focused on the following: agency/organization concerns on engine emissions; diesel engine issues and challenges; health risks from diesel engines emissions; fuels and lubrication technologies; non-thermal plasma and urea after-treatment technologies; and diesel engine technologies for emission reduction 1 and 2.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on AddThis.com... Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search Search our database to find and compare specific vehicles, engines, or hybrid propulsion systems and generate printable reports.

108

THE EFFECTS OF BIODIESEL BLENDS AND ARCO EC-DIESEL ON EMISSIONS from LIGHT HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chassis dynamometer tests were performed on 7 light heavy-duty diesel trucks comparing the emissions of a California diesel fuel with emissions from 4 other fuels: ARCO EC-diesel (EC-D) and three 20% biodiesel blends (1 yellow grease and 2 soy-based). The EC-D and the yellow grease biodiesel blend both showed significant reductions in THC and CO emissions over the test vehicle fleet. EC-D also showed reductions in PM emission rates. NOx emissions were comparable for the different fuel types over the range of vehicles tested. The soy-based biodiesel blends did not show significant or consistent emissions differences over all test vehicles. Total carbon accounted for more than 70% of the PM mass for 4 of the 5 sampled vehicles. Elemental and organic carbon ratios varied significantly from vehicle-to-vehicle but showed very little fuel dependence. Inorganic species represented a smaller portion of the composite total, ranging from 0.2 to 3.3% of the total PM. Total PAH emissions ranged from approximately 1.8 mg/mi to 67.8 mg/mi over the different vehicle/fuel combinations representing between 1.6 and 3.8% of the total PM mass.

Durbin, Thomas

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nonthermal aftertreatment of diesel engine exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of this work has been to develop a nonthermal plasma process to reduce NO{sub x} in diesel exhaust gas. A secondary objective has been to study the possibility of particulate matter (soot) reduction by the same technique. The early work revealed a fundamental difficulty with this NO{sub x} reduction approach in the gas environment of the diesel engine exhaust. These observations necessitated a thorough study of the unfavorable chemistry in the hope that knowledge of the chemical mechanism would offer an opportunity to make the approach useful for NO{sub x} reduction. Whereas fundamental understanding of the mechanism has been obtained, the authors have not found any measure that would make the approach meet its original objective.

Wallman, P.H.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

California's efforts to clean up diesel engines have helped reduce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts California's efforts to clean up diesel engines have helped reduce impact of climate change on state, study finds CARB black carbon study shows decrease in emissions...

111

Simulating the Impact of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions of Particulates and NOx  

SciTech Connect

We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models implemented in Matlab/Simulink to simulate the effect of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated engine is capable of both conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) over real transient driving cycles. Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results demonstrate that, in the simulated conventional vehicle, PCCI can significantly reduce fuel consumption and emissions by reducing the need for LNT and DPF regeneration. However, the opportunity for PCCI operation in the simulated HEV is limited because the engine typically experiences higher loads and multiple stop-start transients that are outside the allowable PCCI operating range. Thus developing ways of extending the PCCI operating range combined with improved control strategies for engine and emissions control management will be especially important for realizing the potential benefits of PCCI in HEVs.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts January 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. Unless referenced otherwise, the information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester.

113

Drive cycle analysis of butanol/diesel blends in a light-duty vehicle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential exists to displace a portion of the petroleum diesel demand with butanol and positively impact engine-out particulate matter. As a preliminary investigation, 20% and 40% by volume blends of butanol with ultra low sulfur diesel fuel were operated in a 1999 Mercedes Benz C220 turbo diesel vehicle (Euro III compliant). Cold and hot start urban as well as highway drive cycle tests were performed for the two blends of butanol and compared to diesel fuel. In addition, 35 MPH and 55 MPH steady-state tests were conducted under varying road loads for the two fuel blends. Exhaust gas emissions, fuel consumption, and intake and exhaust temperatures were acquired for each test condition. Filter smoke numbers were also acquired during the steady-state tests.

Miers, S. A.; Carlson, R. W.; McConnell, S. S.; Ng, H. K.; Wallner, T.; LeFeber, J.; Energy Systems; Esper Images Video & Multimedia

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Investigation Of The Ion Current Signal In Gen-Set Turbocharged Diesel Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel powered generator sets have traditionally been and remain the number-one choice for standby and emergency power systems. As an established engine technology, diesel engines… (more)

Badawy, Tamer Hassan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Numerical Simulation on Forced Swirl Combustion Chamber in Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept of forced swirl combustion chamber in diesel engine is proposed in this paper. It can be used to enhance the intensity of swirl flow in the cylinder and accelerate the rate of air-fuel mixture process by designing the special structure in the ... Keywords: diesel engine, forced swirl, combustion chamber, simulation

Yong Shang; Fu-shui Liu; Xiang-rong Li

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Numerical Simulation on Forced Swirl Combustion Chamber in Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept of forced swirl combustion chamber in diesel engine is proposed in this paper. It can be used to enhance the intensity of swirl flow in the cylinder and accelerate the rate of air-fuel mixture process by designing the special structure in the ... Keywords: diesel engine, forced swirl, combustion chamber, simulation

Shang Yong; Liu Fu-shui; Li Xiang-rong

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on AddThis.com... Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods To maintain the Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search tool, the National

118

Study of deposit formation inside diesel injectors nozzles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel engines are widely used in heavy duty transportation applications such as in trucks, buses and ships because of their reliability and high torque output. A key diesel technology is the injection system which is ...

Wang, YinChun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

NONE

1995-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Piston Bowl Optimization for RCCI Combustion in a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an engine combustion strategy that that produces low NO{sub x} and PM emissions with high thermal efficiency. Previous RCCI research has been investigated in single-cylinder heavy-duty engines. The current study investigates RCCI operation in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine at 3 operating points. These operating points were chosen to cover a range of conditions seen in the US EPA light-duty FTP test. The operating points were chosen by the Ad Hoc working group to simulate operation in the FTP test. The fueling strategy for the engine experiments consisted of in-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel-injection (PFI) of gasoline and early-cycle, direct-injection (DI) of diesel fuel. At these 3 points, the stock engine configuration is compared to operation with both the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and custom machined pistons designed for RCCI operation. The pistons were designed with assistance from the KIVA 3V computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. By using a genetic algorithm optimization, in conjunction with KIVA, the piston bowl profile was optimized for dedicated RCCI operation to reduce unburned fuel emissions and piston bowl surface area. By reducing these parameters, the thermal efficiency of the engine was improved while maintaining low NOx and PM emissions. Results show that with the new piston bowl profile and an optimized injection schedule, RCCI brake thermal efficiency was increased from 37%, with the stock EURO IV configuration, to 40% at the 2,600 rev/min, 6.9 bar BMEP condition, and NOx and PM emissions targets were met without the need for exhaust after-treatment.

Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Kokjohn, Sage [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Regulated Emissions from Biodiesel Tested in Heavy-Duty Engines Meeting 2004 Emission Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel produced from soybean oil, canola oil, yellow grease, and beef tallow was tested in two heavy-duty engines. The biodiesels were tested neat and as 20% by volume blends with a 15 ppm sulfur petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The test engines were the following: 2002 Cummins ISB and 2003 DDC Series 60. Both engines met the 2004 U.S. emission standard of 2.5 g/bhp-h NO{sub x}+HC (3.35 g/kW-h) and utilized exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All emission tests employed the heavy-duty transient procedure as specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Reduction in PM emissions and increase in NO{sub x} emissions were observed for all biodiesels in all engines, confirming observations made in older engines. On average PM was reduced by 25% and NO{sub x} increased by 3% for the two engines tested for a variety of B20 blends. These changes are slightly larger in magnitude, but in the same range as observed in older engines. The cetane improver 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate was shown to have no measurable effect on NO{sub x} emissions from B20 in these engines, in contrast to observations reported for older engines. The effect of intake air humidity on NO{sub x} emissions from the Cummins ISB was quantified. The CFR NO{sub x}/humidity correction factor was shown to be valid for an engine equipped with EGR, operating at 1700 m above sea level, and operating on conventional or biodiesel.

McCormick, R. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Black, S.; Ireland, J.; McDaniel, T.; Williams, A.; Frailey, M.; Sharp, C. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Feature - Air Force Fellows helping work toward smarter diesel engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Force Fellows helping work toward smarter diesel engines Air Force Fellows helping work toward smarter diesel engines Air Force Fellows Clint Abell (left) and Jeff Gillen work on Smarter Diesel Engine (SDE) 21. The project involves using ion sensors to help the engine run at maximum efficiency. Air Force Fellows Clint Abell (left) and Jeff Gillen work on Smarter Diesel Engine (SDE) 21. The project involves using ion sensors to help the engine run at maximum efficiency. (Photo by Wes Agresta) One of the three core values of the Air Force is "excellence in all we do." So it should be no surprise that there are currently two Air Force officers here at Argonne studying ways to improve the efficiency of military vehicles. Lieutenant Colonel Jeff Gillen and Major Clint Abell are the fourth set of Air Force Fellows to spend time at Argonne, but the first to be stationed

123

Examinatal Study on Common Rail Diesel Engine for Multi-injection Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on diesel engine equipped with common rail, the multi-injection strategies common rail diesel engine test bed is established with NI test system. In this test bed, the influences of optimized multi-injection strategies to diesel engine performances ... Keywords: common rail, diesel engine, multi-injection, emission

An Shijie; Chang Hanbao; Xu Hongjun

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging conditions were provided by our collaborators at John Deere Power Systems. Among various zeolites reported here, CuFe-SSZ-13 offers the best NO{sub x} conversion activity in 150-650 C range and is hydrothermally stable when tested under accelerated aging conditions. It is important to note that Cu-SSZ-13 is now a commercial catalyst for NO{sub x} treatment on diesel passenger vehicles. Thus, our catalyst performs better than the commercial catalyst under fast SCR conditions. We initially focused on fast SCR tests to enable us to screen catalysts rapidly. Only the catalysts that exhibit high NO{sub x} conversion at low temperatures are selected for screening under varying NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio. The detailed tests of CuFe-SSZ-13 show that CuFe-SSZ-13 is more effective than commercial Cu-SSZ-13 even at NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio of 0.1. The mechanistic studies, employing stop-flow diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS), suggest that high concentration of NO{sup +}, generated by heterobimetallic zeolites, is probably responsible for their superior low temperature NO{sub x} activity. The results described in this report clearly show that we have successfully completed the first step in a new emission treatment catalyst which is synthesis and laboratory testing employing simulated exhaust. The next step in the catalyst development is engine testing. Efforts are in progress to obtain follow-on funding to carry out scale-up and engine testing to facilitate commercialization of this technology.

Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Yang, Xiaofan [ORNL; Debusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Wu, Zili [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Improving supply chain responsiveness for diesel engine remanufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving a significant reduction in order-to-shipment lead-time of remanufactured diesel engines can dramatically decrease the amount of finished goods inventory that Caterpillar needs to carry in order to meet its delivery ...

Méndez de la Luz, Diego A., 1979-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997), “Emission from CNG and diesel Refuse Haulers Using1997), “Emission from CNG and diesel Refuse Haulers Using

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Synergies of PCCI-Type Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that future NOx and PM emission targets for diesel engines cannot be met solely via advanced combustion over the full engine drive cycle. Therefore some combination of advanced combustion methodology with an aftertreatment technology will be required. In this study, NOx reduction, fuel efficiency, and regeneration performance of lean NOx trap (LNT) were evaluated for four operating conditions. The combustion approaches included baseline engine operation with and without EGR, two exhaust enrichment methods (post injection and delayed injection), and one advanced combustion mode to enable high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A 1.7 liter 4-cylinder diesel engine was operated under five conditions, which represent key interest points for light-duty diesel operation. At the low load setting the exhaust temperature was too low to enable LNT regeneration and oxidation; however, HECC (low NOx) was achievable. HECC was also reached under more moderate loads and the exhaust temperatures were high enough to enable even further NOx reductions by the LNT. At high loads HECC becomes difficult but the LNT performance improves and acceptable regeneration can be met with enrichment methodologies.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF DIESEL ENGINE NOX EMISSIONS USING ETHANOL AS A REDUCTANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NOx emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine were reduced by more than 90% and 80% utilizing a full-scale ethanol-SCR system for space velocities of 21000/h and 57000/h respectively. These results were achieved for catalyst temperatures between 360 and 400 C and for C1:NOx ratios of 4-6. The SCR process appears to rapidly convert ethanol to acetaldehyde, which subsequently slipped past the catalyst at appreciable levels at a space velocity of 57000/h. Ammonia and N2O were produced during conversion; the concentrations of each were higher for the low space velocity condition. However, the concentration of N2O did not exceed 10 ppm. In contrast to other catalyst technologies, NOx reduction appeared to be enhanced by initial catalyst aging, with the presumed mechanism being sulfate accumulation within the catalyst. A concept for utilizing ethanol (distilled from an E-diesel fuel) as the SCR reductant was demonstrated.

(1)Kass, M; Thomas, J; Lewis, S; Storey, J; Domingo, N; Graves, R (2) Panov, A

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Investigation of Solid Particle Number Measurement of Engine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using the same engine and aftertreatment system [ 27] andaftertreatment for pm and nox reduction on heavy-duty diesel engineaftertreatment systems. At the Euro IV heavy-duty engine

Zheng, Zhongqing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

JET BREAKUP AND SPRAY FORMATION IN A DIESEL ENGINE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The breakup of injected fuel into spray is of key interest to the design of a fuel efficient, nonpolluting diesel engine. We report preliminary progress on the numerical simulation of diesel fuel injection spray with the front tracking code FronTier. Our simulation design is set to match experiments at ANL, and our present agreement is semi-quantitative. Future efforts will include mesh refinement studies, which will better model the turbulent flow.

GLIMM,J.; LI,X.; KIM,M.N.; OH,W.; MARCHESE,A.; SAMULYAK,R.; TZANOS,C.

2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

131

Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, entitled Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,'' describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

Badgley, P.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Coal-fueled diesel engines for locomotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GE Transportation Systems (GE/TS) completed a two and one half year study into the economic viability of a coal fueled locomotive. The coal fueled diesel engine was deemed to be one of the most attractive options. Building on the BN-NS study, a proposal was submitted to DOE to continue researching economic and technical feasibility of a coal fueled diesel engine for locomotives. The contract DE-AC21-85MC22181 was awarded to GE Corporate Research and Development (GE/CRD) for a three year program that began in March 1985. This program included an economic assessment and a technical feasibility study. The economic assessment study examined seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal fueled diesels. These areas included impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The results of the study indicated the merits for development of a coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. The technical feasibility study examined the combustion of CWS through lab and bench scale experiments. The major accomplishments from this study have been the development of CWS injection hardware, the successful testing of CWS fuel in a full size, single cylinder, medium speed diesel engine, evaluation of full scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions.

Hsu, B.D.; Najewicz, D.J.; Cook, C.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey XLT Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 50 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Additional Description:...

134

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

86HE Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Paccar - MX-13 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid...

135

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T370 hybrid truck Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 2 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Additional Description:...

136

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Gillig Corp. - Diesel-Electric Hybrid Bus and CNG Bus Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport -...

137

A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An alternative approach is presented for the regression of response data on predictor variables that are not logically or physically separable. The methodology is demonstrated by its application to a data set of heavy-duty diesel emissions. Because of the covariance of fuel properties, it is found advantageous to redefine the predictor variables as vectors, in which the original fuel properties are components, rather than as scalars each involving only a single fuel property. The fuel property vectors are defined in such a way that they are mathematically independent and statistically uncorrelated. Because the available data set does not allow definitive separation of vehicle and fuel effects, and because test fuels used in several of the studies may be unrealistically contrived to break the association of fuel variables, the data set is not considered adequate for development of a full-fledged emission model. Nevertheless, the data clearly show that only a few basic patterns of fuel-property variation affect emissions and that the number of these patterns is considerably less than the number of variables initially thought to be involved. These basic patterns, referred to as ''eigenfuels,'' may reflect blending practice in accordance with their relative weighting in specific circumstances. The methodology is believed to be widely applicable in a variety of contexts. It promises an end to the threat of collinearity and the frustration of attempting, often unrealistically, to separate variables that are inseparable.

McAdams, H.T.

2001-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modeling the effects of late cycle oxygen enrichment on diesel engine combustion and emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidimensional simulation of Auxiliary Gas Injection (AGI) for late cycle oxygen enrichment was exercised to assess the merits of AGI for reducing the emissions of soot from heavy duty diesel engines while not adversely affecting the NO{sub x} emissions of the engine. Here, AGI is the controlled enhancement of mixing within the diesel engine combustion chamber by high speed jets of air or another gas. The engine simulated was a Caterpillar 3401 engine. For a particular operating condition of this engine, the simulated soot emissions of the engine were reduced by 80% while not significantly affecting the engine-out NO{sub x} emissions compared to the engine operating without AGI. The effects of AGI duration, timing, and orientation are studied to confirm the window of opportunity for realizing lower engine-out soot while not increasing engine out NO{sub x} through controlled enhancement of in-cylinder mixing. These studies have shown that this window occurs during the late combustion cycle, from 20 to 60 crank angle degrees after top-dead-center. During this time, the combustion chamber temperatures are sufficiently high that soot oxidation increases in response in increased mixing, but the temperature is low enough that NO{sub x} reactions are quenched. The effect of the oxygen composition of the injected air is studied for the range of compositions between 21% and 30% oxygen by volume. This is the range of oxygen enrichment that is practical to produce from an air separation membrane. Simulations showed that this level of oxygen enrichment is insufficient to provide an additional benefit by either increasing the level of soot oxidation or prolonging the window of opportunity for increasing soot oxidation through enhanced mixing.

Mather, D. K.; Foster, D. E.; Poola, R. B.; Longman, D. E.; Chanda, A.; Vachon, T. J.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data, the synthetic fuel contained slightly less heat energy and fewer emissions. Test results obtained from adding different levels of a small amount of hydrogen into the intake manifold of a diesel-operated engine showed no effect on exhaust heat content. In other words, both synthetic fuel and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen may not have a significant enough effect on the amount of recoverable heat and its feasibility. An economic analysis computer program was developed on Visual Basic for Application in Microsoft Excel. The program was developed to be user friendly, to accept different levels of input data, and to expand for other heat recovery applications (i.e., power, desalination, etc.) by adding into the program the simulation subroutines of the desired applications. The developed program has been validated using experimental data.

Chuen-Sen Lin

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Conversion of a diesel engine to a spark ignition natural gas engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Requirements for alternatives to diesel-fueled vehicles are developing, particularly in urban centers not in compliance with mandated air quality standards. An operator of fleets of diesel- powered vehicles may be forced to either purchase new vehicles or equip some of the existing fleets with engines designed or modified to run on alternative fuels. In converting existing vehicles, the operator can either replace the existing engine or modify it to burn an alternative fuel. Work described in this report addresses the problem of modifying an existing diesel engine to operate on natural gas. Tecogen has developed a technique for converting turbocharged automotive diesel engines to operate as dedicated spark-ignition engines with natural gas fuel. The engine cycle is converted to a more-complete-expansion cycle in which the expansion ratio of the original engine is unchanged while the effective compression ratio is lowered, so that engine detonation is avoided. The converted natural gas engine, with an expansion ratio higher than in conventional spark- ignition natural gas engines, offers thermal efficiency at wide-open- throttle conditions comparable to its diesel counterpart. This allows field conversion of existing engines. Low exhaust emissions can be achieved when the engine is operated with precise control of the fuel air mixture at stoichiometry with a 3-way catalyst. A Navistar DTA- 466 diesel engine with an expansion ratio of 16.5 to 1 was converted in this way, modifying the cam profiles, increasing the turbocharger boost pressure, incorporating an aftercooler if not already present, and adding a spark-ignition system, natural gas fuel management system, throttle body for load control, and an electronic engine control system. The proof-of-concept engine achieved a power level comparable to that of the diesel engine without detonation. A conversion system was developed for the Navistar DT 466 engine. NOx emissions of 1.5 g/bhp-h have been obtained.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Demonstration of a NOx Control System for Stationary Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

California has over 26,000 stationary diesel engines, mostly in emergency power and direct drive applications. In the past few years, various incentive programs in the state have resulted in the change-out of older, dirtier engines for newer, cleaner models or replacement with electric motors. Emissions reductions can be accomplished by equipping existing engines with controls for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). The retrofit systems currently available, however, either are not cost com...

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Prime Movers of Globalization: The History and Impact of Diesel Engines and Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Diesel Engines and Gas Turbines By Vaclav Smil Reviewedof Diesel Engines and Gas Turbines. Cambridge, MA: The MITin the 1890s and the gas turbine invented by Frank Whittle

Anderson, Byron P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High-alcohol microemulsion fuel performance in a diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Incidence of methanol use in diesel engines is increasing rapidly due to the potential to reduce both diesel particulate emissions and petroleum consumption. Because simple alcohols and conventional diesel fuel are normally immiscible, most tests to date have used neat to near-neat alcohol, or blends incorporating surfactants or other alcohols. Alcohol's poor ignition quality usually necssitates the use of often expensive cetane enhancers, full-time glow plugs, or spark assist. Reported herein are results of screening tests of clear microemulsion and micellar fuels which contain 10 to 65% C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohol. Ignition performance and NO emissions were measured for clear, stable fuel blends containing alcohols, diesel fuel and additives such as alkyl nitrates, acrylic acids, and several vegetable oil derivatives. Using a diesel engine calibrated with reference fuels, cetane numbers for fifty four blends were estimated. The apparent cetane numbers ranged from around 20 to above 50 with the majority between 30 and 45. Emissions of nitric oxide were measured for a few select fuels and were found to be 10 to 20% lower than No. 2 diesel fuel. 36 refs., 87 figs., 8 tabs.

West, B.H.; Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Freightliner - M2 106 Hybrid Applications: Tractor, Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric...

145

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Vision Motor Corp. - Tyrano Eaton - Hybrid Drive System Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric...

146

Physical properties of bio-diesel & Implications for use of bio-diesel in diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

In this study we identify components of a typical biodiesel fuel and estimate both their individual and mixed thermo-physical and transport properties. We then use the estimated mixture properties in computational simulations to gauge the extent to which combustion is modified when biodiesel is substituted for conventional diesel fuel. Our simulation studies included both regular diesel combustion (DI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). Preliminary results indicate that biodiesel ignition is significantly delayed due to slower liquid evaporation, with the effects being more pronounced for DI than PCCI. The lower vapor pressure and higher liquid heat capacity of biodiesel are two key contributors to this slower rate of evaporation. Other physical properties are more similar between the two fuels, and their impacts are not clearly evident in the present study. Future studies of diesel combustion sensitivity to both physical and chemical properties of biodiesel are suggested.

Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Ra, Youngchul [ORNL; Griffin, Jelani K [ORNL; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI); Thiel, Matthew P. (Madison, WI)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Comparative Analysis on the Effects of Diesel Particulate Filter and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with no aftertreatment devices to establish a baseline measurement and also on the same engine equipped first with a DPF and secondary emissions significantly. Introduction Advances in diesel engine and aftertreatment technologies, samples were first collected from a heavy-duty diesel engine with no aftertreatment system to establish

Wu, Mingshen

149

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 3 Power Source(s): Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Eaton -...

150

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T270 hybrid Applications: Tractor, Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid...

151

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T270 hybrid Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Peterbilt Motors - 337338 Peterbilt Motors - 330 Hybrid Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic...

152

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Hino - 195h Hino - Hino 5L Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic Displacement: 5.0 liters...

153

On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the research was to refine and complete development of an on-board particulate matter (PM) sensor for diesel, DISI, and HCCI engines, bringing it to a point where it could be commercialized and marketed.

Hall, Matt; Matthews, Ron

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats run for hundreds of hours in heavy-duty diesels provided insights into the kinds of complexity that the contact conditions in engines can produce, and suggested the physical basis for the current approach to modeling. The model presented here involves four terms, two representing the valve response and two for its mating seat material. The model's structure assumes that wear that takes place under a complex combination of plastic deformation, tangential shear, and oxidation. Tribolayers form, are removed, and may reform. Layer formation affects the friction forces in the interface, and in turn, the energy available to do work on the materials to cause wear. To provide friction data for the model at various temperatures, sliding contact experiments were conducted from 22 to 850 C in a pin-on-disk apparatus at ORNL. In order to account for the behavior of different materials and engine designs, parameters in all four terms of the model can be adjusted to account for wear-in and incubation periods before the dominant wear processes evolve to their steady-state rates. For example, the deformation rate is assumed to be maximum during the early stages of operation, and then, due to material work-hardening and the increase in nominal contact area (which reduces the load per unit area), decreases to a lower rate at long times. Conversely, the rate of abrasion increases with time or number of cycles due to the build-up of oxides and tribo-layers between contact surfaces. The competition between deformation and abrasion results in complex, non-linear behavior of material loss per cycle of operation. Furthermore, these factors are affected by valve design features, such as the angle of incline of the valve seat. Several modeling scenarios are presented to demonstrate how the wear profile versus number of cycles changes in response to: (a) different relative abrasion rates of the seat and valve materials, (b) the friction coefficient as a function of temperature, (c) the relative deformation contribution of valve and seat materials, and (d) an interruption in the dominant we

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The piston dynamics under knock situation of diesel dual fuel engine: a numerical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compression ignition engine fueled by natural gas or Diesel Dual Fuel (DDF) engine is a promising engine for the future of a high oil price. Unfortunately, the DDF engine knocks easily: this leads to damage of pistons. So, the understanding of the ... Keywords: diesel dual fuel engine, knock, mixed-lubrication, modelling, piston secondary motion, simulation

Krisada Wannatong; Somchai Chanchaona; Surachai Sanitjai

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.

Johnson, R.N.; Hayden, H.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Engine performance and exhaust emissions from a diesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-road diesel engines are significant contributors to air pollution in the United States. Recent regulations put forth by EPA and other environmental agencies have laid out stringent guidelines for engine manufacturers and fuel producers. Recent increases in oil prices and foreign energy dependency has led to a push to produce renewable fuels, which will supplement current reserves. Biodiesel is a clean-burning renewable fuel, that can be blended with petroleum diesel. It is important to understand the effect on engine performance and exhaust emissions when using biodiesel from different feedstocks. The objective of this research was to determine the relationship between engine performance and emissions and cottonseed oil biodiesel used in a diesel engine rated for 14.2 kW. When using cottonseed oil biodiesel blends, CO, hydrocarbon, NOx, and SO2 emissions decreased as compared to petroleum diesel. Carbon dioxide emissions had no definitive trend in relation to cottonseed oil biodiesel blends. Carbon monoxide emissions increased by an average 15% using B5 and by an average of 19% using B100. Hydrocarbon emissions decreased by 14% using B5 and by 26% using B100. Nitrogen oxide emissions decreased by four percent with B5, five percent with B20, and 14% with B100. Sulfur dioxide emissions decreased by an average of 86% using B100, and by 94% using B50 blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel. The difference between peak output power when using biodiesel and diesel was insignificant in blends less that B40. Peak measured power using B100 was about five percent lower than for diesel fuel. Pure cottonseed oil biodiesel achieved and maintained a peak corrected measured power of 13.1 kW at speeds of 2990, 2875, and 2800 rpm at loads of 41.3, 42.7, and 43.8 N-m. Using B5 produced a peak power of 13.6 kW at 2990 rpm and 43.9 N-m and at 2800 rpm and 46.7 N-m, while using B20 produced a peak power of 13.4 kW at 2990 rpm and 43.7 N-m. Brake-specific fuel consumption at peak measured load and torque using B100 was 1238 g/kW-h. Brake-specific fuel consumption at peak measured power and loads using B5 and B20 were 1276 and 1155 g/kW-h.

Powell, Jacob Joseph

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Sulfur Management of NOx Adsorber Technology for Diesel Light-Duty Vehicle and Truck Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur poisoning from engine fuel and lube is one of the most recognizable degradation mechanisms of a NOx adsorber catalyst system for diesel emission reduction. Even with the availability of 15 ppm sulfur diesel fuel, NOx adsorber will be deactivated without an effective sulfur management. Two general pathways are currently being explored for sulfur management: (1) the use of a disposable SOx trap that can be replaced or rejuvenated offline periodically, and (2) the use of diesel fuel injection in the exhaust and high temperature de-sulfation approach to remove the sulfur poisons to recover the NOx trapping efficiency. The major concern of the de-sulfation process is the many prolonged high temperature rich cycles that catalyst will encounter during its useful life. It is shown that NOx adsorber catalyst suffers some loss of its trapping capacity upon high temperature lean-rich exposure. With the use of a disposable SOx trap to remove large portion of the sulfur poisons from the exhaust, the NOx adsorber catalyst can be protected and the numbers of de-sulfation events can be greatly reduced. Spectroscopic techniques, such as DRIFTS and Raman, have been used to monitor the underlying chemical reactions during NOx trapping/ regeneration and de-sulfation periods, and provide a fundamental understanding of NOx storage capacity and catalyst degradation mechanism using model catalysts. This paper examines the sulfur effect on two model NOx adsorber catalysts. The chemistry of SOx/base metal oxides and the sulfation product pathways and their corresponding spectroscopic data are discussed. SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-3245 {copyright} 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

Fang, Howard L.; Wang, Jerry C.; Yu, Robert C. (Cummins, Inc.); Wan, C. Z. (Engelhard Corp.); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Regulation of Emissions from Stationary Diesel Engines (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On July 11, 2006, the EPA issued regulations covering emissions from stationary diesel engines New Source Performance Standards that limit emissions of NOx, particulate matter, SO2, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons to the same levels required for nonroad diesel engines. The regulation affects new, modified, and reconstructed diesel engines. Beginning with MY 2007 [16], engine manufacturers must specify that new engines less than 3,000 horsepower meet the same emissions standard as nonroad diesel engines. For engines greater than 3,000 horsepower, the standard will be fully effective in 2011. Stationary diesel engine fuel will also be subject to the same standard as nonroad diesel engine fuel, which reduces the sulfur content of the fuel to 500 parts per million by mid-2007 and 15 parts per million by mid-2010.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

An experimental investigation of low octane gasoline in diesel engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional combustion techniques struggle to meet the current emissions norms. In particular, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) emissions have limited the utilization of diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Advance combustion concepts have proved the potential to combine fuel efficiency and improved emission performance. Low-temperature combustion (LTC) offers reduced NO{sub x} and PM emissions with comparable modern diesel engine efficiencies. The ability of premixed, low-temperature compression ignition to deliver low PM and NO{sub x} emissions is dependent on achieving optimal combustion phasing. Diesel operated LTC is limited by early knocking combustion, whereas conventional gasoline operated LTC is limited by misfiring. So the concept of using an unconventional fuel with the properties in between those two boundary fuels has been experimented in this paper. Low-octane (84 RON) gasoline has shown comparable diesel efficiencies with the lowest NO{sub x} emissions at reasonable high power densities (NO{sub x} emission was 1 g/kW h at 12 bar BMEP and 2750 rpm).

Ciatti, S. A.; Subramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Experimental and computational study of soot formation under diesel engine conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past research has shown that during diesel combustion, soot is formed in local premixed fuel-rich regions. This project focuses on the fundamentals soot formation under fuel-rich conditions similar to those in diesel engine ...

Kitsopanidis, Ioannis, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

OH radical imaging in a DI diesel engine and the structure of the early diffusion flame  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laser-sheet imaging studies have considerably advanced our understanding of diesel combustion; however, the location and nature of the flame zones within the combusting fuel jet have been largely unstudied. To address this issue, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical has been applied to the reacting fuel jet of a direct-injection diesel engine of the ``heavy-duty`` size class, modified for optical access. An Nd:YAG-based laser system was used to pump the overlapping Q{sub 1}9 and Q{sub 2}8 lines of the (1,0) band of the A{yields}X transition at 284.01 nm, while the fluorescent emission from both the (0,O) and (1, I) bands (308 to 320 nm) was imaged with an intensified video camera. This scheme allowed rejection of elastically scattered laser light, PAH fluorescence, and laser-induced incandescence. OH PLIF is shown to be an excellent diagnostic for diesel diffusion flames. The signal is strong, and it is confined to a narrow region about the flame front because the threebody recombination reactions that reduce high flame-front OH concentrations to equilibrium levels occur rapidly at diesel pressures. No signal was evident in the fuel-rich premixed flame regions where calculations and burner experiments indicate that OH concentrations will be below detectable limits. Temporal sequences of OH PLIF images are presented showing the onset and development of the early diffusion flame up to the time that soot obscures the images. These images show that the diffusion flame develops around the periphery of the-downstream portion of the reacting fuel jet about half way through the premixed burn spike. Although affected by turbulence, the diffusion flame remains at the jet periphery for the rest of the imaged sequence.

Dec, J.E.; Coy, E.B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd EditionChapter 3 The Basics of Diesel Engines and Diesel Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd Edition Chapter 3 The Basics of Diesel Engines and Diesel Fuels Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters AOCS 14987AFD8C4C7FBFCBA3FD4D98DB9DC5 Press   ...

164

Coal-fueled diesel technology development: Nozzle development for coal-fueled diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Direct injection of a micronized coal water mixture fuel into the combustion chambers of a diesel engine requires atomizing an abrasive slurry fuel with accurately sized orifices. Five injector orifice materials were evaluated: diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, thermally stabilized diamond, tungsten carbide with cobalt binder, and tungsten carbide with nickel binder with brazed and mechanically mounted orifice inserts. Nozzle bodies were fabricated of Armco 17-4 precipitation hardening stainless steel and Stellite 6B in order to withstand cyclic injection pressures and elevated temperatures. Based on a total of approximately 200 cylinder hours of engine operation with coal water mixture fuel diamond compacts were chosen for the orifice material.

Johnson, R.N.; Lee, M.; White, R.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Emissions and efficiency of agricultural diesels using low-proof ethanol as supplement fuel. [Tractor engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental investigations were made to evaluate the potential of using low-proof ethanol to supplement diesel fuel in agricultural engines. Fumigation, mechanical emulsification, and chemical emulsifiers were used to introduce a significant amount of alcohol with diesel fuel for engine operation. A total of five diesel tractor engines were tested using each of the fuel systems. Exhaust products and fuel usage were determined at various engine speed/load conditions. 5 references, 12 figures, 14 tables.

Allsup, J.R.; Clingenpeel, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

New Flyer - Xcelsior Applications: Bus - Transit, Trolley Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Electricity, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: varies Power Source(s): Cummins...

167

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner C2e Hybrid Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 81...

168

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Peterbilt Motors - 320 HLA Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid System(s):...

169

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Motor Coach Industries - D4500 CT Hybrid Commuter Coach Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 57 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport -...

170

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hino - 195h Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Hino - Hino 5L Hybrid System(s): Hino - Hino Hybrid Drive...

171

On-Road Development of the C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet details on-road development of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy-duty trucks, including emissions, fuel costs, and petroleum displacement.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

TRANSIENT, REAL-TIME, PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN DIESEL ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports our efforts to develop an instrument, TG-1, to measure particulate emissions from diesel engines in real-time. TG-1 while based on laser-induced incandescence allows measurements at 10 Hz on typical engine exhausts. Using such an instrument, measurements were performed in the exhaust of a 1.7L Mercedes Benz engine coupled to a low inertia dynamometer. Comparative measurements performed under engine steady state conditions showed the instrument to agree within {+-}12% of measurements performed with an SMPS. Moreover, the instrument had far better time response and time resolution than a TEOM{reg_sign} 1105. Also, TG-1 appears to surpass the shortcomings of the TEOM instrument, i.e., of yielding negative values under certain engine conditions and, being sensitive to external vibration.

Gupta, S; Shih, J; Hillman, G; sekar, R; Graze, R; Shimpi, S; Martin, W; Pier, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

173

ENSC 461: Four-Stroke Diesel Engine School of Engineering Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective - Determining characteristic curve of a four-stroke Diesel engine - Calculating thermal efficiency digitally. Additional connections and displays for measurements of exhaust-gas temperature and the engine for various fuel tanks (1); a pipeline (not visible here) is used to fill the measurement tube (7) for fuel

Bahrami, Majid

174

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

175

Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

82 Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Additional Description: A heavy-duty truck designed for regional-haul applications....

177

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T660 Tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Additional Description: A Class 8 heavy-duty truck designed for on-highway...

178

Beyond Diesel - Renewable Diesel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CTTS fact sheet describing NREL's new Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Research Laboratory, which will be used to facilitate increased renewable diesel use in heavy-duty vehicles.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

[Martin high pressure common rail diesel engine injection system]. Technical progress report, August--October 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have a contract with Diesel Recerche of Trieste, Italy, and the Fincantier Group in Italy. They are naval ship builders. Our contract is to work with Diesel Recerche to design the `Martin` fuel injection system for their first test engine for a naval ship. Tiby Martin has been working in the design and detailed layout of the application drawings for Diesel Recerche.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Zeolite Based SCR Catalysts for Off-Road Diesel Engine Emission ...  

Since diesel engines operate under lean ... concentrations of particulates and Nox while CO and hydrocarbons are low as compared with stoichiometric gasoline

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DISCRETE-FREQUENCY AND BROADBAND NOISE RADIATION FROM DIESEL ENGINE COOLING FANS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This effort focuses on measuring and predicting the discrete-frequency and broadband noise radiated by diesel engine cooling fans. Unsteady forces developed by the interaction of… (more)

Kim, Geon-Seok

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nova Bus - LFS HEV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison Transmission -...

183

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nova Bus - LFS Artic HEV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 62 Power Source(s): Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison...

184

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Axess Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 41 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Ballard Power Systems -...

185

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - 42BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 43 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

186

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

60BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 43 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid...

187

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

E-Z Rider II BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 33 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISB 6.7L...

188

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

IC Bus - HC Hybrid Series Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 45 Power Source(s): Navistar - MaxxForce DT Hybrid System(s): Eaton -...

189

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - CompoBus Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 47 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

190

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

DesignLine Corp. - EcoSaver IV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: Hybrid - CNG Electric, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Capstone Turbine Corp. -...

191

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

60BRT North American Bus Industries - 31LFW 35LFW 40LFW ElDorado National - E-Z Rider II BRT ElDorado National - Axess Gillig Corp. - Diesel-Electric Hybrid Bus and CNG Bus...

192

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

31LFW 35LFW 40LFW Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISL 8.9L...

193

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

LFX Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: Varies Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison...

194

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Autocar - E3 Hybrid Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid System(s): Parker Hannifin Corp. - RunWise...

195

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Peterbilt Motors - 386HE Kenworth - T370 hybrid truck Kenworth - T270 hybrid IC Bus - HC Hybrid Series Turtle Top - Odyssey XLT Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Thomas Built...

196

EXPLORING LOW EMISSION DIESEL ENGINE OILS WORKSHOP - A SUMMARY REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses and summarizes some of the results of the title workshop. The workshop was held January 31-February 2, 2000 in Phoenix, Arizona. The purpose of the workshop was ''To craft a shared vision for Industry-Government (DOE) research and development collaboration in Diesel Engine Oils to minimize emissions while maintaining or enhancing engine performance''. The final report of the workshop (NREL/SR-570-28521) was issued in June 2000 by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393. There were some 95 participants at the workshop representing industry, government and academia, Figure 1. The format for the workshop is described in Figure 2. This format allowed for considerable discussion of the various issues prior to deliberations in breakout groups. This process resulted in recommendations to solve the issues related to the next generation of diesel engine oils. Keynote addresses by SAE President Rodica Baranescu (International Truck and Engine Corporation), James Eberhardt of DOE and Paul Machiele of EPA focused on diesel progress, workshop issues and regulatory fuel issues. A panel of experts further defined the issues of interest, presenting snapshots of the current status in their areas of expertise. A Q&A session was followed by a series of technical presentations discussing the various areas. Some two dozen presentations covered the technical issues, Figure 3. An open forum was held to allow any participant to present related studies or comment on any of the technical issues. The participants broke into work groups addressing the various areas found on Figure 2. A group leader was appointed and reported on their findings, recommendations, suggested participants for projects and on related items.

Perez, Joseph

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Engines - 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates Diesel particulate matter has a very complex geometry Most studies have observed these three-dimensional structures in...

198

Diesel engine lubrication with poor quality residual fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of marine residual fuel is declining. This is being caused by a gradual trend towards production of heavier crudes and increased residuum conversion processes in refineries to meet light product demand while holding down crude runs. Additionally, more stringent inland fuel sulfur regulations have caused the higher sulfur residues to be used for marine residual fuel blending. Engine manufacturers are making major efforts in design so that their engines can burn these fuels at high efficiency with minimum adverse effects. The oil industry is developing improved lubricants to reduce as much as possible the increased wear and deposit formation caused by these poor quality fuels. To guide the development of improved lubricants, knowledge is required about the impact of the main fuel characteristics on lubrication. This paper summarizes work conducted to assess the impact of fuel sulfur, Conradson carbon and asphaltenes on wear and deposit formation in engines representative of full scale crosshead diesel engines and medium speed trunk piston engines. Results obtained with improved lubricants in these engines are reviewed.

Van der Horst, G.W.; Hold, G.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions of a Diesel Engine From Various Biodiesel Feedstock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing fuel prices, stricter government policies, and technological developments made it possible to seek for renewable alternatives, called biofuels, to petroleum fuel. Biodiesel, a biofuel that is produced from chemically mixing animal fat, vegetable oils, or recycled restaurant grease with alcohol and catalyst, is gaining popularity in recent years as a substitute for petroleum diesel. Ninety percent (90%) of U.S. biodiesel industry makes use of soybean oil as its feedstock. However, soybean oil alone cannot meet such a huge demand on biofuel production. Hence, it is important to identify and get more information about other feedstocks, specifically on its effects on the performance and exhaust emissions of diesel engines. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance and emissions of two diesel engines operating on different biodiesel fuels (i.e. canola oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, peanut oil, and chicken fat) and compare them to the performance and emissions when the engine is operated on soybean oil-based biodiesel and petroleum-based diesel. Results indicated that an engine operating on biodiesel generates a little less power and torque at any given speed than one running on diesel. Such power and torque loss were attributed to the biodiesel's lower energy content. The lower heating value (energy content) of biodiesel can be reflected in the specific fuel consumption, i.e., to generate the same power, more biodiesel is needed. The reduction in torque and power of less than 10% indicates that in some cases biodiesel has better combustion than diesel. Unfortunately, the high efficiency of combustion may give rise to increased combustion temperature which may lead to higher exhaust emissions. The gradual decrease in the total hydrocarbon and CO2 emissions, as blends were increased from B20 to B100, was also found to be an indication of better combustion using biodiesel fuels than petroleum diesel. However, NOx emissions were higher, predominantly at low speeds for most biodiesel and blends and therefore may require some additives or engine modifications/or adjustments to equalize the NOx emissions of diesel. Other emissions particularly SO2 were lower than standards require.

Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Attaining Tier 2 Emissions Through Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Integration - Strategy and Experimental Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of diesel engines to meet the stringent emissions regulations of 2007 and beyond is an important consideration for light trucks and other personal transportation vehicles. Integrated engine and aftertreatment systems have been developed at Detroit Diesel Corporation for multiple engine and vehicle platforms. Tier 2 emissions technologies have been demonstrated with significant fuel economy advantage compared to the respective production gasoline engines while maintaining excellent drivability.

Aneja, R.; Bolton, B.; Hakim, N.; Pavlova-MacKinnon, Z.

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Prediction of diesel engine performance using biofuels with artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel, bioethanol and biogas are the most important alternative fuels produced by using biologic origin sources. Effect of biofuel on engine performance is one of the research subjects of today. The engine experiments to test the engines are many ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Biodiesel, Bioethanol, E-diesel, Engine performance

Hidayet O?uz; Ismail Sar?tas; Hakan Emre Baydan

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Diesel-fueled solid oxide fuel cell auxiliary power units for heavy-duty vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCS) as 3--10 kW auxiliary power units for trucks and military vehicles operating on diesel fuel. It discusses the requirements and specifications for such units, and the advantages, challenges, and development issues for SOFCS used in this application. Based on system design and analysis, such systems should achieve efficiencies approaching 40% (lower heating value), with a relatively simple system configuration. The major components of such a system are the fuel cell stack, a catalytic autothermal reformer, and a spent gas burner/air preheater. Building an SOFC-based auxiliary power unit is not straightforward, however, and the tasks needed to develop a 3--10 kW brassboard demonstration unit are outlined.

Krause, T.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Champion Bus Inc. - CTS - Front Engine Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 32 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

206

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - All American Rear Engine Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 84 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

207

Engineering for sustainable development for bio-diesel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering for Sustainable Development (ESD) is an integrated systems approach, which aims at developing a balance between the requirements of the current stakeholders without compromising the ability of the future generations to meet their needs. This is a multi-criteria decision-making process that involves the identification of the most optimal sustainable process, which satisfies economic, ecological and social criteria as well as safety and health requirements. Certain difficulties are encountered when ESD is applied, such as ill-defined criteria, scarcity of information, lack of process-specific data, metrics, and the need to satisfy multiple decision makers. To overcome these difficulties, ESD can be broken down into three major steps, starting with the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of the process, followed by generation of non-dominating alternatives, and finally selecting the most sustainable process by employing an analytic hierarchical selection process. This methodology starts with the prioritization of the sustainability metrics (health and safety, economic, ecological and social components). The alternatives are then subjected to a pair-wise comparison with respect to each Sustainable Development (SD) indicator and prioritized depending on their performance. The SD indicator priority score and each individual alternative’s performance score together are used to determine the most sustainable alternative. The proposed methodology for ESD is applied for bio-diesel production in this thesis. The results obtained for bio-diesel production using the proposed methodology are similar to the alternatives that are considered to be economically and environmentally favorable by both researchers and commercial manufacturers; hence the proposed methodology can be considered to be accurate. The proposed methodology will also find wide range of application as it is flexible and can be used for the sustainable development of a number of systems similar to the bio-diesel production system; it is also user friendly and can be customized with ease. Due to these benefits, the proposed methodology can be considered to be a useful tool for decision making for sustainable development of chemical processes.

Narayanan, Divya

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Tracing Fuel Component Carbon in the Emissions from Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The addition of oxygenates to diesel fuel can reduce particulate emissions, but the underlying chemical pathways for the reductions are not well understood. While measurements of particulate matter (PM), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), and carbon monoxide (CO) are routine, determining the contribution of carbon atoms in the original fuel molecules to the formation of these undesired exhaust emissions has proven difficult. Renewable bio-derived fuels (ethanol or bio-diesel) containing a universal distribution of contemporary carbon are easily traced by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). These measurements provide general information about the emissions of bio-derived fuels. Another approach exploits synthetic organic chemistry to place {sup 14}C atoms in a specific bond position in a specific fuel molecule. The highly labeled fuel molecule is then diluted in {sup 14}C-free petroleum-derived stock to make a contemporary petroleum fuel suitable for tracing. The specific {sup 14}C atoms are then traced through the combustion event to determine whether they reside in PM, HC, CO, CO{sub 2}, or other emission products. This knowledge of how specific molecular structures produce certain emissions can be used to refine chemical-kinetic combustion models and to optimize fuel composition to reduce undesired emissions. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique and the lack of appreciable {sup 14}C in fossil fuels, fuels for AMS experiments can be labeled with modern levels of {sup 14}C and still produce a strong signal. Since the fuel is not radioactive, emission tests can be conducted in any conventional engine lab, dynamometer facility, or on the open road.

Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Martin, G C; Cheng, A S E; Dibble, R W; Frantz, B R

2002-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development of the next generation medium-duty natural gas engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done under this subcontract in the areas of System Design, System Fabrication, and Experimental Program. The report contains the details of the engine development process for achieving throttleless stratified charge spark ignition (SI) engine operation as well as advanced turbocharging strategies. Engine test results showing the potential of the direct-injection stratified charge combustion strategy for increasing part-load engine efficiency on a John Deere 8.1-liter natural gas engine are also included in this report. In addition, steady state and step transient engine data are presented that quantify the performance of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) as well as a modified waste-gated turbocharger on the engine. The benefits of the technologies investigated during this project will be realized in the form of increased drive-cycle efficiency to diesel-like levels, while retaining the low emissions characteristics of a lean-burn natural gas engine.

Podnar, D.J.; Kubesh, J.T.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 77 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel...

211

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane...

212

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel system Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 6.8...

213

TransForum v9n2 - Air Force Fellows and Smarter Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Force Fellows Help Work Toward Smarter Diesel Engines Air force fellows Major Clint Abell (center), Steve McConnell, Lt. Col. Jeff Gillen, Thomas Wallner and Steve Ciatti (in...

214

Part load operation and heat recovery optimization in cogeneration units with diesel engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the optimization possibilities of different co-generation units with diesel engines — especially applied in small and middle-size biogas power plant installations. The first subject of the publication is the analysis of ...

Slawomir Smolen

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Detailed Multi-Zone Thermodynamic Simulation For Direct-Injection Diesel Engine Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed multi-zone thermodynamic simulation has been developed for the direct-injection (DI) diesel engine combustion process. For the purpose of predicting heterogeneous type combustion systems, the model explores the formation of pre-ignition radicals, start of combustion, and eventual heat release. These mechanisms are described based on the current understanding and knowledge of the diesel engine combustion acquired through advanced laser-based diagnostics. Six zones are developed to take into account the surrounding bulk gas, liquid- and vapor-phase fuel, pre-ignition mixing, fuel-rich combustion products as well as the diffusion flame combustion products. A three-step phenomenological soot model and a nitric oxide emission model are applied based on where and when each of these reactions mainly occurs within the diesel fuel jet evolution process. The simulation is completed for a 4.5 liter, inline four-cylinder diesel engine for a range of operating conditions. Specifically, the engine possesses a compression ratio of 16.6, and has a bore and stroke of 106 and 127 mm. The results suggest that the simulation is able to accurately reproduce the fuel jet evolution and heat release process for conventional diesel engine combustion conditions. The soot and nitric oxide models are able to qualitatively predict the effects of various engine parameters on the engine-out emissions. In particular, the detailed thermodynamics and characteristics with respect to the combustion and emission formation processes are investigated for different engine speed/loads, injection pressures and timings, and EGR levels. The local thermodynamic properties and energy, mass distributions obtained from the simulation offer some fundamental insights into heterogeneous type combustion systems. The current work provides opportunities to better study and understand the diesel engine combustion and emission formation mechanisms for conventional diesel engine combustion modes. The flexible, low computational cost features of this simulation result in a convenient tool for conducting parametric studies, and benefits for engine control and diagnostics.

Xue, Xingyu 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

391 KB) Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions from Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Joe Mauderly Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (PDF 325...

217

An In-Cylinder Study of Soot and NO in a DI Diesel Engine. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clearly the reduction of NOx and particulate emissions remains a major challenge to Diesel engine manufacturers due to increasingly stringent emission standards in the US and other countries. The well documented NOx/particulate trade-off observed in Diesel engines makes the simultaneous reduction of both emissions particularly difficult for manufacturers to achieve. In an effort to provide an improved understanding of the fundamental processes which result in this trade-off, a program was carried out at Penn State to develop the appropriate engine facilities and laser diagnostics to permit in-cylinder studies of Diesel combustion and emissions production with the support of the Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Technology Division . This work has also been supported by the Cummins Engine Company, Lubrizol Corporation and the National Science Foundation. An optically accessible, direct injection, Diesel engine was constructed for these studies. The major objective of the, design of the engine was to maximize optical access under conditions representative of Diesel engine combustion in small bore, commercial engines. Intake air is preheated and boosted in pressure to make the in-cylinder conditions of heat release and pressure as realistic as possible. Another important objective of the design was flexibility in combustion chamber geometry to permit a variety of head and bowl geometries to be studied. In all the results reported in this report a square bowl was used to simplify the introduction of laser light sheets into the engine.

Litzinger, T.A.

1995-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven'' through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle's exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory  

SciTech Connect

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven'' through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle's exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Biodiesel: The clean, green fuel for diesel engines (fact sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Natural, renewable resources such as vegetable oils and recycled restaurant greases can be chemically transformed into clean-burning biodiesel fuels. As its name implies, biodiesel is like diesel fuel except that it's organically produced. It's also safe for the environment, biodegradable, and produces significantly less air pollution than diesel fuel.

Tyson, K.S.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

222

Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. (Integral Technologies, Inc., Westmont, IL (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. [Integral Technologies, Inc., Westmont, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The ethanol heavy-duty truck fleet demonstration project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to test and demonstrate the use of a high- percentage ethanol-blended fuel in a fleet of heavy-duty, over-the- road trucks, paying particular attention to emissions, performance, and repair and maintenance costs. This project also represents the first public demonstration of the use of ethanol fuels as a viable alternative to conventional diesel fuel in heavy-duty engines.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Prediction of performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fueled with biodiesel produced from waste frying palm oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its fuel properties and compatibility with the petroleum-based diesel fuel (PBDF). Therefore, in this study, the prediction of the engine performance and exhaust emissions is carried ... Keywords: ANN, Biodiesel, Diesel engine, Emissions, Engine performance

Mustafa Canakci; Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Erol Arcaklioglu; Ahmet Erdil

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

FEASIBILITY STUDY OF THE POTENTIAL USE OF CHEMISTRY BASED EMISSION PREDICTIONS FOR REAL-TIME CONTROL OF MODERN DIESEL ENGINES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Adding the model to the overall engine and aftertreatment control and diagnostics strategy. "NOx prediction in diesel engines for aftertreatment control," ASME 2003-41196. [5] Aithal SM. 2008-TIME CONTROL OF MODERN DIESEL ENGINES. S. M. Aithal Mathematics and Computer Science Division Argonne National

227

Selection of Light Duty Truck Engine Air Systems Using Virtual Lab Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated development approach using seasoned engine technology methodologies, virtual lab parametric investigations, and selected hardware verification tests reflects today's state-of-the-art R&D trends. This presentation will outline such a strategy. The use of this ''Wired'' approach results in substantial reduction in the development cycle time and hardware iterations. An example showing the virtual lab application for a viable design of the air-exhaust-turbocharger system of a light duty truck engine for personal transportation will be presented.

Zhang, Houshun

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Engineering evaluation of the General Motors (GM) diesel rating and capabilities  

SciTech Connect

K-Reactor`s number one GM diesel (GM-lK) suffered recurrent, premature piston pin bushing failures between July 1990 and January 1991. These failures raised a concern that the engine`s original design capabilities were being exceeded. Were we asking old engines to do too much by powering 1200 kw (continuous) rated electrical generators? Was excessive wear of the piston pin bushings a result of having exceeded the engine`s capabilities (overload), or were the recent failures a direct result of poor quality, poor design, or defective replacement parts? Considering the engine`s overall performance for the past 30 years, during which an engine failure of this nature had never occurred, and the fact that 1200 kw was approximately 50% of the engine`s original tested capability, Reactor Engineering did not consider it likely that an overloaded engine caused bushing failures. What seemed more plausible was that the engine`s failure to perform was caused by deficiencies in, or poor quality of, replacement parts.The following report documents: (1) the results of K-Reactor EDG failure analysis; (2) correlation of P- and C-Reactor GM diesel teardowns; (3) the engine rebuild to blueprint specification; (4) how the engine was determined ready for test; (5) testing parameters that were developed; (6) a summary of test results and test insights; (7) how WSRC determined engine operation was acceptable; (8) independent review of 1200 kw operational data; (9) approval of the engines` 12OOkw continuous rating.

Gross, R.E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Methylal and Methylal-Diesel Blended Fuels from Use In Compression-Ignition Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas-to-liquids catalytic conversion technologies show promise for liberating stranded natural gas reserves and for achieving energy diversity worldwide. Some gas-to-liquids products are used as transportation fuels and as blendstocks for upgrading crude derived fuels. Methylal (CH{sub 3}-O-CH{sub 2}-O-CH{sub 3}) also known as dimethoxymethane or DMM, is a gas-to-liquid chemical that has been evaluated for use as a diesel fuel component. Methylal contains 42% oxygen by weight and is soluble in diesel fuel. The physical and chemical properties of neat methylal and for blends of methylal in conventional diesel fuel are presented. Methylal was found to be more volatile than diesel fuel, and special precautions for distribution and fuel tank storage are discussed. Steady state engine tests were also performed using an unmodified Cummins 85.9 turbocharged diesel engine to examine the effect of methylal blend concentration on performance and emissions. Substantial reductions of particulate matter emissions h ave been demonstrated 3r IO to 30% blends of methylal in diesel fuel. This research indicates that methylal may be an effective blendstock for diesel fuel provided design changes are made to vehicle fuel handling systems.

Keith D. Vertin; James M. Ohi; David W. Naegeli; Kenneth H. Childress; Gary P. Hagen; Chris I. McCarthy; Adelbert S. Cheng; Robert W. Dibble

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Brent Bailey; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

231

Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, entitled ``Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,`` describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

Badgley, P.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

An Evolutionary Algorithm to design Diesel Engines T. Donateo, D. Laforgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be achieved. A typical case is the contemporary reduction of soot and NOx emissions in a diesel engine. All are very close to the origin of the plot. · On the contrary, a strong reduction of NOx can be obtained gases. The competitive goals to be achieved in engine optimization are the reduction of emission levels

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

233

Getting performance without sacrificing economy or emissions control in a heavy-duty LPG engine  

SciTech Connect

A commercial 637 CID liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) engine was evaluated as a candidate powerplant for new bus purchases and/or as a replacement for obsolete LPG engines currently being used in metropolitan Chicago bus service. Limited route service experience with LPG conversion of a gasoline engine indicated both its potential and the need for its optimization in order to take advantage of the unique characteristics of LPG. The engine-dynamometer study, with emphasis on fuel system-ignition relationships, led to substantial improvement in fuel economy without depreciation of engine power. The 637 CID LPG engine fuel economy was increased from an average of 1.77 mpg for 1965 to 1971 to 2.60 mpg for the Dec. 1971 to April 1972 period in Chicago field tests. Cylinder head redesign permitted lean mixture operation that reduced exhaust emissions to levels calculated to conform to the 1973 Federal standards and the 1973-1974 California Air Resources Board requirements for heavy-duty engines. The exhaust emissions data obtained with the optimized 7.5:1 CR engine based on the California 13-mode cycle were 8.3 g/bhp/hr carbon monoxide and 9.9 g/bhp/hr hydrocarbons plus nitrogen dioxide.

Mengelkamp, R.A.; Linnard, R.E.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assessing economic impacts of clean diesel engines. Phase 1 report: U.S.- or foreign-produced clean diesel engines for selected light trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light trucks' share of the US light vehicle market rose from 20% in 1980 to 41% in 1996. By 1996, annual energy consumption for light trucks was 6.0 x 10{sup 15} Btu (quadrillion Btu, or quad), compared with 7.9 quad for cars. Gasoline engines, used in almost 99% of light trucks, do not meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. These engines have poor fuel economy, many getting only 10--12 miles per gallon. Diesel engines, despite their much better fuel economy, had not been preferred by US light truck manufacturers because of problems with high NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. The US Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, has funded research projects at several leading engine makers to develop a new low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine, first for large trucks, then for light trucks. Recent advances in diesel engine technology may overcome the NO{sub x} and particulate problems. Two plausible alternative clean diesel (CD) engine market penetration trajectories were developed, representing an optimistic case (High Case) and an industry response to meet the CAFE standards (CAFE Case). However, leadership in the technology to produce a successful small, advanced diesel engine for light trucks is an open issue between U.S. and foreign companies and could have major industry and national implications. Direct and indirect economic effects of the following CD scenarios were estimated by using the Standard and Poor's Data Resources, Inc., US economy model: High Case with US Dominance, High Case with Foreign Dominance, CAFE Case with US Dominance, and CAFE Case with Foreign Dominance. The model results demonstrate that the economic activity under each of the four CD scenarios is higher than in the Base Case (business as usual). The economic activity is highest for the High Case with US dominance, resulting in maximum gains in such key indicators as gross domestic product, total civilian employment, and federal government surplus. Specifically, the cumulative real gross domestic product surplus over the Base Case during the 2000--2022 period is about $56 x 10{sup 9} (constant 1992 dollars) under this high US dominance case. In contrast, the real gross domestic product gains under the high foreign dominance case would be only about half of the above gains with US dominance.

Teotia, A.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Cuenca, R.M.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

The effect of TDC temperature and density on the liquid-phase fuel penetration in a D.I. Diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A parametric study of the liquid-phase fuel penetration of evaporating Diesel fuel jets has been conducted in a directinjection Diesel engine using laser elastic-scatter imaging. The experiments were conducted in an optically accessible Diesel engine of the ``heavy-duty`` size class at a representative medium speed (1200 rpm) operating condition. The density and temperature at TDC were varied systematically by adjusting the intake temperature and pressure. At all operating conditions the measurements show that initially the liquid fuel penetrates almost linearly with increasing crank angle until reaching a maximum length. Then, the liquid-fuel penetration length remains fairly constant although fuel injection continues. At a TDC density of 16.6 kg/m{sup 3} and a temperature of about 1000 K the maximum penetration length is approximately 23 mm. However, it varies significantly as TDC conditions are changed, with the liquid-length being less at higher temperatures and at higher densities. The corresponding apparent heat release rate plots are presented and the results of the liquid-phase fuel penetration are discussed with respect to the ignition delay and premixed bum fraction.

Espey, C. [Daimler-Benz AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Research on Fault Diagnosis of Marine Diesel Engine Based on Grey Relational Analysis and Kernel Fuzzy C-means Clustering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the problem of small samples and nonlinear feature in fault diagnosis of marine diesel engine, comprehensively using the methods of grey relational analysis and kernel fuzzy c-means clustering, a method solving fault diagnosis of marine ... Keywords: marine diesel engine, fault diagnosis, grey relational analysis, kernel fuzzy c-means clustering

Xiuyan Peng; Yanyou Chai; Yanyou Chai; Liufeng Xu; Xinjiang Man

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Update on Modeling for Effective Diesel Engine Aftertreatment Implementation - Master Plan, Status and Critical Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated diesel engine-aftertreatment-vehicle system is extremely complex with numerous interacting variables and an unlimited number of control options. An experimental approach to develop an optimized viable system is tedious, if at all possible. Sophisticated component, subsystem and integrated simulation tools offer an excellent option of a virtual lab approach to the development of such a complex system. A viable and robust diesel engine aftertreatment system can thus be developed within optimum time and resources when this virtual simulation is integrated with selective hardware-based testing.

Bolton, B.; Fan, X.; Hakim, N.; Sisken, K.; Zhang, H.

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

Progress in Understanding the Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help guide heavy vehicle engine, fuel, and exhaust after-treatment technology development, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute are conducting research not addressed elsewhere on aspects of the toxicity of particulate engine emissions. Advances in these technologies that reduce diesel particulate mass emissions may result in changes in particle composition, and there is concern that the number of ultrafine (<0.1 micron) particles may increase. All present epidemiological and laboratory data on the toxicity of diesel emissions were derived from emissions of older-technology engines. New, short-term toxicity data are needed to make health-based choices among diesel technologies and to compare the toxicity of diesel emissions to those of other engine technologies. This research program has two facets: (1) development and use of short-term in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays for comparing the toxicities of gasoline and diesel exhaust emissions; and (2) determination of the disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles deposited in the lung. Responses of cultured cells, cultured lung slices, and rodent lungs to various types of particles were compared to develop an improved short-term toxicity screening capability. To date, chemical toxicity indicators of cultured human A549 cells and early inflammatory and cytotoxic indicators of rat lungs have given the best distinguishing capability. A study is now underway to determine the relative toxicities of exhaust samples from in-use diesel and gasoline engines. The samples are being collected under the direction of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The ability to generate solid ultrafine particles and to trace their movement in the body as particles and soluble material was developed. Data from rodents suggest that ultrafine particles can move from the lung to the liver in particulate form. The quantitative disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles will be determined in rodents and nonhuman primates.

Kristen J. Nikula; Gregory L. Finch; Richard A. Westhouse; JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

239

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Donald Stanton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Donald Stanton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: 1. Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today’s state-ofthe- art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle 2. Develop & design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements. 3. Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class. 4. Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: ? A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target ? An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle – Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine ? Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated. ? The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing. ? The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment. ? The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment ? Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines) ? Key subsystems developed include – sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light- Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Stanton, Donald W

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

242

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest has arisen in the development of coal-fired diesel engines for the purpose of efficiently utilizing the extensive coal reserves in the United States, and therefore reducing dependence on foreign oil. One process, which is being considered for use in producing clean coal fuel products involves mild gasification. This process produces by-products which can be further refined and, when blended with neat diesel fuel, used as an engine fuel. The purpose of this task was to test a blend of this coal liquid and diesel fuel (referred to as coal-lite) in an engine, and determine if any detrimental results were observed. This was done by performing a back-to-back performance and emission test of neat diesel fuel and the coal-lite fuel, followed by a 500-hour test of the coal-lite fuel, and completed by a back-to-back performance and emission test of the coal-lite fuel and neat diesel fuel.

Wakenell, J.F.; Fritz, S.G.; Schwalb, J.A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 7, Extended wear testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest has arisen in the development of coal-fired diesel engines for the purpose of efficiently utilizing the extensive coal reserves in the United States, and therefore reducing dependence on foreign oil. One process, which is being considered for use in producing clean coal fuel products involves mild gasification. This process produces by-products which can be further refined and, when blended with neat diesel fuel, used as an engine fuel. The purpose of this task was to test a blend of this coal liquid and diesel fuel (referred to as coal-lite) in an engine, and determine if any detrimental results were observed. This was done by performing a back-to-back performance and emission test of neat diesel fuel and the coal-lite fuel, followed by a 500-hour test of the coal-lite fuel, and completed by a back-to-back performance and emission test of the coal-lite fuel and neat diesel fuel.

Wakenell, J.F.; Fritz, S.G.; Schwalb, J.A.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the diesel engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: Definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; Definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; Determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; Evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and Presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential.

Not Available

1990-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Pages that link to "BPM Diesel Engineering" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Engineering. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwikiSpecial:WhatLinksHereBPMDieselEngineering" Special pages About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Developer services OpenEI...

246

Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Attenuating Diesel Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Early this decade, Argonne chemists developed a special catalyst that can

247

The Detroit Diesel DELTA Engine for Light Trucks and SUVs - Year 2000 Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) is developing the DELTA 4.0L V6 engine, specifically for the North American light truck market. This market poses unique requirements for a diesel engine, necessitating a clean sheet engine design. DELTA was developed from a clean sheet of paper, with the first engine firing just 228 days later. The process began with a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis, which prioritized the development criteria. The development process integrated a co-located, fully cross-functional team. Suppliers were fully integrated and maintained on-site representation. The first demonstration vehicle moved under its own power 12 weeks after the first engine fired. It was demonstrated to the automotive press 18 days later. DELTA has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to disprove historical North American diesel perceptions and compete directly with gasoline engines. This paper outlines the Generation 0.0 development process and briefly defines the engine. A brief indication of the Generation 0.5 development status is given.

Nabil S. Hakim; Charles E. Freese; Stanley P. Miller

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fabrication of small-orifice fuel injectors for diesel engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel fuel injector nozzles with spray hole diameters of 50-75 {micro}m have been fabricated via electroless nickel plating of conventionally made nozzles. Thick layers of nickel are deposited onto the orifice interior surfaces, reducing the diameter from {approx}200 {micro}m to the target diameter. The nickel plate is hard, smooth, and adherent, and covers the orifice interior surfaces uniformly.

Woodford, J. B.; Fenske, G. R.

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

249

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

250

ADVANCED DIESEL ENGINE AND AFTERTREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR TIER 2 EMISSIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced diesel engine and aftertreatment technologies have been developed for multiple engine and vehicle platforms. Tier 2 (2007 and beyond) emissions levels have been demonstrated for a light truck vehicle over a FTP-75 test cycle on a vehicle chassis dynamometer. These low emissions levels are obtained while retaining the fuel economy advantage characteristic of diesel engines. The performance and emissions results were achieved by integrating advanced combustion strategies (CLEAN Combustion{copyright}) with prototype aftertreatment systems. CLEAN Combustion{copyright} allows partial control of exhaust species for aftertreatment integration in addition to simultaneous NOx and PM reduction. Analytical tools enabled the engine and aftertreatment sub-systems development and system integration. The experimental technology development methodology utilized a range of facilities to streamline development of the eventual solution including utilization of steady state and transient dynamometer test-beds to simulate chassis dynamometer test cycles.

Aneja, R.; Bolton, B; Oladipo, A; Pavlova-MacKinnon, Z; Radwan, A

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Compatible Vehicles: Cargotec - Ottawa 4x2 Elgin Sweeper Company - Broom Bear/Crosswind/Eagle/Pelican North American Bus Industries - 60BRT North American Bus Industries - 31LFW / 35LFW / 40LFW ElDorado National - E-Z Rider II BRT ElDorado National - Axess ElDorado National - XHF Champion Bus Inc. - CTS - Front Engine Motor Coach Industries - D4500 CT Hybrid Commuter Coach Gillig Corp. - Diesel-Electric Hybrid Bus and CNG Bus Freightliner - Business Class M2 112 Blue Bird Corp. - All American Rear Engine Capacity Trucks - TJ9000 Heil Environmental - RapidRail McNeilus - Rear Load (Std, HD, XC, Tag, MS, Metro-Pak) McNeilus - CNG Cement Mixer North American Bus Industries - 42BRT Heil Environmental - DuraPack Python Heil Environmental - Rear Loader Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner HDX CNG

252

Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide adsorbents for diesel engine emission control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are sorbents and devices for controlling sulfur oxides emissions as well as systems including such sorbents and devices. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the disclosed sorbents, devices and systems. In one embodiment the disclosed sorbents can be conveniently regenerated, such as under normal exhaust stream from a combustion engine, particularly a diesel engine. Accordingly, also disclosed are combustion vehicles equipped with sulfur dioxide emission control devices.

Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of Innovative Combustion Processes for a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) emissions and fuel economy goals, a small-bore, high-speed, direct-injection (HSDI) diesel facility in which to conduct research into the physics of the combustion process relevant to these engines has been developed. The characteristics of this facility are described, and the motivation for selecting these characteristics and their relation to high efficiency, low-emission HSDI engine technology is discussed.

John Dec; Paul Miles

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible D.I. diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection Diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Espey, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Update on Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engine. Recent experimental results of diesel combustion research will be discussed and a description will be given of our HCCI experimental program and of our HCCI modeling work.

Jay Keller; Gurpreet Singh

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Diesel fuel component contribution to engine emissions and performance. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary diesel fuel is a blend of several refinery streams chosen to meet specifications. The need to increase yield of transportation fuel from crude oil has resulted in converting increased proportions of residual oil to lighter products. This conversion is accomplished by thermal, catalytic, and hydrocracking of high molecular weight materials rich in aromatic compounds. The current efforts to reformulate California diesel fuel for reduced emissions from existing engines is an example of another driving force affecting refining practice: regulations designed to reduce exhaust emissions. Although derived from petroleum crude oil, reformulated diesel fuel is an alternative to current specification-grade diesel fuel, and this alternative presents opportunities and questions to be resolved by fuel and engine research. Various concerned parties have argued that regulations for fuel reformulation have not been based on an adequate data base. Despite numerous studies, much ambiguity remains about the relationship of exhaust parameters to fuel composition, particularly for diesel fuel. In an effort to gather pertinent data, the automobile industry and the oil refiners have joined forces in the Air Quality Improvement Research Program (AUTO/OIL) to address this question for gasoline. The objective of that work is to define the relationship between gasoline composition and the magnitude and composition of the exhaust emissions. The results of the AUTO/OEL program will also be used, along with other data bases, to define the EPA {open_quotes}complex model{close_quotes} for reformulated gasolines. Valuable insights have been gained for compression ignition engines in the Coordinating Research Council`s VE-1 program, but no program similar to AUTO/OIL has been started for diesel fuel reformulation. A more detailed understanding of the fuel/performance relationship is a readily apparent need.

Erwin, J.; Ryan, T.W. III; Moulton, D.S. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

SENSITIZATION AND EXACERBATION OF ALLERGIC DISEASES BY DIESEL ENGINE PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most studies of the health effects of diesel exhaust have focused on the controversial issue of its role in cancer. However, recently the role of combustion products such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in modulating the immune response has garnered much attention. In particular the effect of DEP on allergic and asthmatic diseases has been the focus of many studies. A link between industrialization and allergic disease has long been presumed. Indeed, only 50 years after the first recorded reported case of allergy in 1819, Charles Blackely wrote that the ''hay-fever epidemic'' was associated with the movement of people from the country into the cities. Ishizaki et al. (1987) found that people in Japan living on busy roads lined with cedar trees have more allergies to cedar than residents living on similar streets with much less traffic. Since that time other epidemiological studies have reported similar findings. Kramer, et al., showed that hay fever is greater in residential areas with heavy truck traffic, while Weiland, et al., reported that allergic symptoms correlate with the distance of residences to roads with heavy traffic.

Diaz-Sanchez, David

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

In-cylinder pressure characteristics of a CI engine using blends of diesel fuel and methyl esters of beef tallow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Cummins N14-410 diesel engine was operated on 12 fuels produced by blending methyl tallowate, methyl soyate, and ethanol with no. 2 diesel fuel. Engine in-cylinder pressure data were used to evaluate engine performance. Peak cylinder pressures for each fuel blend at all engine speeds were lower than peak pressure for diesel fuel with the exception of the 80% diesel, 13% methyl tallowate, and 7% ethanol; and the 80% diesel, 6.5% methyl tallowate, 6.5% methyl soyate and 7% ethanol blends. The indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) values for all fuel blends were less than for diesel fuel. The differences in IMEP values correlated with differences in power output of the engine. Similarly, maximum rates of pressure rise for most fuel blends were less than for diesel fuel. It was concluded that the fuel blends used in this study would have no detrimental long-term effects on engine performance, wear, and knock. 6 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

Ali, Y.; Hanna, M.A.; Borg, J.E. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Measurement of Fuel Dilution of Oil in a Diesel Engine using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique for measuring the fuel dilution of oil in a diesel engine is presented. Fuel dilution can occur when advanced in-cylinder fuel injection techniques are employed for the purpose of producing rich exhaust for lean NOx trap catalyst regeneration. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy is used to monitor the oil in a Mercedes 1.7-liter engine operated on a dynamometer platform. A fluorescent dye suitable for use in diesel fuel and oil systems is added to the engine fuel. The LIF spectra are monitored to detect the growth of the dye signal relative to the background fluorescence of the oil; fuel mass concentration is quantified based on a known sample set. The technique was implemented with fiber optic probes which can be inserted at various points in the oil system of the engine. A low cost 532-nm laser diode was used for excitation of the fluorescence. Measurements of fuel dilution of oil are presented for various in-cylinder injection strategies for rich operation of the diesel engine. Rates of fuel dilution increase for all strategies relative to normal lean operation, and higher fuel dilution rates are observed when extra fuel injection occurs later in the combustion cycle when fuel penetration into the cylinder wall oil film is more likely.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Diesel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Vehicles Audi A3 Diesel vehicles may be making a comeback. Diesel engines are more powerful and fuel-efficient than similar-sized gasoline engines (about 30-35% more fuel efficient). Plus, today's diesel vehicles are much improved over diesels of the past. Better Performance Improved fuel injection and electronic engine control technologies have Increased power Improved acceleration Increased efficiency New engine designs, along with noise- and vibration-damping technologies, have made them quieter and smoother. Cold-weather starting has been improved also. Cleaner Mercedes ML320 BlueTEC Today's diesels must meet the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Advances in engine technologies, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, and improved exhaust treatment have made this possible.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Changes related to "BPM Diesel Engineering" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

period. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwikiSpecial:RecentChangesLinkedBPMDieselEngineering" Atom Special pages About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Developer services...

263

Plant Engineering: Storage and Use of Low-Concentration (5%) Biodiesel Blends in Nuclear Plant Emergency Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for biodiesel to be found in diesel fuel for emergency diesel generators (EDGs) is greatly increased since ASTM approved the allowance of up to 5 volume percent biodiesel (B5) in commercial diesel covered by ASTM D975. Although B5 is approved for use by all major diesel engine manufacturers, little is known about possible problems that could be encountered by utilities with EDGs. This report is an addendum to previously published Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1021071. It i...

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

264

Plant Support Engineering: Storage and Use of Low Concentration (5%) Biodiesel Blends in Nuclear Plant Emergency Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for biodiesel to be found in diesel fuel for emergency diesel generators (EDGs) is greatly increased since the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approved the allowance of up to 5 volume percent (vol%) biodiesel (B5) in commercial diesel covered by ASTM D975. While B5 is approved for use by all major diesel engine manufacturers, little is known about possible problems that could be encountered by utilities with EDGs. This report contains the findings from an extensive literat...

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

Caterpillar Light Truck Clean Diesel Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, light trucks accounted for over 48% of new vehicle sales in the U.S. and well over half the new Light Duty vehicle fuel consumption. The Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) program seeks to introduce large numbers of advanced technology diesel engines in light-duty trucks that would improve their fuel economy (mpg) by at least 50% and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign oil. Incorporating diesel engines in this application represents a high-risk technical and economic challenge. To meet the challenge, a government-industry partnership (Department of Energy, diesel engine manufacturers, and the automotive original equipment manufacturers) is applying joint resources to meet specific goals that will provide benefits to the nation. [1] Caterpillar initially teamed with Ford Motor Company on a 5 year program (1997-2002) to develop prototype vehicles that demonstrate a 50% fuel economy improvement over the current 1997 gasoline powered light truck vehicle in this class while complying with EPA's Tier II emissions regulations. The light truck vehicle selected for the demonstration is a 1999 Ford F150 SuperCab. To meet the goals of the program, the 4.6 L V-8 gasoline engine in this vehicle will be replaced by an advanced compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engine. Key elements of the Caterpillar LTCD program plan to develop the advanced CIDI engine are presented in this paper.

Robert L. Miller; Kevin P. Duffy; Michael A. Flinn; Steve A. Faulkner; Mike A. Graham

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

Biphase turbine bottoming cycle for a diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

Application of a two-phase turbine system to waste heat recovery was examined. Bottoming cycle efficiencies ranging from 15 to 30% were calculated for a 720/sup 0/F diesel exhaust temperature. A single stage demonstration unit, designed for non-toxic fluids (water and DowTherm A) and for atmospheric seals and bearings, had a cycle efficiency of 23%. The net output power was 276 hp at 8,100 rpm, increasing the total shaft power from 1,800 hp for the diesel alone, to 2,076 hp for the combined system. A four stage organic turbine, for the same application, had a rotational speed of 14,700 rpm while a four stage steam turbine had 26,000 rpm. Fabrication drawings were prepared for the turbine and nozzle. The major improvement leading to higher cycle efficiency and lower turbine rpm was found to be the use of a liquid component with lower sensible heat. A reduction in capital cost was found to result from the use of a contact heat exchanger instead of tube-fin construction. The cost for a contact heat exchanger was only $35-52/kWe compared to $98/kWe for a tube-fin heat exchanger. Design drawings and materials list were prepared. A program resulting in the demonstration of a two-phase bottoming system was planned and the required cost estimated. The program would result in a feasibility test of the nozzle and turbine at the end of the first year, a laboratory performance test of the bottoming system by the end of the second year and a field demonstration test and laboratory endurance test of the bottoming system during the third year. The blowdown test rig for the first year's program and test turbine were designed.

Ahmad, S.; Hays, L.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Biodiesel Emissions Testing with a Modern Diesel Engine - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-399  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To evaluate the emissions and performance impact of biodiesel in a modern diesel engine equipped with a diesel particulate filter. This testing is in support of the Non-Petroleum Based Fuels (NPBF) 2010 Annual Operating Plan (AOP).

Williams, A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Engineering evaluation of the General Motors (GM) diesel rating and capabilities  

SciTech Connect

K-Reactor's number one GM diesel (GM-lK) suffered recurrent, premature piston pin bushing failures between July 1990 and January 1991. These failures raised a concern that the engine's original design capabilities were being exceeded. Were we asking old engines to do too much by powering 1200 kw (continuous) rated electrical generators Was excessive wear of the piston pin bushings a result of having exceeded the engine's capabilities (overload), or were the recent failures a direct result of poor quality, poor design, or defective replacement parts Considering the engine's overall performance for the past 30 years, during which an engine failure of this nature had never occurred, and the fact that 1200 kw was approximately 50% of the engine's original tested capability, Reactor Engineering did not consider it likely that an overloaded engine caused bushing failures. What seemed more plausible was that the engine's failure to perform was caused by deficiencies in, or poor quality of, replacement parts.The following report documents: (1) the results of K-Reactor EDG failure analysis; (2) correlation of P- and C-Reactor GM diesel teardowns; (3) the engine rebuild to blueprint specification; (4) how the engine was determined ready for test; (5) testing parameters that were developed; (6) a summary of test results and test insights; (7) how WSRC determined engine operation was acceptable; (8) independent review of 1200 kw operational data; (9) approval of the engines' 12OOkw continuous rating.

Gross, R.E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The application of the wavelet finite element method on the temperature calculation of ceramic coating diesel engine piston  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to analyse the temperature distribution of diesel engine piston, the wavelet finite element was constructed based on Daubechies wavelet scale function and traditional finite element. And the temperature distribution of the conventional and ceramic ...

Bin Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

A digital control algorithm for diesel engine governing  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a microprocessor based precision engine speed control system was investigated. A sample rate selection criteria is presented along with a procedure to implement a high performance digital PID control algorithm. The algorithm requires a digital speed sensor of 12 to 14 bits to minimize excessive fuel rack motion at a steady state due to digital quantization effects. Computer simulation and experimental test results of the algorithm are presented for an 1800 RPM, 125 Kilowatt engine generator set.

Garvey, P.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fate of SO{sub 2} During Plasma Treatment of Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} to achieve efficient reduction of NO{sub x} and particulates in diesel engine exhaust. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO{sub 2} is also active in converting SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without oxidizing SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. It is shown that the presence of hydrocarbons in the plasma is essential for enhancing the selective partial oxidation of NO and suppressing the oxidation of SO{sub 2}.

Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Second law analysis of premixed compression ignition combustion in a diesel engine using a thermodynamic engine cycle simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A second law analysis of compression ignition engine was completed using a thermodynamic engine cycle simulation. The major components of availability destruction and transfer for an entire engine cycle were identified and the influence of mode of combustion, injection timing and EGR on availability balance was evaluated. The simulation pressure data was matched with the available experimental pressure data gathered from the tests on the Isuzu 1.7 L direct injection diesel engine. Various input parameters of the simulation were changed to represent actual engine conditions. Availability destruction due to combustion decreases with advanced injection timing and under premixed compression ignition (PCI) modes; but it is found to be insensitive to the level of EGR. Similarly, trends (or lack of trends) in the other components of availability balance were identified for variation in injection timing, EGR level and mode of combustion. Optimum strategy for efficient combustion processes was proposed based on the observed trends.

Oak, Sushil Shreekant

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO[sub x] concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Engineering Meetings Board has approved this paper for publication. It has successfully completed SAE's peer review process under the supervision of the session organizer. This process requires a minimum of three (3) reviews by industry experts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through the use of engine optimization, aftertreatment system integration, and ultra-low sulfur diesel of Chemical Species from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines and the Effects of Modern Aftertreatment Technology Z in increased emissions of HC and CO for engines without aftertreatment systems [9]. However, for the 2007

Wu, Mingshen

279

Commercialization of coal diesel engines for non-utility and export power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic motivation behind this project is to develop coal-burning heat engine technology primarily for 10-100 MW modular stationary power applications in the late 1990`s and beyond, when oil and gas prices may return to the $5--7/MMBtu range. The fuel is a low-cost, coal-based liquid with the consistency of black paint, composed of 12-micron mean size premium 2% ash coal dust mixed 50/50 with water. The Clean Coal Diesel Plant of the future is targeted for the 10-100 MW non-utility generation (NUG) and small utility markets, including independent power producers (IPP) and cogeneration. A family of plant designs will be offered using the Cooper-Bessemer 3.8, 5.0, and 6.3 MW Model LS engines as building blocks. In addition, larger plants will be configured with an engine in the 10-25 MW class (Cooper will license the technology to other large bore stationary engine manufacturers). The reciprocating engine offers a remarkable degree of flexibility in selecting plant capacity. This flexibility exists because the engines are modular in every sense (fuel cell stacks have similar modularity). Scale-up is accomplished simply by adding cylinders (e.g., 20 vs 16) or by adding engines (4 vs 3). There is no scale-up of the basic cylinder size. Thus, there is essentially no technical development needed to scale-up the Cooper-Bessemer Clean Coal Diesel Technology all the way from 2 MW (one 6-cylinder engine) to 50 MW (eight 20-cylinder engines), other than engineering adaptation of the turbocharger to match the engine.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E.; Mayville, R.A.; Itse, D.; Kimberley, J.; Parkinson, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mixing and flame structures inferred from OH-PLIF for conventional and low-temperature diesel engine combustion  

SciTech Connect

The structure of first- and second-stage combustion is investigated in a heavy-duty, single-cylinder optical engine using chemiluminescence imaging, Mie-scatter imaging of liquid-fuel, and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF) along with calculations of fluorescence quenching. Three different diesel combustion modes are studied: conventional non-diluted high-temperature combustion (HTC) with either (1) short or (2) long ignition delay, and (3) highly diluted low-temperature combustion (LTC) with early fuel injection. For the short ignition delay HTC condition, the OH fluorescence images show that second-stage combustion occurs mainly on the fuel jet periphery in a thickness of about 1 mm. For the long ignition delay HTC condition, the second-stage combustion zone on the jet periphery is thicker (5-6 mm). For the early-injection LTC condition, the second-stage combustion is even thicker (20-25 mm) and occurs only in the down-stream regions of the jet. The relationship between OH concentration and OH-PLIF intensity over a range of equivalence ratios is estimated from quenching calculations using collider species concentrations predicted by chemical kinetics simulations of combustion. The calculations show that both OH concentration and OH-PLIF intensity peak near stoichiometric mixtures and fall by an order of magnitude or more for equivalence ratios less than 0.2-0.4 and greater than 1.4-1.6. Using the OH fluorescence quenching predictions together with OH-PLIF images, quantitative boundaries for mixing are established for the three engine combustion modes. (author)

Singh, Satbir [General Motors Research and Development, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Musculus, Mark P.B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Reitz, Rolf D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Oxygen-enriched diesel engine performance: A comparison of analytical and experimental results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of oxygen-enriched combustion air in diesel engines can lead to significant improvements in power density, as well as reductions in particulate emissions, but at the expense of higher NO{sub x} emissions. Oxygen enrichment would also lead to lower ignition delays and the opportunity to burn lower grade fuels. Analytical and experimental studies are being conducted in parallel to establish the optimal combination of oxygen level and diesel fuel properties. In this paper, cylinder pressure data acquired on a single-cylinder engine are used to generate heat release rates for operation under various oxygen contents. These derived heat release rates are in turn used to improve the combustion correlation -- and thus the prediction capability -- of the simulation code. It is shown that simulated and measured cylinder pressures and other performance parameters are in good agreement. The improved simulation can provide sufficiently accurate predictions of trends and magnitudes to be useful in parametric studies assessing the effects of oxygen enrichment and water injection on diesel engine performance. Measured ignition delays, NO{sub x} emissions, and particulate emissions are also compared with previously published data. The measured ignition delays are slightly lower than previously reported. Particulate emissions measured in this series of tests are significantly lower than previously reported. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Assanis, D.N. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA)); Schaus, J.E. (Autoresearch Labs., Inc., Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance with meeting DOE technical targets this research was aimed at developing and optimizing new fuel injection technologies and strategies for the combustion of clean burning renewable fuels in diesel engines. In addition a simultaneous minimum 20% improvement in fuel economy was targeted with the aid of this novel advanced combustion system. Biodiesel and other renewable fuels have unique properties that can be leveraged to reduce emissions and increase engine efficiency. This research is an investigation into the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and its impacts on the performance of a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engine, which is a novel engine configuration that incorporates technologies and strategies for simultaneously reducing NOx and particulate emissions while increasing engine efficiency. Generating fundamental knowledge about the properties of biodiesel and blends with petroleum-derived diesel and their impact on in-cylinder fuel atomization and combustion processes was an important initial step to being able to optimize fuel injection strategies as well as introduce new technologies. With the benefit of this knowledge experiments were performed on both optical and metal LTC engines in which combustion and emissions could be observed and measured under realistic conditions. With the aid these experiments and detailed combustion models strategies were identified and applied in order to improve fuel economy and simultaneously reduce emissions.

Chia-fon F. Lee; Alan C. Hansen

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermodynamic simulation is used to study effects of O2-enriched intake air on performance and NO emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. Parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the O2-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, gross and net power output of an engine operating under different levels of O2 enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in 13% increase in net engine power when intake air with 28 vol% O2 is used and fuel injection timing retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in only 4% improvement in power. If part of the higher exhaust enthalpies from the O2 enrichment is recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met. O2 enrichment with its higher combustion temperatures reduces emissions of particulates and visible smoke but increases NO emissions (by up to 3 times at 26% O2 content). Therefore, exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required if the full potential of O2 enrichment for improving the performance of locomotive diesel engines is to be realized.

Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Assanis, D.N. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cataldi, G.R. [Association of American Railroads, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Efficiency evaluation of the DISC (direct-injection stratified charge), DHC (dilute homogeneous charge), and DI Diesel engines (direct-injection diesel)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermodynamic laws governing the Otto and diesel cycle engines and the possible approaches that might be taken to increase the delivered efficiency of the reciprocating piston engine are discussed. The generic aspects of current research are discussed and typical links between research and the technical barriers to the engines' development are shown. The advanced engines are discussed individually. After a brief description of each engine and its advantages, the major technical barriers to their development are discussed. Also included for each engine is a discussion of examples of the linkages between these barriers and current combustion and thermodynamic research. For each engine a list of questions is presented that have yet to be resolved and could not be resolved within the scope of this study. These questions partially indicate the limit to the state of knowledge regarding efficiency characteristics of the advanced engine concepts. The major technical barriers to each of the engines and their ranges of efficiency improvement are summarized.

Hane, G.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

(Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system and design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different engine design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1989-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Engine deposit and pour point studies using canola oil as a diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect

Engine tests conducted during previous investigations have established the viability of using canola oil as a substitute for diesel fuel on a short term basis, but also revealed the need to assess possible combustion chamber deposits from long range testing. Low temperature problems in handling vegetable oils has also been recognized as posing a threat to their use in winter operation. This paper reports a procedure involving a direct comparison of running two different fuels in an engine simultaneously to study deposit problems, and also reports on three attempted methods - fuel blending, fuel heating and fuel additives to reduce the pour point of canola oil. 3 figures, 1 table.

Strayer, R.C.; Craig, W.K.; Zoerb, G.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Control method for turbocharged diesel engines having exhaust gas recirculation  

SciTech Connect

A method of controlling the airflow into a compression ignition engine having an EGR and a VGT. The control strategy includes the steps of generating desired EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates as a function of the desired and measured compressor mass airflow values and exhaust manifold pressure values. The desired compressor mass airflow and exhaust manifold pressure values are generated as a function of the operator-requested fueling rate and engine speed. The EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates are then inverted to corresponding EGR and VGT actuator positions to achieve the desired compressor mass airflow rate and exhaust manifold pressure. The control strategy also includes a method of estimating the intake manifold pressure used in generating the EGR valve and VGT turbine positions.

Kolmanovsky, Ilya V. (Ypsilanti, MI); Jankovic, Mrdjan J (Birmingham, MI); Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI)

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Assessment of heavy-duty gasoline and diesel vehicles in California: population and use patterns. Final report, June 1983-March 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents an inventory of Vehicle Miles Travelled (VMT) in California by heavy-duty vehicles (HDV) in each of the 58 counties and 14 air basins. To compile the inventory, PES used data generated by two California Department of Transportation (CAL TRANS) annual studies. These data were supplemented by several types of auxiliary data compiled by a literature search, a special truck traffic survey on 21 different routes selected from city and county roads, and an owner/operator telephone questionnaire on vehicle usage of 622 randomly selected HDV's. Out-of-state truck activities in California were estimated by analyzing data from the 1976 Interstate Transportation and Traffic Engineering Survey and the 1971 Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering Survey.

Horie, Y.; Rapoport, R.; Pantalone, J.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal efficiencies of 54% have been demonstrated by single cylinder engine testing of advanced diesel engine concepts developed under Department of Energy funding. In order for these concept engines to be commercially viable, cost effective and durable systems for insulating the piston, head, ports and exhaust manifolds will be required. The application and development of new materials such as thick thermal barrier coating systems will be key to insulating these components. Development of test methods to rapidly evaluate the durability of coating systems without expensive engine testing is a major objective of current work. In addition, a novel, low cost method for producing thermal barrier coated pistons without final machining of the coating has been developed.

M. B. Beardsley; P. G. Happoldt; K.C. Kelley; E. F. Rejda; D. F. Socie

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop the engine and lubricant system design approach that has the highest probability for commercial acceptance. Several specific objectives can also be identified. These objectives include: definition of the dominant wear mechanisms prevailing in coal-fueled diesel engines; definition of the specific effect of each coal-related lube oil contaminant; determination of the potential of traditional engine lubrication design approaches to either solve or mitigate the effects of the coal related lube oil contaminants; evaluation of several different design approaches aimed specifically at preventing lube oil contamination or preventing damage due to lube oil contamination; and presentation of the engine/lubricant system design determined to have the most potential. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: Wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NO{sub x}, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model and preliminary soot modeling results are described in this report. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme has been developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations have been made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-valve engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results have been obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot production in direct-injection diesel engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined experimental and kinetic modeling study of soot formation in diesel engine combustion has been used to study the addition of oxygenated species to diesel fuel to reduce soot emissions. This work indicates that the primary role of oxygen atoms in the fuel mixture is to reduce the levels of carbon atoms available for soot formation by fixing them in the form of CO or COz. When the structure of the oxygenate leads to prompt and direct formation of CO2, the oxygenate is less effective in reducing soot production than in cases when all fuel-bound 0 atoms produce only CO. The kinetic and molecular structure principles leading to this conclusion are described.

Westbrook, Charles K. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Pitz, William J. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Mueller, Charles J.; Martin, Glen M.; Pickett, Lyle M.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Micronized-coal-water slurry sprays from a diesel engine positive displacement fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted to characterize the sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system for a diesel engine. Diesel fuel water and three concentrations of micronized-coal-water slurry were used in these experiments. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies and still photographs of the sprays were obtained. In addition, instaneous fuel line pressures and needle lifts were obtained. Data were acquired as a function of fluid, nozzle orifice diameter, rack setting and chamber conditions. The high speed movies were used to determine spray penetration and spray growth.

Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.; Seshadri, A.K.; Zicterman, G. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

DELTA-DIESEL ENGINE LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATION Contract DE-FC05-97OR22606 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DELTA Diesel Engine Light Truck Application End of Contract Report DE-FC05-97-OR22606 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report is the final technical report of the Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program under contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606. During the course of this contract, Detroit Diesel Corporation analyzed, designed, tooled, developed and applied the ''Proof of Concept'' (Generation 0) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine and designed the successor ''Production Technology Demonstration'' (Generation 1) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine. The objectives of DELTA Program contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606 were to: Demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies, specifically intended for the North American LDT and SUV markets; Demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages. With a clean sheet design, DDC produced the DELTA engine concept promising the following attributes: 30-50% improved fuel economy; Low cost; Good durability and reliability; Acceptable noise, vibration and harshness (NVH); State-of-the-art features; Even firing, 4 valves per cylinder; High pressure common rail fuel system; Electronically controlled; Turbocharged, intercooled, cooled EGR; Extremely low emissions via CLEAN Combustion{copyright} technology. To demonstrate the engine technology in the SUV market, DDC repowered a 1999 Dodge Durango with the DELTA Generation 0 engine. Fuel economy improvements were approximately 50% better than the gasoline engine replaced in the vehicle.

Hakim, Nabil Balnaves, Mike

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

297

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro–cogeneration System Based on a Stirling Engine and Fuelled by Diesel and Ethanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examined the performance of a residential micro–cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine and fuelled by diesel and ethanol. An extensive number of… (more)

Farra, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Isotopic Tracing of Particulate Matter from a Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Ethanol-in-Diesel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to investigate the relative contribution to diesel engine particulate matter (PM) from the ethanol and diesel fractions of blended fuels. Four test fuels along with a diesel fuel baseline were investigated. The test fuels were comprised of {sup 14}C depleted diesel fuel mixed with contemporary grain ethanol (>400 the {sup 14}C concentration of diesel). An emulsifier (Span 85) or cosolvent (butyl alcohol) was used to facilitate mixing. The experimental test engine was a 1993 Cummins B5.9 diesel rated at 175 hp at 2500 rpm. Test fuels were run at steady-state conditions of 1600 rpm and 210 ft-lbs, and PM samples were collected on quartz filters following dilution of engine exhaust in a mini-dilution tunnel. AMS analysis of the filter samples showed that the ethanol contributed less to PM relative to its fraction in the fuel blend. For the emulsified blends, 6.4% and 10.3% contributions to PM were observed for 11.5% and 23.0% ethanol fuels, respectively. For the cosolvent blends, even lower contributions were observed (3.8% and 6.3% contributions to PM for 12.5% and 25.0% ethanol fuels, respectively).

Cheng, A.S.; Dibble, R.W.; Buchholz, B.

1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

299

Application of oxygen-enriched combustion for locomotive diesel engines. Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermodynamic simulation is used to study the effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on the performance and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. The parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the oxygen-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, the gross and net power outputs of an engine operating under different levels of oxygen enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in an increase in net engine power of approximately 13% when intake air with an oxygen content of 28% by volume is used and fuel injection timing is retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure improves power by only 4%. If part of the significantly higher exhaust enthalpies available as a result of oxygen enrichment are recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met, resulting in substantial net power improvements. Oxygen enrichment reduces particulate and visible smoke emissions but increases NO emissions. However, a combination of retarded fuel injection timing and post-treatment of exhaust gases may be adequate to meet the locomotive diesel engine NO{sub x} standards. Exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required to realize the full potential of oxygen enrichment. Economic analysis shows that oxygen-enrichment technology is economically feasible and provides high returns on investment. The study also indicates the strong influence of membrane parasitic requirements and exhaust energy recovery on economic benefits. To obtain an economic advantage while using a membrane with higher parasitic power requirements, it is necessary to recover a part of the exhaust energy.

Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.R.; Assanis, D.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Study of a Diesel Engine Based Micro-CHP System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, funded by New York State Energy Research and Development Agency (NYSERDA), investigated the potential for an oil-fired combined heat and power system (micro-CHP system) for potential use in residences that use oil to heat their homes. Obviously, this requires the power source to be one that uses heating oil (diesel). The work consisted of an experimental study using a diesel engine and an analytical study that examined potential energy savings and benefits of micro-CHP systems for 'typical' locations in New York State. A search for a small diesel engine disclosed that no such engines were manufactured in the U.S. A single cylinder engine manufactured in Germany driving an electric generator was purchased for the experimental work. The engine was tested using on-road diesel fuel (15 ppm sulfur), and biodiesel blends. One of the main objectives was to demonstrate the possibility of operation in the so-called HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) mode. The HCCI mode of operation of engines is being explored as a way to reduce the emission of smoke, and NOx significantly without exhaust treatment. This is being done primarily in the context of engines used in transportation applications. However, it is felt that in a micro-CHP application using a single cylinder engine, such an approach would confer those emission benefits and would be much easier to implement. This was demonstrated successfully by injecting the fuel into the engine air intake using a heated atomizer made by Econox Technologies LLC to promote significant vaporization before entering the cylinder. Efficiency and emission measurements were made under different electrical loads provided by two space heaters connected to the generator in normal and HCCI modes of operation. The goals of the analytical work were to characterize, from the published literature, the prime-movers for micro-CHP applications, quantify parametrically the expected energy savings of using micro-CHP systems instead of the conventional heating system, and analyze system approaches for interaction with the local electric utility. The primary energy savings between the space heating provided by a conventional space heating system with all the required electrical energy supplied by the grid and the micro-CHP system supplemented when needed by a conventional space heating and the grid supplied electricity. were calculated for two locations namely Long Island and Albany. The key results from the experimental work are summarized first and the results from the analytical work next. Experimental results: (1) The engine could be operated successfully in the normal and HCCI modes using both diesel and biodiesel blends. (2) The smoke levels are lower with biodiesel than with diesel in both modes of operation. (3) The NOx levels are lower with the HCCI mode of operation than with the normal mode for both fuels. (4) The engine efficiency in these tests is lower in the HCCI mode of operation. However, the system parameters were not optimized for such operation within the scope of this project. However, for an engine designed with such operation in mind, the efficiency would possibly be not lower. Analytical results: (1) The internal combustion engine (diesel engine in this case) is the only proven technology as a prime mover at present. However, as noted above, no U.S. engine is available at present. (2) For both locations, the use of a micro-CHP system results in primary energy savings. This is true whether the CHP system is used only to supply domestic hot water or to supply both hot water and space heat and even for a low efficiency system especially for the latter case. The size of the thermal storage (as long as it above a certain minimum) did not affect this. (3) For example, for a 2 kW CHP electrical efficiency of 25%, a typical house on Long Island will save about 30MBtu of energy per year for a combined space heat and domestic hot water system. This corresponds to annual energy savings of about 210 gallons oil equivalent per (4) The savings increased initially with the powe

Krishna, C.R.; Andrews, J.; Tutu, N.; Butcher, T.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Application of pulsed plasma NO{sub x} reduction to diesel engine exhaust  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the effect of pulsed plasma discharges on gas mixtures simulating diesel engine exhaust by modeling and by experiment. Our modeling results have shown that the pulsed plasma can convert NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} using the nitrogen itself as a reductant. However, this process is energetically unfavorable for the plasma regime of our measurements. In our experiments we found that addition of hydrocarbons improves substantially the energy efficiency of pulsed plasma NO{sub x} reduction. Real exhaust gas contains some gaseous hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide that may prove sufficient for improving the energy efficiency of the ``right`` pulsed plasma reduction process.

Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Hsiao, M.C.

1993-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

Ives, L.K. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Emission and Performance Comparison of the Natural Gas C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Trucks: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details results of on-road development and emissions characteristics of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy duty trucks. The objective of this project was to develop, on road and in service, a natural gas truck/bus engine (the C-Gas Plus) with higher horsepower, lower cost, and better performance and diagnostics than the previous C8.3G natural gas engine. The engine was to have an advanced engine management control system to enable implementation of proven technologies that improve engine performance and power density (hp/L). The C-Gas Plus engine was designed to meet the following objectives: (1) Higher engine ratings (280 hp and 850 ft-lb torque for the C-Gas Plus) than the C8.3G natural gas engine; (2) Lower capital cost than the C8.3G engine; and (3) Low emission standards: California Air Resources Board (CARB) low-NO{sub x} (oxides of nitrogen) (2.0 g/bhp-h) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Fuel Fleet Program ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) emission certifications.

Lyford-Pike, E. J.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

Naylor, M.G.S. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modelling and prediction of particulate matter, NOx, and performance of a diesel vehicle engine under rare data using relevance vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, the performance maps and emissions of a diesel engine are obtained empirically through many testes on the dynamometers because no exact mathematical engine model exists. In the current literature, many artificial-neural-network- (ANN-) ...

Ka In Wong, Pak Kin Wong, Chun Shun Cheung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Production of Diesel Engine Turbocharger Turbine from Low Cost Titanium Powder  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbochargers in commercial turbo-diesel engines are multi-material systems where usually the compressor rotor is made of aluminum or titanium based material and the turbine rotor is made of either a nickel based superalloy or titanium, designed to operate under the harsh exhaust gas conditions. The use of cast titanium in the turbine section has been used by Cummins Turbo Technologies since 1997. Having the benefit of a lower mass than the superalloy based turbines; higher turbine speeds in a more compact design can be achieved with titanium. In an effort to improve the cost model, and develop an industrial supply of titanium componentry that is more stable than the traditional aerospace based supply chain, the Contractor has developed component manufacturing schemes that use economical Armstrong titanium and titanium alloy powders and MgR-HDH powders. Those manufacturing schemes can be applied to compressor and turbine rotor components for diesel engine applications with the potential of providing a reliable supply of titanium componentry with a cost and performance advantage over cast titanium.

Muth, T. R.; Mayer, R. (Queen City Forging)

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to characterize coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors. Since the combustion event is a strong function of the fuel spray, full characterization of the spray is a necessity for successful engine design and for modeling of the combustion process. Two experimental facilities were used at TAMU to study the injection of coal slurry fuels. The first experimental facility incorporates General Electric locomotive engine components (injection pump, fuel line, and nozzle) and a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the moving parts of the pump. The second experimental facility is based on an accumulator injector from General Electric. Instrumentation includes instantaneous needle lift and fuel line pressure. A pressurized visualization chamber was used to provide a spray environment which simulated the engine gas density and permitted the use of spray diagnostic techniques. The study was divided into two phases: (1) overall characterization of the spray, and (2) detailed droplet size and size distribution characterization. In addition to this overall characterization of the spray, the second phase of this study characterized the details of the atomization quality.

Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Getting Serious About Biofuels ALTHOUGH RUDOLF DIESEL IMAGINED THAT HIS EPONYMOUS ENGINE WOULD BE FUELED BY VEGETABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Getting Serious About Biofuels ALTHOUGH RUDOLF DIESEL IMAGINED THAT HIS EPONYMOUS ENGINE WOULD- outrequiringsubstantialmodificationofexistingvehiclesorofthefueldistributioninfrastructure:secu- rity of supply (biofuels can be produced locally in sustainable systems), lowernet of biomass transport determines the supply area of a biofuels processing facility and thus its scale

313

Heavy-Duty Stoichiometric Compression Ignition Engine with Improved Fuel Economy over Alternative Technologies for Meeting 2010 On-Highway Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the reported work were: to apply the stoichiometric compression ignition (SCI) concept to a 9.0 liter diesel engine; to obtain engine-out NO{sub x} and PM exhaust emissions so that the engine can meet 2010 on-highway emission standards by applying a three-way catalyst for NO{sub x} control and a particulate filter for PM control; and to simulate an optimize the engine and air system to approach 50% thermal efficiency using variable valve actuation and electric turbo compounding. The work demonstrated that an advanced diesel engine can be operated at stoichiometric conditions with reasonable particulate and NOx emissions at full power and peak torque conditions; calculated that the SCI engine will operate at 42% brake thermal efficiency without advanced hardware, turbocompounding, or waste heat recovery; and determined that EGR is not necessary for this advanced concept engine, and this greatly simplifies the concept.

Kirby J. Baumgard; Richard E. Winsor

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Final report, September 28, 1990--November 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program was to study the feasibility of operating a Detroit Diesel Series 149 engine at high speeds using a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. The CWS-fueled 149 engine is proposed for the mine-haul off-highway truck and work boat marine markets. Economic analysis studies indicate that, for these markets, the use of CWS fuel could have sufficient operating cost savings, depending upon the future diesel fuel price, emission control system capital and operating costs, and maintenance and overhaul costs. A major portion of the maintenance costs is expected to be due to lower life and higher cost of the CWS injectors. Injection and combustion systems were specially designed for CWS, and were installed in one cylinder of a Detroit Diesel 8V-149TI engine for testing. The objective was to achieve engine operation for sustained periods at speeds up to 1,900 rpm with reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate. A computer simulation predicted autoignition of coal fuel at 1,900 rpm would require an average droplet size of 18 microns and 19:1 compression ratio, so the injection system, and pistons were designed accordingly. The injection system was capable of supplying the required volume of CWS/injection with a duration of approximately 25 crank angle degrees and peak pressures on the order of 100 mpa. In addition to the high compression ratio, the combustion system also utilized hot residual gases in the cylinder, warm inlet air admission and ceramic insulated engine components to enhance combustion. Autoignition of CWS fuel was achieved at 1900 rpm, at loads ranging from 20--80 percent of the rated load of diesel-fuel powered cylinders. Limited emissions data indicates coal burnout rates in excess of 99 percent. NO{sub x} levels were significantly lower, while unburned hydrocarbon levels were higher for the CWS fueled cylinder than for corresponding diesel-fuel powered cylinders.

Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.; Ryan, T.W. III; Schwalb, J.A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, R.P. Jr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The influence of bowl offset on air motion in a direct injection diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

The influence of bowl offset on motored mean flow and turbulence in a direct injection diesel engine has been examined with the aid of a multi-dimensional flow code. Results are presented for three piston geometries. The bowl geometry of each piston was the same, while the offset between the bowl and the cylinder axis was varied from 0.0 to 9.6% of the bore. The swirl ratio at intake valve closing was also varied from 2.60 to 4.27. It was found that the angular momentum of the air at TDC was decreased by less than 8% when the bowl was offset. Nevertheless, the mean (squish and swirl) flows were strongly affected by the offset. In addition, the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (predicted by the /delta/-e model) was modified. Moderate increases (10% or less) in mass averaged turbulence intensity at TDC with offset were observed.

McKinley, T.L.; Primus, R.J

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

ORNL light-duty vehicles PC system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This data system, designed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), monitors information on every light-duty vehicle (automobiles and light-duty trucks) sold in the United States since model year 1976. The data are specified in two days. One way is on a model basis (i.e, engine and transmission combinations) and includes data on city, highway, and combined fuel economies; engine size; drive-train; fuel type (gasoline or diesel); interior volume; body type; and other vehicle attributes. The other way is on a make basis (e.g., Ford Escort, Oldsmobile 98) and includes data on sales; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) size class; the sales-weighted fuel economy; sales-weighted interior volume; sales-weighted engine displacement (cid); curb weight; and other attributes. A unique identification number is assigned to a specific vehicle category. This identification number contains information on the manufacturer, the location of the manufacturer (domestic or import), and the sponsorship of the vehicle (domestic or import). Fuel economies, model year sales and various vehicle characteristics for every make of the 164 million light-duty vehicles sold in the US since model year 1976 can be obtained from this data system. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Hu, P.S.; Patterson, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Combined Catalyzed Soot Filter and SCR Catalyst System for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Substantially reduces particulate emission for diesel vehicles Up to 90% effective against carbonaceous particulate matter Significantly reduces CO and HC Filter regenerates at normal diesel operation temperatures Removable design for easy cleaning and maintenance.

Kakwani, R.M.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent). Benzene emissions were reduced by up to 50 percent with the ethanol-blended fuels. Emissions of 1,3-butadiene were also substantially decreased, with reductions ranging from 24 to 82 percent. Isolated trends were noted for certain PAHs. There was a decrease in 1-nitropyrene with use of ethanol in all cases. Particulate phase 1-nitropyrene was reduced from 18 to 62 percent. There was also a general increase in the proportion of heavy PAHs in the particulate phase with ethanol use, and although less pronounced, a general decrease in light PAHs in the particulate phase.

Merritt, P. M.; Ulmet, V.; McCormick, R. L.; Mitchell, W. E.; Baumgard, K. J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings were determined using composite specimens of ceramic coated onto stainless steel substrates, tested with the coating in compression and the steel in tension. The strength of the coating was determined from an elastic bi-material analysis of the resulting failure of the coating in compression.(3) Altough initial comparisons of the materials would appear to be straight forward from these results, the results of the aging tests of the materials are necessary to insure that trends in properties remain after long term exposure to a diesel environment. Some comparisons can be made, such as the comparison between for lot-to-lot variation. An axial fatigue test to determine the high cycle fatigue behavior of TTBCs was developed at the University of Illinois under funding from this program.(4) A fatigue test apparatus has been designed and initial work performed which demonstrates the ability to provide a routine method of axial testing of coating. The test fixture replaces the normal load frame and fixtures used to transmit the hydraulic oil loading to the sample with the TTBC specimen itself. The TTBC specimen is a composite metal/coating with stainless steel ends. The coating is sprayed onto a mild steel center tube section onto which the stainless steel ends are press fit. The specimen is then machined. After machining, the specimen is placed in an acid bath which etches the mild steel away leaving the TTBC attached to the the stainless steel ends. Plugs are then installed in the ends and the composite specimen loaded in the test fixture where the hydraulic oil pressurizes each end to apply the load. Since oil transmits the load, bending loads are minimized. This test fixture has been modified to allow piston ends to be attached to the specimen which allows tensile loading as well as compressive loading of the specimen. In addition to the room temperature data, specimens have been tested at 800 Degrees C with the surprising result that at high temperature, the TTBC exhibits much higher fatigue strength. Testing of the TTBC using tension/compression cycling has been con

M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Allison Transmission (2) Azure Dynamics (1) BAE Systems (1) DesignLine Allison Transmission (2) Azure Dynamics (1) BAE Systems (1) DesignLine Corp. (1) Eaton (3) Hino (1) Parker Hannifin Corp. (1) Proterra (1) Smith Electric Vehicles (1) Fuel Type All Hybrid - Diesel Electric (8) Hybrid - Gasoline Electric (1) Application All Bus - School (4) Bus - Shuttle (2) Bus - Transit (6) Refuse hauler (2) Tractor (2) Trolley (2) Vocational truck (2) Go Compare Allison Transmission - Allison H 40 EP Allison Transmission - Allison H 50 EP Azure Dynamics - Balance Parallel Hybrid Drive BAE Systems - HybriDrive DesignLine Corp. - ECOSaver IV Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Eaton - Hybrid Drive System Eaton - Hybrid Hydraulic Launch Assist (HLA) Hino - Hino Hybrid Drive Parker Hannifin Corp. - RunWise Proterra - ProDrive System Smith Electric Vehicles - 120 kw induction motor with Lithium-ion batteries

322

The Chemistry of the Thermal DeNOx Process: A Review of the Technology's Possible Application to control of NOx from Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a review of the Thermal DeNOx process with respect to its application to control of NOx emissions from diesel engines. The chemistry of the process is discussed first in empirical and then theoretical terms. Based on this discussion the possibilities of applying the process to controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines is considered. Two options are examined, modifying the requirements of the chemistry of the Thermal DeNOx process to suit the conditions provided by diesel engines and modifying the engines to provide the conditions required by the process chemistry. While the former examination did not reveal any promising opportunities, the latter did. Turbocharged diesel engine systems in which the turbocharger is a net producer of power seem capable of providing the conditions necessary for NOx reduction via the Thermal DeNOx reaction.

Lyon, Richard

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

323

UndergradUate degree Program do your interests lie in the areas of aircraft and space vehicles, diesel engines, the mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by vehicles · designing and building a 100 MPG four-passenger, plug-in, diesel hybrid car · designing and wind, diesel engines, the mechanics and control of musculoskeletal systems, or solar and other renewable energy nanosatellite · investigating the dynamics and vortex wakes of rising and falling bodies · designing a wind farm

Lipson, Michal

324

Effect of nozzle orifice geometry on spray, combustion, and emission characteristics under diesel engine conditions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engine performance and emissions are strongly coupled with fuel atomization and spray processes, which in turn are strongly influenced by injector flow dynamics. Modern engines employ micro-orifices with different orifice designs. It is critical to characterize the effects of various designs on engine performance and emissions. In this study, a recently developed primary breakup model (KH-ACT), which accounts for the effects of cavitation and turbulence generated inside the injector nozzle is incorporated into a CFD software CONVERGE for comprehensive engine simulations. The effects of orifice geometry on inner nozzle flow, spray, and combustion processes are examined by coupling the injector flow and spray simulations. Results indicate that conicity and hydrogrinding reduce cavitation and turbulence inside the nozzle orifice, which slows down primary breakup, increasing spray penetration, and reducing dispersion. Consequently, with conical and hydroground nozzles, the vaporization rate and fuel air mixing are reduced, and ignition occurs further downstream. The flame lift-off lengths are the highest and lowest for the hydroground and conical nozzles, respectively. This can be related to the rate of fuel injection, which is higher for the hydroground nozzle, leading to richer mixtures and lower flame base speeds. A modified flame index is employed to resolve the flame structure, which indicates a dual combustion mode. For the conical nozzle, the relative role of rich premixed combustion is enhanced and that of diffusion combustion reduced compared to the other two nozzles. In contrast, for the hydroground nozzle, the role of rich premixed combustion is reduced and that of non-premixed combustion is enhanced. Consequently, the amount of soot produced is the highest for the conical nozzle, while the amount of NOx produced is the highest for the hydroground nozzle, indicating the classical tradeoff between them.

Som, S.; Longman, D. E; Ramirez, A. I.; Aggarwal, S. K. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Overview of Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are to describe the ongoing projects in diesel engine combustion research at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to detail recent experimental results. The approach we are employing is to assemble experimental hardware that mimic realistic engine geometries while enabling optical access. For example, we are using multi-cylinder engine heads or one-cylinder versions of production heads mated to one-cylinder engine blocks. Optical access is then obtained through a periscope in an exhaust valve, quartz windows in the piston crown, windows in spacer plates just below the head, or quartz cylinder liners. We have three diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, and a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative diesel fuels.

Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

327

Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

Not Available

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Study of Fuel Property Effects Using Future Low Emissions Heavy Duty Truck Engine Hardware  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel properties have had substantial impact on engine emissions. Fuel impact varies with engine technology. An assessment of fuel impact on future low emission designs was needed as part of an EMAEPA-API study effort

Li, Sharon

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

HEAVY-DUTY VEHICLE IN USE EMISSION PERFORMANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engines for heavy-duty vehicles are emission certified by running engines according to specified load pattern or duty cycle. In the US, the US Heavy-Duty Transient cycle has been in use already for a number of years, and Europe is, according to the requirements of the Directive 1999/96/EC gradually switching to transient-type testing. Evaluating the in-use emission performance of heavy-duty vehicles presents a problem. Taking engines out of vehicles for engine dynamometer testing is difficult and costly. In addition, engine dynamometer testing does not take into account the properties of the vehicle itself (i.e. mass, transmission etc.). It is also debatable, how well the standardized duty cycles reflect real-life -driving patterns. VTT Processes has recently commissioned a new emission laboratory for heavy-duty vehicles. The facility comprises both engine test stand and a fully transient heavy-duty chassis dynamometer. The roller diameter of the dynamometer is 2.5 meters. Regulated emissions are measured using a full-flow CVS system. The HD vehicle chassis dynamometer measurements (emissions, fuel consumption) has been granted accreditation by the Centre of Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES, Finland). A national program to generate emission data on buses has been set up for the years 2002-2004. The target is to generate emission factors for some 50 different buses representing different degree of sophistication (Euro 1 to Euro5/EEV, with and without exhaust gas aftertreatment), different fuel technologies (diesel, natural gas) and different ages (the effect of aging). The work is funded by the Metropolitan Council of Helsinki, Helsinki City Transport, The Ministry of Transport and Communications Finland and the gas company Gasum Oy. The International Association for Natural Gas Vehicles (IANGV) has opted to buy into the project. For IANGV, VTT will deliver comprehensive emission data (including particle size distribution and chemical and biological characterization of particles) for up-to-date diesel and natural gas vehicles. The paper describes the methodology used for the measurements on buses, the test matrix and some preliminary emission data on both regulated and unregulated emissions.

Nylund, N; Ikonen, M; Laurikko, J

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

Design of oil consumption measuring system to determine the effects of evolving oil sump composition over time on diesel engine performance and emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automotive industry is currently struggling because of the increasingly stricter emissions standards that will take effect in the near future. Diesel engine emissions are of particular interest because they are still ...

Ortiz-Soto, Elliott (Elliott A.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Influence of fuel sulfur content on emissions from diesel engines equipped with oxidation catalysts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) are a viable exhaust aftertreatment alternative for alleviating regulated exhaust emissions of hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matter (PM)… (more)

Evans, Jason Carter.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Dual Fuel Conversion System for Diesel Engines: Inventions and Innovation Project Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new dual fuel conversion system allows diesel fuel switching with clean burning natural gas.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ballard Power Systems (3) Balqon (3) Bosch Rexroth (1) Boulder Electric Ballard Power Systems (3) Balqon (3) Bosch Rexroth (1) Boulder Electric Vehicle (1) Capstone Turbine Corp. (2) Cummins (2) Cummins Westport (2) Electric Vehicles International (1) Enova Systems (1) Ford Motor Co. (5) General Motors (5) Hino (1) KEM (1) Navistar (1) Paccar (2) Smith Electric Vehicles (2) UQM (2) UTC Power (1) Valence (1) Vision Motor Corp. (2) Volvo (1) Westport Innovations (1) Fuel Type All CNG (8) Electricity (11) Ethanol (2) Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic (5) Hydrogen (3) LNG (4) Propane (10) Application All Bus - School (6) Bus - Shuttle (9) Bus - Transit (11) Refuse hauler (2) Street sweeper (5) Tractor (13) Trolley (3) Van (9) Vocational truck (16) Go Compare Ballard Power Systems - FCvelocity-HD6 fuel cell Ballard Power Systems - Hydrogen Fuel Cell

334

Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide absorbents for lean-burn diesel engine emission control  

SciTech Connect

It is known that sulfur oxides contribute significantly and deleteriously to the overall performance of lean-burn diesel engine aftertreatment systems, especially in the case of NOx traps. A Ag-based, fast regenerable SO2 absorbent has been developed and will be described. Over a temperature range of 300oC to 550oC, it absorbs almost all of the SO2 in the simulated exhaust gases during the lean cycles and can be fully regenerated by the short rich cycles at the same temperature. Its composition has been optimized as 1 wt% Pt-5wt%Ag-SiO2, and the preferred silica source for the supporting material has been identified as inert Cabosil fumed silica. The thermal instability of Ag2O under fuel-lean conditions at 230oC and above makes it possible to fast regenerate the sulfur-loaded absorbent during the following fuel-rich cycles. Pt catalyst helps reducing Ag2SO4 during rich cycles at low temperatures. And the chemically inert fumed SiO2 support gives the absorbent long term stability. This absorbent shows great potential to work under the same lean-rich cycling conditions as those imposed on the NOx traps, and thus, can protect the downstream particulate filter and the NOx trap from sulfur poisoning.

Li, Liyu; King, David L.

2010-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

Abrasive wear by diesel engine coal-fuel and related particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the work summarized in this report was to obtain a basic understanding of the factors which are responsible for wear of the piston ring and cylinder wall surfaces in diesel engines utilizing coal-fuel. The approach included analytical studies using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses to characterize coal-fuel and various combustion particles, and two different wear tests. The wear tests were a modified pin-on-disk test and a block-on-ring test capable of either unidirectional or reciprocating-rotational sliding. The wear tests in general were conducted with mixtures of the particles and lubricating oil. The particles studied included coal-fuel, particles resulting from the combustion of coal fuel, mineral matter extracted during the processing of coal, and several other common abrasive particle types among which quartz was the most extensively examined. The variables studied included those associated with the particles, such as particle type, size, and hardness; variables related to contact conditions and the surrounding environment; and variables related to the type and properties of the test specimen materials.

Ives, L.K. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Microwave Nitridation of Sintered Reaction Bonded Silicon Parts for Natural Gas Fueled Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This cooperative project was a joint development program between Eaton Corporation and Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER). Cooperative work was of benefit to both parties. ORNL was able to assess up-scale of the microwave nitridation process using a more intricate-shaped part designed for application in advanced diesel engines. Eaton Corporation mined access to microwave facilities and expertise for the nitridation of SRBSN materials. The broad objective of the CRADA established with Eaton Corporation and ORNL was to develop cost-effective silicon nitride ceramics compared to the current materials available. The following conclusions can be made from the work performed under the CRADA: (1) Demonstrated that the binder burnout step can be incorporated into the SRBSN processing in the microwave furnace. (2) Scale-up of the microwave nitridation process using Eaton Corporation parts showed that the nitridation weight gains were essentially identical to those obtained by conventional heating. (3) Combined nitridation and sintering processes using silicon nitride beads as packing powders results in degradation of the mechanical properties. (4) Gelcasting of silicon nitride materials using Eaton Si mixtures was demonstrated.

Edler, J.; Kiggans, J.O.; Suman, A.W.; Tiegs, T.N.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for study in-cylinder processes in a di diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed-dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 usec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color IR imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

Light Duty Truck Aftertreatment - Experience and Challenges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel's test experience on light duty truck PM aftertreatment technology development will be presented. The Tier-II extremely low emissions standards combined with the light-duty test cycle impose a significant challenge for the development of production-viable emissions technologies. A robust general path to achieve these emissions targets will be outlined.

Redon, Fabien

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Combustion optimization studies for stratified charge and diesel engines. Progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the program are to assess the feasibility and operating characteristics of the following high compression, spark ignition (or self ignition), stratified charge (or diesel) engine configuration: compression ratio: 16; open chember; direct fuel injection; unthrottled operation; 615 cc/cylinder; explored speed range 1000 to 4000 rpm (expected practical range 600 to 6000 rpm); fuels: ethanol-diesel mixtures; spark ignition (stratified charge) or self ignition (diesel), to continue the development and the testing of physical and numerical aspects of multi-dimensional combustion models in order to assess and improve their accuracy and to reduce their computation time, and to contribute to the achievement of a more fundamental and detailed understanding, characterization, and command of the processes wich control efficiency and emissions in internal combustion engines. Progress to date includes: engine modifications to obtain a transparent-piston, transparent-head configuration have been implemented; a gaseous fuel injection system has been designed, built, and operated; shadowgraph records of engine combustion have been obtained; a LDV system for in-cylinder gas velocity measurements has been selected; progress has been made toward measuring in-cylinder pressure, temperature, and composition for complete characterization of the charge; modeling of unsteady gaseous jets has yielded results which match asymptotically known steady state solutions; comparison with unsteady, two-dimensional bomb flames has yielded general scaling procedures for the computation of laminar flames; studies toward modeling of thick sprays have continued; DISC and other technical meetings have been attended and the results of the program made known to researchers and automotive industries; a very promising technique to apply television to unsteady events with short characteristic time (< 30 ms) has been developed and applied to obtain records of engine flames.

Steinberger, R.L.; Bracco, F.V.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Study and program plan for improved heavy duty gas turbine engine ceramic component development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A five-year program plan was generated from the study activities with the objectives of demonstrating a fuel economy of 213 mg/W . h (0.35 lb/hp-hr) brake specific fuel consumption by 1981 through use of ceramic materials, with conformance to current and projected Federal noise and emission standards, and to demonstrate a commercially viable engine. Study results show that increased turbine inlet and regenerator inlet temperatures, through the use of ceramic materials, contribute the greatest amount to achieving fuel economy goals. Further, improved component efficiencies (for the compressor, gasifier turbine, power turbine, and regenerator disks show significant additional gains in fuel economy. Fuel saved in a 500,000-mile engine life, risk levels involved in development, and engine-related life cycle costs for fleets (100 units) of trucks and buses were used as criteria to select work goals for the planned program.

Helms, H.E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory. Annual progress report, April 1990--April 1991  

SciTech Connect

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be ``driven`` through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle`s exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Definition: Diesel fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel fuel Diesel fuel Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Diesel fuel A liquid fuel produced from petroleum; used in diesel engines.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Diesel oil and Gazole (fuel) redirect here. Sometimes "diesel oil" is used to mean lubricating oil for diesel engines. Diesel fuel in general is any liquid fuel used in diesel engines. The most common is a specific fractional distillate of petroleum fuel oil, but alternatives that are not derived from petroleum, such as biodiesel, biomass to liquid (BTL) or gas to liquid (GTL) diesel, are increasingly being developed and adopted. To distinguish these types, petroleum-derived diesel is increasingly called petrodiesel. Ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) is a standard for defining diesel fuel with substantially lowered sulfur contents. As of 2007, almost

344

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

Schwalb, J.A.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Onboard Plasmatron Generation of Hydrogen rich Gas for Diesel Engine Exhaust Aftertreatment and Other Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasmatron reformers can provide attractive means for conversion of diesel fuel into hydrogen rich gas. The hydrogen rich gas can be used for improved NOx trap technology and other aftertreatment applications.

Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Heywood,J.; Rabinovich, A.

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

Field Evaluation of Fumigation Bi-Fuel Systems Installed on Diesel Engine-Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of megawatts of emergency generation provide backup power to industry and businesses in the United States and Canada. Typically, individual size is relatively small, ranging from 100 kW to 2000 kW. Most are diesel-fueled generators. Diesel generators are generally the low-cost option. Their application also allows compliance with regulatory requirements for on-site fuel storage. Use of these generators other than for emergency power is coming under increased scrutiny by environmental regulatory...

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

Heavy Truck Engine Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

Nelson, Christopher

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that although higher CN does not significantly alter ignition delay at moderate to high loads it has a dominant influence on the acceptable injection timing range. Apart from CN effects, fuel oxygen content plays an independent role in reducing some emissions. It is therefore recommended that compensation for fuel ignitability and oxygen content be included in combustion control strategies to optimize emissions and performance of future diesel engines.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Szymkowicz, Patrick G. [General Motors Corporation; Northrop, William F [General Motors Corporation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the engine and emission aftertreatment technologies toengine technology and the utilization of complex emissions aftertreatment

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS -- NOx = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY -- The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT -- Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

Stang, John H.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

351

Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS--NO{sub x} = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NO{sub x} = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY--The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT--Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

John H. Stang

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS NOx = 0.50 g/mi PM = 0.05 g/mi CO = 2.8 g/mi NMHC = 0.07 g/mi California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi PM = 0.01 g/mi (2) FUEL ECONOMY The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

Stang, John H.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not prevent manufacturers of heavy-duty diesel engines from meeting new particulate emissions standards for 1994 and later model years, 1 the Clean Air Act Amend- ments of 1990 (CAAA90) require refiners to reduce the sulfur content of on-highway diesel fuel from current average levels of 0.30 percent by weight to no more than 0.05 percent by weight. The new standard, which goes into effect October 1, 1993, also requires that on-highway diesel fuel have a minimum cetane index of 40 or a maximum aromatic content of 35 percent by volume. 2 (See list of terms and definitions on the fol- lowing page.) This provision is designed to prevent any future rises in aromatics levels. 3 Since the direct mea- surement of aromatics is complex, a minimum cetane

354

Ethanol Blends and Engine Operating Strategy Effects on Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Engine Particle Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spark ignition (SI) engines with direct injection (DI) fueling can improve fuel economy and vehicle power beyond that of port fuel injection (PFI). Despite this distinct advantage, DI fueling often increases particle emissions such that SI exhaust may be subject to future particle emissions regulations. Challenges in controlling particle emissions arise as engines encounter varied fuel composition such as intermediate ethanol blends. Furthermore, modern engines are operated using unconventional breathing strategies with advanced cam-based variable valve actuation systems. In this study, we investigate particle emissions from a multi-cylinder DI engine operated with three different breathing strategies, fueling strategies and fuels. The breathing strategies are conventional throttled operation, early intake valve closing (EIVC) and late intake valve closing (LIVC); the fueling strategies are single injection DI (sDI), multi-injection DI (mDI), and PFI; and the fuels are emissions certification gasoline, E20 and E85. The results indicate the dominant factor influencing particle number concentration emissions for the sDI and mDI strategies is the fuel injection timing. Overly advanced injection timing results in particle formation due to fuel spray impingement on the piston, and overly retarded injection timing results in particle formation due to poor fuel and air mixing. In addition, fuel type has a significant effect on particle emissions for the DI fueling strategies. Gasoline and E20 fuels generate comparable levels of particle emissions, but E85 produces dramatically lower particle number concentration. The particle emissions for E85 are near the detection limit for the FSN instrument, and particle number emissions are one to two orders of magnitude lower for E85 relative to gasoline and E20. We found PFI fueling produces very low levels of particle emissions under all conditions and is much less sensitive to engine breathing strategy and fuel type than the DI fueling strategies. The particle number-size distributions for PFI fueling are of the same order for all of the breathing strategies and fuel types and are one to two orders lower than for the sDI fuel injection strategy with gasoline and E20. Remarkably, the particle emissions for E85 under the sDI fueling strategy are similar to particle emissions with a PFI fueling strategy. Thus by using E85, the efficiency and power advantages of DI fueling can be gained without generating high particle emissions.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Youngquist, Adam D [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Moore, Wayne [Delphi; Foster, Matthew [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Diesel Vehicle Diesel Vehicle Availability to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions Laws & Incentives Diesel Vehicle Availability According to J.D. Power Automotive Forecasting, demand for light-duty diesel vehicles might double in the next 10 years. More auto manufacturers

357

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 7. Hermance, D. , Toyota Hybrid System, 1999SAE TOPTECGasoline Engine for the Toyota Hybrid System, JSAE Papervehicles being marketed by Toyota and Honda in the United

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 7. Hermance, D. , Toyota Hybrid System, 1999SAE TOPTECGasoline Engine for the Toyota Hybrid System, JSAE Papervehicles being marketed by Toyota and Honda in the United

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

119, 2003 18. Hermance, D. , Toyota Hybrid System, 1999 SAEGasoline Engine for the Toyota Hybrid System, JSAE papereconomy and emissions of the Toyota and Honda Hybrid Cars (

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Using LNG as a Fuel in Heavy-Duty Tractors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recognizing the lack of operational data on alternative fuel heavy-truck trucks, NREL contracted with the Trucking Research Institute (TRI) in 1994 to obtain a cooperative agreement with Liquid Carbonic. The purpose of this agreement was to (1) purchase and operate liquid natural gas- (LNG-) powered heavy-duty tractor-trailers with prototype Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) Series 60 natural gas (S60G) engines in over-the-road commercial service applications; and (2) collect and provide operational data to DDC to facilitate the on-road prototype development of the engine and to NREL for the Alternative Fuels Data Center. The vehicles operated from August 1994 through April of 1997 and led to a commercially available, emissions-certified S60G in 1998. This report briefly documents the engine development, the operational characteristics of LNG, and the lessons learned during the project.

Liquid Carbonic, Inc. and Trucking Research Institute

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

PCR+ In Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In past work for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), PCR+ was developed as an alternative methodology for building statistical models. PCR+ is an extension of Principal Components Regression (PCR), in which the eigenvectors resulting from Principal Components Analysis (PCA) are used as predictor variables in regression analysis. The work was motivated by the observation that most heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine research was conducted with test fuels that had been ''concocted'' in the laboratory to vary selected fuel properties in isolation from each other. This approach departs markedly from the real world, where the reformulation of diesel fuels for almost any purpose leads to changes in a number of interrelated properties. In this work, we present new information regarding the problems encountered in the conventional approach to model-building and how the PCR+ method can be used to improve research on the relationship between fuel characteristics and engine emissions. We also discuss how PCR+ can be applied to a variety of other research problems related to diesel fuels.

McAdams, H.T.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Hennepin County`s experience with heavy-duty ethanol vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From November 1993 to October 1996, Hennepin County, which includes Minneapolis, field-tested two heavy-duty snowplow/road maintenance trucks fueled by ethanol. The overall objective of this program was to collect data from original equipment manufacturer alternative fuel heavy-duty trucks, along with comparable data from a similarly configured diesel-powered vehicle, to establish economic, emissions, performance, and durability data for the alternative fuel technology. These ethanol trucks, along with an identical third truck equipped with a diesel engine, were operated year round to maintain the Hennepin county roads. In winter, the trucks were run in 8-hour shifts plowing and hauling snow from urban and suburban roads. For the rest of the year, the three trucks were used to repair and maintain these same roads. As a result of this project, a considerable amount of data was collected on E95 fuel use, as well as maintenance, repair, emissions, and operational characteristics. Maintenance and repair costs of the E95 trucks were considerably higher primarily due to fuel filter and fuel pump issues. From an emissions standpoint, the E95 trucks emitted less particulate matter and fewer oxides of nitrogen but more carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. Overall, the E95 trucks operated as well as the diesel, as long as the fuel filters were changed frequently. This project was a success in that E95, a domestically produced fuel from a renewable energy source, was used in a heavy-duty truck application and performed the same rigorous tasks as the diesel counterparts. The drawbacks to E95 as a heavy-duty fuel take the form of higher operational costs, higher fuel costs, shorter range, and the lack of over-the-road infrastructure.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot  

SciTech Connect

This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 405 Academic Activities Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Truckstop Electrification Implementation Plan: A Diesel Engine Idle Reduction in Class 8 Trucks Using On-Vehicle Shore-Power Nationa l Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During any hour of the day in the United States, over 100,000 heavy-duty truck engines may be idling to provide heating or air conditioning for their resting drivers. During nighttime hours, this number might climb to 200,000 idling engines. Heating or air conditioning loads typically served by these idling engines only amount to one or two horsepower per truck. Because the parasitic loads required to keep these engines idling are typically from ten to thirty horsepower, exhaust emissions attributable to...

2003-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Near and long term efficiency improvements to natural gas heavy duty engines. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trucking Research Institute (TRI) in cooperation with the Department of Energy Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (DOE), South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), and Gas Research Institute (GRI), requests proposals designed to support the Natural Gas Engine Enhanced Efficiency Program. This effort, which contains Programs A & B, is designed to fund projects that advance both the part and full load fuel efficiency of heavy-duty (250 hp plus) natural gas engines. Approximately $1.2 million will be available in Program A to fund up to three projects. These projects may target either or both near-term, and longer-term engine efficiency goals in addition, it is possible that one of the projects funded under Program A will be selected for additional funding for up to 42 months under Program B funding amounts are to be determined.

NONE

1997-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

A COMPACT CORONA DISCHARGE DEVICE (CDD{trademark}) FOR NON-THERMAL PLASMA GENERATION IN GASOLINE OR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Higher fuel economy targets and hybrid vehicles are increasing the marketability of diesel engines. But in order to implement the growth of diesels to achieve the fuel economy benefits, all emission regulation issues must be met. To do this traps and catalysts are being utilized. One of the main problems is finding a technology that enables the exhaust emission system to not only meet the emission requirements when new, but also to meet them at the regulated intermediate and full life requirements. Work is being done that enables catalysts to remain highly efficient throughout their full life. It is done by using a corona discharge device (CDD{trademark}) that introduces non-thermal plasma into the exhaust ahead of the converter. This low power device creates radicals that alter the chemistry of the exhaust so as to limit the poisoning of the catalyst. This can be done without so called ''purge'' cycles that lower fuel economy and degrade catalyst long-term durability. This device has been developed, not as a laboratory tool, but as a production ready product and is the first of its kind that is commercially available for testing. It is this product, the Corona Discharge Device, CDD{trademark}, which will be described.

Nowak,Victor J.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Experimental Studies for CPF and SCR Model, Control System, and OBD Development for Engines Using Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The research carried out on this project developed experimentally validated Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) high?fidelity models that served as the basis for the reduced order models used for internal state estimation. The high?fidelity and reduced order/estimator codes were evaluated by the industrial partners with feedback to MTU that improved the codes. Ammonia, particulate matter (PM) mass retained, PM concentration, and NOX sensors were evaluated and used in conjunction with the estimator codes. The data collected from PM experiments were used to develop the PM kinetics using the high?fidelity DPF code for both NO2 assisted oxidation and thermal oxidation for Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (ULSF), and B10 and B20 biodiesel fuels. Nine SAE papers were presented and this technology transfer process should provide the basis for industry to improve the OBD and control of urea injection and fuel injection for active regeneration of the PM in the DPF using the computational techniques developed. This knowledge will provide industry the ability to reduce the emissions and fuel consumption from vehicles in the field. Four MS and three PhD Mechanical Engineering students were supported on this project and their thesis research provided them with expertise in experimental, modeling, and controls in aftertreatment systems.

Johnson, John; Naber, Jeffrey; Parker, Gordon; Yang, Song-Lin; Stevens, Andrews; Pihl, Josh

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by compressed natural gas (CNG) in spark-ignition engines,buses are powered by a CNG spark-ignition engine, providedno matter whether it is a CNG or a diesel engine [4, 5].

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

Milam, David

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

100 area diesel performance data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance data for diesel engine-generator sets was collected to aid an analysis of the electric power system being conducted by an offsite consultant. Diesels in three different services were studied: emergency power (GM) diesels, 903 fan backup diesels and the Caterpillar diesels that power the dc motors for the D/sub 2/O pumps. It was convenient to collect data for the ECS booster pump diesel at the same time, even though it is not part of the electric power system. The results are published here to make them more widely available.

Smith, J.A.; Tudor, A.A.

1984-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

373

Operational test report for WESF diesel generator diesel tank installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WESF Backup Generator Underground Diesel Tank 101 has been replaced with a new above ground 1000 gallon diesel tank. Following the tank installation, inspections and tests specified in the Operational Test Procedure, WHC-SD-WM-OTP-155, were performed. Inspections performed by a Quality Control person indicated the installation was leak free and the diesel generator/engine ran as desired. There were no test and inspection exceptions, therefore, the diesel tank installation is operable.

Schwehr, B.A.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

Alternatives to Diesel Fuel in California - Fuel Cycle Energy and Emission Effects of Possible Replacements Due to the TAC Diesel Particulate Decision  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression ignition by spark ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, ressionignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOx emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM10 reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated.

Christopher L. Saraicks; Donald M. Rote; Frank Stodolsky; James J. Eberhardt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Alternatives to diesel fuel in California - fuel cycle energy and emission effects of possible replacements due to the TAC diesel particulate decision.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible mid-course strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression-ignition by spark-ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21% above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7% above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case the authors estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOX emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM{sub 10} reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated.

Saricks, C. L.; Rote, D. M.; Stodolsky, F.; Eberhardt, J. J.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ultra-Clean Diesel Fuel: U.S. Production and Distribution Capability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines have potential for use in a large number of future vehicles in the US. However, to achieve this potential, proponents of diesel engine technologies must solve diesel's pollution problems, including objectionable levels of emissions of particulates and oxides of nitrogen. To meet emissions reduction goals, diesel fuel quality improvements could enable diesel engines with advanced aftertreatment systems to achieve the necessary emissions performance. The diesel fuel would most likely have to be reformulated to be as clean as low sulfur gasoline. This report examines the small- and large-market extremes for introduction of ultra-clean diesel fuel in the US and concludes that petroleum refinery and distribution systems could produce adequate low sulfur blendstocks to satisfy small markets for low sulfur (30 parts per million) light duty diesel fuel, and deliver that fuel to retail consumers with only modest changes. Initially, there could be poor economic returns on under-utilized infrastructure investments. Subsequent growth in the diesel fuel market could be inconsistent with U.S. refinery configurations and economics. As diesel fuel volumes grow, the manufacturing cost may increase, depending upon how hydrodesulfurization technologies develop, whether significantly greater volumes of the diesel pool have to be desulfurized, to what degree other properties like aromatic levels have to be changed, and whether competitive fuel production technologies become economic. Low sulfur (10 parts per million) and low aromatics (10 volume percent) diesel fuel for the total market could require desulfurization, dearomatization, and hydrogen production investments amounting to a third of current refinery market value. The refinery capital cost component alone would be 3 cents per gallon of diesel fuel. Outside of refineries, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant investment cost would be 3 to 6 cents per gallon. With total projected investments of $11.8 billion (6 to 9 cents per gallon) for the U.S. Gulf Coast alone, financing, engineering, and construction and material availability are major issues that must be addressed, for both refinery and GTL investments.

Hadder, G.R.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

TransForum v3n4 - Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ZEROING IN ON DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS Thick clouds of soot particles no longer billow from new bus and truck exhaust pipes, thanks to today's advanced diesel engines, which...

378

Effect of Biodiesel Blends on Diesel Particulate Filter Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents results of tests of ultra-low sulfur diesel blended with soy-biodiesel at 5 percent using a Cummins ISB engine with a diesel particulate filter.

Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Ireland, J.; Fang, H. L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company, “Diesel Engine Aftertreatment: How Ford Knocks Outwhile a Diesel engine also requires expensive aftertreatmentfrom Diesel engines require the use of aftertreatment

Saxena, Samveg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Develop the dual fuel conversion system for high output, medium speed diesel engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original plan for the project involved design modifications to an existing system to enhance its performance and increase the limit of power that was achieved by the original design and to apply the higher performance product to the full sized engine and test its performance. The new system would also be applied to a different engine model. The specific work would include the redesign of gas injectors, piston configurations and two types of igniters, engine instrumentation, monitoring and testing.

NONE

1998-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fabrication and testing of an enhanced ignition system to reduce cold-start emissions in an ethanol (E85) light-duty truck engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes an experimental investigation of the potential for an enhanced ignition system to lower the cold-start emissions of a light-duty vehicle engine using fuel ethanol (commonly referred to as E85). Plasma jet ignition and conventional inductive ignition were compared for a General Motors 4-cylinder, alcohol-compatible engine. Emission and combustion stability measurements were made over a range of air/fuel ratios and spark timing settings using a steady-state, cold-idle experimental technique in which the engine coolant was maintained at 25 C to simulate cold-running conditions. These tests were aimed at identifying the degree to which calibration strategies such as mixture enleanment and retarded spark timing could lower engine-out hydrocarbon emissions and raise exhaust temperatures, as well as determining how such calibration changes would affect the combustion stability of the engine (as quantified by the coefficient of variation, or COV, of indicated mean effective pressure calculated from successive cylinder pressure measurements). 44 refs., 39 figs.

Gardiner, D.; Mallory, R.; Todesco, M. [Nexum Research Corp., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Thermotech Engineering Div.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Investigation of diesel soot mediated oils and additive package on wear.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Contamination of lubricating oil by diesel soot is one of the major causes of increased engine wear. The diesel soot interacts with the engine oil… (more)

Balla, Santhosh Kumar.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Performance Evaluation and Optimization of Diesel Fuel Properties and Chemistry in an HCCI Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nine CRC fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE fuels) have been evaluated in a simple, premixed HCCI engine under varying conditions of fuel rate, air-fuel ratio, and intake temperature. Engine performance was found to vary mainly as a function of combustion phasing as affected by fuel cetane and engine control variables. The data was modeled using statistical techniques involving eigenvector representation of the fuel properties and engine control variables, to define engine response and allow optimization across the fuels for best fuel efficiency. In general, the independent manipulation of intake temperature and air-fuel ratio provided some opportunity for improving combustion efficiency of a specific fuel beyond the direct effect of targeting the optimum combustion phasing of the engine (near 5 CAD ATDC). High cetane fuels suffer performance loss due to easier ignition, resulting in lower intake temperatures, which increase HC and CO emissions and result in the need for more advanced combustion phasing. The FACE fuels also varied in T90 temperature and % aromatics, independent of cetane number. T90 temperature was found to have an effect on engine performance when combined with high centane, but % aromatics did not, when evaluated independently of cetane and T90.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Eaton, Scott J [ORNL; Crawford, Robert W [Rincon Ranch Consulting

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Investigation of Diesel combustion using multiple injection strategies for idling after cold start of passenger-car engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive investigation was carried out in order to better understand the combustion behaviour in a low compression ratio DI Diesel engine when multiple injection strategies are applied just after the engine cold starts in low temperature conditions (idling). More specifically, the aim of this study was twofold: on one hand, to understand the effect of the multiple injection strategies on the indicated mean effective pressure; on the other hand, to contribute to the understanding of combustion stability characterized by the coefficient of variation of indicated mean effective pressure. The first objective was fulfilled by analyzing the rate of heat release obtained by in-cylinder pressure diagnosis. The results showed that the timing of the pilot injection closest to the main injection was the most influential parameter based on the behaviour of the rate of heat release (regardless of the multiple injection strategy applied). For the second objective, the combustion stability was found to be correlated with the combustion centroid angle. The results showed a trend between them and the existence of a range of centroid angles where the combustion stability is strong enough. In addition, it was also evident that convenient split injection allows shifting the centroid to such a zone and improves combustion stability after start. (author)

Payri, F.; Broatch, A.; Salavert, J.M.; Martin, J. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Aptdo. 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

An in-cylinder study of the particulate/NO{sub x} trade-off in a DI Diesel Engine. Draft of final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the work performed during the contract period was to establish the ability to study soot and NO within the combustion chamber of a DI Diesel engine and to couple these measurements with actual exhaust emissions. This work was motivated by the need to obtain a more complete understanding of the particulate/NO{sub X} trade-off, observed in Diesel engines, to aid engine designers in meeting emissions limits. In order to achieve the desired goal, an optically accessible DI Diesel engine was designed and constructed. Also, planar imaging methods for imaging soot and NO were developed in laboratory flames and were then applied to the engine. For the study of soot, planar Mie scattering was used and a polarization ratio method was investigated to distinguish soot from fuel droplets. The Mie scattering technique proved to be well suited for the engine, and extensive results were obtained. In order to observe NO, planar laser induced fluorescence was used and it was successfully applied in the engine. In addition to these techniques, high speed combustion photography and shadowgraph photography were applied to obtain general characteristics of the combustion process. As a final diagnostic, actual engine emissions were measured. This report begins with a brief discussion of the problem under investigation and a summary of other studies of the NO{sub x}/particulate trade-off. Following these sections is a summary of the accomplishments and results from the present study. Finally, detailed results are presented through the six technical papers which were written during the contract period; these papers are appended to the report.

Litzinger, T.A.; Santavicca, D.A.; Santoro, R.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst: Final Report, 24 February 2004 -- 23 February 2006  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas NREL Technical Monitor: R. Parish Prepared under Subcontract No. ZCI-4-32049-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

387

X-ray radiography measurements of diesel spray structure at engine-like ambient density.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray radiography has been used to examine the dependence of the near-nozzle fuel distribution of diesel sprays on injection pressure and ambient density. Measurements of sprays from two nozzles with different geometries, one extensively hydroground and the other largely non-hydroground, have been obtained to show how nozzles of different geometries respond to changes in ambient density and rail pressure. The spray penetration near the nozzle demonstrates little dependence on ambient density but a strong dependence on rail pressure. Comparison of these results with standard correlations in the literature show that, in the near-nozzle region examined in this study, the penetration is expected to show little dependence on ambient density. The spray width becomes much larger for both nozzles as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position by the square root of the density ratio between the fuel and the ambient gas accounts for the trends in spray width with ambient density for both nozzles. The radiography data can also be examined to determine the relative trends in the steady-state, mass-averaged axial velocity of the spray. The velocity decays more rapidly with axial distance as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position also accounts for the trend of velocity decay with ambient pressure.

Kastengren, A. L.; Powell, C. F.; Wang, Y.-J.; Im, K.-S.; Wang, J.; Livermore Software Technology Corp.; Shanghai Jiaotong Univ.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

X-ray radiography measurements of diesel spray structure at engine-like ambient density,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray radiography has been used to examine the dependence of the near-nozzle fuel distribution of diesel sprays on injection pressure and ambient density. Measurements of sprays from two nozzles with different geometries, one extensively hydroground and the other largely non-hydroground, have been obtained to show how nozzles of different geometries respond to changes in ambient density and rail pressure. The spray penetration near the nozzle demonstrates little dependence on ambient density but a strong dependence on rail pressure. Comparison of these results with standard correlations in the literature show that, in the near-nozzle region examined in this study, the penetration is expected to show little dependence on ambient density. The spray width becomes much larger for both nozzles as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position by the square root of the density ratio between the fuel and the ambient gas accounts for the trends in spray width with ambient density for both nozzles. The radiography data can also be examined to determine the relative trends in the steady-state, mass-averaged axial velocity of the spray. The velocity decays more rapidly with axial distance as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position also accounts for the trend of velocity decay with ambient pressure.

Kastengren, A. L.; Powell, C. F.; Wang, Y.-J.; Im, K.-S.; Wang, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Argonne Transportation - Diesel Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Team Receives DOE Award for Groundbreaking Diesel Fuel Spray Research Team Receives DOE Award for Groundbreaking Diesel Fuel Spray Research Jin Wang, Chris Powell, Yong Yue, and Steve Ciatti Recent DOE Award winners, (L-R) Jin Wang, Chris Powell, Yong Yue, and Steve Ciatti, stand in front of their fuel spray injection chamber. Using the synchrotron beam at the APS, the team is able to probe the fuel spray and study the process of combustion. A team of Argonne scientists (Jin Wang, Steve Ciatti, Chris Powell, and Yong Yue) recently won the 2002 National Laboratory Combustion and Emissions Control R&D Award for groundbreaking work in diesel fuel sprays. For the first time ever, the team used x-rays to penetrate through gasoline and diesel sprays and made detailed measurements of fuel injection systems for diesel engines. This technology uncovered a previously unknown

391

Assessing the Battery Cost at Which Plug-In Hybrid Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles Become Cost-Effective  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validated diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid medium-duty parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reductions and cost implications of hybrid and plug-in hybrid diesel variants. The hybrid and plug-in hybrid variants are run on a field data-derived design matrix to analyze the effect of drive cycle, distance, engine downsizing, battery replacements, and battery energy on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. For an array of diesel fuel costs, the battery cost per kilowatt-hour at which the hybridized configuration becomes cost-effective is calculated. This builds on a previous analysis that found the fuel savings from medium duty plug-in hybrids more than offset the vehicles' incremental price under future battery and fuel cost projections, but that they seldom did so under present day cost assumptions in the absence of purchase incentives. The results also highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle specific daily distance and kinetic intensity.

Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J. D.; Brooker, A. D.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Transient Scuffing of Candidate Diesel Engine Materials at Temperatures up to 600oC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This milestone report summarizes the general characteristics of scuffing damage to solid surfaces, then describes transient effects on scuffing observed during oscillating sliding wear tests of candidate material pairs for high-temperature diesel engine applications, like waste-gate bushings in exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems. It is shown that oxidation and the formation of wear particle layers influence the friction of such components. In the case of metallic materials in cylindrical contacts where there is a generous clearance, debris layers can form which reduce the torque over time. For ceramic combinations, the opposite effect is observed. Here, the accumulation of wear debris leads to an increase in the turning torque. High-temperature transient scuffing behavior is considered in terms of a series of stages in which the composition and morphology of the contact is changing. These changes are used to explain the behavior of 11 material pairs consisting of stainless steels, Ni-based alloys, Co-based alloys, and structural ceramics.

Blau, P.

2003-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

An investigation of late-combustion soot burnout in a DI diesel engine using simultaneous planar imaging of soot and OH radical  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engine design continues to be driven by the need to improve performance while at the same time achieving further reductions in emissions. The development of new designs to accomplish these goals requires an understanding of how the emissions are produced in the engine. Laser-imaging diagnostics are uniquely capable of providing this information, and the understanding of diesel combustion and emissions formation has been advanced considerably in recent years by their application. However, previous studies have generally focused on the early and middle stages of diesel combustion. These previous laser-imaging studies do provide important insight into the soot formation and oxidation processes during the main combustion event. They indicate that prior to the end of injection, soot formation is initiated by fuel-rich premixed combustion (equivalence ratio > 4) near the upstream limit of the luminous portion of the reacting fuel jet. The soot is then oxidized at the diffusion flame around the periphery of the luminous plume. Under typical diesel engine conditions, the diffusion flame does not burn the remaining fuel and soot as rapidly as it is supplied, resulting in an expanding region of rich combustion products and soot. This is evident in natural emission images by the increasing size of the luminous soot cloud prior to the end of injection. Hence, the amount of soot in the combustion chamber typically increases until shortly after the end of fuel injection, at which time the main soot formation period ends and the burnout phase begins. Sampling valve and two-color pyrometry data indicate that the vast majority (more than 90%) of the soot formed is oxidized before combustion ends; however, it is generally thought that a small fraction of this soot from the main combustion zones is not consumed and is the source of tail pipe soot emissions.

John E. Dec; Peter L. Kelly-Zion

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Diesel Power: Clean Vehicles for Tomorrow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Power: Diesel Power: Clean Vehicles for Tomorrow July 2010 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program The diesel engine has changed significantly over the last quarter-century, in terms of technology and performance. For this reason, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has created this series of documents about the history of the diesel engine, its current uses in transportation vehicles,

396

DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Opportunities for Low Cost Titanium in Reduced Fuel Consumption, Improved Emissions, and Enhanced Durability Heavy Duty Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine which components of heavy-duty highway vehicles are candidates for the substitution of titanium materials for current materials if the cost of those Ti components is very significantly reduced from current levels. The processes which could be used to produce those low cost components were also investigated. Heavy-duty highway vehicles are defined as all trucks and busses included in Classes 2C through 8. These include heavy pickups and vans above 8,500 lbs. GVWR, through highway tractor trailers. Class 8 is characterized as being a very cyclic market, with ''normal'' year volume, such as in 2000, of approximately 240,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-7 are less cyclic, with ''normal'' i.e., year 2000, volume totaling approximately 325,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-8 are powered about 88.5% by diesel engines, and Class 2C at very roughly 83% diesel. The engine portion of the study therefore focused on diesels. Vehicle production volumes were used in estimates of the market size for candidate components.

Kraft, E.H.

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

398

Super Duty Diesel Truck with NOx Aftertreatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A profile of a Ford-Energy Department program to develop a three-stage aftertreatment technology, which cleans the vehicle exhaust emissions.

399

Impact of Biodiesel on the Oxidation Kinetics and Morphology of Diesel Particulate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We compare the oxidation characteristics of four different diesel particulates generated with a modern light-duty engine. The four particulates represent engine fueling with conventional ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), biodiesel, and two intermediate blends of these fuels. The comparisons discussed here are based on complementary measurements implemented in a laboratory micro-reactor, including temperature programmed desorption and oxidation, pulsed isothermal oxidation, and BET surface area. From these measurements we have derived models that are consistent with the observed oxidation reactivity differences. When accessible surface area effects are properly accounted for, the oxidation kinetics of the fixed carbon components were found to consistently exhibit an Arrhenius activation energy of 113 6 kJ/mol. Release of volatile carbon from the as-collected particulate appears to follow a temperaturedependent rate law.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

DEMONSTRATION OF POTENTIAL FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION AND DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project addresses the potential for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) devices (using urea as reductant) together with Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) and low-pressure loop exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to achieve future stringent emissions standards for heavy-duty engines powering Class 8 vehicles. Two emission control systems consisting of the three technologies (EGR, SCR, and DPF) were calibrated on a Caterpillar C-12 heavy-duty diesel engine. Results of these calibrations showed good promise in meeting the 2010 heavy-duty emission standards as set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These two emission control systems were developed to evaluate a series of fuels that have similar formulations except for their sulfur content. Additionally, one fuel, code-named BP15, was also evaluated. This fuel was prepared by processing straight-run distillate stocks through a commercial, single stage hydrotreater employing high activity catalyst at maximum severity. An additional goal of this program is to provide data for an on-going EPA technology review that evaluates progress toward meeting 2007/2010 emission standards. These emissions levels were to be achieved not only on the transient test cycles but in other modes of operation such as the steady-state Euro-III style emission test known as the OICA (Organisation Internationale des Compagnies d'Automobiles) or the ESC (European Stationary Cycle). Additionally, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions standards are to be met.

McGILL,R; KHAIR, M; SHARP, C

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duty diesel engines" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine. Volume 1, Concept evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 3, Traditional approaches to wear prevention  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contamination of the lube-oil with hard abrasive particles leads to a three-body abrasive wear mechanism that highly accelerates piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-fueled diesel engines. One approach to reducing that wear is to modify the size and orientation of surface asperities on the cylinder to enhance the formation of a hydrodynamic film, and to provide avenues of escape for particles that would otherwise be trapped in the wear zone. Another approach is to introduce additives into the contaminated lube-oil that further enhance hydrodynamic film formation, form chemical films on the wearing surfaces, or form films on the contaminant particles. This work focuses on defining the effects of cylinder liner surface finish, various configurations of slots in the cylinder liner surface, and various additives in the contaminated lube-oil on the wear process. Wear tests were initiated in a bench apparatus using coal-ash contaminated lube-oil to test the various wear configurations. The results of these tests indicate that the formation of a hydrodynamic film between the ring and cylinder specimens is enhanced by increasing surface roughness, and by orienting the surface asperities normal to the direction of ring travel but modifications to the cylinder liner surface did not greatly reduce the wear rate. Additives to the lubricant seemed to have a much more significant effect on wear, with a dispersant additive highly accelerating the wear, while a detergent additive was able to reduce the wear almost to the rate achieved where there was no contaminant.

Schwalb, J.A.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Chapter 6: Experimental Studies on the Performance of Catalytically Hydrotreated Fast Pyrolysis oil in a Stationary Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, products obtained from hydrothermal upgrading, Fisher-Tropsch diesel from bio-based synthesis gas and bio by a Karl Fisher titration. For the Karl Fisher titrations a 787 KF Titrino device from Metrohm was used

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

404

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering 1500 Engineering Dr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Diesel Engine, Exhaust System, Engine Emissions and Aftertreatment Device Models," SAE Paper 2005 Engine, Emissions, and Exhaust Aftertreatment System Level Model to Simulate Diesel Particulate Filter Diesel Engine, Emissions, and Exhaust Aftertreatment System Level Model," SAE 2009-01-1511, SAE

Sheridan, Jennifer

405

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a wide range of engine and aftertreatment configurations. 6–differences in the engine and aftertreatment technologies,especially as diesel engine and aftertreatment technology

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Series 50 propane-fueled Nova bus: Engine development, installation, and field trials  

SciTech Connect

The report describes a project to develop the Detroit Diesel series 50 liquefied propane gas (LPG) heavy-duty engine and to conduct demonstrations of LPG-fuelled buses at selected sites (Halifax Regional Municipality and three sites in the United States). The project included five main elements: Engine development and certification, chassis re-engineering and engine installation, field demonstration, LPG fuel testing, and LPG fuel variability testing. Lessons learned with regard to engine design and other issues are discussed, and recommendations are made for further development and testing.

Smith, B.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Heavy-Duty Emissions Control: Plasma-Facilitated vs Reformer-Assisted Lean NOx Catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress has been made in the control of combustion processes to limit the formation of environmentally harmful species, but lean burn vehicles, such as those powered by diesel engines used for the majority of commercial trucking and off-road applications, remain a major source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Tighter control of the combustion process coupled with exhaust gas recirculation has brought emissions in line with 2004 targets worldwide. Additional modifications to the engine control system, somewhat limited NOx control, and PM filters will likely allow the 2007 limits to be met for the on-highway regulations for heavy-duty engines in the United States. Concern arises when the NOx emission limit of 0.2 g/bhphr set for the year 2010 is considered.

(1)Aardahl, C; (1)Rozmiarek, R; (1)Rappe, K; (1)Mendoza, D (2)Park, P

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Demonstration of Air-Power-Assist Engine Technology for Clean Combustion and Direct Energy Recovery in Heavy Duty Application  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the project consists of four months of applied research, starting from September 1, 2005 and was completed by December 31, 2005. During this time, the project team heavily relied on highly detailed numerical modeling techniques to evaluate the feasibility of the APA technology. Specifically, (i) A GT-Power{sup TM}engine simulation model was constructed to predict engine efficiency at various operating conditions. Efficiency was defined based on the second-law thermodynamic availability. (ii) The engine efficiency map generated by the engine simulation was then fed into a simplified vehicle model, which was constructed in the Matlab/Simulink environment, to predict fuel consumption of a refuse truck on a simple collection cycle. (iii) Design and analysis work supporting the concept of retrofitting an existing Sturman Industries Hydraulic Valve Actuation (HVA) system with the modifications that are required to run the HVA system with Air Power Assist functionality. A Matlab/Simulink model was used to calculate the dynamic response of the HVA system. Computer aided design (CAD) was done in Solidworks for mechanical design and hydraulic layout. At the end of Phase I, 11% fuel economy improvement was predicted. During Phase II, the engine simulation group completed the engine mapping work. The air handling group made substantial progress in identifying suppliers and conducting 3D modelling design. Sturman Industries completed design modification of the HVA system, which was reviewed and accepted by Volvo Powertrain. In Phase II, the possibility of 15% fuel economy improvement was shown with new EGR cooler design by reducing EGR cooler outlet temperature with APA engine technology from Air Handling Group. In addition, Vehicle Simulation with APA technology estimated 4 -21% fuel economy improvement over a wide range of driving cycles. During Phase III, the engine experimental setup was initiated at VPTNA, Hagerstown, MD. Air Handling system and HVA system were delivered to VPTNA and then assembly of APA engine was completed by June 2007. Functional testing of APA engine was performed and AC and AM modes testing were completed by October 2007. After completing testing, data analysis and post processing were performed. Especially, the models were instrumental in identifying some of the key issues with the experimental HVA system. Based upon the available engine test results during AC and AM modes, the projected fuel economy improvement over the NY composite cycle is 14.7%. This is close to but slightly lower than the originally estimated 18% from ADVISOR simulation. The APA project group demonstrated the concept of APA technology by using simulation and experimental testing. However, there are still exists of technical challenges to meet the original expectation of APA technology. The enabling technology of this concept, i.e. a fully flexible valve actuation system that can handle high back pressure from the exhaust manifold is identified as one of the major technical challenges for realizing the APA concept.

Hyungsuk Kang; Chun Tai

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Using Carbon-14 Isotope Tracing to Investigate Molecular Structure Effects of the Oxygenate Dibutyl Maleate on Soot Emissions from a DI Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot emissions from a DI diesel engine was examined using carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) isotope tracing. Carbon atoms in three distinct chemical structures within the diesel oxygenate dibutyl maleate (DBM) were labeled with {sup 14}C. The {sup 14}C from the labeled DBM was then detected in engine-out particulate matter (PM), in-cylinder deposits, and CO{sub 2} emissions using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The results indicate that molecular structure plays an important role in determining whether a specific carbon atom either does or does not form soot. Chemical-kinetic modeling results indicate that structures that produce CO{sub 2} directly from the fuel are less effective at reducing soot than structures that produce CO before producing CO{sub 2}. Because they can follow individual carbon atoms through a real combustion process, {sup 14}C isotope tracing studies help strengthen the connection between actual engine emissions and chemical-kinetic models of combustion and soot formation/oxidation processes.

Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Upatnieks, A; Martin, G C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

410

Spray tip penetration and cone angles for coal-water slurry using a modified medium-speed diesel engine injection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system of a medium-speed diesel engine. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, instantaneous fuel line pressures and needle lifts were obtained. For injection pressures of order 30 MPa, the sprays were similar for coal-water slurry, diesel fuel and water. The time until the center core of the spray broke-up (break-up time) was determined from both the movies and from a correlations using the fuel line pressures. Results from these two independent procedures were in good agreement. For the base case conditions, the break-up time was 0.58 and 0.50 ms for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively. The break-up times increased with increasing nozzle orifice size and with decreasing chamber density. The break-up time was not a function of coal loading for coal loadings up to 53%. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as on the time and location of the measurement. For the cases studied, the time-averaged cone angles ranged between 10.2 and 17.0{degree}.

Caton, J.a.; Seshadri, A.K.; Kihm, K.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-Duty Light-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Alternative Fuel Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Micro Hybrid Vehicles ARRA Vehicle and Infrastructure Projects EVSE Testing Energy Storage Testing Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles Other ICE

412

Develop the dual fuel conversion system for high output, medium speed diesel engines. Quarterly report number 3, April 1--June 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarter the project focused primarily in two basic areas. Approximately 60% of the time was applied at continuing to manufacture and test alternate designs of the diesel prechamber and its associated auxiliary equipment. Approximately 23% time was applied to the hydraulic actuation of the gas injector and the design work of applying the gas injector to the engines cylinder liner. The remaining 17% time was spread over a number of areas two of which include the completion of knock detection system and test facility calibration and service.

NONE

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z