Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

FROM DUST TO PLANETESIMALS: CRITERIA FOR GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF SMALL PARTICLES IN GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dust particles sediment toward the midplanes of protoplanetary disks, forming dust-rich sublayers encased in gas. What densities must the particle sublayer attain before it can fragment by self-gravity? We describe various candidate threshold densities. One of these is the Roche density, which is that required for a strengthless satellite to resist tidal disruption by its primary. Another is the Toomre density, which is that required for de-stabilizing self-gravity to defeat the stabilizing influences of pressure and rotation. We show that for sublayers containing aerodynamically well-coupled dust, the Toomre density exceeds the Roche density by many (up to about four) orders of magnitude. We present three-dimensional shearing box simulations of self-gravitating, stratified, dust-gas mixtures to test which of the candidate thresholds is relevant for collapse. All of our simulations indicate that the larger Toomre density is required for collapse. This result is sensible because sublayers are readily stabilized by pressure. Sound-crossing times for thin layers are easily shorter than free-fall times, and the effective sound speed in dust-gas suspensions decreases only weakly with the dust-to-gas ratio (as the inverse square root). Our findings assume that particles are small enough that their stopping times in gas are shorter than all other timescales. Relaxing this assumption may lower the threshold for gravitational collapse back down to the Roche criterion. In particular, if the particle stopping time becomes longer than the sound-crossing time, then sublayers may lose pressure support and become gravitationally unstable.

Shi, Ji-Ming; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: jmshi@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, UC Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B-20, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, UC Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B-20, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Transport of dust particles in inductively coupled discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination by particulates, or ``dust``, in plasma processing reactors decreases the yield of microelectronic components. In low temperature plasmas, such as those used in etching or deposition reactors to fabricate semiconductor devices, the particles can form to appreciable densities. These particles can be trapped or expelled from the reactor, depending on which forces dominate their transport. Quantities that affect dust motion in Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) discharges are the charge of the dust particles (electrostatic forces), momentum transfer with ions (viscous ion-drag forces), temperature gradients from heated electrodes (thermophoretic forces), and gas flow (fluid drag forces). The authors have developed a 2-D Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the trajectories of dust particles in ICP reactors. The model may have an arbitrary number and variety of dust species, and different gas mixtures may be used. The self-consistent electric fields, ion energy distributions, and species densities are imported from a companion Monte Carlo-fluid hybrid model. A semi-analytic model is used to determine the dust charge as well as the momentum transfer cross sections between dust and ions. The electrode topography can also affect the trapping locations of dust. Grooves on the electrodes perturb electrical forces and heated washers can change the thermophoretic forces; hence the spatial dust density varies from the case with a smooth, nonheated electrode. These effects on particle trapping will be presented. Other factors on trapping locations, such as dust particle size and varying power flow with time, will also be discussed.

Hwang, H.H.; Ventzek, P.L.G.; Hoekstra, R.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Dust-regulated galaxy formation and evolution:A new chemodynamical model with live dust particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interstellar dust plays decisive roles in the conversion of neutral to molecular hydrogen (H_2), the thermodynamical evolution of interstellar medium (ISM), and the modification of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies. These important roles of dust have not been self-consistently included in previous numerical simulations of galaxy formation and evolution. We have therefore developed a new model by which one can investigate whether and how galaxy formation and evolution can be influenced by dust-related physical processes such as photo-electric heating, H_2 formation on dust, and stellar radiation pressure on dust in detail. A novel point of the model is that different dust species in a galaxy are represented by `live dust' particles (i.e., not test particles). Therefore, dust particles in a galaxy not only interact gravitationally with all four components of the galaxy (i.e., dark matter, stars, gas, and dust) but also are grown and destroyed through physical processes of ISM. First we describe a...

Bekki, Kenji

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Characterization of jovian plasma embedded dust particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the data from space missions and laboratories improve, a research domain combining plasmas and charged dust is gaining in prominence. Our solar system provides many natural laboratories such as planetary rings, comet comae and tails, ejecta clouds around moons and asteroids, and Earth's noctilucent clouds for which to closely study plasma-embedded cosmic dust. One natural laboratory to study electromagnetically-controlled cosmic dust has been provided by the Jovian dust streams and the data from the instruments which were on board the Galileo spacecraft. Given the prodigious quantity of dust poured into the Jovian magnetosphere by Io and its volcanoes resulting in the dust streams, the possibility of dusty plasma conditions exist. This paper characterizes the main parameters for those interested in studying dust embedded in a plasma with a focus on the Jupiter environment. I show how to distinguish between dust-in-plasma and dusty-plasma and how the Havnes parameter P can be used to support or negate the possibility of collective behavior of the dusty plasma. The result of applying these tools to the Jovian dust streams reveals mostly dust-in-plasma behavior. In the orbits displaying the highest dust stream fluxes, portions of orbits E4, G7, G8, C21 satisfy the minimum requirements for a dusty plasma. However, the P parameter demonstrates that these mild dusty plasma conditions do not lead to collective behavior of the dust stream particles.

Amara L. Graps

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

5

Characterisation of Dust Particles Trapped in Silica Aerogels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis involves the study of dust particles trapped in silica aerogel for fusion dust diagnostics purpose. The low velocity impact experiments are done… (more)

Liu, Bing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Dust and gas in active galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are strong evidences which favour the existence of dust in active galaxies. Understanding the way in which dust interacts with the radiation and influences the physical conditions of the gas is crucial if we want to learn about the nature of the central active nucleus and about the physical conditions of the ISM in such galaxies. Not taking into account such effects may lead us towards misleading interpretations. Many intriguing questions concerns to the nature and the existence of dust in active galaxies: for instance, under which conditions does the very hard ionizing continuum of an AGN allows the survival of dust grains? Is the composition and size distribution of the dust the same as in our local interstellar medium? How is dust distributed compared to the gas which is at least in part highly ionized by the central AGN? Does dust also exist in radio galaxies at very high redshifts? The work developed in this thesis tries to find answers to some of these questions, through a detailed theoretical and observational research of the mechanisms which control the interaction of dust with the radiation and with the ions. The observable effects of the dust on the emission line spectrum are also analyzed in detail. The final goal has been to give clues about more general questions: origin of the emitting gas, ionization mechanisms, geometry, connection between low and high redshift active galaxies or the validity of the unification scenario. This thesis tries, in summary, to provide a clearer understanding of active galaxies in general.

M. Villar-Martin

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

The gas temperature in circumstellar disks: effects of dust settling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gas temperature in circumstellar disks: effects of dust settling F. Faas, G.J. van Zadelhoff, E distributions. The disk gas-temperature (T ¢¡¢£ ) is in general assumed to be equal to the dust-temperature (T¤¦¥ £ § ), due to collisions. Dust settling depends on both the gas and dust temperature. T

Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan van

8

Saharan dust particles nucleate droplets in eastern Atlantic clouds Cynthia H. Twohy,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as CCN. Given the dual nature of Saharan dust particles as CCN and ice nuclei, this infusion of dust

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

9

The Differential Lifetimes of Protostellar Gas and Dust Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a protostellar disk model that takes into account the combined effect of viscous evolution, photoevaporation and the differential radial motion of dust grains and gas. For T Tauri disks, the lifetimes of dust disks that are mainly composed of millimeter sized grains are always shorter than the gas disks' lifetimes, and become similar only when the grains are fluffy (density 10 AU), without strong signs of gas accretion nor of millimeter thermal emission from the dust. For Herbig AeBe stars, the strong photoevaporation clears the inner disks in 10^6 yr, before the dust grains in the outer disk migrate to the inner region. In this case, the grains left behind in the outer gas disk accumulate at the disk inner edge (at 10-100 AU from the star). The dust grains remain there even after the entire gas disk has been photoevaporated, and form a gas-poor dust ring similar to that observed around HR 4796A. Hence, depending on the strength of the stellar ionizing flux, our model predicts opposite types of products around young stars. For low mass stars with a low photoevaporation rate, dust-poor gas disks with an inner hole would form, whereas for high mass stars with a high photoevaporation rate, gas-poor dust rings would form. This prediction should be examined by observations of gas and dust around weak line T Tauri stars and evolved Herbig AeBe stars.

Taku Takeuchi; C. J. Clarke; D. N. C. Lin

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles from Different Dust Source Regions: The Importance of Particle Mineralogy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four different dust source regions is investigated on a particle-by-particle basis using state-of-the-art scanning electron microscopy techniques including computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/computer-controlled X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX). Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid are observed. Clear differences in the reactivity of mineral dusts from these four different dust regions with nitric acid could be observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, such as those found in parts of China and Saudi Arabia, are found to react to the greatest extent. Calcium containing minerals, such as calcite (CaCO3) and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2), react to form nitrate salt whereas other calcium containing minerals such as gypsum (CaSO4?2H2O) do not react. The importance of particle chemical composition and mineralogy in the heterogeneous chemistry of mineral dust aerosols is definitively borne out in this study of individual dust particles.

Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles with Nitric Acid. A Combined CCSEM/EDX, ESEM AND ICP-MS Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four authentic dust samples with gas-phase nitric acid was investigated in this study. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to investigate the hygroscopic behavior of mineral dust particles reacted with nitric acid. Differences in the reactivity of mineral dust particles from these four different dust source regions with nitric acid were observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, namely China loess dust and Saudi coastal dust, were found to react to the greatest extent.

Laskin, Alexander; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

Coulomb interactions between dust particles in plasma etching reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wafer contamination by particles, or dust, in plasma processing reactors remains a continuing concern in the microelectronics industry. Particles charge negatively in low temperature plasmas and resemble electrically floating bodies. The transport of these particles in plasma processing reactors is dominated by electrostatic, ion-drag, fluid-drag, and thermophoretic forces. Under conditions where the particle density is large, Debye shielding may be insufficient to isolate the particles, leading to particle-particle Coulomb interactions. Such interactions are likely to occur in trapping locations, which are typically near the plasma-sheath boundaries in Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) discharges. Particles that experience Coulomb interactions may display collective behavior, an extreme example being a Coulomb liquid or solid. Particle transport in plasma processing reactors has been studied extensively to predict rates of wafer contamination thought to date particle-particle interactions have not been addressed. In this paper, the authors discuss results from a computer model for dust particle transport in RIE discharges where particle-particle Coulomb interactions are included.

Hwang, H.H.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Surface States and the Charge of a Dust Particle in a Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate electron and ion surface states of a negatively charged dust particle in a gas discharge and identify the charge of the particle with the electron surface density bound in the polarization-induced short-range part of the particle potential. On that scale, ions do not affect the charge. They are trapped in the shallow states of the Coulomb tail of the potential and act only as screening charges. Using orbital-motion limited electron charging fluxes and the particle temperature as an adjustable parameter, we obtain excellent agreement with experimental data.

Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.; Deutsch, H. [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Kersten, H. [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

14

FRAGMENTATION AND EVOLUTION OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS. III. THE EFFECT OF DUST AND GAS ENERGETICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dust and gas energetics are incorporated into a cluster-scale simulation of star formation in order to study the effect of heating and cooling on the star formation process. We build on our previous work by calculating separately the dust and gas temperatures. The dust temperature is set by radiative equilibrium between heating by embedded stars and radiation from dust. The gas temperature is determined using an energy-rate balance algorithm which includes molecular cooling, dust-gas collisional energy transfer, and cosmic-ray ionization. The fragmentation proceeds roughly similarly to simulations in which the gas temperature is set to the dust temperature, but there are differences. The structure of regions around sink particles has properties similar to those of Class 0 objects, but the infall speeds and mass accretion rates are, on average, higher than those seen for regions forming only low-mass stars. The gas and dust temperature have complex distributions not well modeled by approximations that ignore the detailed thermal physics. There is no simple relationship between density and kinetic temperature. In particular, high-density regions have a large range of temperatures, determined by their location relative to heating sources. The total luminosity underestimates the star formation rate at these early stages, before ionizing sources are included, by an order of magnitude. As predicted in our previous work, a larger number of intermediate-mass objects form when improved thermal physics is included, but the resulting initial mass function (IMF) still has too few low-mass stars. However, if we consider recent evidence on core-to-star efficiencies, the match to the IMF is improved.

Martel, Hugo [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada); Urban, Andrea [Sapling Learning, Inc., 2815 Exposition Blvd, Austin, TX 78703 (United States); Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Direct Observation of Completely Processed Calcium Carbonate Dust Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9 -11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J.; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R.; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

The dust and gas content of the Crab Nebula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have constructed MOCASSIN photoionization plus dust radiative transfer models for the Crab Nebula core-collapse supernova (CCSN) remnant, using either smooth or clumped mass distributions, in order to determine the chemical composition and masses of the nebular gas and dust. We computed models for several different geometries suggested for the nebular matter distribution but found that the observed gas and dust spectra are relatively insensitive to these geometries, being determined mainly by the spectrum of the pulsar wind nebula which ionizes and heats the nebula. Smooth distribution models are ruled out since they require 16-49 Msun of gas to fit the integrated optical nebular line fluxes, whereas our clumped models require 7.0 Msun of gas. neither of which can be matched by current CCSN yield predictions. A global gas-phase C/O ratio of 1.65 by number is derived, along with a He/H number ratio of 1.85, A carbonaceous dust composition is favoured by the observed gas-phase C/O ratio: amorphous carbon clu...

Owen, P J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Imaging of high-speed dust particle trajectories on NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imaging of high-speed incandescent dust particle trajectories in a tokamak plasma has been accomplished on NSTX using up to three high-speed cameras each viewing the same plasma volume from different locations and operating at speeds up to 68 000 frames/s with exposure times varying from 2 to 300 {mu}s. The dynamics of the dust trajectories can be quite complex exhibiting a large variation in both speed (10-200 m/s) and direction. Simulations of these trajectories will be utilized to ascertain the role dust may play in future machines such as ITER where significant dust production from wall erosion is expected. NSTX has numerous view ports including both tangential as well as radial views in both the midplane and lower divertors. Several vertical ports are also available so that a few specific regions in NSTX may be viewed simultaneously from several different camera positions. The cameras can be operated in the full visible spectrum but near-infrared filters can be utilized to enhance the observation of incandescent particles against a bright background. A description of the cameras and required optics is presented.

Roquemore, A. L.; Davis, W.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Maqueda, R.; Nishino, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Consequences of three-dimensional physical and electromagnetic structures on dust particle trapping in high plasma density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gradients are present, which introduce fluid drag and thermophoretic forces, dust particle traps may

Kushner, Mark

19

Color-based tracking of plasma dust particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Color-based tracking to observe agglomeration of deposited particles inside a compact planar magnetron during plasma discharge was done by creating high dynamic range (HDR) images of photos captured by a Pentax K10D digital camera. Carbon erosion and redeposition was also monitored using the technique. The HDR images were subjected to a chromaticity-based constraint discoloration inside the plasma chamber indicating film formation or carbon redeposition. Results show that dust deposition occurs first near the evacuation pumps due to the pressure gradient and then accumulates at the positively charged walls of the chamber. This method can be applied to monitor dust formation during dusty plasma experiments without major modification of plasma devices, useful especially for large fusion reactors.

Villamayor, Michelle Marie S., E-mail: mvillamayor@nip.upd.edu.ph; Soriano, Maricor N.; Ramos, Henry J. [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)] [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Kato, Shuichi; Wada, Motoi [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Optical Investigations of Dust Particles Distribution in RF and DC Discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical emission spectroscopy is used to study dust particles movement and conditions of a formation of ordered plasma-dust structures in a capacitively coupled RF discharge. 3D binocular diagnostics of plasma-dust structures in dc discharge was made.

Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 96a Tole Bi St., Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Filatova, I. I.; Azharonok, V. V. [B. I. Stepanov Institute of Physics NAS of Belarus, Nezavisimosti Ave., 68, 220072, Minsk (Belarus)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Dust Particle Trajectories in the NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed. 2008 American Institute of Physics. __________________________________________________

W.U. Boeglin, A.L. Roquemore, and R. Maqueda

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

23

Three-dimensional reconstruction of dust particle trajectories in the NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly mobile incandescent dust particles are routinely observed on NSTX using two fast cameras operating in the visible region. An analysis method to reconstruct dust particle trajectories in space using two fast cameras is presented in this paper. Position accuracies of a few millimeters depending on the particle's location have been achieved and particle velocities between 10 and 200 m/s have been observed.

Boeglin, W. U. [Physics Department, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, Rt. 1 N at Sayre Dr., Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Maqueda, R. [NOVA Photonics, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sensitivity Study of the Effects of Mineral Dust Particle Nonsphericity and Thin Cirrus Clouds on MODIS Dust Optical Depth Retrievals and Direct Radiative Forcing Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A special challenge posed by mineral dust aerosols is associated with their predominantly nonspherical particle shapes. In the present study, the scattering and radiative properties for nonspherical mineral dust aerosols at violet-to-blue (0.412, 0...

Feng, Qian

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

APS/123-QED Influence of the ambipolar-to-free diffusion transition on dust particle charge in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the thermophoretic force [10, 11]. Dust particle charge is a key parameter in a complex plasma. It determines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

COLD DUST BUT WARM GAS IN THE UNUSUAL ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 4125  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the Herschel Space Observatory have revealed an unusual elliptical galaxy, NGC 4125, which has strong and extended submillimeter emission from cold dust but only very strict upper limits to its CO and H I emission. Depending on the dust emissivity, the total dust mass is 2-5 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ?}. While the neutral gas-to-dust mass ratio is extremely low (<12-30), including the ionized gas traced by [C II] emission raises this limit to <39-100. The dust emission follows a similar r {sup 1/4} profile to the stellar light and the dust to stellar mass ratio is toward the high end of what is found in nearby elliptical galaxies. We suggest that NGC 4125 is currently in an unusual phase where evolved stars produced in a merger-triggered burst of star formation are pumping large amounts of gas and dust into the interstellar medium. In this scenario, the low neutral gas-to-dust mass ratio is explained by the gas being heated to temperatures ?10{sup 4} K faster than the dust is evaporated. If galaxies like NGC 4125, where the far-infrared emission does not trace neutral gas in the usual manner, are common at higher redshift, this could have significant implications for our understanding of high redshift galaxies and galaxy evolution.

Wilson, C. D.; Cridland, A.; Foyle, K.; Parkin, T. J.; Cooper, E. Mentuch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Roussel, H. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 7095, F-75014 Paris (France)] [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 7095, F-75014 Paris (France); Sauvage, M.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, Bât. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, Bât. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Smith, M. W. L.; Gear, W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Baes, M.; De Looze, I. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)] [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, G. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)] [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); and others

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. I. IDENTICAL PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows and discuss implications for dust particle collisions in protoplanetary disks. We simulate a weakly compressible turbulent flow, evolving 14 particle species with friction timescale, ?{sub p}, covering the entire range of scales in the flow. The particle Stokes numbers, St, measuring the ratio of ?{sub p} to the Kolmogorov timescale, are in the range 0.1 ?< St ?< 800. Using simulation results, we show that the model by Pan and Padoan gives satisfactory predictions for the rms relative velocity between identical particles. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity is found to be highly non-Gaussian. The PDF tails are well described by a 4/3 stretched exponential function for particles with ?{sub p} ? 1-2 T{sub L}, where T{sub L} is the Lagrangian correlation timescale, consistent with a prediction based on PP10. The PDF approaches Gaussian only for very large particles with ?{sub p} ?> 54 T{sub L}. We split particle pairs at given distances into two types with low and high relative speeds, referred to as continuous and caustic types, respectively, and compute their contributions to the collision kernel. Although amplified by the effect of clustering, the continuous contribution vanishes in the limit of infinitesimal particle distance, where the caustic contribution dominates. The caustic kernel per unit cross section rises rapidly as St increases toward ? 1, reaches a maximum at ?{sub p} ? 2 T{sub L}, and decreases as ?{sub p}{sup -1/2} for ?{sub p} >> T{sub L}.

Pan, Liubin [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Padoan, Paolo, E-mail: lpan@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu [ICREA and ICC, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

Gas turbine engines with particle traps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine (10) incorporates a particle trap (46) that forms an entrapment region (73) in a plenum (24) which extends from within the combustor (18) to the inlet (32) of a radial-inflow turbine (52, 54). The engine (10) is thereby adapted to entrap particles that originate downstream from the compressor (14) and are otherwise propelled by combustion gas (22) into the turbine (52, 54). Carbonaceous particles that are dislodged from the inner wall (50) of the combustor (18) are incinerated within the entrapment region (73) during operation of the engine (10).

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ); Sumner, D. Warren (Phoenix, AZ); Sheoran, Yogendra (Scottsdale, AZ); Judd, Z. Daniel (Phoenix, AZ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in 15 N, leading to average bulk N isotopic of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These particles typically also contain

30

Numerical study of an electrostatic plasma sheath containing two species of charged dust particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-fluid model is used to study the dynamics of a dusty plasma sheath consists of electrons, ions, and two species of charged dust particles, i.e., nano-size and micron-size particles. It is found that, when the sheath is dominated by the nano-size dust grains, spatially periodic fluctuations are developed in the profiles of the sheath potential, and the number density and velocity of the plasma and dust particles. Due to inertial effects, the fluctuations in the parameters of the micron-size grains are much lower than those of the other parameters. The competition between the electric and ion drag forces plays the primary role in development of the fluctuations. The spatial period of the fluctuations is approximately a few Debye lengths and their amplitude depends on the plasma and dust parameters. The fluctuations are reduced by the increase in the radius, mass density, and Mach number of the nano-size particles, as well as the density and Mach number of the ions. But, they are enhanced by the increase in the plasma number density and the electron temperature. The sheath thickness demonstrates a non-monotonic behavior against variation of the nanoparticle parameters, i.e., it first decreases quickly, shows a minimum, and then increases. However, the sheath width always decreases with the plasma number density and ion Mach number, while grows linearly with the electron temperature.

Foroutan, G. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhoundi, A. [Nanostructure Material Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Collection strategy, inner morphology, and size distribution of dust particles in ASDEX Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dust collection and analysis strategy in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is described. During five consecutive operation campaigns (2007–2011), Si collectors were installed, which were supported by filtered vacuum sampling and collection with adhesive tapes in 2009. The outer and inner morphology (e.g. shape) and elemental composition of the collected particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The majority of the ~50?000 analysed particles on the Si collectors of campaign 2009 contain tungsten—the plasma-facing material in AUG—and show basically two different types of outer appearance: spheroids and irregularly shaped particles. By far most of the W-dominated spheroids consist of a solid W core, i.e. solidified W droplets. A part of these particles is coated with a low-Z material; a process that seems to happen presumably in the far scrape-off layer plasma. In addition, some conglomerates of B, C and W appear as spherical particles after their contact with plasma. By far most of the particles classified as B-, C- and W-dominated irregularly shaped particles consist of the same conglomerate with varying fraction of embedded W in the B–C matrix and some porosity, which can exceed 50%. The fragile structures of many conglomerates confirm the absence of intensive plasma contact. Both the ablation and mobilization of conglomerate material and the production of W droplets are proposed to be triggered by arcing. The size distribution of each dust particle class is best described by a log-normal distribution allowing an extrapolation of the dust volume and surface area. The maximum in this distribution is observed above the resolution limit of 0.28 µm only for the W-dominated spheroids, at around 1 µm. The amount of W-containing dust is extrapolated to be less than 300 mg on the horizontal areas of AUG.

M. Balden; N. Endstrasser; P. W. Humrickhouse; V. Rohde; M. Rasinski; U. von Toussaint; S. Elgeti; R. Neu

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DUST-TO-GAS RATIO IN THE EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXY I Zw 18  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The blue compact dwarf galaxy I Zw 18 is one of the most metal-poor systems known in the local universe (12+log(O/H) = 7.17). In this work we study I Zw 18 using data from Spitzer, Herschel Space Telescope, and IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our data set includes the most sensitive maps of I Zw 18, to date, in both the far-infrared and the CO J = 1 {yields} 0 transition. We use dust emission models to derive a dust mass upper limit of only M{sub dust} {<=} 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} (3{sigma} limit). This upper limit is driven by the non-detection at 160 {mu}m, and it is a factor of 4-10 times smaller than previous estimates (depending on the model used). We also estimate an upper limit to the total dust-to-gas mass ratio of M{sub Dust}/M{sub gas} {<=} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. If a linear correlation between the dust-to-gas mass ratio and metallicity (measured as O/H) were to hold, we would expect a ratio of 3.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}. We also show that the infrared spectral energy distribution is similar to that of starbursting systems.

Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Fisher, David B.; Bolatto, Alberto D. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory of Millimeter Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Konigstuehl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Gordon, Karl D.; Roman-Duval, Julia [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donaldson, Jessica; Melendez, Marcio [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Investigation of plasma-dust structures in He-Ar gas mixture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reports on the first experiments with plasma-dust formations in dc gas discharge plasma for a He-Ar mixture. It is shown that the choice of light and heavy gases for the mixture suppresses ion heating in electric field under the conventional conditions of experiments and results in a supersonic jet with high Mach numbers. Distribution functions for drifting ions in the gas mixture are calculated for various mixture concentrations, electric field strengths, and gas pressures.

Maiorov, S. A. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Dosbolayev, M. K. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, Tole bi 96a, Almaty, 050012 (Kazakhstan)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

Durham, Michael Dean (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard John (Aurora, CO); Ebner, Timothy George (Westminster, CO); Stewart, Robin Michele (Arvada, CO); Hyatt, David E. (Denver, CO); Bustard, Cynthia Jean (Littleton, CO); Sjostrom, Sharon (Denver, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Statistical charge distribution over dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a non-Maxwellian Lorentzian plasma is investigated. Two specific situations, viz., (i) the plasma in thermal equilibrium and (ii) non-equilibrium state where the plasma is dark (no emission) or irradiated by laser light (including photoemission) are taken into account. The formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for the Lorentzian plasma, from that in case of Maxwellian plasma, is graphically illustrated and discussed; it is shown that the charge distribution tends to results corresponding to Maxwellian plasma for large spectral index. The charge distribution predicts the opposite charging of the dust particles in certain cases.

Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Misra, Shikha, E-mail: shikhamish@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi-110016 (India)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the direction of the gravitation force in the horizontal iodine air filter are orthogonal, hence the effective accumulation of the small dispersive coal dust particles takes place at the bottom of absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter. It is found that the air dust aerosol stream flow in the horizontal iodine air filter is not limited by the appearing structures, made of the precipitated small dispersive coal dust particles, in distinction from the vertical iodine air filter, in the process of long term operation of the iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

37

Charging and de-charging of dust particles in bulk region of a radio frequency discharge plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis to investigate the effect of the dust particle size and density on the floating potential of the dust particles of uniform radius and other plasma parameters in the bulk region plasma of a RF-discharge in collisionless/collisional regime has been presented herein. For this purpose, the average charge theory based on charge balance on dust and number balance of plasma constituents has been utilized; a derivation for the accretion rate of electrons corresponding to a drifting Maxwellian energy distribution in the presence of an oscillatory RF field has been given and the resulting expression has been used to determine the floating potential of the dust grains. Further, the de-charging of the dust grains after switching off the RF field has also been discussed.

Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Extraplanar Dust: a Tracer of Cold Dense Gas in the Thick Disks of Spiral Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interstellar thick disks of galaxies contain not only gas, but significant quantities of dust. Most of our knowledge of extraplanar dust in disk galaxies comes from direct broadband optical imaging of these systems, wherein the dust is identified due to the irregular extinction it produces against the thick disk and bulge stars. This observational technique is sensitive to only the most dense material, and we argue much of the material identified in this way traces a cold phase of the interstellar thick disks in galaxies. The presence of a cold, dense phase likely implies the interstellar pressures in the thick disks of spiral galaxies can be quite high. This dense phase of the interstellar medium may also fueling thick disk star formation, and H-alpha observations are now revealing H II regions around newly-formed OB stars associations in several galaxies. We argue that the large quantities of dust and the morphologies of the structures traced by the dust imply that much of the extraplanar material in disk galaxies must have been expelled from the underlying thin disk.

J. Christopher Howk

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the directi...

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Transport mechanisms and experimental evidence of positively charged dust particles in an argon plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that dense particle clouds often reside within the steady-state plasma; however, particle transport in the critical post-plasma period has not yet been fully explored. To better understand and characterize particle behavior, charge and transport properties of dust particles in an argon plasma, contained within a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell, were studied in the steady-state and post-plasma regimes of a 500 mTorr, 25 W argon discharge. Using separate water chillers to control independently the temperatures of the upper and lower electrodes, various temperature gradients were imposed on the plasma and thermophoretic transport of the particle clouds observed for both steady and decaying discharges. Next, using a pulsed rf power supply and a tuned Langmuir probe, the decay times of electrons and ions were measured in the afterglow. Finally, utilizing high-speed video in concert with 10 mW He-Ne laser light, post-plasma particle trajectories were observed for various electric fields and electrode temperatures. Results were then compared to calculations from a net force model that included gravity, the electric field, fluid flow, ion drag, and thermophoresis. It was found that temperature gradients greater than {approximately} 10 C/cm significantly altered particle cloud configurations in steady plasmas, and provided a strong transport mechanism in the afterglow. Electrically, the measured ion density decay time was approximately equal to that of the electrons, consistent with ambipolar diffusion.

Brown, D.A.; Hareland, W.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collins, S.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Improving Simulations of Fine Dust Surface Concentrations over the Western United States by Optimizing the Particle Size Distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve estimates of remote contributions of dust to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the western United States, new dust particle size distributions (PSDs) based upon scale-invariant fragmentation theory (Kok_PSD) with constraints from in situ measurements (IMP_PSD) are implemented in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Compared to initial simulations, this leads to reductions in the mass of emitted dust particles with radii <1.8 mm by 40%-60%. Consequently, the root-mean-square error in simulated fine dust concentrations compared to springtime surface observations in the western United States is reduced by 67%-81%. The ratio of simulated fine to coarse PM mass is also improved, which is not achievable by reductions in total dust emissions. The IMP_PSD best represents the PSD of dust transported from remote sources and reduces modeled PM2.5 concentrations up to 5 mg/m3 over the western United States, which is important when considering sources contributing to nonattainment of air quality standards. Citation: Zhang, L., J. F. Kok, D. K. Henze, Q. Li, and C. Zhao (2013), Improving simulations of fine dust surface concentrations over the western United States by optimizing the particle size distribution, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 3270-3275, doi:10.1002/grl.50591.

Zhang, Li; Kok, Jasper F.; Henze, Daven; Li, Qinbin; Zhao, Chun

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

Postma, Arlin K. (Halfway, OR)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

NARROW DUST JETS IN A DIFFUSE GAS COMA: A NATURAL PRODUCT OF SMALL ACTIVE REGIONS ON COMETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comets often display narrow dust jets but more diffuse gas comae when their eccentric orbits bring them into the inner solar system and sunlight sublimates the ice on the nucleus. Comets are also understood to have one or more active areas covering only a fraction of the total surface active with sublimating volatile ices. Calculations of the gas and dust distribution from a small active area on a comet's nucleus show that as the gas moves out radially into the vacuum of space it expands tangentially, filling much of the hemisphere centered on the active region. The dust dragged by the gas remains more concentrated over the active area. This explains some puzzling appearances of comets having collimated dust jets but more diffuse gaseous atmospheres. Our test case is 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the Rosetta mission target comet, whose activity is dominated by a single area covering only 4% of its surface.

Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Rubin, M.; Fougere, N.; Gombosi, T. I., E-mail: mcombi@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

DUST PROPERTIES AND DISK STRUCTURE OF EVOLVED PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN Cep OB2: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, GAS AND DUST MASS, AND INSIDE-OUT EVOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 31 T Tauri stars (TTS) and IRAM/1.3 mm observations for 34 low- and intermediate-mass stars in the Cep OB2 region. Including our previously published data, we analyze 56 TTS and 3 intermediate-mass stars with silicate features in Tr 37 ({approx}4 Myr) and NGC 7160 ({approx}12 Myr). The silicate emission features are well reproduced with a mixture of amorphous (with olivine, forsterite, and silica stoichiometry) and crystalline grains (forsterite, enstatite). We explore grain size and disk structure using radiative transfer disk models, finding that most objects have suffered substantial evolution (grain growth, settling). About half of the disks show inside-out evolution, with either dust-cleared inner holes or a radially dependent dust distribution, typically with larger grains and more settling in the innermost disk. The typical strong silicate features nevertheless require the presence of small dust grains, and could be explained by differential settling according to grain size, anomalous dust distributions, and/or optically thin dust populations within disk gaps. M-type stars tend to have weaker silicate emission and steeper spectral energy distributions than K-type objects. The inferred low dust masses are in a strong contrast with the relatively high gas accretion rates, suggesting global grain growth and/or an anomalous gas-to-dust ratio. Transition disks in the Cep OB2 region display strongly processed grains, suggesting that they are dominated by dust evolution and settling. Finally, the presence of rare but remarkable disks with strong accretion at old ages reveals that some very massive disks may still survive to grain growth, gravitational instabilities, and planet formation.

Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Henning, Thomas; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Sturm, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Patel, Nimesh [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Juhasz, Attila, E-mail: sicilia@mpia.de, E-mail: aurora.sicilia@uam.es [Leiden Observatory, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Dust cluster explosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for the dust cluster explosion where micron/sub-micron sized particles are accelerated at the expense of plasma thermal energy, in the afterglow phase of a complex plasma discharge is proposed. The model is tested by molecular dynamics simulations of dust particles in a confining potential. The nature of the explosion (caused by switching off the discharge) and the concomitant dust acceleration is found to depend critically on the pressure of the background neutral gas. At low gas pressure, the explosion is due to unshielded Coulomb repulsion between dust particles and yields maximum acceleration, while in the high pressure regime it is due to shielded Yukawa repulsion and yields much feebler acceleration. These results are in agreement with experimental findings. Our simulations also confirm a recently proposed electrostatic (ES) isothermal scaling relation, P{sub E}{proportional_to}V{sub d}{sup -2} (where P{sub E} is the ES pressure of the dust particles and V{sub d} is the confining volume).

Saxena, Vikrant [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Avinash, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi (India); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Discharge source with gas curtain for protecting optics from particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas curtain device is employed to deflect debris that is generated by an extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation discharge source such as an electric discharge plasma source. The gas curtain device projects a stream of gas over the path of the radiation to deflect debris particles into a direction that is different from that of the path of the radiation. The gas curtain can be employed to prevent debris accumulation on the optics used in photolithography.

Fornaciari, Neal R.; Kanouff, Michael P.

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

The response of a capacitively coupled discharge to the formation of dust particles: Experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of dust particles on the properties of a capacitively coupled Ar-C{sub 2}H{sub 2} discharge is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of measurements of the intensity and spatial distribution of the emitted light, the line width of the fast component of H{sub {alpha}} line and of the electron density during the particle growth are presented. To analyze the experimental results a one-dimensional discharge model is developed. Using the model the effects of dust grains on the power absorption (taking into account stochastic and Ohmic heating in the plasma sheaths), the optical emission intensity profile, the sheath size, the rf electric field and on the energy of positive ions bombarding the electrodes are investigated. In particular, it is shown that the decrease of the power absorption in the sheaths of complex plasmas is due to the dependence of the stochastic and Ohmic heating in the plasma sheaths on the electron temperature and the current flowing across the discharge plates. The results of the calculations are compared with the available experimental data and found to be in good agreement.

Denysenko, I.; Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stefanovic, I.; Selenin, V.; Winter, J. [School of Physics and Technology, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svobody sq. 4, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany and Institute of Physics, POB 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Dust-to-Gas Ratios in Early-type Galaxies A. F. Crocker (University of Massachusetts Amherst), L. M. Young (New Mex-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust-to-Gas Ratios in Early-type Galaxies A. F. Crocker (University of Massachusetts Amherst), L. M. Bureau, (University of Oxford, United Kingdom), Atlas3D Team We present dust-to-gas ratios for all mass. Cold gas masses are combined molecular and atomic masses, determined from single- dish CO

Bureau, Martin

49

Observation of plasma instabilities related to dust particle growth mechanisms in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Instabilities are observed in the self-bias voltage measured on a probe immersed in microwave plasma excited at Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR). Observed in the MHz range, they were systematically measured in dust-free or dusty plasmas (obtained for different conditions of applied microwave powers and acetylene flow rates). Two characteristic frequencies, well described as lower hybrid oscillations, can be defined. The first one, in the 60–70 MHz range, appears as a sharp peak in the frequency spectra and is observed in every case. Attributed to ions, its position shift observed with the output power highlights that nucleation process takes place in the dusty plasma. Attributed to lower hybrid oscillation of powders, the second broad peak in the 10–20 MHz range leads to the characterization of dust particles growth mechanisms: in the same way as in capacitively coupled plasmas, accumulation of nucleus confined near the probe in the magnetic field followed by aggregation takes place. Then, the measure of electrical instabilities on the self-bias voltage allows characterizing the discharge as well as the chemical processes that take place in the magnetic field region and their kinetics.

Drenik, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia) [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); CNRS, LAPLACE, 31062 Toulouse/Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE, 118 rte de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Yuryev, P.; Clergereaux, R. [CNRS, LAPLACE, 31062 Toulouse/Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE, 118 rte de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)] [CNRS, LAPLACE, 31062 Toulouse/Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE, 118 rte de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Vesel, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Margot, J. [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada)] [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of...

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for separating aerosol particles from a gas sample being withdrawn from a contained atmosphere, comprising the following steps: placing within the contained atmosphere a covering gas impermeable enclosure have an interior chamber partly defined by a bottom metal plate that is permeable to gas; fixing the position of the enclosure with the plate facing downwardly and directly exposed to the contained atmosphere; heating the metal plate to a temperature greater than that of the contained atmosphere, whereby aerosol particles are repelled to the resulting thermophoretic forces applied to them by the temperature gradient produced in the atmosphere immediately under the plate; and sampling gas within the interior chamber of the enclosure.

Poztman, A.K.

1986-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

Quantum Master Equation of Particle in Gas Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evolution of the reduced density operator $\\rho$ of Brownian particle is discussed in single collision approach valid typically in low density gas environments. This is the first succesful derivation of quantum friction caused by {\\it local} environmental interactions. We derive a Lindblad master equation for $\\rho$, whose generators are calculated from differential cross section of a single collision between Brownian and gas particles, respectively. The existence of thermal equilibrium for $\\rho$ is proved. Master equations proposed earlier are shown to be particular cases of our one.

Lajos Diosi

1994-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Westinghouse hot gas particle filter system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Cycles (PCFB) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial power generation applications. Hot gas particulate filters (HGPF) are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC and PCFB in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical HGPF system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PCFB and IGCC systems. This paper reports on the status of Westinghouse`s HGPF commercialization programs including: A quick summary of past gasification based HGPF test programs; A summary of the integrated HGPF operation at the American Electric Power, Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Demonstration Project with approximately 6000 hours of HGPF testing completed; A summary of approximately 3200 hours of HGPF testing at the Foster Wheeler (FW) 10 MW{sub e} facility located in Karhula, Finland; A summary of over 700 hours of HGPF operation at the FW 2 MW{sub e} topping PCFB facility located in Livingston, New Jersey; A summary of the design of the HGPFs for the DOE/Southern Company Services, Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama; A summary of the design of the commercial-scale HGPF system for the Sierra Pacific, Pinon Pine IGCC Project; A review of completed testing and a summary of planned testing of Westinghouse HGPFs in Biomass IGCC applications; and A brief summary of the HGPF systems for the City of Lakeland, McIntosh Unit 4 PCFB Demonstration Project.

Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Debski, V.L.; Morehead, H.T. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States). Power Generation Business Unit

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

Cookson, A.H.

1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hot gas particle filter systems: Commercialization status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCCs) and Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Cycles (PCFBs) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial power generation applications. Hot gas particulate filters (HGPFs) are key components for the successful implementation of advanced IGCC and PCFB power generation cycles. The objective is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical HGPF system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PCFB and IGCC systems. This paper reports on the status of Westinghouse`s HGPF commercialization programs including: A quick summary of past gasification based HGPF test programs; A summary of the integrated HGPF operation at the American Electric Power, Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Demonstration Project with approximately 6,000 hours of HGPF testing completed; A summary of approximately 3,200 hours of HGPF testing at the Foster Wheeler (FW) 10 MWe PCFB facility located in Karhula, Finland; A summary of over 700 hours of HGPF operation at the FW 2 MWe topping PCFB facility located in Livingston, New Jersey; A summary of the design of the HGPFs for the DOE/Southern Company Services, Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama; A summary of the design of the commercial-scale HGPF system for the Sierra Pacific, Pinon Pine IGCC Project; A review of completed testing and a summary of planned testing of Westinghouse HGPFs in Biomass IGCC applications; and A brief summary of the HGPF systems for the City of Lakeland, McIntosh Unit 4 PCFB Demonstration Project.

Morehead, H.T.; Adams, V.L. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States). Power Generation Business Unit; Yang, W.C.; Lippert, T.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Dust Measurements in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

"Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT) Herschel Observations of GSS30-IRS1 in Ophiuchus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a part of the "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT) key program on Herschel, we observed GSS30-IRS1, a Class I protostar located in Ophiuchus (d = 120 pc), with Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). More than 70 lines were detected within a wavelength range from 50 micron to 200 micron, including CO, H2O, OH, and two atomic [O I] lines at 63 and 145 micron. The [C II] line, known as a tracer of externally heated gas by the interstellar radiation field, is also detected at 158 micron. All lines, except [O I] and [C II], are detected only at the central spaxel of 9.4" X 9.4". The [O I] emissions are extended along a NE-SW orientation, and the [C II] line is detected over all spaxels, indicative of external PDR. The total [C II] intensity around GSS30 reveals that the far-ultraviolet radiation field is in the range of 3 to 20 G0, where G0 is in units of the Habing Field, 1.6 X 10^{-3} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. This enhanced external radiation field heats the envelope of GSS30-IRS1, causing the...

Je, Hyerin; Lee, Seokho; Green, Joel D; Evans, Neal J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is prevented by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

Pace, M.O.; Adcock, J.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is preved by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modified theory of secondary electron emission from spherical particles and its effect on dust charging in complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have modified Chow's theory of secondary electron emission (SEE) to take account of the fact that the path length of a primary electron in a spherical particle varies between zero to the diameter or x{sub m} the penetration depth depending on the distance of the path from the centre of the particle. Further by including this modified expression for SEE efficiency, the charging kinetics of spherical grains in a Maxwellian plasma has been developed; it is based on charge balance over dust particles and number balance of electrons and ionic species. It is seen that this effect is more pronounced for smaller particles and higher plasma temperatures. Desirable experimental work has also been discussed.

Misra, Shikha [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Department of Education Building, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Erratum To "Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles From Different Dust Source Regions: The Importance of Particle Mineralogy" [Atmos.Environ.38 (36)(2004)6253 –6261  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The publisher regrets that there was an error in the information in Table 1 incorrectly identifies the mineral dust and their corresponding composition. The corrected table is given below. In addition, the second full sentence below the table should read “Smaller amounts ?1% of other elements such as V and Ti were also observed but are not listed in Table 1 and is the reason why the percentages do not total to 100 in Table 1.” In the original article it states that K was not included in Table 1 but clearly it is.

Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

Postma, A.K.

1984-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Characterization of secondary grain dust explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dust less than 106 um . . . ~ . . ~ ~ ~ ~ 27 4 Coulter Counter particle size distribution for wheat dust less than 106 um . 28 5 Coulter Counter particle size distribution for rice dust less than 106 um ~ 29 6 Coulter Counter particle size... distribution f' or wheat/sorghum dust, less than 106 um . 7 Coulter Counter particle size distribution for soybean dust less than 106 um 31 8 Coulter Counter particle size distribution for corn dust between 106 and. 250 um 9 Coulter Counter particle size...

Schulman, Cheryl Wendler

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid Phase Sintered SiC Ceramic DPF Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid Phase Sintered SiC...

66

Long-Term Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On-Road Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Long-Term Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On-Road Diesel and Gasoline...

67

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

Durham, M.D.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

68

Coupling and evaluating gas/particle mass transfer treatments for aerosol simulation and forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupling and evaluating gas/particle mass transfer treatments for aerosol simulation and forecast hindcasting and forecasting. The lack of an efficient yet accurate gas/particle mass transfer treatment December 2007; accepted 21 February 2008; published 12 June 2008. [1] Simulating gas/particle mass transfer

Jacobson, Mark

69

Method and apparatus for decreased undesired particle emissions in gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

Durham, Michael Dean (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard John (Aurora, CO); Ebner, Timothy George (Westminster, CO); Stewart, Robin Michele (Arvada, CO); Bustard, Cynthia Jean (Littleton, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antin...

Ledenyov, Oleg P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Bousso entropy bound for ideal gas of massive particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bousso entropy bound is investigated for static spherically symmetric configurations of ideal gas with Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Gas of massive particles is considered. The paper is continuation of the previous work concerning the massless case. Special attention is devoted to lightsheets generated by spheres. Conditions under which the Bousso bound can be violated are discussed and it is shown that a possible violating region cannot be arbitrarily large and that it is contained inside a sphere of unit Planck radius if the number of independent spin states $g_s$ is small enough. It is also shown that the central temperature must exceed the Planck temperature in order to get a violation of the Bousso bound for $g_s$ not too large. The situation for higher-dimensional spacetimes is also discussed and the FMW conditions are investigated.

Jan Gersl

2008-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of the aerodynamic resistance of a model of the vertical iodine air filter is completed. The comparative analysis of the technical characteristics of the vertical and horizontal iodine air filters is also made.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

73

Comparison of the Coulter Multisizer and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer for obtaining the aerodynamic particle size of irregularly shaped dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When studying air quality it is often necessary to measure the aerodynamic size distribution of particles. True aerodynamic diameter must be measured using a gravitational settling method, which is impractical. Other methods exist that use other...

McClure, Joshua Wayne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Dust-to-gas ratio, $X_{\\rm CO}$ factor and CO-dark gas in the Galactic anticentre: an observational study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the correlation between extinction and H~{\\sc i} and CO emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes ($|b|>10\\degr$) within the footprint of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic anticentre (XSTPS-GAC) on small and large scales. In Paper I (Chen et al. 2014), we present a three-dimensional dust extinction map within the footprint of XSTPS-GAC, covering a sky area of over 6,000\\,deg$^2$ at a spatial angular resolution of 6\\,arcmin. In the current work, the map is combined with data from gas tracers, including H~{\\sc i} data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array H~{\\sc i} survey and CO data from the Planck mission, to constrain the values of dust-to-gas ratio $DGR=A_V/N({\\rm H})$ and CO-to-$\\rm H_2$ conversion factor $X_{\\rm CO}=N({\\rm H_2})/W_{\\rm CO}$ for the entire GAC footprint excluding the Galactic plane, as well as for selected star-forming regions (such as the Orion, Taurus and Perseus clouds) and a region of diffuse gas in the northern Galactic hemis...

Chen, B -Q; Yuan, H -B; Huang, Y; Xiang, M -S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Molecular and atomic gas in dust lane early-type galaxies - I: Low star-formation efficiencies in minor merger remnants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we present IRAM-30m telescope observations of a sample of bulge-dominated galaxies with large dust lanes, which have had a recent minor merger. We find these galaxies are very gas rich, with H2 masses between 4x10^8 and 2x10^10 Msun. We use these molecular gas masses, combined with atomic gas masses from an accompanying paper, to calculate gas-to-dust and gas-to-stellar mass ratios. The gas-to-dust ratios of our sample objects vary widely (between ~50 and 750), suggesting many objects have low gas-phase metallicities, and thus that the gas has been accreted through a recent merger with a lower mass companion. We calculate the implied minor companion masses and gas fractions, finding a median predicted stellar mass ratio of ~40:1. The minor companion likely had masses between ~10^7 - 10^10 Msun. The implied merger mass ratios are consistent with the expectation for low redshift gas-rich mergers from simulations. We then go on to present evidence that (no matter which star-formation rate indicator ...

Davis, Timothy A; Allison, James R; Shabala, Stanislav S; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Lagos, Claudia del P; Kaviraj, Sugata; Bourne, Nathan; Dunne, Loretta; Eales, Steve; Ivison, Rob J; Maddox, Steve; Smith, Daniel J B; Smith, Matthew W L; Temi, Pasquale

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself.

Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

77

Heterogeneous chemistry of atmospheric mineral dust particles and their resulting cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerosol size distribution The size of an aerosol particle is an important parameter that controls the rates of diffusion, coagulation,coagulation into the larger ultrafine and accumulation Figure 1.1. Typical size distribution of atmospheric aerosols and

Sullivan, Ryan Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Method and apparatus for decreased undesired particle emissions in gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 5 figs.

Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Bustard, C.J.

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

79

On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

Hering, Susanne V. (Berkeley, CA); Goldstein, Allen H. (Orinda, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

80

Numerical simulations of gas-particle flows with combustion Julien NUSSBAUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulations of gas-particle flows with combustion Julien NUSSBAUM French-german Research. At the initial time, the mixture of gas-powder grains is contained in the combustion chamber, limited gas species. The pressure increases in the combustion chamber, while the front flame propagates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Natural Gas Hydrate Particles in Oil-Free Systems with Kinetic Inhibition and Slurry Viscosity Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Gas Hydrate Particles in Oil-Free Systems with Kinetic Inhibition and Slurry Viscosity, reduction of slurry viscosity, and corrosion inhibition. INTRODUCTION Water often forms gas hydrates antiagglomeration (AA) in the natural gas hydrate literature. The main limitation to application has been the need

Firoozabadi, Abbas

82

Oil and Gas CDT What happens inside a frack? Particle-laden fluid transport in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as food engineering where particle-laden fluids are common, to study the flow of particle-laden fluidsOil and Gas CDT What happens inside a frack? Particle-laden fluid transport in fracture networks. University of Strathclyde (Civil & Environmental Engineering and Chemical & Process Engineering) Supervisory

Henderson, Gideon

83

Kinetic simulation of neutral/ionized gas and electrically charged dust in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cometary coma is a unique phenomenon in the solar system being a planetary atmosphere influenced by little or no gravity. As a comet approaches the sun, the water vapor with some fraction of other gases sublimate, generating a cloud of gas, ice and other refractory materials (rocky and organic dust) ejected from the surface of the nucleus. Sublimating gas molecules undergo frequent collisions and photochemical processes in the near-nucleus region. Owing to its negligible gravity, comets produce a large and highly variable extensive dusty coma with a size much larger than the characteristic size of the cometary nucleus.The Rosetta spacecraft is en route to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for a rendezvous, landing, and extensive orbital phase beginning in 2014. Both, interpretation of measurements and safety consideration of the spacecraft require modeling of the comet's dusty gas environment.In this work we present results of a numerical study of multispecies gaseous and electrically charged dust environment of comet Chyuryumov-Gerasimenko. Both, gas and dust phases of the coma are simulated kinetically. Photolytic reactions are taken into account. Parameters of the ambient plasma as well as the distribution of electric/magnetic fields are obtained from an MHD simulation of the coma connected to the solar wind. Trajectories of ions and electrically charged dust grains are simulated by accounting for the Lorentz force and the nucleus gravity.

Tenishev, Valeriy; Rubin, Martin; Combi, Michael R. [University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

The effect of particle shape on pressure drop in a turbulent gas-solid suspension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was to experimentally compare the pressure drop in suspensions of spherical particles versus fibrous particles in the same apparatus and at the same operating conditions. The previous investigators have varied the particle size, loading ratio (lbs. flowing solids... is for a model which will predict the suspension pressure drop based on such variables as particle size and shape, Reynolds number, loading ratio, electrostatic charge, and other variables. CHAPTER II REVIEW OF LITERATURE A. General Interest in Gas-Solid...

Coughran, Mark Thomas

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Broken gauge symmetry in a Bose gas with constant particle number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of broken gauge symmetries in Bose-Einstein condensates is still controversially discussed in science, since it would not conserve the total number of particles. Here, it is shown for the first time that non-random condensate and non-condensate phase distributions may arise from local particle number breaking in a Bose gas with constant particle number, while the global U(1)-gauge symmetry of the system is preserved due to particle number conservation.

Alexej Schelle

2014-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

Secondary dust density waves excited by nonlinear dust acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary dust density waves were observed in conjunction with high amplitude (n{sub d}/n{sub d0}>2) dust acoustic waves (DAW) that were spontaneously excited in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma in the moderately coupled, {Gamma}{approx}1, state. The high amplitude dust acoustic waves produced large dust particle oscillations, displacements, and trapping. Secondary dust density waves were excited in the wave troughs of the high amplitude DAWs. The waveforms, amplitudes, wavelengths, and wave speeds of the primary DAWs and the secondary waves were measured. A dust-dust streaming instability is discussed as a possible mechanism for the production of the secondary waves.

Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Development of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel chemistry model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first portion of this work is a comprehensive analysis of the chemical environment in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO fuel particle. Fission product inventory versus burnup is calculated. Based on those ...

Diecker, Jane T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An integrated performance model for high temperature gas cooled reactor coated particle fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of coated fuel particles is essential for the development and deployment of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) systems for future power generation. Fuel performance modeling is indispensable for understanding ...

Wang, Jing, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Feasibility of an alpha particle gas densimeter for stack sampling applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEASIBILITY OF AN ALPHA PARTICLE GAS DENSIMETER FOR STACK SAMPLING APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RANDALL ~ JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May l983 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering FEASIBILITY OF AN ALPHA PARTICLE GAS DENSIMETER FOR STACK SAMPLING APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RANDALL MARK JO HN SON Approved as to style and content by: Ro ert A. F3e d (Ch irman of Committee...

Johnson, Randall Mark

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Gas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total AN (gas + aerosol) and ANaer show that on average 21% of ANs are in the condensed phaseGas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield A. W. Rollins samples. These measurements show that ANs are a ubiquitous component of the OA with the ­ONO2 subunit

Cohen, Ronald C.

91

Gas-liquid transition in the model of particles interacting at high energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An application of the ideas of the inertial confinement fusion process in the case of particles interacting at high energy is investigated. A possibility of the gas-liquid transition in the gas is considered using different approaches. In particular, a shock wave description of interactions between particles is studied and a self-similar solution of Euler's equation is discussed. Additionally, Boltzmann equation is solved for self-consistent field (Vlasov's equation) in linear approximation for the case of a gas under external pressure and the corresponding change of Knudsen number of the system is calculated.

S. Bondarenko; K. Komoshvili

2012-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

92

TWO INTERSTELLAR DUST CANDIDATES FROM THE STARDUST AEROGEL INTERSTELLAR DUST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TWO INTERSTELLAR DUST CANDIDATES FROM THE STARDUST AEROGEL INTERSTELLAR DUST COLLECTOR A. J, and is expected to have collected several dozen contemporary interstellar dust particles in aerogel and aluminum@home, we have so far identified 28 tracks in the aerogel collectors. We report on the results

Nittler, Larry R.

93

Vertically aligned gas-insulated transmission line having particle traps at the inner conductor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gas insulated electrical apparatus having first and second conductors separated by an insulating support within an insulating gas environment, and particle traps disposed along the surface of the high potential conductor for trapping and inactivating foreign particles which may be present within the insulating gas medium. Several embodiments of the invention were developed which are particularly suited for vertically aligned gas insulated transmission lines. The particle traps are grooves or cavities formed into the walls of the tubular inner conductor, without extending into the hollow portion of the conductor. In other embodiments, the traps are appendages or insert flanges extending from the inner conductor, with the insulator supports contacting the appendages instead of the inner conductor.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Images of Vega Dust Ring at 350 and 450 microns: New Clues to the Trapping of Multiple-Sized Dust Particles in Planetary Resonances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the SHARC II camera at Caltech Submillimeter Observatory to make 350 and 450 micron images of the Vega dust disk at spatial resolutions (FWHM) of 9.7" and 11.1", respectively. The images show a ring-like morphology (radius \\~ 100 AU) with inhomogeneous structure that is qualitatively different from that previously reported at 850 microns and longer wavelengths. We attribute the 350/450 micron emission to a grain population whose characteristic size (~ 1 mm) is intermediate between that of the cm-sized grains responsible for emission longward of 850 microns and the much smaller grains (< 18 microns) in the extensive halo, visible at 70 microns, discussed by Su et al. (2005). We have combined our submillimeter images with Spitzer data at 70 microns to produce 2-d maps of line-of-sight optical depth (relative column density). These "tau maps" suggest that the mm-sized grains are located preferentially in three symmetrically-located concentrations. If so, then this structure could be understood in terms of the Wyatt (2003) model in which planetesimals are trapped in the mean motion resonances of a Neptune-mass planet at 65 AU, provided allowance is made for the spatial distribution of dust grains to differ from that of the parent planetesimals. The peaks of the tau maps are, in fact, located near the expected positions corresponding to the 4:3 resonance. If this identification is confirmed by future observations, it would resolve an ambiguity with regard to the location of the planet.

K. A. Marsh; C. D. Dowell; T. Velusamy; K. Grogan; C. A. Beichman

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antinodes of the acoustic waves are positioned. Finally, we completed the comparative analysis of the theoretical calculations with the experimental results, obtained for the cases of: 1) the experimental aerodynamic modeling of physical processes of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF; and 2) the gamma-activation spectroscopy analysis of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF. We made the innovative propositions on the necessary technical modifications with the purpose to improve the IAF technical characteristics and increase its operational time at the nuclear power plant (NPP), going from the completed precise characterization of the IAF parameters at the long term operation.

Oleg P. Ledenyov; Ivan M. Neklyudov

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Photophoretic contribution to the transport of absorbing particles across combustion gas boundary layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since radiation energy fluxes can be comparable to convective (Fourier) fluxes in large fossil-fuel-fired power stations and furnaces, the authors have examined particle drift (phoresis) induced by nonuniform photon-particle heating in a host gas. The authors analysis of the photophoretic velocity includes the important slipflow regime, and the numerical results show that photophoresis is a significant transport mechanism for micron-sized absorbing particles in high radiative transfer combustion environments, with equivalent photophoretic diffusivities (dimensionless photophoretic velocities) being as large as 10% of the better-known thermophoretic diffusivity (Rosner, 1980, 1985). Since previous experimental results (Rosner and Kim, 1984) demonstrated that thermophoresis causes over a 3-decade increase in particle deposition rates by convective diffusion, clearly, for small, absorbing particles, photophoresis will also be an important contributor to observed deposition rates. Accordingly, they present mass transfer coefficients for particle transport across laminar gaseous boundary layers, including both particle thermophoresis and photophoresis.

Castillo, J.L. (U.N.E.D., Madrid (Spain)); Mackowski, D.W.; Rosner, D.E. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Using DSMC to compute the force on a particle in a rarefied gas flow.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach is presented to compute the force on a spherical particle in a rarefied flow of a monatomic gas. This approach relies on the development of a Green's function that describes the force on a spherical particle in a delta-function molecular velocity distribution function. The gas-surface interaction model in this development allows incomplete accommodation of energy and tangential momentum. The force from an arbitrary molecular velocity distribution is calculated by computing the moment of the force Green's function in the same way that other macroscopic variables are determined. Since the molecular velocity distribution function is directly determined in the DSMC method, the force Green's function approach can be implemented straightforwardly in DSMC codes. A similar approach yields the heat transfer to a spherical particle in a rarefied gas flow. The force Green's function is demonstrated by application to two problems. First, the drag force on a spherical particle at arbitrary temperature and moving at arbitrary velocity through an equilibrium motionless gas is found analytically and numerically. Second, the thermophoretic force on a motionless particle in a motionless gas with a heat flux is found analytically and numerically. Good agreement is observed in both situations.

Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Torczynski, John Robert

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS IN THE DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME (DIGIT) HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM: CONTINUUM SEDs, AND AN INVENTORY OF CHARACTERISTIC FAR-INFRARED LINES FROM PACS SPECTROSCOPY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present 50-210 {mu}m spectral scans of 30 Class 0/I protostellar sources, obtained with Herschel-PACS, and 0.5-1000 {mu}m spectral energy distributions, as part of the Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time Key Program. Some sources exhibit up to 75 H{sub 2}O lines ranging in excitation energy from 100 to 2000 K, 12 transitions of OH, and CO rotational lines ranging from J = 14 {yields} 13 up to J = 40 {yields} 39. [O I] is detected in all but one source in the entire sample; among the sources with detectable [O I] are two very low luminosity objects. The mean 63/145 {mu}m [O I] flux ratio is 17.2 {+-} 9.2. The [O I] 63 {mu}m line correlates with L{sub bol}, but not with the time-averaged outflow rate derived from low-J CO maps. [C II] emission is in general not local to the source. The sample L{sub bol} increased by 1.25 (1.06) and T{sub bol} decreased to 0.96 (0.96) of mean (median) values with the inclusion of the Herschel data. Most CO rotational diagrams are characterized by two optically thin components ( = (0.70 {+-} 1.12) x 10{sup 49} total particles). N{sub CO} correlates strongly with L{sub bol}, but neither T{sub rot} nor N{sub CO}(warm)/N{sub CO}(hot) correlates with L{sub bol}, suggesting that the total excited gas is related to the current source luminosity, but that the excitation is primarily determined by the physics of the interaction (e.g., UV-heating/shocks). Rotational temperatures for H{sub 2}O ( = 194 +/- 85 K) and OH ( = 183 +/- 117 K) are generally lower than for CO, and much of the scatter in the observations about the best fit is attributed to differences in excitation conditions and optical depths among the detected lines.

Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II; Rascati, Michelle R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Jorgensen, Jes K.; Dionatos, Odysseas; Lindberg, Johan E. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Kristensen, Lars E.; Yildiz, Umut A.; Van Kempen, Tim A. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Salyk, Colette [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Meeus, Gwendolyn [Dpt. Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Bouwman, Jeroen [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Karska, Agata; Fedele, Davide [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Dunham, Michael M., E-mail: joel@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Collaboration: DIGIT Team1

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Investigation of Gas Solid Fluidized Bed Dynamics with Non-Spherical Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the largest challenges for 21st century is to fulfill global energy demand while also reducing detrimental impacts of energy generation and use on the environment. Gasification is a promising technology to meet the requirement of reduced emissions without compromising performance. Coal gasification is not an incinerating process; rather than burning coal completely a partial combustion takes place in the presence of steam and limited amounts of oxygen. In this controlled environment, a chemical reaction takes place to produce a mixture of clean synthetic gas. Gas-solid fluidized bed is one such type of gasification technology. During gasification, the mixing behavior of solid (coal) and gas and their flow patterns can be very complicated to understand. Many attempts have taken place in laboratory scale to understand bed hydrodynamics with spherical particles though in actual applications with coal, the particles are non-spherical. This issue drove the documented attempt presented here to investigate fluidized bed behavior using different ranges of non-spherical particles, as well as spherical. For this investigation, various parameters are controlled that included particle size, bed height, bed diameter and particle shape. Particles ranged from 355 µm to 1180 µm, bed diameter varied from 2 cm to 7 cm, two fluidized beds with diameters of 3.4 cm and 12.4 cm, for the spherical and non-spherical shaped particles that were taken into consideration. Pressure drop was measured with increasing superficial gas velocity. The velocity required in order to start to fluidize the particle is called the minimum fluidization velocity, which is one of the most important parameters to design and optimize within a gas-solid fluidized bed. This minimum fluidization velocity was monitored during investigation while observing variables factors and their effect on this velocity. From our investigation, it has been found that minimum fluidization velocity is independent of bed height for both spherical and non-spherical particles. Further, it decrease with decreasing particle size and decreases with decreasing bed diameter. Shadow sizing, a non-intrusive imaging and diagnostic technology, was also used to visualize flow fields inside fluidized beds for both spherical and non- spherical particles and to detect the particle sizes.

Choudhuri, Ahsan

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hybrid Particle-Continuum Methods for Nonequilibrium Gas and Plasma Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two different hybrid particle-continuum methods are described for simulation of nonequilibrium gas and plasma dynamics. The first technique, used for nonequilibrium hypersonic gas flows, uses either a continuum description or a particle method throughout a flow domain based on local conditions. This technique is successful in reproducing the results of full particle simulations at a small fraction of the cost. The second method uses a continuum model of the electrons combined with a particle description of the ions and atoms for simulating plasma jets. The physical accuracy of the method is assessed through comparisons with plasma plume measurements obtained in space. These examples illustrate that the complex physical phenomena associated with nonequilibrium conditions can be simulated with physical accuracy and numerical efficiency using such hybrid approaches.

Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

Single-particle spectral density of a Bose gas in the two-fluid hydrodynamic regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Bose superfluids, the single-particle Green's function can be directly related to the superfluid velocity-velocity correlation function in the hydrodynamic regime. An explicit expression for the single-particle spectral density was originally written down by Hohenberg and Martin in 1965, starting from the two-fluid equations for a superfluid. We give a simple derivation of their results. Using these results, we calculate the relative weights of first and second sound modes in the single-particle spectral density as a function of temperature in a uniform Bose gas. We show that the second sound mode makes a dominant contribution to the single-particle spectrum in a relatively high-temperature region. We also discuss the possibility of experimental observation of the second sound mode in a Bose gas by photoemission spectroscopy.

Arahata, Emiko; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Griffin, Allan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A7 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Particle trap with dielectric barrier for use in gas insulated transmission lines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping electrode is disposed within the outer sheath, and the electrode has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the apertured electrode.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Particle trap with dielectric barrier for use in gas insulated transmission lines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping electrode is disposed within the outer sheath, and the electrode has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the apertured electrode. 7 figs.

Dale, S.J.

1982-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cocurrent gas - liquid flow at high rates in small particle beds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas liquid cocurrent flow at high pressure drop often occurs near the well bore and in grabel filled perforations during production of oil and geothermal energy. Available studies have, however, emphasized large particles and low pressure drops. Here, results for air-water flows to high fluxes in beds of small glass spheres and in 0.44 mm sand, show the influence of particle size, and flow composition and rate, on pressure drop enhancement and flow regime extent.

Wilemon, M.; Torrest, R.S. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma T. M. Flanagan and J. Goree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma T. M. Flanagan and J. Goree Department of Physics 2009 Thermal creep flow TCF is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result

Goree, John

107

Two-dimensional imaging of gas-to-particle transition in flames by laser-induced nanoplasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional imaging of gas/particle phase transition of metal oxides in their native high-temperature flow conditions, using laser-driven localized nanoplasmas, was obtained by utilizing the gap between the excitation energies of the gas and particle phases such that only the Ti atoms in the particle phase were selectively excited without detectable Bremsstrahlung background. These in situ images of the particle phase Ti distribution allow the quantitative visualization of the transition of the gas precursors to the nanoparticle phase across the flame sheet as well as diffusion of the particle concentration in the post-flame zone.

Zhang, Yiyang [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Shuiqing, E-mail: lishuiqing@tsinghua.edu.cn; Ren, Yihua; Yao, Qiang [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Law, Chung K. [Center for Combustion Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-5263 (United States)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

A theoretical study on gas-phase coating of aerosol particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ coating of aerosol particles by gas-phase and surface reaction in a flow reactor is modeled accounting for scavenging (capture of small particles by large particles) and simultaneous surface reaction along with the finite sintering rate of the scavenged particles. A log-normal size distribution is assumed for the host and coating particles to describe coagulation and a monodisperse size distribution is used for the coating particles to describe sintering. As an example, coating of titania particles with silica in a continuous flow hot-wall reactor was modeled. High temperatures, low reactant concentrations, and large host particle surface areas favored smoother coatings in the parameter range: temperature 1,700--1,800 K, host particle number concentration 1 {times} 10{sup 5}--1 {times} 10{sup 7} No./cm{sup 3}, average host particle size 1 {micro}m, inlet coating reactant concentration (SiCl{sub 4}) 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}--2 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} mol/cm{sup 3}, and various surface reaction rates. The fraction of silica deposited on the TiO{sub 2} particles decreased by more than seven times with a hundredfold increase in SiCl{sub 4} inlet concentration because of the resulted increase in the average SiO{sub 2} particle size under the assumed coating conditions. Increasing the TiO{sub 2} particle number concentration resulted in higher scavenging efficiency of SiO{sub 2}. In the TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} system it is likely that surface reaction as well as scavenging play important roles in the coating process. The results agree qualitatively with experimental observations of TiO{sub 2} particles coated in situ with silica.

Jain, S.; Fotou, G.P.; Kodas, T.T. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, MN (United States)] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, MN (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer (''blanket'') on the uranium metal corrosion rates were also evaluated.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Development and initial evaluation of a dynamic species-resolved model for gas phase chemistry and size-resolved gas//particle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condensed products of gas phase oxidation, the present model can be viewed as the most detailed SOA of the semivolatile or nonvolatile products of VOC oxidation between the gas and particle phases. Chem- ical analysis of the SOA identifies many products that condense, thereby allowing formulation of gas phase path- ways

Dabdub, Donald

111

Observation of the spatial growth of self-excited dust-density waves T. M. Flanagan and J. Goree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA Received 12 October rate increases as gas pressure decreases. At a critical gas pressure, which is observed, a balance are comparatively much longer and easily observed. If a dust particle's Coulomb potential energy is larger than its

Goree, John

112

Dust Filtration by Planet-Induced Gap Edges: Implications for Transitional Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By carrying out two-dimensional two-fluid global simulations, we have studied the response of dust to gap formation by a single planet in the gaseous component of a protoplanetary disk - the so-called "dust filtration" mechanism. We have found that a gap opened by a giant planet at 20 AU in a \\alpha=0.01, \\dot{M}=10^{-8} Msun/yr disk can effectively stop dust particles larger than 0.1 mm drifting inwards, leaving a sub-millimeter dust cavity/hole. However, smaller particles are difficult to filter by a planet-induced gap due to 1) dust diffusion, and 2) a high gas accretion velocity at the gap edge. An analytic model is also derived to understand what size particles can be filtered by the gap edge. Finally, with our updated understanding of dust filtration, we have computed Monte-Carlo radiative transfer models with variable dust size distributions to generate the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of disks with gaps. By comparing with transitional disk observations (e.g. GM Aur), we have found that dust fi...

Zhu, Zhaohuan; Dong, Ruobing; Espaillat, Catherine; Hartmann, Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine Dr. Fletcher Miller SDSU Department of Mechanical Engineering Abstract Solar thermal power for electricity for the California desert and in other appro- priate regions worldwide. Current technology relies on steam Rankine

Ponce, V. Miguel

114

Experimental and theoretical studies of particle generation afterlaser ablation of copper with background gas at atmosphericpressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser ablation has proven to be an effective method for generating nanoparticles; particles are produced in the laser induced vapor plume during the cooling stage. To understand the in-situ condensation process, a series of time resolved light scattering images were recorded and analyzed. Significant changes in the condensation rate and the shape of the condensed aerosol plume were observed in two background gases, helium and argon. The primary particle shape and size distribution were measured using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a differential mobility analyzer (DMA). The gas dynamics simulation included nucleation and coagulation within the vapor plume, heat and mass transfer from the vapor plume to the background gas, and heat transfer to the sample. The experimental data and the calculated evolution of the shape of the vapor plume showed the same trend for the spatial distribution of the condensed particles in both background gases. The simulated particle size distribution also qualitatively agreed with the experimental data. It was determined that the laser energy, the physical properties of the background gas (conductivity, diffusivity and viscosity), and the shape of the ablation system (ablation chamber and the layout of the sample) have strong effects on the condensation process and the subsequent sizes, shapes and degree of aggregation of the particles.

Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Closures for Course-Grid Simulation of Fluidized Gas-Particle Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas-particle flows in fluidized beds and riser reactors are inherently unstable, and they manifest fluctuations over a wide range of length and time scales. Two-fluid models for such flows reveal unstable modes whose length scale is as small as ten particle diameters. Yet, because of limited computational resources, gas-particle flows in large fluidized beds are invariably simulated by solving discretized versions of the two-fluid model equations over a coarse spatial grid. Such coarse-grid simulations do not resolve the small-scale spatial structures which are known to affect the macroscale flow structures both qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus there is a need to develop filtered two-fluid models which are suitable for coarse-grid simulations and capturing the effect of the small-scale structures through closures in terms of the filtered variables. The overall objective of the project is to develop validated closures for filtered two-fluid models for gas-particle flows, with the transport gasifier as a primary, motivating example. In this project, highly resolved three-dimensional simulations of a kinetic theory based two-fluid model for gas-particle flows have been performed and the statistical information on structures in the 100-1000 particle diameters length scale has been extracted. Based on these results, closures for filtered two-fluid models have been constructed. The filtered model equations and closures have been validated against experimental data and the results obtained in highly resolved simulations of gas-particle flows. The proposed project enables more accurate simulations of not only the transport gasifier, but also many other non-reacting and reacting gas-particle flows in a variety of chemical reactors. The results of this study are in the form of closures which can readily be incorporated into existing multi-phase flow codes such as MFIX (www.mfix.org). Therefore, the benefits of this study can be realized quickly. The training provided by this project has prepared a PhD student to enter research and development careers in DOE laboratories or chemicals/energy-related industries.

Sankaran Sundaresan

2010-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

White noise approach to the low density limit of a quantum particle in a gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The white noise approach to the investigation of the dynamics of a quantum particle interacting with a dilute and in general non-equilibrium gaseous environment in the low density limit is outlined. The low density limit is the kinetic Markovian regime when only pair collisions (i.e., collisions of the test particle with one particle of the gas at one time moment) contribute to the dynamics. In the white noise approach one first proves that the appropriate operators describing the gas converge in the sense of appropriate matrix elements to certain operators of quantum white noise. Then these white noise operators are used to derive quantum white noise and quantum stochastic equations describing the approximate dynamics of the total system consisting of the particle and the gas. The derivation is given ab initio, starting from the exact microscopic quantum dynamics. The limiting dynamics is described by a quantum stochastic equation driven by a quantum Poisson process. This equation then applied to the derivation of quantum Langevin equation and linear Boltzmann equation for the reduced density matrix of the test particle. The first part of the paper describes the approach which was developed by L. Accardi, I.V. Volovich and the author and uses the Fock-antiFock (or GNS) representation for the CCR algebra of the gas. The second part presents the approach to the derivation of the limiting equations directly in terms of the correlation functions, without use of the Fock-antiFock representation. This approach simplifies the derivation and allows to express the strength of the quantum number process directly in terms of the one-particle $S$-matrix.

Alexander Pechen

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

Constraining the structure of the transition disk HD 135344B (SAO 206462) by simultaneous modeling of multi-wavelength gas and dust observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HD 135344B is an accreting (pre-) transition disk which displays emission of warm CO extending tens of AU inside its 30 AU dust cavity. We employ the dust radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk structure from the simultaneous modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED), VLT/CRIRES CO P(10) 4.75 micron, Herschel/PACS [O I] 63 micron, Spitzer-IRS, and JCMT 12CO J=3-2 spectra, VLTI/PIONIER H-band visibilities, and constraints from (sub-)mm continuum interferometry and near-IR imaging. We found a disk model able to describe simultaneously the current observations. This disk has the following structure: (1) to reproduce the SED, the near-IR interferometry data, and the CO ro-vibrational emission, refractory grains (we suggest carbon) are present inside the silicate sublimation radius (0.08 100 to account for the 870 micron continuum upper limit and the CO P(10) line flux; (5) the gas/dust ratio at 30

Carmona, A; Thi, W F; Benisty, M; Ménard, F; Grady, C; Kamp, I; Woitke, P; Olofsson, J; Roberge, A; Brittain, S; Dûchene, G; Meeus, G; Martin-Zaïdi, C; Dent, B; Bouquin, J B Le; Berger, J P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Gas accumulation in particle-rich suspensions and implications for bubble populations in crystal-rich magma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas accumulation in particle-rich suspensions and implications for bubble populations in crystal Stromboli degassing Gas mobility plays an important role in driving volcanic eruptions and controlling eruption style. The explosivity of an eruption depends, among other factors, on how easily gas can escape

Rempel, Alan W.

120

The Transformation of Solid Atmospheric Particles into Liquid Droplets Through Heterogeneous Chemistry: Laboratory Insights into the Processing of Calcium Containing Mineral Dust Aerosol in the Troposphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

[1] Individual calcium carbonate particles reacted with gas- phase nitric acid at 293 K have been followed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) analysis as a function of time and relative humidity (RH). The rate of calcium carbonate to calcium nitrate conversion is significantly enhanced in the presence of water vapor. The SEM images clearly show that solid CaCO3 particles are converted to spherical droplets as the reaction proceeds. The process occurs through a two-step mechanism involving the conversion of calcium carbonate into calcium nitrate followed by the deliquescence of the calcium nitrate product. The change in phase of the particles and the significant reactivity of nitric acid and CaCO3 at low RH are a direct result of the deliquescence of the product at low RH. This is the first laboratory study to show the phase transformation of solid particles into liquid droplets through heterogeneous chemistry.

Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Laskin, Alexander; Cowin, James P.

2003-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

Durham, M.D.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

Characterization of Solidified Gas Thin Film Targets via Alpha Particle Energy Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is reported for measuring the thickness and uniformity of thin films of solidified gas targets. The energy of alpha particles traversing the film is measured and the energy loss is converted to thickness using the stopping power. The uniformity is determined by measuring the thickness at different positions with an array of sources. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to study the film deposition mechanism. Thickness calibrations for a TRIUMF solid hydrogen target system are presented.

MUH collaboration; M. C. Fujiwara; G. A. Beer; J. L. Beveridge; J. L. Douglas; T. M. Huber; R. Jacot-Guillarmod; S. K. Kim; P. E. Knowles; A. R. Kunselman; M. Maier; G. M. Marshall; G. R. Mason; F. Mulhauser; A. Olin; C. Petitjean; T. A. Porcelli; J. Zmeskal

1996-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

Iron Speciation in Urban Dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved understanding of anthropogenic impacts on ocean fertility requires knowledge of anthropogenic dust mineralogy and associated Fe speciation as a critical step toward developing Fe solubility models constrained by mineralogical composition. This study explored the utility of micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy ({mu}-XAS) in characterizing the speciation of Fe in urban dust samples. A micro-focused beam of 10 x 7 {micro}m made possible the measurement of the Fe K edge XAS spectra of individual dust particles in the PM5.6 size fraction collected in Newark, New Jersey, USA. Spectral analysis indicated the presence of mixtures of Fe-containing minerals within individual dust particles; we observed significant magnetite content along with other Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide minerals which could not be conclusively identified. Our data indicate that detailed quantitative determination of Fe speciation requires extended energy scans to constrain the types and relative abundance of Fe species present. We observe heterogeneity in Fe speciation at the dust particle level, which underscores the importance of analyzing a statistically adequate number of particles within each dust sample. Where possible, {mu}-XAS measurements should be complemented with additional characterization techniques such as {mu}-XRD and bulk XAS to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Fe speciation in dust materials. X-ray microprobes should be used to complement bulk methods used to determine particle composition, methods that fail to record particle heterogeneity.

E Elzinga; Y Gao; J Fitts; R Tappero

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Herschel Key Program, "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT): the origin of molecular and atomic emission in low-mass protostars in Taurus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Six low-mass embedded sources (L1489, L1551-IRS5, TMR1, TMC1-A, L1527, and TMC1) in Taurus have been observed with Herschel-PACS to cover the full spectrum from 50 to 210 $\\mu$m as part of the Herschel key program, "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time (DIGIT)". The relatively low intensity of the interstellar radiation field surrounding Taurus minimizes contamination of the [C II] emission associated with the sources by diffuse emission from the cloud surface, allowing study of the [C II] emission from the source. In several sources, the [C II] emission is distributed along the outflow, as is the [O I] emission. The atomic line luminosities correlate well with each other, as do the molecular lines, but the atomic and molecular lines correlate poorly. The relative contribution of CO to the total gas cooling is constant at $\\sim$30 %, while the cooling fraction by H$_2$O varies from source to source, suggesting different shock properties resulting in different photodissociation levels of H$_2$O. The gas with a power-law...

Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Seokho; Evans, Neal J; Green, Joel D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Hybrid particle traps and conditioning procedure for gas insulated transmission lines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner condor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping ring is disposed within the outer sheath, and the trapping ring has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the trapping ring along an arc. A support sheet having an adhesive coating thereon is secured to the trapping ring and disposed on the outer sheath within the low field region formed between the trapping ring and the outer sheath. A conditioning method used to condition the transmission line prior to activation in service comprises applying an AC voltage to the inner conductor in a plurality of voltage-time steps, with the voltage-time steps increasing in voltage magnitude while decreasing in time duration.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Churchill, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

On the Virial Series for a Gas of Particles with Uniformly Repulsive Pairwise Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pressure of a gas of particles with a uniformly repulsive pair interaction in a finite container is shown to satisfy (exactly as a formal object) a "viscous" Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equation whose solution in power series is recursively given by the variation of constants formula. We investigate the solution of the H-J and of its Legendre transform equation by the Cauchy-Majorant method and provide a lower bound to the radius of convergence on the virial series of the gas which goes beyond the threshold established by Lagrange's inversion formula. A comparison between the behavior of the Mayer and virial coefficients for different regimes of repulsion intensity is also provided.

David Brydges; Domingos H. U. Marchetti

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Molecular Hydrogen Emission from Protoplanetary Disks II. Effects of X-ray Irradiation and Dust Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed models for the density and temperature profiles of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks are constructed by taking into account X-ray and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from a central T Tauri star, as well as dust size growth and settling toward the disk midplane. The spatial and size distributions of dust grains in the disks are numerically computed by solving the coagulation equation for settling dust particles. The level populations and line emission of molecular hydrogen are calculated using the derived physical structure of the disks. X-ray irradiation is the dominant heating source of the gas in the inner disk region and in the surface layer, while the far UV heating dominates otherwise. If the central star has strong X-ray and weak UV radiation, the H2 level populations are controlled by X-ray pumping, and the X-ray induced transition lines could be observable. If the UV irradiation is strong, the level populations are controlled by thermal collisions or UV pumping, depending on the properties of the dust grains in the disks. As the dust particles evolve in the disks, the gas temperature at the disk surface drops because the grain photoelectric heating becomes less efficient, while the UV radiation fields become stronger due to the decrease of grain opacity. This makes the H2 level populations change from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to non-LTE distributions, which results in changes to the line ratios of H2 emission. Our results suggest that dust evolution in protoplanetary disks could be observable through the H2 line ratios. The emission lines are strong from disks irradiated by strong UV and X-rays and possessing small dust grains; such disks will be good targets in which to observe H2 emission.

H. Nomura; Y. Aikawa; M. Tsujimoto; Y. Nakagawa; T. J. Millar

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Gas Absorption in the KH 15D System: Further Evidence for Dust Settling in the Circumbinary Disk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Na I D lines in the spectrum of the young binary KH 15D have been analyzed in detail. We find an excess absorption component that may be attributed to foreground interstellar absorption, and to gas possibly associated with ...

Lawler, S. M.

131

A Comprehensive Parameterization of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation of Dust Surrogate: Laboratory Study with Hematite Particles and Its Application to Atmospheric Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization that covers a wide temperature range (-36 ?C to -78 ?C) is presented. Developing and testing such an ice nucleation parameterization, which is constrained through identical experimental conditions, is critical in order to accurately simulate the ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. The surface-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of hematite particles, inferred by ns, were derived from AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber measurements under water subsaturated conditions that were realized by continuously changing temperature (T) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) in the chamber. Our measurements showed several different pathways to nucleate ice depending on T and RHice conditions. For instance, almost independent freezing was observed at -60 ?C < T < -50 ?C, where RHice explicitly controlled ice nucleation efficiency, while both T and RHice played roles in other two T regimes: -78 ?C < T < -60 ?C and -50 ?C < T < -36 ?C. More specifically, observations at T colder than -60 ?C revealed that higher RHice was necessary to maintain constant ns, whereas T may have played a significant role in ice nucleation at T warmer than -50 ?C. We implemented new ns parameterizations into two cloud models to investigate its sensitivity and compare with the existing ice nucleation schemes towards simulating cirrus cloud properties. Our results show that the new AIDA-based parameterizations lead to an order of magnitude higher ice crystal concentrations and inhibition of homogeneous nucleation in colder temperature regions. Our cloud simulation results suggest that atmospheric dust particles that form ice nuclei at lower temperatures, below -36 ?C, can potentially have stronger influence on cloud properties such as cloud longevity and initiation when compared to previous parameterizations.

Hiranuma, Naruki; Paukert, Marco; Steinke, Isabelle; Zhang, Kai; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hoose, Corinna; Schnaiter, Martin; Saathoff, Harald; Mohler, Ottmar

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Dust-Plasma Sheath in an Oblique Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using numerical simulations of the multi fluid equations the structure of the magnetized sheath near a plasma boundary is studied in the presence of charged dust particles. The dependence of the electron, ion, and dust densities as well as the electrostatic potential, dust charge, and ion normal velocity, on the magnetic field strength and the edge dust number density is investigated.

Foroutan, G.; Mehdipour, H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

133

Simulation of dust streaming in toroidal traps: Stationary flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular-dynamic simulations were performed to study dust motion in a toroidal trap under the influence of the ion drag force driven by a Hall motion of the ions in E x B direction, gravity, inter-particle forces, and friction with the neutral gas. This article is focused on the inhomogeneous stationary streaming motion. Depending on the strength of friction, the spontaneous formation of a stationary shock or a spatial bifurcation into a fast flow and a slow vortex flow is observed. In the quiescent streaming region, the particle flow features a shell structure which undergoes a structural phase transition along the flow direction.

Reichstein, Torben; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

COARSE-GRID SIMULATION OF REACTING AND NON-REACTING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal goal of this project, funded under the ''DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative'' is virtual demonstration of circulating fluidized bed performance. We had proposed a ''virtual demonstration tool'', which is based on the open-domain CFD code MFIX. The principal challenge funded through this grant is to devise and implement in this CFD code sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures. Within the past year, which was the third year of the project, we have made the following specific advances. (a) We have completed a study of the impact of sub-grid models of different levels of detail on the results obtained in coarse-grid simulations of gas-particle flow. (b) We have also completed a study of a model problem to understand the effect of wall friction, which was proved in our earlier work to be very important for stable operation of standpipes in a circulating fluidized bed circuit. These are described in a greater detail in this report.

Sankaran Sundaresan

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Iron speciation in urban dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved understanding of anthropogenic impacts on ocean fertility requires knowledge of anthropogenic dust mineralogy and associated Fe speciation as a critical step toward developing Fe solubility models constrained by mineralogical composition. This study explored the utility of micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy ({mu}-XAS) in characterizing the speciation of Fe in urban dust samples. A micro-focused beam of 10 x 7 {mu}m made possible the measurement of the Fe K edge XAS spectra of individual dust particles in the PM5.6 size fraction collected in Newark, New Jersey, USA. Spectral analysis indicated the presence of mixtures of Fe-containing minerals within individual dust particles; we observed significant magnetite content along with other Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide minerals which could not be conclusively identified. Our data indicate that detailed quantitative determination of Fe speciation requires extended energy scans to constrain the types and relative abundance of Fe species present. We observe heterogeneity in Fe speciation at the dust particle level, which underscores the importance of analyzing a statistically adequate number of particles within each dust sample. Where possible, {mu}-XAS measurements should be complemented with additional characterization techniques such as {mu}-XRD and bulk XAS to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Fe speciation in dust materials. X-ray microprobes should be used to complement bulk methods used to determine particle composition, methods that fail to record particle heterogeneity. Keywords - Urban dust; Iron; Speciation; Micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

Elzinga, E.J.; Fitts, J.; Gao, Y.; Tappero, R.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for powering a gas turbine or to supply industrial processin conjunetion with a gas turbine system providing severalincluding heating a gas to operate a turbine (4), providing

Hunt, Arlon J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols, Natural Cirrus Clouds and Contrails: Broadband Optical Properties and Sensitivity Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation aims to study the broadband optical properties and radiative effects of dust aerosols and ice clouds. It covers three main topics: the uncertainty of dust optical properties and radiative effects from the dust particle shape...

Yi, Bingqi

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

138

Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A. [GREMI - Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Wet electroscrubbers for state of the art gas cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrostatic scrubber (electroscrubber) discussed combines advantages of electrostatic precipitators and inertial wet scrubbers, and removes many shortcomings inherent to both of these systems operating independently. The electroscrubber is a device in which Coulomb attraction or repulsion forces between electrically charged scrubbing droplets (collector) and dust particles are utilized for the removal of particles from a gas. Unlike wet electrostatic precipitators in which particles are precipitated only on the collection electrode, in electroscrubbers, the collection of dust particles takes place in the entire precipitator chamber. Compared to inertial scrubbers, the electroscrubbers can operate at lower droplet velocities, but the collection efficiency for a single droplet can be larger than 1. The paper reviews the state-of-the-art of wet electrostatic scrubbing (electroscrubbing) technique used for gas cleaning from dust or smoke particles. Three groups of problems are discussed: (1) The fundamental problems concerning the charged dust particle deposition on a charged collector, usually a drop, with a focus on different models describing the process. (2) The experimental works of fundamental importance referring to the scrubbing process, which can be used for validating the theory. (3) The laboratory demonstrations and industrial tests of different constructions of electroscrubbers designed for effective gas cleaning. It was shown in the paper that a higher collection efficiency of an electroscrubber could be obtained for higher values of Coulomb number and for a Stokes number lower than 5. 103 refs., 4 figs.

Anatol Jaworek; Wamadeva Balachandran; Andrzej Krupa; Janusz Kulon; Marcin Lackowski [Polish Academy of Sciences, Gdansk (Poland). Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

THE CO-TO-H{sub 2} CONVERSION FACTOR AND DUST-TO-GAS RATIO ON KILOPARSEC SCALES IN NEARBY GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present ?kiloparsec spatial resolution maps of the CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor (?{sub CO}) and dust-to-gas ratio (DGR) in 26 nearby, star-forming galaxies. We have simultaneously solved for ?{sub CO} and the DGR by assuming that the DGR is approximately constant on kiloparsec scales. With this assumption, we can combine maps of dust mass surface density, CO-integrated intensity, and H I column density to solve for both ?{sub CO} and the DGR with no assumptions about their value or dependence on metallicity or other parameters. Such a study has just become possible with the availability of high-resolution far-IR maps from the Herschel key program KINGFISH, {sup 12}CO J = (2-1) maps from the IRAM 30 m large program HERACLES, and H I 21 cm line maps from THINGS. We use a fixed ratio between the (2-1) and (1-0) lines to present our ?{sub CO} results on the more typically used {sup 12}CO J = (1-0) scale and show using literature measurements that variations in the line ratio do not affect our results. In total, we derive 782 individual solutions for ?{sub CO} and the DGR. On average, ?{sub CO} = 3.1 M{sub ?} pc{sup –2} (K km s{sup –1}){sup –1} for our sample with a standard deviation of 0.3 dex. Within galaxies, we observe a generally flat profile of ?{sub CO} as a function of galactocentric radius. However, most galaxies exhibit a lower ?{sub CO} value in the central kiloparsec—a factor of ?2 below the galaxy mean, on average. In some cases, the central ?{sub CO} value can be factors of 5-10 below the standard Milky Way (MW) value of ?{sub CO,{sub MW}} = 4.4 M{sub ?} pc{sup –2} (K km s{sup –1}){sup –1}. While for ?{sub CO} we find only weak correlations with metallicity, the DGR is well-correlated with metallicity, with an approximately linear slope. Finally, we present several recommendations for choosing an appropriate ?{sub CO} for studies of nearby galaxies.

Sandstrom, K. M.; Walter, F. [Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Bolatto, A. D.; Wolfire, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Croxall, K. V.; Crocker, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mail Drop 111, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Wilson, C. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C.; Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Donovan Meyer, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Usero, A. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Bigiel, F. [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Brinks, E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Dale, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Engelbracht, C. W., E-mail: sandstrom@mpia.de [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Astrophysics of Dust in Cold Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nine lectures reviewing the astrophysics of dust in interstellar clouds. Topics include: (1) Summary of observational evidence concerning interstellar dust: broadband extinction, scattering of starlight, polarization of starlight, spectroscopy of dust, IR and FIR emission, and depletions of grain-forming elements. (2) Optics of interstellar dust grains: dielectric functions of nonconducting and conducting materials, calculational techniques, formulae valid in the Rayleigh limit, Kramers-Kronig relations, microwave emission mechanisms, and X-ray scattering. (3) IR and FIR emission: heating of interstellar dust, including single-photon heating, and resulting IR emission spectrum. (4) Charging of dust grains: collisional charging, photoelectric emission, and resulting charge distribution functions. (5) Dynamics: gas drag, Lorentz force, forces due to anisotropic radiation, and resulting drift velocities. (6) Rotational dynamics: brownian rotation, suprathermal rotation, and effects of starlight torques. (7) Alignment of interstellar dust: observations and theories. (8) Evolution of the grain population: dust formation in outflows, grain growth in the ISM, photodesorption, and grain destruction in shock waves. (9) Effects of dust grains: photoelectric heating, H2 formation, ion recombination, coupling of gas to magnetic fields, and dust grains as indicators of magnetic field direction.

B. T. Draine

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Circumstellar Dust Shells Detlef Schonberner, Matthias Steffen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Circumstellar Dust Shells Detlef Sch¨onberner, Matthias Steffen This research project is concerned spectra and intensity maps computed from the resulting time­dependent wind models can be compared directly as spherical grains of amor­ phous carbon with a radius of 0.05 ¯m, the adopted dust­ to­gas ratio being 1

143

aeolian dust experiment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

core relative to ambient, facilitating dust lifting by reducing the threshold wind speed for particle elevation. Finally, radial velocity profiles constructed from our...

144

anhydrous interplanetary dust: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. A. M. McDonnell; Kalle Bunte; Hakan Svedhem; Gerhard Drolshagen 2006-09-13 3 Fractal Signatures in Analogs of Interplanetary Dust Particles CERN Preprints Summary:...

145

Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at various planes. Together, these two techniques can provide the needed local solids flow dynamic information for the same setup under identical operating conditions, and the data obtained can be used as a benchmark for development, and refinement of the appropriate riser models. For the above reasons these two techniques were implemented in this study on a fully developed section of the riser. To derive the global mixing information in the riser, accurate solids RTD is needed and was obtained by monitoring the entry and exit of a single radioactive tracer. Other global parameters such as Cycle Time Distribution (CTD), overall solids holdup in the riser, solids recycle percentage at the bottom section of the riser were evaluated from different solids travel time distributions. Besides, to measure accurately and in-situ the overall solids mass flux, a novel method was applied.

Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

2005-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

Gas-solid carbonation of Ca(OH)2 and CaO particles under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions by using a thermogravimetric analyzer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gas-solid carbonation of Ca(OH)2 and CaO particles under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions Gas Control 11, 3 (2012) 172-180" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijggc.2012.08.009 #12;2 Abstract The gas, quantify the gas-solid carbonation extent and the carbonation kinetics of Ca(OH)2 and CaO; and secondly

Boyer, Edmond

147

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for the dust removed from fresh DWPF Frit 418 while it was being shaken in a small scale LabRAM test was measured. The median size on a volume basis was 7.6 ?m and 90% of the frit particles were between 1.6 and 28 ?m. The mass of dust collected using this test protocol was much less than 1% of the original frit. 4. Can the dust be removed in a small number of processing steps and without the larger frit particles continuing to spall additional dust sized particles? a. Test results using a LabRAM were inconclusive. The LaRAM performs less efficient particle size separation than the equipment used by Bekeson and Multi-Aspirator. 5. What particle size of frit is expected to create a dust problem? a. The original criterion for creating a dusting problem was those particle sizes that were readily suspended when being shaken. For that criterion calculations and Microtrac size analyses indicated that particles smaller than 37 ?m are likely dust generators. Subsequently a more sophisticated criterion for dust problem was considered, particle sizes that would become suspended in the air flow patterns inside the SME and possibly plug the condenser. That size may be larger than 37 ?m but has not yet been determined. 6. If particles smaller than 37 ?m are removed will bulk dust generation be eliminated? a. Video-taped tests were performed using three gallons each of three types of frit 418, DWPF frit, Bekeson frit and Multi-Aspirator frit. Frit was poured through air from a height of approximately eight feet into a container half filled with water. Pouring Bekeson frit or Multi-Aspirator frit generated markedly less visible dust, but there was still a significant amount, which still has the potential of causing a dust problem. 7. Can completely dry frit be poured into the SME without having dust plug the condenser at the top of the vessel? a. Because of the complexity of air currents inside the SME and the difficulty of defensible size scaling a more prototypical test will be required to answer this question. We recommend construction of a full scale

Steimke, J. L.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

149

Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Panoramic Camera (Pancam) Twilight Image Analysis for Determination of Planetary Boundary Layer and Dust Particle Size Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to take surface-based measurements to offer support for dust and boundary layer measurements made from remote sensors (Lemmon et al., 2004a). Mars has different atmospheric characteristics from those on Earth. For example, the solar constant for Mars... is approximately 44% of the value for Earth (varying by approximately 20%), and the temperature ranges on Mars (- 125?C to +25?C) slightly ____________ This thesis follows the style of the Journal of Geophysical Research. 2 overlap those on Earth (- 80?C...

Grounds, Stephanie Beth

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Dust filtration at gap edges: Implications for the spectral energy distributions of discs with embedded planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of some T Tauri stars display a deficit of near-IR flux that could be a consequence of an embedded Jupiter-mass planet partially clearing an inner hole in the circumstellar disc. Here, we use two-dimensional numerical simulations of the planet-disc interaction, in concert with simple models for the dust dynamics, to quantify how a planet influences the dust at different radii within the disc. We show that pressure gradients at the outer edge of the gap cleared by the planet act as a filter - letting particles smaller than a critical size through to the inner disc while holding back larger particles in the outer disc. The critical particle size depends upon the disc properties, but is typically of the order of 10 microns. This filtration process will lead to discontinuous grain populations across the planet's orbital radius, with small grains in the inner disc and an outer population of larger grains. We show that this type of dust population is qualitatively consistent with SED modelling of systems that have optically thin inner holes in their circumstellar discs. This process can also produce a very large gas-to-dust ratio in the inner disc, potentially explaining those systems with optically thin inner cavities that still have relatively high accretion rates.

W. K. M. Rice; Philip J. Armitage; Kenneth Wood; Giuseppe Lodato

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of submicron particle size classification and collection techniques for nuclear facility off-gas streams. [Diffusion battery and electrofluidized bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are an essential part of nuclear facility off-gas cleanup systems. However, HEPA-rated sampling filters are not the most appropriate samplers for the particle penetrating off-gas cleanup systems. Previous work at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) estimated perhaps 5% of the radioactivity that challenged sampling filters penetrated them in the form of submicron particles - typically less than 0.2 microns. Accordingly, to evaluate these penetrating aerosols more fully, a suitable robust monitoring system for size differentiation and measurement of submicron particles was developed. A literature survey revealed that the diffusion battery was the best choice for particle size classification and that the electrofluidized bed was the best method for particle collection in ICPP off-gas streams. This report describes the laboratory study and in-plant demonstration of these two techniques.

Hohorst, F.A.; Fernandez, S.J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels -- Final Report under the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this INERI project was to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated-particle fuels and to explore improved coated-particle fuel designs that could be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in gas-cooled fast reactors. Project participants included the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), Centre Étude Atomique (CEA), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). To accomplish the project objectives, work was organized into five tasks.

David Petti; Philippe Martin; Mayeul Phélip; Ronald Ballinger; Petti does not have NT account

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

PHYS 626 --Fundamentals of Plasma Physics --Section 5.6-5.7 1. A simple collision model (Lorentz gas model) is to assume that a particle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas model) is to assume that a particle experience s collisions per unit time and have a change. The Lorentz gas model can describe well collisions between electron and neutrals, or even between ionsPHYS 626 -- Fundamentals of Plasma Physics -- Section 5.6-5.7 1. A simple collision model (Lorentz

Ng, Chung-Sang

154

Dust Studies in DIII-D and TEXTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of naturally occurring and artificially introduced carbon dust are conducted in DIII-D and TEXTOR. In DIII-D, dust does not present operational concerns except immediately after entry vents. Submicron sized dust is routinely observed using Mie scattering from a Nd:Yag laser. The source is strongly correlated with the presence of Type I edge localized modes (ELMs). Larger size (0.005-1 mm diameter) dust is observed by optical imaging, showing elevated dust levels after entry vents. Inverse dependence of the dust velocity on the inferred dust size is found from the imaging data. Direct heating of the dust particles by the neutral beam injection (NBI) and acceleration of dust particles by the plasma flows are observed. Energetic plasma disruptions produce significant amounts of dust. Large flakes or debris falling into the plasma may result in a disruption. Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust is studied in DIII-D and TEXTOR by introducing micron-size dust in plasma discharges. In DIII-D, a sample holder filled with {approx}30 mg of dust is introduced in the lower divertor and exposed to high-power ELMing H-mode discharges with strike points swept across the divertor floor. After a brief exposure ({approx}0.1 s) at the outer strike point, part of the dust is injected into the plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3 and resulting in a twofold increase of the radiated power. In TEXTOR, instrumented dust holders with 1-45 mg of dust are exposed in the scrape-off layer 0-2 cm radially outside of the last closed flux surface in discharges heated with neutral beam injection (NBI) power of 1.4 MW. At the given configuration of the launch, the dust did not penetrate the core plasma and only moderately perturbed the edge plasma, as evidenced by an increase of the edge carbon content.

Rudakov, D L; Litnovsky, A; West, W P; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D; Brezinsek, S; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Hollmann, E M; Huber, A; Hyatt, A W; Krasheninnikov, S I; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Pigarov, A Y; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Smirnov, R D; Sharpe, J P; Solomon, W M; Watkins, J G; Wong, C C

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

155

Effect of Synthesis Condition and Annealing on the Sensitivity and Stability of Gas Sensors Made of Zn-Doped y-Fe2O3 Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, the effect of synthesis conditions and annealing process on the sensitivity and stability of gas sensors made of flame-synthesized Zn-doped ?-Fe2O3 particles was investigated. Zn-doped ?-Fe2O3 particles were synthesized by flame...

Kim, Taeyang

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels (I-NERI Annual Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this INERI project is to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated particle fuels and to develop improved coated-particle fuel designs that can be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in fast gas-cooled reactors. Thermomechanical, thermophysical, and physiochemical material properties data were compiled by both the US and the French and preliminary assessments conducted. Comparison between U.S. and European data revealed many similarities and a few important differences. In all cases, the data needed for accurate fuel performance modeling of coated particle fuel at high burnup were lacking. The development of the INEEL fuel performance model, PARFUME, continued from earlier efforts. The statistical model being used to simulate the detailed finite element calculations is being upgraded and improved to allow for changes in fuel design attributes (e.g. thickness of layers, dimensions of kernel) as well as changes in important material properties to increase the flexibility of the code. In addition, modeling of other potentially important failure modes such as debonding and asphericity was started. A paper on the status of the model was presented at the HTR-2002 meeting in Petten, Netherlands in April 2002, and a paper on the statistical method was submitted to the Journal of Nuclear Material in September 2002. Benchmarking of the model against Japanese and an older DRAGON irradiation are planned. Preliminary calculations of the stresses in a coated particle have been calculated by the CEA using the ATLAS finite element model. This model and the material properties and constitutive relationships will be incorporated into a more general software platform termed Pleiades. Pleiades will be able to analyze different fuel forms at different scales (from particle to fuel body) and also handle the statistical variability in coated particle fuel. Diffusion couple experiments to study Ag and Pd transport through SiC were conducted. Analysis and characterization of the samples continues. Two active transport mechanisms are proposed: diffusion in SiC and release through SiC cracks or another, as yet undetermined, path. Silver concentration profiles determined by XPS analysis suggest diffusion within the SiC layer, most likely dominated by grain boundary diffusion. However, diffusion coefficients calculated from mass loss measurements suggest a much faster release path, postulated as small cracks or flaws that provide open paths with little resistance to silver migration. Work is ongoing to identify and characterize this path. Work on Pd behavior has begun and will continue next year.

Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Languille, Alain; Martin, Philippe; Ballinger, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The effects of gas adsorption on particle shapes in supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work has shown that the shapes of the metal particles in a supported platinum catalyst are substantially altered when the catalyst is treated in an appropriate adages. However, at present it is unclear why the shape changes occur. In the work here, simple first-order calculations were done to examine the effects of hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon monoxide on the equilibrium crystal shape of the platinum particles in a supported platinum catalyst. The calculation assumed that the main effect of the gaseous environment was to change the surface free energy of the facets on the platinum particles. The results of the calculations showed that when a clean platinum particle is equilibrated in nitrogen, the shape should not change significantly. However, Pt(100) facets should grow in hydrogen while Pt(210) facets should grow in carbon monoxide. By comparison, previous experiments have shown the Pt(100) facets do grow in hydrogen. Little change in shape is observed in nitrogen. Thus, it seems that changes in the surface free energy of the facets in the metal particles on a supported metal catalyst due to the presence of an adgas play an important role in the shape changes which are observed.

Shi, A.C.; Masel, R.I. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Molecular Hydrogen Emission from Protoplanetary Disks II. Effects of X-ray Irradiation and Dust Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed models for the density and temperature profiles of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks are constructed by taking into account X-ray and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from a central T Tauri star, as well as dust size growth and settling toward the disk midplane. The spatial and size distributions of dust grains in the disks are numerically computed by solving the coagulation equation for settling dust particles. The level populations and line emission of molecular hydrogen are calculated using the derived physical structure of the disks. X-ray irradiation is the dominant heating source of the gas in the inner disk region and in the surface layer, while the far UV heating dominates otherwise. If the central star has strong X-ray and weak UV radiation, the H2 level populations are controlled by X-ray pumping, and the X-ray induced transition lines could be observable. If the UV irradiation is strong, the level populations are controlled by thermal collisions or UV pumping, depending on the properties of...

Nomura, H; Tsujimoto, M; Nakagawa, Y; Millar, T J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

GRAIN SORTING IN COMETARY DUST FROM THE OUTER SOLAR NEBULA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most young stars are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. Close to the hot stars, amorphous dust grains from the parent molecular cloud are reprocessed into crystals that are then distributed throughout the accretion disk. In some disks, there is a reduction in crystalline grain size with heliocentric distance from the star. We investigated crystalline grain size distributions in chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) believed to be from small, icy bodies that accreted in outer regions of the solar nebula. The grains are Mg-rich silicates and Fe-rich sulfides, the two most abundant minerals in CP IDPs. We find that they are predominantly <0.25 {mu}m in radius with a mean grain size that varies from one CP IDP to another. We report a size-density relationship between the silicates and sulfides. A similar size-density relationship between much larger silicate and sulfide grains in meteorites from the asteroid belt is ascribed to aerodynamic sorting. Since the silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs are theoretically too small for aerodynamic sorting, their size-density relationship may be due to another process capable of sorting small grains.

Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Ishii, H. A. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Brownlee, D. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kearsley, A. T. [Department of Mineralogy, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, M. J.; Price, M. C., E-mail: P.Wozniakiewicz@kent.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Studies on hydrogen plasma and dust charging in low-pressure filament discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of working gas pressure and dust charging on electron energy probability function has been studied for hydrogen plasma in a multi-dipole dusty plasma device. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to evaluate the plasma parameters and electron energy probability function (EEPF) for different working pressures. For lower energy range (below 10?eV), the EEPF follows a bi-Maxwellian shape at very low pressure (6 × 10{sup ?5}?mbar), while elevating the working pressure up to ?2 × 10{sup ?3} mbar, the shape of the EEPF transforms into a single Maxwellian. Some dip structures are observed at high energy range (??>?10?eV) in the EEPF of hydrogen plasma at all the working conditions. In presence of dust particles, it is observed that the shape of the EEPF changes due to the redistribution of the high and low-energy electron populations. Finally, the effect of working pressure on charge accumulation on dust particles is studied with the help of a Faraday cup and electrometer. From the observations, a strong influence of working pressure on plasma parameters, EEPF and dust charging is observed.

Kakati, B., E-mail: bharatkakati15@gmail.com; Kalita, D.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur 782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Quantum lattice gas model of Dirac particles in 1+1 dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented is a quantum computing representation of Dirac particle dynamics. The approach employs an operator splitting method that is an analytically closed-form product decomposition of the unitary evolution operator. This allows the Dirac equation to be cast as a unitary finite-difference equation in a high-energy limit. The split evolution operator (with separate kinetic and interaction terms) is useful for efficient quantum simulation. For pedagogical purposes, here we restrict the treatment to Dirac particle dynamics in 1+1 spacetime dimensions. Independent derivations of the quantum algorithm are presented and the model's validity is tested in several quantum simulations by comparing the numerical results against analytical predictions. Using the relativistic quantum algorithm in the case when mc^2 >> pc, quantum simulations of a nonrelativistic particle in an external scalar square well and parabolic potential is presented.

Jeffrey Yepez

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

Particle number fluctuations in nuclear collisions within excluded volume hadron gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The multiplicity fluctuations are studied in the van der Waals excluded volume hadron-resonance gas model. The calculations are done in the grand canonical ensemble within the Boltzmann statistics approximation. The scaled variances for positive, negative and all charged hadrons are calculated along the chemical freeze-out line of nucleus-nucleus collisions at different collision energies. The multiplicity fluctuations are found to be suppressed in the van der Waals gas. The numerical calculations are presented for two values of hard-core hadron radius, $r=0.3$ fm and 0.5 fm, as well as for the upper limit of the excluded volume suppression effects.

M. I. Gorenstein; M. Hauer; D. O. Nikolajenko

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Airborne dust in Saudi Arabia : source areas, entrainment, simulation and composition.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Spatial and temporal characteristics of dust storm activity in Saudi Arabia has been established using coarse-particle (PM10) dust concentrations recorded by the KACST monitoring network… (more)

Alharbi, Badr Hadhidh A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Secondary Electron Emission from Dust and Its Effect on Charging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen plasma is produced in a plasma chamber by striking discharge between incandescent tungsten filaments and the permanent magnetic cage [1], which is grounded. The magnetic cage has a full line cusped magnetic field geometry used to confine the plasma elements. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to study the plasma parameters in various discharge conditions. The charge accumulated on the dust particles is calculated using the capacitance model and the dust current is measured by the combination of a Faraday cup and an electrometer at different discharge conditions. It is found Secondary electron emission from dust having low emission yield effects the charging of dust particles in presence of high energetic electrons.

Saikia, B. K.; Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ejecta Particle-Size Measurements in Vacuum and Helium Gas using Ultraviolet In-Line Fraunhofer Holography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultraviolet (UV) in-line Fraunhofer holography diagnostic has been developed for making high-resolution spatial measurements of ejecta particles traveling at many mm/?sec. This report will discuss the development of the diagnostic, including the high-powered laser system and high-resolution optical relay system. In addition, we will also describe the system required to reconstruct the images from the hologram and the corresponding analysis of those images to extract particles. Finally, we will present results from six high-explosive (HE), shock-driven Sn-ejecta experiments. Particle-size distributions will be shown that cover most of the ejecta velocities for experiments conducted in a vacuum, and helium gas environments. In addition, a modification has been made to the laser system that produces two laser pulses separated by 6.8 ns. This double-pulsed capability allows a superposition of two holograms to be acquired at two different times, thus allowing ejecta velocities to be measured directly. Results from this double-pulsed experiment will be described.

Sorenson, D. S. [LANL; Pazuchanics, P. [LANL; Johnson, R. [LANL; Malone, R. M. [NSTec; Kaufman, M. I. [NSTec; Tibbitts, A. [NSTec; Tunnell, T. [NSTec; Marks, D. [NSTec; Capelle, G. A. [NSTec; Grover, M. [NSTec; Marshall, B. [NSTec; Stevens, G. D. [NSTec; Turley, W. D. [NSTec; LaLone, B. [NSTec

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Transparent self-cleaning dust shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transparent electromagnetic shield to protect solar panels and the like from dust deposition. The shield is a panel of clear non-conducting (dielectric) material with embedded parallel electrodes. The panel is coated with a semiconducting film. Desirably the electrodes are transparent. The electrodes are connected to a single-phase AC signal or to a multi-phase AC signal that produces a travelling electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field produced by the electrodes lifts dust particles away from the shield and repels charged particles. Deposited dust particles are removed when the electrodes are activated, regardless of the resistivity of the dust. Electrostatic charges on the panel are discharged by the semiconducting film. When used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells, the power for the device may be obtained from the cells themselves. For other surfaces, such as windshields, optical windows and the like, the power must be derived from an external source. One embodiment of the invention employs monitoring and detection devices to determine when the level of obscuration of the screen by dust has reached a threshold level requiring activation of the dust removal feature.

Mazumder, Malay K.; Sims, Robert A.; Wilson, James D.

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Transport and deposition of particles in gas turbines: Effects of convection, diffusion, thermophoresis, inertial impaction and coagulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosols are produced in a large number of industrial processes over a wide range of sizes. Of particular importance is deposition of coal and oil combustion aerosols in turbines. A model coupling the transport and the dynamics of aerosols to flow characteristics in gas turbines is presented. An order of magnitude analysis is carried out based on typical operational conditions for coal and oil combustion (neglecting coagulation) to determine the relative importance of various mechanisms on particle behavior. A scheme is then developed to incorporate a moment model of a log normally distributed aerosol to predict aerosol transport and dynamics in turbine flows. The proposed moment model reflects the contributions from convection, inertia, diffusion and thermophoresis. Aerosol behavior in various laminar 2-D and axisymmetric flows is considered in this study. Results are compared to published work in 1-D and 2-D planar and axisymmetric.

Brown, D.P.; Biswas, P.; Rubin, S.G. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

Gubler, Philipp; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Nishida, Yusuke

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

Philipp Gubler; Naoki Yamamoto; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Yusuke Nishida

2015-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

The large scale dust lanes of the Galactic bar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(abridged) By comparing the distribution of dust and gas in the central regions of the Galaxy, we aim to obtain new insights into the properties of the offset dust lanes leading the bar's major axis in the Milky Way. On the one hand, the molecular emission of the dust lanes is extracted from the observed CO l-b-V distribution according to the interpretation of a dynamical model. On the other hand, a three dimensional extinction map of the Galactic central region constructed from near-infrared observations is used as a tracer of the dust itself and clearly reveals dust lanes in its face-on projection. Comparison of the position of both independent detections of the dust lanes is performed in the (l, b) plane. These two completely independent methods are used to provide a coherent picture of the dust lanes in the Milky Way bar. In both the gas and dust distributions, the dust lanes are found to be out of the Galactic plane, appearing at negative latitudes for l > 0 deg and at positive latitudes for l reformation downstream. Due to the decrease in velocity caused by the shock, this occurs at lower z. The second assumes that the gas and dust remain on a common tilted plane, but that the molecular gas decouples from the Milky Way's magnetic field, itself strong enough to resist the shear of the bar's shock. The diffuse gas and dust remain coupled to the field and are carried further downstream. This second scenario has recently been suggested in order to explain observations of the barred galaxy NGC 1097.

D. J. Marshall; R. Fux; A. C. Robin; C. Reyle

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Mean-field approach in the multi-component gas of interacting particles applied to relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized mean-field approach for thermodynamic description of relativistic single- and multi-component gas in the grand canonical ensemble is formulated. In the framework of the proposed approach different phenomenological excluded-volume procedures are presented and compared to the existing ones. The mean-field approach is then used to effectively include hard-core repulsion in hadron-resonance gas model for description of chemical freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions. We calculate the collision energy dependence of several quantities for different values of hard-core hadron radius and for different excluded-volume procedures such as van der Waals and Carnahan-Starling models. It is shown that a choice of the excluded-volume model becomes important for large particle densities, and for large enough values of hadron radii ($r\\gtrsim0.9$ fm) there can be a sizable difference between different excluded-volume procedures used to describe the chemical freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions. For the smaller and more commonly used values of hard-core hadron radii ($r\\lesssim0.5$ fm) the van der Waals excluded-volume procedure is shown to be sufficient.

D. Anchishkin; V. Vovchenko

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

Niamey Dust Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Niamey aerosol are composed of two main components: dust due to the proximity of the Sahara Desert, and soot from local and regional biomass burning. The purpose of this data product is to identify when the local conditions are dominated by the dust component so that the properties of the dust events can be further studied.

Flynn, Connor

173

Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

L. C. Cadwallader

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

He Puff System For Dust Detector Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local detection of surface dust is needed for the safe operation of next-step magnetic fusion devices such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a 5 cm x 5 cm grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 50 V, has been developed to detect dust on remote surfaces and was successfully tested for the first time on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). We report on a helium puff system that clears residual dust from this detector and any incident debris or fibers that might cause a permanent short circuit. The entire surface of the detector was cleared of carbon particles by two consecutive helium puffs delivered by three nozzles of 0.45 mm inside diameter. The optimal configuration was found to be with the nozzles at an angle of 30o with respect to the surface of the detector and a helium backing pressure of 6 bar. __________________________________________________

B. Rais, C.H. Skinner A.L. Roquemore

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Residual electric charges on dust grains at plasma extinction L. Coudel1, M. Mikikian1, Y. Tessier1, L. Boufendi1, A. A. Samarian2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. An upward thermophoretic force was thus applied to dust particles to balance gravity [4] when the plasma

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

age-dependent dust heating: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

correlations. Zeljko Ivezic; Moshe Elitzur 1996-12-17 17 Spatial distribution of Far infrared emission in spiral galaxies II. Heating sources and gas-to-dust ratio...

177

Dust density effect on complex plasma decay L. Couedel a,b, A.A. Samarian a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and supported by comparison to existing experimental data. Key words: Complex plasma, dust, afterglow, decay (PECVD, etching, fusion reactor,etc). The dust particles are charged due to their interactions, the dust particles can be either grown directly in the plasma chamber (by sputtering [6,7] or using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

178

Electric Dipole Radiation from Spinning Dust Grains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the rotational excitation of small interstellar grains and the resulting electric dipole radiation from spinning dust. Attention is given to excitation and damping of rotation by: collisions with neutrals; collisions with ions; plasma drag; emission of infrared radiation; emission of microwave radiation; photoelectric emission; and formation of H_2 on the grain surface. We introduce dimensionless functions F and G which allow direct comparison of the contributions of different mechanisms to rotational drag and excitation. Emissivities are estimated for dust in different phases of the interstellar medium, including diffuse HI, warm HI, low-density photoionized gas, and cold molecular gas. Spinning dust grains can explain much, and perhaps all, of the 14-50 GHz background component recently observed in CBR studies. It should be possible to detect rotational emission from small grains by ground-based observations of molecular clouds.

B. T. Draine; A. Lazarian

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A WINDOWED HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER USING A SUSPENSION OF ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES AS THE SOLAR ABSORBER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a regenerated gas turbine sys- tem providing severaltemperature for powering a gas turbine or to supply indus-from the compressor of a gas turbine and passes on to the

Fisk, William J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Migration of Artificially Introduced Micron Size Carbon Dust in the DIII-D Divertor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust in a tokamak environment was studied by introducing about 30 milligrams of dust flakes 5-10 {micro}m in diameter in the lower divertor of DIII-D using the DiMES sample holder. The dust was exposed to high power ELMing Hmode discharges in lower-single-null magnetic configuration with the strike points swept across the divertor floor. When the outer strike point (OSP) passed over the dust holder exposing it to high particle and heat fluxes, part of the dust was injected into the plasma. In about 0.1 sec following the OSP pass over the dust, 1-2% of the total dust carbon content (2-4 x 10{sup 19} carbon atoms, equivalent to a few million dust particles) penetrated the core plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3. When the OSP was inboard of the dust holder, the dust injection continued at a lower rate. Individual dust particles were observed moving at velocities of 10-100 m/s, predominantly in the toroidal direction for deuteron flow to the outer divertor target, consistent with the ion drag force. The observed behavior of the dust is in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C; Brooks, N; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Krasheninnikov, S; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Pigarov, A Y; Solomon, W; Antar, G; Boedo, J; Doerner, R; Hollmann, E; Hyatt, A; Maingi, R; Moyer, R; Nagy, A; Nishino, N; Roquemore, L; Stangeby, P; Watkins, J

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Haul road dust control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field study was conducted to measure dust from haul trucks at a limestone quarry and a coal preparation plant waste hauling operation. The study found that primarily wind, distance and road treatment conditions notably affected the dust concentrations at locations next to, 50 ft from, and 100 ft away from the unpaved haulage road. Airborne dust measured along the unpaved haul road showed that high concentrations of fugitive dust can be generated with these concentrations rapidly decreasing to nearly background levels within 100 ft of the road. Instantaneous respirable dust measurements illustrated that the trucks generate a real-time dust cloud that has a peak concentration with a time-related decay rate as the dust moves past the sampling locations. The respirable dust concentrations and peak levels were notably diminished as the dust cloud was transported, diluted, and diffused by the wind over the 100 ft distance from the road. Individual truck concentrations and peak levels measured next to the dry road surface test section were quite variable and dependent on wind conditions, particularly wind direction, with respect to reaching the sampling location. The vast majority of the fugitive airborne dust generated from unpaved and untreated haulage roads was non-respirable. 6 figs.

Reed, W.R.; Organiscak, J.A. [NIOSH-PRL, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Dust accelerators and their applications in high-temperature plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Much effort has been devoted to gening rid of the dust nuisance. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ticos, Catakin M [NILPRP, ROMANIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Microchemical investigations of dust emitted by a lead smelter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dusts emitted by an important pyrometallurgical lead smelter have been sampled within the pipes of the grilling and furnace working units before and after the filtering systems, respectively. Particle size distribution, elementary analyses, and X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicate PbS, PbSO{sub 4}, PbSO{sub 4}{center_dot}PbO, Pb, ZnS small particles less than 5 {micro}m in size to contribute mainly to the current atmospheric pollution. Although at least 90% of dust are retained on the filters, the amounts of the respirable smaller particles are significantly larger in the current emission. The average chemical speciation was found to be analogous for the dust samples collected before and after the filters. The scanning electron microscopy associated with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and Raman microspectrometry established the morphology and chemical composition at the level of individual particles. A lot of minor compounds were found as small heterogeneous individual particles in the heterogeneous particles of grilling dust. Among the homogeneous particles of furnace dust, amorphous C, {beta}-PbO, PbO-PbCl{sub 2}, FeO, CdS, CdSO{sub 4} were often detected as homogeneous mixtures with the major compounds within the particles.

Sobanska, S.; Ricq, N. [Ecole des Mines de Douai (France). Dept. Chimie et Environnement] [Ecole des Mines de Douai (France). Dept. Chimie et Environnement; [Univ. de Lille I, Villeneuve d`Ascq (France); Laboudigue, A.; Guillermo, R. [Ecole des Mines de Douai (France). Dept. Chimie et Environnement] [Ecole des Mines de Douai (France). Dept. Chimie et Environnement; Bremard, C.; Laureyns, J.; Merlin, J.C.; Wignacourt, J.P. [Univ. de Lille I, Villeneuve d`Ascq (France)] [Univ. de Lille I, Villeneuve d`Ascq (France)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Charged particle's $p_T$ spectra and elliptic flow in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV Au+Au collisions: QGP vs. hadronic resonance gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that if the hadronic resonance gas (HRG), with viscosity to entropy ratio $\\eta/s\\approx$0.24, is physical at temperature $T\\approx$220 MeV, charged particles $p_T$ spectra and elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, over a wide range of collision centrality do not distinguish between initial QGP fluid and initial hadronic resonance gas. Unambiguous identification of bulk of the matter produced in Au+Au collisions require clear demonstration that HRG is unphysical at temperature $T<$200 MeV. It calls for precise lattice simulations with realistic boundary conditions.

Chaudhuri, A K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

VOLUME 78, NUMBER 8 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 FEBRUARY 1997 Debye Shielding and Particle Correlations in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in dusty plasma research, while fully aware that the dust particles are strongly coupled, have continued

Otani, Niels F.

186

Chaotic dust dynamics and implications for the hemispherical color asymmetries of the Uranian satellites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system Cook and Franklin, 1970), (ii) interstellar dust particles (ISDPs) (Landgraf, 2000), (iii) solar of fast incoming particles like solar photons and cosmic rays cannot generate a hemispherical leading

Hamilton, Douglas P.

187

Generation of dust projectiles passing over an obstacle in the plasma sheath  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dust projectiles were produced in a radio-frequency plasma by increasing 6-fold the radio-frequency power put into the discharge. The initial static dust particles were observed to gain speed while moving away from the confining region and escaped from the inter-electrode space on a ballistic-like trajectory. Single-grain dynamics simulations indicated that the dust particles were accelerated by changes induced in the sheath electric field profile.

Ticos, Catalin M.; Stoica, Daniel S. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Delzanno, Gian Luca [Los Alamos National Laboratory, T-5 Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics Group, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dust suppression results using mineral oil applications on corn and milo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution (MCPSD) analysis, to determine the amount and particle size of the dust captured on the grain surface. Statistical analyses were performed on the effects due to dust concentration, mineral oil application and mineral oil*dust interaction. Each... TO CORN BENEFITS OF ADDING MINERAL OIL TO MILO 96 . 97 23 TREATMENT DESCRIPTION OP CORN SAMPLES USED FOR TESTING. 104 TREATMENT DESCRIPTION OF MILO SAMPLES USED FOR TESTING, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION STATISTICS...

Wardlaw, Herman Douglas

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ON THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF LOW-METALLICITY STARS: THE IMPORTANCE OF DUST COOLING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first stars to form in the universe are believed to have distribution of masses biased toward massive stars. This contrasts with the present-day initial mass function, which has a predominance of stars with masses lower than 1 M{sub Sun }. Therefore, the mode of star formation must have changed as the universe evolved. Such a transition is attributed to a more efficient cooling provided by increasing metallicity. Especially dust cooling can overcome the compressional heating, which lowers the gas temperature thus increasing its instability to fragmentation. The purpose of this paper is to verify if dust cooling can efficiently cool the gas, and enhance the fragmentation of gas clouds at the early stages of the universe. To confirm that, we calculate a set of hydrodynamic simulations that include sink particles, which represent contracting protostars. The thermal evolution of the gas during the collapse is followed by making use of a primordial chemical network and also a recipe for dust cooling. We model four clouds with different amounts of metals (10{sup -4}, 10{sup -5}, 10-6 Z{sub Sun }, and 0), and analyze how this property affect the fragmentation of star-forming clouds. We find evidence for fragmentation in all four cases, and hence conclude that there is no critical metallicity below which fragmentation is impossible. Nevertheless, there is a clear change in the behavior of the clouds at Z {approx}< 10{sup -5} Z{sub Sun }, caused by the fact that at this metallicity, fragmentation takes longer to occur than accretion, leading to a flat mass function at lower metallicities.

Dopcke, Gustavo [Member of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg, IMPRS-HD, Germany. (Germany)] [Member of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg, IMPRS-HD, Germany. (Germany); Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Klessen, Ralf S., E-mail: gustavo@uni-hd.de [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

THE CHEMICAL IMPRINT OF SILICATE DUST ON THE MOST METAL-POOR STARS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the impact of dust-induced gas fragmentation on the formation of the first low-mass, metal-poor stars (<1 M[subscript ?]) in the early universe. Previous work has shown the existence of a critical dust-to-gas ...

Bromm, Volker

191

Dust around Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

Wang, Lifan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Instituet fuer Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -7} torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -10} torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

Shu, Anthony; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kempf, Sascha; Thomas, Evan [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Northway, Paige [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Gruen, Eberhard [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Mocker, Anna [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); IRS, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Munsat, Tobin [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Srama, Ralf [MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); IRS, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); and others

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Control of Dust Inventory in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particles with sizes ranging from 100 nm to 100 {mu}m are produced in tokamaks by the interaction of the plasma with the first wall materials and divertor. Dust has not yet been of a major concern in existing tokamaks mainly because their quantities are small and these devices are not nuclear facilities. However, in ITER and in future reactors, they could represent operational and potential safety issues. The aim of this paper is thus to describe the dust creation processes in the tokamak environment. The diagnostics and removal techniques that are needed to be implemented to measure and minimise the dust inventory are also presented. The integration of these techniques into a tokamak environment is also discussed.

Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C. [Association Euratom CEA, CEA/DSM/IRFM, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sharpe, P. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Andrew, P.; Ciattaglia, S.; Pitcher, C. S.; Taylor, N. [ITER Organization, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Furlan, J. [Fusion For Energy, c/Josep Pla, n. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

ISM dust feedback from low to high mass stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dust component of the interstellar medium (ISM) has been extensively studied in the past decades. Late-type stars have been assumed as the main source of dust to the ISM, but recent observations show that supernova remnants may play a role on the ISM dust feedback. In this work, I study the importance of low and high mass stars, as well as their evolutionary phase, on the ISM dust feedback process. I also determine the changes on the obtained results considering different mass distribution functions and star formation history. We describe a semi-empirical calculation of the relative importance of each star at each evolutionary phase in the dust ejection to the ISM. I compare the obtained results for two stellar mass distribution functions, the classic Salpeter initial mass function and the present day mass function. I used the evolutionary track models for each stellar mass, and the empirical mass-loss rates and dust-to-gas ratio. The relative contribution of each stellar mass depends on the used distribution. Ejecta from massive stars represent the most important objects for the ISM dust replenishment using the Salpeter IMF. On the other hand, for the present day mass function low and intermediate mass stars are dominant. Late-type giant and supergiant stars dominate the ISM dust feedback in our actual Galaxy, but this may not the case of galaxies experiencing high star formation rates, or at high redshifts. In those cases, SNe are dominant in the dust feedback process.

Falceta-Goncalves; D.

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

Kakati, B., E-mail: bharatkakati15@gmail.com; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup 782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electrostatic dust detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for detecting dust in a variety of environments which can include radioactive and other hostile environments both in a vacuum and in a pressurized system. The apparatus consists of a grid coupled to a selected bias voltage. The signal generated when dust impacts and shorts out the grid is electrically filtered, and then analyzed by a signal analyzer which is then sent to a counter. For fine grids a correlation can be developed to relate the number of counts observed to the amount of dust which impacts the grid.

Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

198

Particle impact damping: influence of material and size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, particle impact damping is measured for a cantilever beam with a particle-filled enclosure attached to its free end. Many particle materials are tested: lead spheres, steel spheres, glass spheres, tungsten carbide pellets, lead dust...

Marhadi, Kun Saptohartyadi

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

MODEL FOR DETERMINING THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF PARTICLE BEDS WITH HIGH SOLID-TO-GAS THERMAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-TO-GAS THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY RATIO A.R. Raffray, Z. Gorbis, A. Badawi, M.S. Tillack, A.Y. Ying, and M. A. Abdou

Abdou, Mohamed

200

Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

personnel listed dust found in cotton gins, or gin dust, fueled two explosions in the past. OSHA is required by law to regulate facilities handling explosible dusts to provide a safe working environment for employees. The dust handling facilities must test...

Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report, October 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial pilot-scale testing of two additives was completed at CONSOL`s research coal combustor. The results and conclusions from this test series and subsequent analysis of the data are presented in this report. Table 1 summarizes the conditions tested. During the tests, the research combustor was firing a medium-sulfur coal. The combustor had recently been retrofitted with low-NOx burners for a DOE Clean Coal test program. Operation of the low-NOx burners required a reduced flow rate in the combustor, resulting in lower flow and velocity in the ESP. A comprehensive baseline condition was tested, followed by initial screening runs for several additives. It was discovered that the flyash exhibited properties characteristic of a high-resistivity ash. In-situ measurements at the ESP inlet confirmed that the resistivity was in the 10{sup 10} -- 10{sup 12} ohm-cm range. In addition, the ESP plate rappers were not able to remove ash buildup on the first section during normal operation. Power off rapping was periodically required to fully clean the plates; this is a clear indication of high-resistivity conditions. Since the major benefit of ESP additives will be to reduce reentrainment at low to midrange resistivity, this operating condition was undesirable for performance testing. It was decided to continue the program with SO{sub 3} conditioning of the flue gas to reduce particle resistivity. It was also decided to operate with two rather than three electrical fields energized. By reducing the ESP collection area, it was hoped that it would be easier to measure changes in ESP performance and to see an immediate indication of the effectiveness Of SO{sub 3} conditioning. The ESP was reconfigured with two electrical sections energized and SO{sub 3} conditioning at a rate of approximately 20 ppM. An additional baseline was run, followed by extended tests with two additives referred to in this report as Additive ``C`` and Additive ``D.``

Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.

1994-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development of Criteria and Identification of Particle Cluster Size Based on Measurements of Void Fraction in Gas-Solid Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A circulating fluidized bed (CFB) built at FIU was used to study particle motion in the riser in order to simulate flow regimes in a cold gasifier. High speed imaging was used in order to capture the dynamics of the particles flowing in the riser. The imaging method used here is called the shadow sizing technique which allowed the determination of particle areas and trajectories at various flow rates in the riser. The solid volume fraction and particle velocities calculated using the images acquired during the experiments can be related to granular temperature in order to detect formations of clusters in the riser section of the CFB. The shadow sizing technique was observed to be an effective method in detecting dynamics of particles in motion and formation of clusters when supported with high-speed imaging.

David Roelant; Seckin Gokaltun

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Spatiotemporal evolution of dielectric driven cogenerated dust density waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental observation of spatiotemporal evolution of dust density waves (DDWs) in cogenerated dusty plasma in the presence of modified field induced by glass plate is reported. Various DDWs, such as vertical, oblique, and stationary, were detected simultaneously for the first time. Evolution of spatiotemporal complexity like bifurcation in propagating wavefronts is also observed. As dust concentration reaches extremely high value, the DDW collapses. Also, the oblique and nonpropagating mode vanishes when we increase the number of glass plates, while dust particles were trapped above each glass plates showing only vertical DDWs.

Sarkar, Sanjib; Bose, M. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)] [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Mukherjee, S. [FCIPT, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [FCIPT, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Pramanik, J. [Kharagpur College, Kharagpur 721305, West Bengal (India)] [Kharagpur College, Kharagpur 721305, West Bengal (India)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method and apparatus for measuring surface density of explosive and inert dust in stratified layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determining the surface density of coal dust on top of rock dust or rock dust on top of coal dust is disclosed which comprises directing a light source at either a coal or rock dust layer overlaying a substratum of the other, detecting the amount of light reflected from the deposit, generating a signal from the reflected light which is converted into a normalized output (V), and calculating the surface density from the normalized output. The surface density S.sub.c of coal dust on top of rock dust is calculated according to the equation: S.sub.c =1/-a.sub.c ln(V) wherein a.sub.c is a constant for the coal dust particles, and the surface density S.sub.r of rock dust on top of coal dust is determined by the equation: ##EQU1## wherein a.sub.r is a constant based on the properties of the rock dust particles. An apparatus is also disclosed for carrying out the method of the present invention.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Perlee, Henry E. (Bethel Park, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Dust acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The linear and nonlinear properties of dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a collisionless Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma, whose constituents are electrons, ions, and negatively charged dust particles. At dust time scale, the electron and ion number densities follow the Thomas-Fermi distribution, whereas the dust component is described by the classical fluid equations. A linear dispersion relation is analyzed to show that the wave frequencies associated with the upper and lower modes are enhanced with the variation of dust concentration. The effect of the latter is seen more strongly on the upper mode as compared to the lower mode. For nonlinear analysis, we obtain magnetized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equations involving the dust-acoustic solitary waves in the framework of reductive perturbation technique. Furthermore, the shock wave excitations are also studied by allowing dissipation effects in the model, leading to the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and ZKB equations. The analysis reveals that the dust-acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi plasma are strongly influenced by the plasma parameters, e.g., dust concentration, dust temperature, obliqueness, magnetic field strength, and dust fluid viscosity. The present results should be important for understanding the solitary and shock excitations in the environments of white dwarfs or supernova, where dust particles can exist.

Rahim, Z.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics (NCP) at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Center for Physics (NCP) at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Intergalactic dust and its photoelectric heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have examined the dust photoelectric heating in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The heating rate in a typical radiation field of the IGM is represented by $\\Gamma_{\\rm pe} = 1.2\\times10^{-34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-3}$ $({\\cal D}/10^{-4})(n_{\\rm H}/10^{-5} {\\rm cm^{-3}})^{4/3} (J_{\\rm L}/10^{-21} {\\rm erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} Hz^{-1} sr^{-1}})^{2/3} (T/10^4 {\\rm K})^{-1/6}$, where ${\\cal D}$ is the dust-to-gas mass ratio, $n_{\\rm H}$ is the hydrogen number density, $J_{\\rm L}$ is the mean intensity at the hydrogen Lyman limit of the background radiation, and $T$ is the gas temperature, if we assume the new X-ray photoelectric yield model by Weingartner et al. (2006) and the dust size distribution in the Milky Way by Mathis, Rumpl, & Nordsieck (1977). This heating rate dominates the HI and HeII photoionization heating rates when the hydrogen number density is less than $\\sim10^{-6}$ cm$^{-3}$ if ${\\cal D}=10^{-4}$ which is 1% of that in the Milky Way, although the heating rate is a factor of 2--4 smaller than that with the old yield model by Weingartner & Draine (2001). The grain size distribution is very important. If only large ($\\ge0.1$ $\\mu$m) grains exist in the IGM, the heating rate is reduced by a factor of $\\simeq5$. Since the dust heating is more efficient in a lower density medium relative to the photoionization heating, it may cause an inverted temperature--density relation in the low density IGM suggested by Bolton et al. (2008). Finally, we have found that the dust heating is not very important in the mean IGM before the cosmic reionization.

Akio K. Inoue; Hideyuki Kamaya

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Little is yet known (theoretically or experimentally) about the simultaneous effects of particle inertia, particle thermophoresis and high mass loading on the important engineering problem of predicting deposition rates from flowing dusty'' gases. For this reason, we investigate the motion of particles present at nonnegligible mass loading in a flowing nonisothermal gaseous medium and their deposition on strongly cooled or heated solid objects by examining the instructive case of steady axisymmetric dusty gas'' flow between two infinite disks: an inlet (porous) disk and the impermeable target'' disk -- a flow not unlike that encountered in recent seeded-flame experiments. Since this stagnation flow/geometry admits interesting self-similar solutions at all Reynolds numbers, we are able to predict laminar flow mass-, momentum- and energy-transfer rate coefficients over a wide range of particle mass loadings, dimensionless particle relaxation times (Stokes numbers), dimensionless thermophoretic diffusivities, and gas Reynolds numbers. As a by-product, we illustrate the accuracy and possible improvement of our previous diffusion model'' for tightly coupled dusty gas systems. Moreover, we report new results illustrating the dependence of the important critical'' Stokes number (for incipient particle impaction) on particle mass loading and wall/gas temperature ratio for dust-laden gas motion towards overheated'' solid surfaces. The present formulation and insulating transport coefficients should not only be useful in explaining/predicting recent deposition rate trends in seeded'' flame experiments, but also highly mass-loaded systems of technological interest.

Rosner, D.E.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Dust-acoustic waves in nonuniform dusty plasma in presence of polarization force  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the dust density nonuniformity and the polarization force on linear propagation of the dust-acoustic waves in a nonuniform dusty plasma (consisting of electrons, ions, and arbitrarily charged dust particles) have been theoretically investigated. It has been shown that the linear dispersion properties of the dust-acoustic (DA) waves have been significantly modified by the dust density nonuniformity, dust polarity, and the polarization force. It is also found here that the phase speed of the DA waves is decreased by the effects of polarization force, and that their amplitude increases with the decrease of equilibrium dust number density. The different situations, which are relevant to different space and laboratory dusty plasmas, have been briefly discussed.

Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A.; Ashrafi, K. S. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 (Bangladesh)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effect of energetic electrons on dust charging in hot cathode filament discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of energetic electrons on dust charging for different types of dust is studied in hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma is produced by hot cathode filament discharge method in a dusty plasma device. A full line cusped magnetic field cage is used to confine the plasma elements. To study the plasma parameters for various discharge conditions, a cylindrical Langmuir probe having 0.15 mm diameter and 10.0 mm length is used. An electronically controlled dust dropper is used to drop the dust particles into the plasma. For different discharge conditions, the dust current is measured using a Faraday cup connected to an electrometer. The effect of secondary emission as well as discharge voltage on charging of dust grains in hydrogen plasma is studied with different dust.

Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur 782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Dynamics of the electric current in an ideal electron gas: a sound mode inside the quasi-particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the equation of motion for the Noether current in an electron gas within the framework of the Schwinger-Keldysh Closed-Time-Path formalism. The equation is shown to be highly non-linear and irreversible even for a non-interacting, ideal gas of electrons at non-zero density. We truncate the linearised equation of motion, written as the Laurent series in Fourier space, so that the resulting expressions are local in time, both at zero and at small finite temperatures. Furthermore, we show that the one-loop Coulomb interactions only alter the physical picture quantitatively, while preserving the characteristics of the dynamics that the electric current exhibits in the absence of interactions. As a result of the composite nature of the Noether current, composite sound waves are found to be the dominant IR collective excitations at length scales between the inverse Fermi momentum and the mean free path that would exist in an interacting electron gas. We also discuss the difference and the transition between the hydrodynamical regime of an ideal gas, defined in this work, and the hydrodynamical regime in phenomenological hydrodynamics, which is normally used for the description of interacting gases.

Sašo Grozdanov; Janos Polonyi

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Method of removing SO.sub.2, NO.sub.X and particles from gas mixtures using streamer corona  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting sulfur dioxide and/or nitrogen oxide gases to acid mist and or particle aerosols is disclosed in which the gases are passed through a streamer corona discharge zone having electrodes of a wire-cylinder or wire-plate geometry.

Mizuno, Akira (Toyohashi, JP); Clements, Judson S. (Tallahassee, FL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Extraplanar Dust in Spiral Galaxies: Observations and Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent optical and submillimeter observations have begun to probe the existence of dust grains in the halos of spiral galaxies. I review our own work in this area which employs high-resolution optical images of edge-on spiral galaxies to trace high-z dust in absorption against the background stellar light of the galaxies. We have found that a substantial fraction of such galaxies (>50%) show extensive webs of dust-bearing clouds to heights z>2 kpc. Extraplanar dust in galaxies is statistically correlated with extraplanar diffuse ionized gas, though there is no evidence for a direct, physical relationship between these two phases of the high-z interstellar medium. The dense high-z clouds individually have masses estimated to be >10^5} to 10^6 solar masses. The detailed properties of the observed dust structures suggest the clouds seen in our images may represent the dense phase of a multiphase ISM at high-z. Such dense clouds can have an important effect on the observed light distribution in spiral galaxies. I discuss the effects such high-z dust can have on quantitative measures of the vertical structure of stars and ionized gas in edge-on systems.

J. Christopher Howk

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

Raman spectroscopy of carbon dust samples from NSTX Y. Raitses a,*, C.H. Skinner a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the diagnosis of the microscopic structure of different forms of carbon. The intensity of D-mode at 1350 cmÃ?1Raman spectroscopy of carbon dust samples from NSTX Y. Raitses a,*, C.H. Skinner a , F. Jiang b , T. The Raman measurements indicate that the production of carbon dust particles in NSTX involves modifications

Duffy, Thomas S.

215

Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

Friesen, F. QL. [Grinnell College, 1115 8th Avenue, Grinnell, IA 50112-1616

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Dynamics of the electric current in an ideal electron gas: a sound mode inside the quasi-particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the equation of motion for the Noether current in an electron gas within the framework of the Schwinger-Keldysh Closed-Time-Path formalism. The equation is shown to be highly non-linear and irreversible even for a non-interacting, ideal gas of electrons at non-zero density. We truncate the linearised equation of motion, written as the Laurent series in Fourier space, so that the resulting expressions are local in time, both at zero and at small finite temperatures. Furthermore, we show that the one-loop Coulomb interactions only alter the physical picture quantitatively, while preserving the characteristics of the dynamics that the electric current exhibits in the absence of interactions. As a result of the composite nature of the Noether current, composite sound waves are found to be the dominant IR collective excitations at length scales between the inverse Fermi momentum and the mean free path that would exist in an interacting electron gas. We also discuss the difference and the transition betwee...

Grozdanov, Sašo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development of an Electrostatic Dust Detector for use in a Tokamak Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial results from a novel device to detect dust particles settling on remote surfaces are presented. Dust particle inventories are a concern in next-step fusion devices. The increase in duty cycle will lead to a scale-up in the amount of particles generated by plasma material interactions. These particles will be chemically and radiologically hazardous and it will be important to establish that the in-vessel particle inventory is within regulatory limits. The detection device consists of two interlocking combs of closely spaced conductive traces on a Teflon circuit board. When a DC bias is applied impinging dust creates a transient short circuit between the traces. The increase in bias current generates a signal pulse that is counted by standard nuclear counting electronics. We present data on the response of the device in air and vacuum to carbon particles.

A. Bader; C.H. Skinner, A.L. Roquemore; S. Langish

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Paramagnetic alignment of thermally rotating dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paramagnetic alignment of thermally rotating oblate dust grains is studied analytically for finite ratios of grain to gas temperatures. For such ratios, the alignment of angular momentum J in respect to the grain axis of maximal inertia is only partial. We treat the alignment of J using perturbative methods and disentangle the problem of J alignment in grain body axes from that of J alignment in respect to magnetic field. This enables us to find the alignment of grain axes to magnetic field and thus relate our theory to polarimetric observations.Our present results are applicable to the alignment of both paramagnetic and superparamagnetic grains.

A. Lazarian

1997-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

219

Measurement of work function in CF? gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CF4 gas is useful in many applications, especially as a drift gas in particle detection chambers. In order to make accurate measurements of incident particles the properties of the drift gas must be well understood. An ...

Wolfe, Ian C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Particle Concentration At Planet Induced Gap Edges and Vortices: I. Inviscid 3-D Hydro Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a systematic study of the dynamics of dust particles in protoplanetary disks with embedded planets using global 2-D and 3-D inviscid hydrodynamic simulations. We implement Lagrangian particles into magnetohydrodynamic code Athena with cylindrical coordinates and explore the behavior of dust grains with sizes spanning more than 6 orders of magnitude --- from the well-coupled to decoupled limits. We find two distinct outcomes depending on the mass of the embedded planet, which is varied between 8 M_earth to 9 M_{J}. In the presence of a low mass planet (8 M_earth), two narrow gaps start to open in the gas on each side of the planet where the density waves shock. Although these gaps are quite shallow, they dramatically affect particle drift speed and cause significant, axisymmetric dust depletion near the planet. On the other hand, a more massive planet (>0.1 M_{J}) carves out a deeper gap with sharp edges, which are unstable to the formation of vortices that later merge into a single vortex. The vort...

Zhu, Zhaohuan; Rafikov, Roman R; Bai, Xuening

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

Paul W. Humrickhouse

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Dust Masses, PAH Abundances, and Starlight Intensities in the SINGS Galaxy Sample  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical dust models are presented for 65 galaxies in the SINGS survey that are strongly detected in the four IRAC bands and three MIPS bands. For each galaxy we estimate (1) the total dust mass, (2) the fraction of the dust mass contributed by PAHs, and (3) the intensity of the starlight heating the dust grains. We find that spiral galaxies have dust properties resembling the dust in the local region of the Milky Way, with similar dust-to-gas ratio, and similar PAH abundance. The observed SEDs, including galaxies with SCUBA photometry, can be reproduced by dust models that do not require "cold" (T8.1, grains contain a substantial fraction of interstellar Mg, Si and Fe. Galaxies with A_O8.1 have a median q_PAH=3.55%. The derived dust masses favor a value X_CO approx 4e20 cm^{-2}(K kms)^{-1} for the CO to H_2 conversion factor. Except for some starbursting systems (Mrk33, Tolo89, NGC3049), dust in the diffuse ISM dominates the IR power.

Draine, B T; Bendo, G; Gordon, K D; Smith, J D T; Armus, L; Engelbracht, C W; Helou, G; Kennicutt, R C; Li, A; Roussel, H; Walter, F; Calzetti, D; Moustakas, J; Murphy, E J; Rieke, G H; Bot, C; Hollenbach, D J; Sheth, K; Teplitz, H I

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Dust Masses, PAH Abundances, and Starlight Intensities in the SINGS Galaxy Sample  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical dust models are presented for 65 galaxies in the SINGS survey that are strongly detected in the four IRAC bands and three MIPS bands. For each galaxy we estimate (1) the total dust mass, (2) the fraction of the dust mass contributed by PAHs, and (3) the intensity of the starlight heating the dust grains. We find that spiral galaxies have dust properties resembling the dust in the local region of the Milky Way, with similar dust-to-gas ratio, and similar PAH abundance. The observed SEDs, including galaxies with SCUBA photometry, can be reproduced by dust models that do not require "cold" (Tmedia of galaxies with A_O=12+log(O/H)>8.1, grains contain a substantial fraction of interstellar Mg, Si and Fe. Galaxies with A_O8.1 have a median q_PAH=3.55%. The derived dust masses favor a value X_CO approx 4e20 cm^{-2}(K kms)^{-1} for the CO to H_2 conversion factor. Except for some starbursting systems (Mrk33, Tolo89, NGC3049), dust in the diffuse ISM dominates the IR power.

B. T. Draine; D. A. Dale; G. Bendo; K. D. Gordon; J. D. T. Smith; L. Armus; C. W. Engelbracht; G. Helou; R. C. Kennicutt; A. Li; H. Roussel; F. Walter; D. Calzetti; J. Moustakas; E. J. Murphy; G. H. Rieke; C. Bot; D. J. Hollenbach; K. Sheth; H. I. Teplitz

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

224

Uncertainty in Modeling Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing from Size Parameterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the uncertainties in simulating mass balance and radiative forcing of mineral dust due to biases in the aerosol size parameterization. Simulations are conducted quasi-globally (180oW-180oE and 60oS-70oN) using the WRF24 Chem model with three different approaches to represent aerosol size distribution (8-bin, 4-bin, and 3-mode). The biases in the 3-mode or 4-bin approaches against a relatively more accurate 8-bin approach in simulating dust mass balance and radiative forcing are identified. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach simulates similar but coarser size distributions of dust particles in the atmosphere, while the 3-mode pproach retains more fine dust particles but fewer coarse dust particles due to its prescribed og of each mode. Although the 3-mode approach yields up to 10 days longer dust mass lifetime over the remote oceanic regions than the 8-bin approach, the three size approaches produce similar dust mass lifetime (3.2 days to 3.5 days) on quasi-global average, reflecting that the global dust mass lifetime is mainly determined by the dust mass lifetime near the dust source regions. With the same global dust emission (~6000 Tg yr-1), the 8-bin approach produces a dust mass loading of 39 Tg, while the 4-bin and 3-mode approaches produce 3% (40.2 Tg) and 25% (49.1 Tg) higher dust mass loading, respectively. The difference in dust mass loading between the 8-bin approach and the 4-bin or 3-mode approaches has large spatial variations, with generally smaller relative difference (<10%) near the surface over the dust source regions. The three size approaches also result in significantly different dry and wet deposition fluxes and number concentrations of dust. The difference in dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) (a factor of 3) among the three size approaches is much larger than their difference (25%) in dust mass loading. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach yields stronger dust absorptivity, while the 3-mode approach yields weaker dust absorptivity. Overall, on quasi-global average, the three size parameterizations result in a significant difference of a factor of 2~3 in dust surface cooling (-1.02~-2.87 W m-2) and atmospheric warming (0.39~0.96 W m-2) and in a tremendous difference of a factor of ~10 in dust TOA cooling (-0.24~-2.20 W m-2). An uncertainty of a factor of 2 is quantified in dust emission estimation due to the different size parameterizations. This study also highlights the uncertainties in modeling dust mass and number loading, deposition fluxes, and radiative forcing resulting from different size parameterizations, and motivates further investigation of the impact of size parameterizations on modeling dust impacts on air quality, climate, and ecosystem.

Zhao, Chun; Chen, Siyu; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Kok, Jasper; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Huang, J.

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

225

Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deposition of carbon from carbonaceous gaseous environments is prevalent in many chemical and petrochemical processes such as, hydrogen-, ammonia-, and methanol-reforming systems, syngas production systems, and iron-ore reduction plants. One of the major consequences of carbon deposition is the degradation of structural materials by a phenomenon known as ''metal dusting''. There are two major issues of importance in metal dusting. First is formation of coke and subsequent deposition of coke on metallic structural components. Second is the initiation and subsequent propagation of metal dusting degradation of the structural alloy. In the past, we reported on the mechanism for metal dusting of Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present metal dusting data on both Fe- and Ni-base alloys after exposure in high and atmospheric pressure environments that simulate the gas chemistry in operating hydrogen reformers. We have also measured the progression of pits by measuring the depth as a function of exposure time for a variety of Fe- and Ni-base structural alloys. We have clearly established the role of transport of iron in forming a non-protective spinel phase in the initiation process and presence of carbon transfer channels in the oxide scale for the continued propagation of pits, by nano-beam X-ray analysis using the advance photon source (APS), Raman scattering, and SEM/EDX analysis. In this report, we have developed correlations between weight loss and pit progression rates and evaluated the effects of carbon activity, system pressure, and alloy chemistry, on weight loss and pit propagation. To develop pit propagation data for the alloys without incurring substantial time for the initiation of pits, especially for the Ni-base alloys that exhibit incubation times of thousands of hours, a pre-pitting method has been developed. The pre-pitted alloys exhibited pit propagation rates similar to those of materials tested without pre-pitting. We have also developed a substantial body of metal-dusting data on the performance of Fe- and Ni-base weldments. During the course of this project, we have developed new Ni-base and Cu-base alloys and tested them in simulated metal dusting environments at 1 atm and at high pressures. Results clearly showed superior performance of both classes of alloys in resisting metal dusting. We also developed an approach to mitigate metal dusting by performing an intermediate oxidation step for extending the life of alloys in which metal dusting has initiated and pits are in progression. Finally, we have analyzed several components that have failed in plants such as hydrogen plant, pilot plant reformer, and a gas boiler.

Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

PROPERTIES AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF DUST EMISSION IN THE CRAB NEBULA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent infrared (IR) observations of freshly formed dust in supernova remnants have yielded significantly lower dust masses than predicted by theoretical models and measured from high-redshift observations. The Crab Nebula's pulsar wind is thought to be sweeping up freshly formed supernova (SN) dust along with the ejected gas. The evidence for this dust was found in the form of an IR excess in the integrated spectrum of the Crab and in extinction against the synchrotron nebula that revealed the presence of dust in the filament cores. We present the first spatially resolved emission spectra of dust in the Crab Nebula acquired with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The IR spectra are dominated by synchrotron emission and show forbidden line emission from S, Si, Ne, Ar, O, Fe, and Ni. We derived a synchrotron spectral map from the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m images, and subtracted this contribution from our data to produce a map of the residual continuum emission from dust. The dust emission appears to be concentrated along the ejecta filaments and is well described by an amorphous carbon or silicate grain compositions. We find a dust temperature of 55 {+-} 4 K for silicates and 60 {+-} 7 K for carbon grains. The total estimated dust mass is (1.2-12) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun }, well below the theoretical dust yield predicted for a core-collapse supernova. Our grain heating model implies that the dust grain radii are relatively small, unlike what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP SN.

Temim, Tea; Sonneborn, George; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gehrz, Robert D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Slane, Patrick [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Roellig, Thomas L., E-mail: tea.temim@nasa.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Raman Spectroscopy of Carbon Dust Samples from NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raman spectrum of dust particles exposed to the NSTX plasma is different from the spectrum of unexposed particles scraped from an unused graphite tile. For the unexposed particles, the high energy G-mode peak (Raman shift ~1580 cm-1) is much stronger than the defect-induced D-mode peak (Raman shift ~ 1350 cm-1), a pattern that is consistent with Raman spectrum for commercial graphite materials. For dust particles exposed to the plasma, the ratio of G-mode to D-mode peaks is lower and becomes even less than 1. The Raman measurements indicate that the production of carbon dust particles in NSTX involves modifications of the physical and chemical structure of the original graphite material. These modifications are shown to be similar to those measured for carbon deposits from atmospheric pressure helium arc discharge with an ablating anode electrode made from a graphite tile material. We also demonstrate experimentally that heating to 2000-2700 K alone can not explain the observed structural modifications indicating that they must be due to higher temperatures needed for graphite vaporization, which is followed either by condensation or some plasma-induced processes leading to the formation of more disordered forms of carbon material than the original graphite.

Y. Raitses, C.H. Skinner, F. Jiang and T.S. Duffy

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800ºC.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cyborg Bugs... and Neural Dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyborg Bugs... and Neural Dust Michel M. Maharbiz © 2014 D.J. Seo Elad Alon system Seo D, et al. "Neural Dust: An Ultrasonic, Low Power SoluNon for Chronic Brain-Machine Interfaces," arXiv, Jul. 2013 Seo D, et al. "In Vitro Characteriza

California at Irvine, University of

230

VARIABLE WINDS AND DUST FORMATION IN R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have observed P-Cygni and asymmetric, blue-shifted absorption profiles in the He I {lambda}10830 lines of 12 R Coronae Borealis stars over short (1 month) and long (3 yr) timescales to look for variations linked to their dust-formation episodes. In almost all cases, the strengths and terminal velocities of the line vary significantly and are correlated with dust formation events. Strong absorption features with blue-shifted velocities {approx}400 km s{sup -1} appear during declines in visible brightness and persist for about 100 days after recovery to maximum brightness. Small residual winds of somewhat lower velocity are present outside of the decline and recovery periods. The correlations support models in which recently formed dust near the star is propelled outward at high speed by radiation pressure and drags the gas along with it.

Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Zhang Wanshu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Geballe, T. R., E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: wzhan21@lsu.edu, E-mail: tgeballe@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly technical report No. 10, December 1, 1988--February 28, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Little is yet known (theoretically or experimentally) about the simultaneous effects of particle inertia, particle thermophoresis and high mass loading on the important engineering problem of predicting deposition rates from flowing ``dusty`` gases. For this reason, we investigate the motion of particles present at nonnegligible mass loading in a flowing nonisothermal gaseous medium and their deposition on strongly cooled or heated solid objects by examining the instructive case of steady axisymmetric ``dusty gas`` flow between two infinite disks: an inlet (porous) disk and the impermeable ``target`` disk -- a flow not unlike that encountered in recent seeded-flame experiments. Since this stagnation flow/geometry admits interesting self-similar solutions at all Reynolds numbers, we are able to predict laminar flow mass-, momentum- and energy-transfer rate coefficients over a wide range of particle mass loadings, dimensionless particle relaxation times (Stokes numbers), dimensionless thermophoretic diffusivities, and gas Reynolds numbers. As a by-product, we illustrate the accuracy and possible improvement of our previous ``diffusion model`` for tightly coupled dusty gas systems. Moreover, we report new results illustrating the dependence of the important ``critical`` Stokes number (for incipient particle impaction) on particle mass loading and wall/gas temperature ratio for dust-laden gas motion towards ``overheated`` solid surfaces. The present formulation and insulating transport coefficients should not only be useful in explaining/predicting recent deposition rate trends in ``seeded`` flame experiments, but also highly mass-loaded systems of technological interest.

Rosner, D.E.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol-to-liquid particle extraction Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XXXI Houston, March 2000 SIMS ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERPLANETARY DUST FROM SPACE-EXPOSED AEROGEL. Summary: the captured residues. Extraction of particles. In the first step of the...

233

1014 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 4, AUGUST 2008 Dust-Cloud Dynamics in a Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is proposed. Index Terms--Charge, dust cloud, dusty plasma. ACOMPLEX (dusty) plasma is a partially ionized gas research program (FAST) under Contract FR060169. L. Couëdel is with the School of Physics, The University of the plasma are lost by diffusion to the walls of the reactor and by recombination on the dust

Boyer, Edmond

234

The Millennium Gas project aims to undertake smoothed-particle hydrodynamic resimulations of the Millennium Simulation, providing many hundred massive galaxy clusters for comparison with X-ray surveys (170 clusters with kTsl > 3 keV). This paper looks at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Abstract The Millennium Gas project aims to undertake smoothed-particle hydrodynamic-ray surveys (170 clusters with kTsl > 3 keV). This paper looks at the hot gas and stellar fractions-core systems but are successful in matching the hot gas profiles of non-cool-core clusters. Although

Thomas, Peter

235

On the Evolution of Dust Mineralogy, From Protoplanetary Disks to Planetary Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineralogical studies of silicate features emitted by dust grains in protoplanetary disks and Solar System bodies can shed light on the progress of planet formation. The significant fraction of crystalline material in comets, chondritic meteorites and interplanetary dust particles indicates a modification of the almost completely amorphous ISM dust from which they formed. The production of crystalline silicates thus must happen in protoplanetary disks, where dust evolves to build planets and planetesimals. Different scenarios have been proposed, but it is still unclear how and when this happens. This paper presents dust grain mineralogy of a complete sample of protoplanetary disks in the young Serpens cluster. These results are compared to those in the young Taurus region and to sources that have retained their protoplanetary disks in the older Upper Scorpius and Eta Chamaeleontis stellar clusters, using the same analysis technique for all samples. This comparison allows an investigation of the grain mineralo...

Oliveira, Isa; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Merin, Bruno

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Vacuum friction in rotating particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the frictional torque acting on particles rotating in empty space. At zero temperature, vacuum friction transforms mechanical energy into light emission and produces particle heating. However, particle cooling relative to the environment occurs at finite temperatures and low rotation velocities. Radiation emission is boosted and its spectrum significantly departed from a hot-body emission profile as the velocity increases. Stopping times ranging from hours to billions of years are predicted for materials, particle sizes, and temperatures accessible to experiment. Implications for the behavior of cosmic dust are discussed.

A. Manjavacas; F. J. García de Abajo

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

Dust and Molecules at High Redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last years, progress has been very rapid in the domain of molecules at high redshift, and we know in better detail now the molecular and dust content in several systems beyond z=1 and up to z = 5. The first discovery in 1992 by Brown and van den Bout of CO lines at z=2.28 in a gravitationally lensed starburst galaxy, strongly stimulated searches of other systems, but these were harder than foreseen, and less than 10 other systems have been discovered in CO emission. Redshifts range between 2 and 5, the largest being BR1202-0725 at z=4.69. Most of these systems, if not all, are gravitationally amplified objects. Some have been discovered first through their dust emission, relatively easy to detect because of the negative K-correction effect. The detection of all these systems could give an answer about the debated question of the star-formation rate as a function of redshift. The maximum of star-formation rate, found around z=2 from optical studies, could shift to higher z if the most remote objects are hidden by dust. Absorption in front of quasars can also probe cold gas at high redshift, taking advantage of very high spatial (milli arcsec) and spectral (30m/s) resolutions. From the diffuse components, one can measure the cosmic black body temperature as a function of redshift. All these preliminary studies will be carried out at large scales with future millimeter instruments, and some perspectives are given.

F. Combes

1998-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

Tanpopo cosmic dust collector: Silica aerogel production and bacterial DNA contamination analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrophobic silica aerogels with ultra-low densities have been designed and developed as cosmic dust capture media for the Tanpopo mission which is proposed to be carried out on the International Space Station. Glass particles as a simulated cosmic dust with 30 \\mu m in diameter and 2.4 g/cm^3 in density were successfully captured by the novel aerogel at a velocity of 6 km/s. Background levels of contaminated DNA in the ultra-low density aerogel were lower than the detection limit of a polymerase chain reaction assay. These results show that the manufactured aerogel has good performance as a cosmic dust collector and sufficient quality in respect of DNA contamination. The aerogel is feasible for the biological analyses of captured cosmic dust particles in the astrobiological studies.

Tabata, Makoto; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Yano, Hajime; Yamagishi, Akihiko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

PROPERTIES OF NEWLY FORMED DUST GRAINS IN THE LUMINOUS TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2010jl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the universe. However, our knowledge of their importance to dust production is limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova 2010jl around one and a half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ?1350-1450 K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ?(7.5-8.5) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ?}. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate of the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (?< 0.1 ?m, and most likely ?< 0.01 ?m). We believe the dust grains were formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ?10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density must be ?> 3 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of ?> 0.02 M{sub ?} yr{sup –1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ?100 km s{sup –1}). This strongly supports a scenario in which SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous-Blue-Variable-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.

Maeda, K.; Nozawa, T.; Folatelli, G.; Moriya, T. J.; Nomoto, K.; Bersten, M.; Quimby, R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Minowa, Y.; Pyo, T.-S. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Motohara, K.; Kitagawa, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ueno, I.; Kawabata, K. S.; Yamanaka, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kozasa, T. [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Iye, M., E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.jp [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mineral Dust Entrainment and Deposition (DEAD) model: Description and 1990s dust climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DUST MODEL AND 1990S CLIMATOLOGY Table 5. Trace MetalDUST MODEL AND 1990S CLIMATOLOGY Figure 7. Predicted andDUST MODEL AND 1990S CLIMATOLOGY Mahowald, N. , K. Kohfeld,

Zender, Charles S; Bian, H.; Newman, D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

autogenous bone dust: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

galaxies, a method for the dust mass evaluation, which accounts for the dust temperature distribution, is here presented and discussed. The derived dust masses turn out to...

243

Improved high efficiency third stage separator cyclones for separation of fines from fluid catalytic cracking flue gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stairmand type small diameter (0.254 m) multicyclones were cold flow tested for fluid catalytic cracking third stage separator application. The gas discharge from the cyclone dust outlet into the common collection hopper was found to far exceed the hopper bleed rate (underflow). The excess gas reentrained dust from the hopper back into cyclones, which lowered collection efficiencies. Vortex {open_quotes}stabilization{close_quotes} using apex cones was unsuccessful whereas a Mobil proprietary cyclone modification was successful in minimizing excess gas discharge and dust reentrainment at the cyclone-hopper boundary. In tests at 700 {degrees}C, the modified cyclones captured all particles above 4 {mu}m. Mobil-Kellogg incorporated the modified cyclones in a new third stage separator design which is targeted for achieving lowest opacity and <50 mg/Nm{sup 3} emissions at the stack. The first such unit will be commercialized in Mobil`s newest catalytic cracker (M.W. Kellogg design) under construction in Altona, Australia in late 1996. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Chitnis, G.K.; Schatz, K.W. [Mobil Technology Co., Paulsboro, NJ (United States); Bussey, B.K. [M.W. Kellogg Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

Techniques For Injection Of Pre-Charaterized Dust Into The Scrape Off Layer Of Fusion Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction of micron-sized dust into the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a plasma has recently found many applications aimed primarily at determining dust behavior in future fusion reactors. The dust particles are typically composed of materials intrinsic to a fusion reactor. On DIII-D and TEXTOR carbon dust has been introduced into the SOL using a probe inserted from below into the divertor region. On NSTX, both Li and tungsten dust have been dropped from the top of the machine into the SOL throughout the duration of a discharge, by utilizing a vibrating piezoelectric based particle dropper. The original particle dropper was developed to inject passivated Li powder {approx} 40 {mu}m in diameter into the SOL to enhance plasma performance. A simplified version of the dropper was developed to introduce trace amounts of tungsten powder for only a few discharges, thus not requiring a large powder reservoir. The particles emit visible light from plasma interactions and can be tracked by either spectroscopic means or by fast frame rate visible cameras. This data can then be compared with dust transport codes such as DUSTT to make predictions of dust behavior in next-step devices such as ITER. For complete modeling results, it is desired to be able to inject pre-characterized dust particles in the SOL at various known poloidal locations, including near the vessel midplane. Purely mechanical methods of injecting particles are presently being studied using a modified piezoelectric-based powder dropper as a particle source and one of several piezo-based transducers to deflect the particles into the SOL. Vibrating piezo fans operating at 60 Hz with a deflection of {+-}2.5 cm can impart a significant horizontal boost in velocity. The highest injection velocities are expected from rotating paddle wheels capable of injecting particles at 10's of meters per second depending primarily on the rotation velocity and diameter of the wheel. Several injection concepts have been tested and will be discussed below.

Roquemore, A. L.; John, B.; Friesen, F.; Hartzfeld, K.; Mansfield, D. K.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

Anisotropic collective flow of a Lorentz gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical results for the anisotropic collective flow of a Lorentz gas of massless particles scattering on fixed centres are presented.

Nicolas Borghini; Clement Gombeaud

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities >~ 200 km/s for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are incre...

Slavin, Jonathan D; Jones, Anthony P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

DUST GRAIN EVOLUTION IN SPATIALLY RESOLVED T TAURI BINARIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core-accretion planet formation begins in protoplanetary disks with the growth of small, interstellar medium dust grains into larger particles. The progress of grain growth, which can be quantified using 10 {mu}m silicate spectroscopy, has broad implications for the final products of planet formation. Previous studies have attempted to correlate stellar and disk properties with the 10 {mu}m silicate feature in an effort to determine which stars are efficient at grain growth. Thus far there does not appear to be a dominant correlated parameter. In this paper, we use spatially resolved adaptive optics spectroscopy of nine T Tauri binaries as tight as 0.''25 to determine if basic properties shared between binary stars, such as age, composition, and formation history, have an effect on dust grain evolution. We find with 90%-95% confidence that the silicate feature equivalent widths of binaries are more similar than those of randomly paired single stars, implying that shared properties do play an important role in dust grain evolution. At lower statistical significance, we find with 82% confidence that the secondary has a more prominent silicate emission feature (i.e., smaller grains) than the primary. If confirmed by larger surveys, this would imply that spectral type and/or binarity are important factors in dust grain evolution.

Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Males, Jared R. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Greene, Thomas P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

DUST EMISSION AND STAR FORMATION IN STEPHAN'S QUINTET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze a comprehensive set of MIR/FIR observations of Stephan's Quintet (SQ), taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our study reveals the presence of a luminous (L{sub IR} {approx} 4.6 x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) and extended component of infrared dust emission, not connected with the main bodies of the galaxies, but roughly coincident with the X-ray halo of the group. We fitted the inferred dust emission spectral energy distribution of this extended source and the other main infrared emission components of SQ, including the intergalactic shock, to elucidate the mechanisms powering the dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, taking into account collisional heating by the plasma and heating through UV and optical photons. Combining the inferred direct and dust-processed UV emission to estimate the star formation rate (SFR) for each source we obtain a total SFR for SQ of 7.5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, similar to that expected for non-interacting galaxies with stellar mass comparable to the SQ galaxies. Although star formation in SQ is mainly occurring at, or external to the periphery of the galaxies, the relation of SFR per unit physical area to gas column density for the brightest sources is similar to that seen for star formation regions in galactic disks. We also show that available sources of dust in the group halo can provide enough dust to produce up to L{sub IR} {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} powered by collisional heating. Though a minority of the total infrared emission (which we infer to trace distributed star-formation), this is several times higher than the X-ray luminosity of the halo, so could indicate an important cooling mechanism for the hot intergalactic medium (IGM) and account for the overall correspondence between FIR and X-ray emission. We investigate two potential modes of star formation in SQ consistent with the data, fueled either by gas from a virialized hot IGM continuously accreting onto the group, whose cooling is enhanced by grains injected from an in situ population of intermediate mass stars, or by interstellar gas stripped from the galaxies. The former mode offers a natural explanation for the observed baryon deficiency in the IGM of SQ as well as for the steep L{sub X}-T{sub X} relation of groups such as SQ with lower velocity dispersions.

Natale, G.; Tuffs, R. J. [Max Planck Institute fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Xu, C. K.; Lu, N. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Popescu, C. C. [University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Fischera, J. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Lisenfeld, U. [Department de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain); Appleton, P. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dopita, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Duc, P.-A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Dapnia/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gao, Y. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Reach, W. [Spitzer Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sulentic, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa, CSIC, Apdo. 3004, 18080, Granada (Spain); Yun, M., E-mail: giovanni.natale@mpi-hd.mpg.d, E-mail: richard.buffs@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Coal cutting research slashes dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Bureau of Mines' research projects aimed at the reduction of coal dust during coal cutting operations are described. These include an investigation of the effects of conical bit wear on respirable dust generation, energy and cutting forces; the determination of the best conical bit mount condition to increase life by enhancing bit rotation; a comparison between chisel- and conical-type cutters. In order to establish a suitable homogeneous reference material for cutting experiments, a synthetic coal with a plaster base is being developed.

Roepke, W.W.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nonlinear dust acoustic waves and shocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe experiments on (1) nonlinear dust acoustic waves and (2) dust acoustic shocks performed in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma. First, we describe experiments showing nonlinear dust acoustic waves characterized by waveforms of the dust density that are typically sharper in the wave crests and flatter in the wave troughs (compared to sinusoidal waves), indicating the development of wave harmonics. We discuss this behavior in terms of a second-order fluid theory for dust acoustic waves. Second, experimental observations of the propagation and steepening of large-amplitude dust acoustic waves into dust acoustic shock waves are presented. The observed shock wave evolution is compared with numerical calculations based on the Riemann solution of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for dust acoustic waves.

Merlino, R. L.; Heinrich, J. R.; Hyun, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Using Reconstructed Dust Climatology to Study the Impacts of Martian Dust Storms on Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Reconstructed Dust Climatology to Study the Impacts of Martian Dust Storms on Dynamics L@atm.ox.ac.uk) Abstract We have reconstructed the climatology of the dust on Mars using available retrievals and estimates) a reconstruction of the dust optical depth climatology based on weighted gridding for Martian years 24

Cambridge, University of

253

EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Triaxial TestsTests Direct Shear TestsDirect Shear Tests Clean and Coal Dust Fouled Ballast BehaviorClean1 EFFECT OF COAL DUST ONEFFECT OF COAL DUST ON RAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTHRAILROAD BALLAST STRENGTH for Laboratory StudyFouling Mechanism / Need for Laboratory Study Mechanical Properties of Coal Dust

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

254

Adding coal dust to coal batch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The granulometric composition of coke dust from the dry-slaking machine is determined. The influence of additions of 3-7% coke dust on the quality of industrial coking batch and the coke obtained by box coking is estimated. Adding 1% coke dust to coking batch does not markedly change the coke quality. Industrial equipment for the supply of dry-slaking dust to the batch is described.

V.S. Shved; A.V.Berezin [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

TITLE: Identification of Possible Interstellar Dust Impact Craters on Stardust Foil I033N,1 P43A. Extraterrestrial Dust: Laboratory Analysis of Mission-Returned Samples and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particle that impacted the spacecraft's solar panels. TEM/EDS analysis determined the presence of solar on Stardust Foil I033N,1 SESSION TYPE: Poster; SESSION TITLE: P43A. Extraterrestrial Dust: Laboratory Analysis. Contamination was monitored according to the ISPE protocol: four 4 µm ! 3 µm areas of C layers of different

256

Prediction of the In-Situ Dust Measurements of the Stardust Mission to Comet 81P/Wild 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We predict the amount of cometary, interplanetary, and interstellar cosmic dust that is to be measured by the Cometary and Interstellar Dust Analyzer (CIDA) and the aerogel collector on-board the Stardust spacecraft during its fly-by of comet P/Wild 2 and during the interplanetary cruise phase. We give the dust flux on the spacecraft during the encounter with the comet using both, a radially symmetric and an axially symmetric coma model. At closest approach, we predict a total dust flux of $10^{6.0} m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for the radially symmetric case and $10^{6.5} m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for the axially symmetric case. This prediction is based on an observation of the comet at a heliocentric distance of $1.7 {\\rm AU}$. We reproduce the measurements of the Giotto and VEGA missions to comet P/Halley using the same model as for the Stardust predictions. The planned measurements of {\\em interstellar} dust by Stardust have been triggered by the discovery of interstellar dust impacts in the data collected by the Ulysses and Galileo dust detector. Using the Ulysses and Galileo measurements we predict that 25 interstellar particles, mainly with masses of about $10^{-12} g$, will hit the target of the CIDA experiment. The interstellar side of the aerogel collector will contain 120 interstellar particles, 40 of which with sizes greater than $1 \\mu m$. We furthermore investigate the ``contamination'' of the CIDA and collector measurements by interplanetary particles during the cruise phase.

Markus Landgraf; Michael Müller; Eberhard Grün

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of particles energy loss generation of electron-ion+ pairs #12;Gas Filled Detectors Primary and Total Ionization fast charged particles ionize the atoms of a gas fraction of resulting primary electrons have enough kinetic energy to ionize other atoms #12;Gas Filled

Peletier, Reynier

258

A Search for Extraplanar Dust in Nearby Edge-On Spirals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present high resolution BV images of 12 edge-on spiral galaxies observed with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope. These images were obtained to search for extraplanar (|z| > 0.4 kpc) absorbing dust structures similar to those previously found in NGC 891 (Howk & Savage 1997). Our imaged galaxies include a sample of seven massive L_*-like spiral galaxies within D 87 deg from the plane of the sky. We find that five of these seven systems show extraplanar dust, visible as highly-structured absorbing clouds against the background stellar light of the galaxies. The more prominent structures are estimated to have associated gas masses >10^5 M_sun; the implied potential energies are > 10^(52) ergs. All of the galaxies in our sample that show detectable halpha emission at large z also show extraplanar dust structures. None of those galaxies for which extraplanar halpha searches were negative show evidence for extensive high-z dust. The existence of extraplanar dust is a common property of massive spiral galaxies. We discuss several mechanisms for shaping the observed dust features, emphasizing the possibility that these dusty clouds represent the dense phase of a multiphase medium at high-z in spiral galaxies. The correlation between high-z dust and extraplanar Halpha emission may simply suggest that both trace the high-z interstellar medium in its various forms (or phases), the existence of which may ultimately be driven by vigorous star formation in the underlying disk. (Abstract abridged)

J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

1999-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup ?4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (?pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur 782 402 (India)] [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur 782 402 (India)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

aerosol particles collected: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Saller 2002-05-07 6 Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles Materials Science Websites Summary: being clouds...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Role of positively charged dust grains on dust acoustic wave propagation in presence of nonthermal ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An expression for ion current flowing to the dust grains is proposed, when dust charge is positive and the ions are nonthermal. Secondary electron emission has been considered as the source of positive charging of the dust grains. Investigation shows that presence of positively charged dust grains along with thermal electrons and nonthermal ions generate purely growing dust acoustic waves for both the cases of ion nonthermal parameter greater than one and less than one. In the later case, the growth is conditional.

Sarkar, Susmita; Maity, Saumyen [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

First optical images of circumstellar dust surrounding the debris disk candidate HD 32297  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope recently revealed a circumstellar dust disk around the A star HD 32297. Dust scattered light is detected as far as 400 AU radius and the linear morphology is consistent with a disk ~10 degrees away from an edge-on orientation. Here we present the first optical images that show the dust scattered light morphology from 560 to 1680 AU radius. The position angle of the putative disk midplane diverges by 31 degrees and the color of dust scattering is most likely blue. We associate HD 32297 with a wall of interstellar gas and the enigmatic region south of the Taurus molecular cloud. We propose that the extreme asymmetries and blue disk color originate from a collision with a clump of interstellar material as HD 32297 moves southward, and discuss evidence consistent with an age of 30 Myr or younger.

P. Kalas

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

THE REBOUND CONDITION OF DUST AGGREGATES REVEALED BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THEIR COLLISIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collisional growth of dust aggregates is a plausible root of planetesimals forming in protoplanetary disks. However, a rebound of colliding dust aggregates prevents dust from growing into planetesimals. In fact, rebounding aggregates are observed in laboratory experiments but not in previous numerical simulations. Therefore, the condition of rebound between dust aggregates should be clarified to better understand the processes of dust growth and planetesimal formation. We have carried out numerical simulations of aggregate collisions for various types of aggregates and succeeded in reproducing a rebound of colliding aggregates under specific conditions. Our finding is that in the rebound process, the key factor of the aggregate structure is the coordination number, namely, the number of particles in contact with a particle. A rebound is governed by the energy dissipation along with restructuring of the aggregates and a large coordination number inhibits the restructuring at collisions. Results of our numerical simulation for various aggregates indicate that they stick to each other when the mean coordination number is less than 6, regardless of their materials and structures, as long as their collision velocity is less than the critical velocity for fragmentation. This criterion of the coordination number would correspond to a filling factor of {approx}0.3, which is somewhat larger than that reported in laboratory experiments. In protoplanetary disks, dust aggregates are expected to have low bulk densities (<0.1 g cm{sup -3}) during their growth, which would prevent dust aggregates from rebounding. This result supports the formation of planetesimals with direct dust growth in protoplanetary disks.

Wada, Koji [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Tetsuo [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Suyama, Toru [Nagano City Museum, Hachimanpara Historic Park, Oshimada, Nagano 381-2212 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroshi, E-mail: wada@perc.it-chiba.ac.jp [Center for Planetary Science (CPS), Chuo-ku Minatojima Minamimachi 7-1-48, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

ORIGIN OF DUST AROUND V1309 SCO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The origin of dust grains in the interstellar medium is still an unanswered problem. Nicholls et al. found the presence of a significant amount of dust around V1309 Sco, which may originate from the merger of a contact binary. We investigate the origin of dust around V1309 Sco and suggest that these dust grains are produced in the binary-merger ejecta. By means of the AGBDUST code, we estimate that ?5.2 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ?} dust grains are produced with a radii of ?10{sup –5} cm. These dust grains are mainly composed of silicate and iron grains. Because the mass of the binary merger ejecta is very small, the contribution of dust produced by binary merger ejecta to the overall dust production in the interstellar medium is negligible. However, it is important to note that the discovery of a significant amount of dust around V1309 Sco offers a direct support for the idea that common-envelope ejecta provides an ideal environment for dust formation and growth. Therefore, we confirm that common envelope ejecta can be important source of cosmic dust.

Zhu, Chunhua; Lü, Guoliang; Wang, Zhaojun, E-mail: guolianglv@gmail.com [School of Physical Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi, 830046 (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A novel aspect of dust in plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear screening of the dust grains immersed in a homogenous fully ionized electron-ion plasma is investigated. Assuming conservation of entropy, an important relation is obtained between the maximum potential (and therefore the charge) of the dust grain and the temperature of the electrons. The Thomas-Fermi equation is derived for the potential of a dust grain in a nondegenerate plasma suggesting the existence of dust atom with a well defined atomic radius. Furthermore, based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the notion of a dust-grain molecule is introduced in which the protons act like a kind of 'glue' which binds two negatively charged dust grains together, and the motion of the grains have little influence on that binding force. Finally, considering the weak interaction between the proton clouds of two dust grains, an expression of exchange energy is obtained.

Tsintsadze, N.L.; Murtaza, G.; Ehsan, Z. [Department of Plasma Physics, Tbilisi State University (Georgia); National Centre for Mathematics and Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University Lahore, 54000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Mathematics and Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University Lahore, 54000 (Pakistan)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Does variation in mineral composition alter the short-wave light scattering properties of desert dust aerosol?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

retrievals of mineral dust aerosol from space by visible and near-infrared radiometers. Errors in aerosol depth in deserts and the surrounding regions during periods of high wind. Long range transport of desert particles into the air [6] (wind alone does not have sufficient energy to remove particles from the surface

Oxford, University of

267

SIZE AND DENSITY ESTIMATION FROM IMPACT TRACK MORPHOLOGY IN SILICA AEROGEL: APPLICATION TO DUST FROM COMET 81P/WILD 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large number of cometary dust particles were captured with low-density silica aerogel during the NASA Stardust mission. The dust particles penetrated into the aerogel and formed various track shapes. To estimate the properties of the dust particles, such as density and size, based on the morphology of the tracks, we carried out systematic experiments testing impacts into low-density aerogel at 6 km s{sup -1} using projectiles of various sizes and densities. We found that the maximum track diameter and the ratio of the track length to the maximum track diameter in aerogel are good indicators of projectile size and density, respectively. Based on these results, we estimated the size and density of individual dust particles from comet 81P/Wild 2. The average density of the 'fluffy' dust particles and the bulk density of all dust particles were obtained as 0.35 {+-} 0.07 and 0.49 {+-} 0.18 g cm{sup -3}, respectively. These statistical data provided the content of monolithic and coarse grains in the Stardust particles, {approx}30 wt%. Combining this result with some mid-infrared observational data, we found that the content of crystalline silicates is {approx}50 wt% or more of non-volatile material.

Niimi, Rei; Tsuchiyama, Akira [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kadono, Toshihiko [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okudaira, Kyoko [Office for Planning and Management, The University of Aizu, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8580 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao; Tabata, Makoto [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Watanabe, Takayuki; Yagishita, Masahito [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Machii, Nagisa; Nakamura, Akiko M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa [Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Nakano, Tsukasa, E-mail: kadonot@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp [Geological Survey of Japan, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8567 (Japan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

asian dust particles: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and meteorological parameters in the Gobi region indicated that invasion of polar cold air played an important role climate indices that are appropriate for the scale of...

269

Coal cutting research slashes dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal-Cutting Technology Group at the Bureau of Mine's Twin Cities Research Center is investigating ways to reduce primary dust generated by coal cutting. The progression of research within the program is from fundamental laboratory research, to fundamental field research, to field concept verification. Then the Bureau recommends warranted changes and/or prototype development to industry. Currently the Cutting Technology Group has several projects in each phase of research. The Bureau's current fundamental studies of bit characteristics are directed to determining the effects of conical bit wear on primary respirable dust generation, energy, and cutting forces; establishing best conical bit mount condition to increase life by enhancing bit rotation; and comparing chisel-type cutters to conical-type cutters. Additionally, to establish a suitable homogeneous reference material for cutting experiments, a synthetic coal with a plaster base is being developed.

Roepke, W.W.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Coal cutting research slashes dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal-Cutting Technology Group at the Bureau of Mines Twin Cities (MN) Research Center is investigating ways to reduce primary dust generated by coal cutting. The progression of research within the program is from fundamental laboratory research, to fundamental field research, to field concept verification. Then the Bureau recommends warranted changes and/or prototype development to industry. Currently the group has several projects in each phase of research. The Bureau's current fundamental studies of bit characteristics are directed toward determining the effects of conical bit wear on primary respirable dust generation, energy, and cutting forces; establishing best conical bit mount condition to increase life by enhancing bit rotation; and comparing chisel-type cutters to conical-type cutters. Additionally, to establish a suitable homogeneous reference material for cutting experiments, a synthetic coal with a plaster base is being developed.

Roepke, W.W.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

GEOMETRIC CROSS SECTIONS OF DUST AGGREGATES AND A COMPRESSION MODEL FOR AGGREGATE COLLISIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geometric cross sections of dust aggregates determine their coupling with disk gas, which governs their motions in protoplanetary disks. Collisional outcomes also depend on geometric cross sections of initial aggregates. In a previous paper, we performed three-dimensional N-body simulations of sequential collisions of aggregates composed of a number of sub-micron-sized icy particles and examined radii of gyration (and bulk densities) of the obtained aggregates. We showed that collisional compression of aggregates is not efficient and that aggregates remain fluffy. In the present study, we examine geometric cross sections of the aggregates. Their cross sections decrease due to compression as well as to their gyration radii. It is found that a relation between the cross section and the gyration radius proposed by Okuzumi et al. is valid for the compressed aggregates. We also refine the compression model proposed in our previous paper. The refined model enables us to calculate the evolution of both gyration radii and cross sections of growing aggregates and reproduces well our numerical results of sequential aggregate collisions. The refined model can describe non-equal-mass collisions as well as equal-mass cases. Although we do not take into account oblique collisions in the present study, oblique collisions would further hinder compression of aggregates.

Suyama, Toru [Nagano City Museum, Hachimanpara Historical Park Ojimada-machi, Nagano 381-2212 (Japan); Wada, Koji [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, Tsudanuma 2-17-1, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, N19-W8, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Okuzumi, Satoshi, E-mail: museum@city.nagano.lg.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

272

Impact of Particle Generation Method on the Apparent Hygroscopicity of Insoluble Mineral Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric mineral dust particles represent a major component of tropospheric aerosol mass and provide a reactive surface for heterogeneous reactions with trace atmospheric gases (Dentener et al. 1996).Heterogeneous processes alter the chemical balance of the atmosphere and also modify the physicochemical properties of mineral dust particles (Bauer et al. 2004). Organic and inorganic vapors can react with or partition to dust particles and alter their chemical composition (Al-Hosney et al. 2005; Laskin et al. 2005a, 2005b; Liu et al. 2008; Sullivan et al. 2007, 2009a; Sullivan and Prather 2007; Usher et al. 2003). Calcite (CaCO3) is one of the most reactive components of mineral dust, readily reacting with acidic gases. The fraction of CaCO3 in total dust mineralogy displays large variations between desert regions and other regions of the world as well as between individual mineral particles (Claquin et al. 1999; Jeong 2008; Laskin et al. 2005b; Sullivan et al. 2007). Through reactions with acidic gases CaCO3 can be converted to soluble hygroscopic products including CaCl2 and Ca(NO3)2, and sparingly soluble, non-hygroscopic products including CaSO4 and CaC2O4 (Krueger et al. 2004; Liu et al. 2008; Sullivan et al. 2009a, 2009b).

Sullivan, Ryan; Moore, Meagan J.; Petters, Markus D.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Laskin, Alexander; Roberts, Greg C.; Prather, Kimberly A.

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

PII S0016-7037(99)00284-7 Condensation in dust-enriched systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the resulting condensates. The computations included 23 elements and 374 gas species, and were done over a rangePII S0016-7037(99)00284-7 Condensation in dust-enriched systems DENTON S. EBEL 1 and LAWRENCE--Full equilibrium calculations of the sequence of condensation of the elements from cosmic gases made by total

Grossman, Lawrence

274

SIMS ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERPLANETARY DUST FROM SPACE-EXPOSED AEROGEL. F. J. Stadermann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMS ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERPLANETARY DUST FROM SPACE-EXPOSED AEROGEL. F. J. Stadermann 1: Aerogel is the medium of choice for the intact capture of small particles in space, because it is capable materials [1, 2]. After space-exposed aerogel is returned to the laboratory, the first step of analysis

275

HIGH FLUENCE SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MICROPROBE EFFECTS ON STARDUST INTERSTELLAR DUST CANDIDATES. A. Simionovici1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the interstellar dust stream. Analysis of these candidates from both low density aerogel capture cells and Al]. The aerogel samples were analyzed in situ in their pico- keystones by synchrotron radiation focused microprobe thickness slabs of aerogel containing the IS particles for further analysis. The ISPE team has implemented

Nittler, Larry R.

276

NNWSI PROJECT ELEMENT WBS-1.2.6.9.4.6.1.B INTERIM REPORT ON DUST CONTROL PROPOSALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents interim findings of studies conducted to evaluate dust control equipment during prototype drilling. Based on available data on silica content, type, particle size, and on proposed dry drilling operations, it is estimated that allowable exposures to free silica will range from 0.07 to 1.5 mg/cu meter. They have concluded that airborne concentrations of dust may approach or exceed these values during normal operations, based on studies conducted as part of this task.

D.J. Burton

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Sterrewacht Gas evolution in protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sterrewacht Leiden Gas evolution in protoplanetary disks W.F. Thi , E.F. van Dishoeck , G are surrounded by 10 ­10 M of gas+dust in disks with sizes of 100­400 AU. This material may form extrasolar planets. 3 Disks have also been imaged around Vega-like stars, but are thought to be gas­poor with "!#$ M

Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan van

278

Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

Williams, Jeremiah D. [Physics Department, Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio 45504 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Optical Properties of Saharan Dust and Asian Dust: Application to Radiative Transfer Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because the bulk optical properties of dust are largely dependent on their chemical composition, published reports from numerous dust field studies enabled us to compile observation data sets to derive the effective complex refractive indices...

Fang, Guangyang

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

The dust, planetesimals and planets of HD 38529  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HD 38529 is a post-main sequence G8III/IV star (3.5 Gyr old) with a planetary system consisting of at least two planets having Msin(i) of 0.8 MJup and 12.2 MJup, semimajor axes of 0.13 AU and 3.74 AU, and eccentricities of 0.25 and 0.35, respectively. Spitzer observations show that HD 38529 has an excess emission above the stellar photosphere, with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) at 70 micron of 4.7, a small excess at 33 micron (S/N=2.6) and no excess model the spectral energy distribution of HD 38529 to find out which of these niches show signs of harboring dust-producing plantesimals. The secular analysis, together with the SED modeling resuls, suggest that the planetesimals responsible for most of the dust emission are likely located within 20-50 AU, a configuration that resembles that of the Jovian planets + Kuiper Belt in our Solar System. Finally, we place upper limits (8E-6 lunar masses of 10 micron particles) to the amount of dust that could be located in the dynamically stable region that exists between the two planets (0.25--0.75 AU).

Amaya Moro-Martin; Renu Malhotra; John M. Carpenter; Lynne A. Hillenbrand; Sebastian Wolf; Michael R. Meyer; David Hollenbach; Joan Najita; Thomas Henning

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Methods of forming a fluidized bed of circulating particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is disclosed an apparatus for forming a fluidized bed of circulating particles. In an embodiment, the apparatus includes a bottom portion having a sidewall, the sidewall defining a curvilinear profile, and the bottom portion configured to contain a bed of particles; and a gas inlet configured to produce a column of gas to carry entrained particles therein. There is disclosed a method of forming a fluidized bed of circulating particles. In an embodiment, the method includes positioning particles within a bottom portion having a sidewall, the sidewall defining a curvilinear profile; producing a column of gas directed upwardly through a gas inlet; carrying entrained particles in the column of gas to produce a fountain of particles over the fluidized bed of circulating particles and subside in the particle bed until being directed inwardly into the column of gas within the curvilinear profile.

Marshall, Douglas W. (Blackfoot, ID)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, D.F.

1980-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Determination of Dusty Particle Charge Taking into Account Ion Drag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is devoted to the experimental estimation of charge of dust particle that levitates in the stratum of dc glow discharge. Particle charge is determined on the basis of the balance between ion drag force, gravitational and electric forces. Electric force is obtained from the axial distribution of the light intensity of strata.

Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh.; Orazbayev, S. A. [al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 96a Tole Bi St., Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Petrov, O. F.; Antipov, S. N. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of RAS, 13/19 Izhorskaya, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Particle Astrophysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Particle Astrophysics Particle Astrophysics Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten...

287

asian sand dust: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus...

288

Dust-acoustic filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal motion effect of charged particles in the filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma in the dust-acoustic frequency region is investigated by using the Lorentz transformed conductivity of the dusty plasma components and the total dielectric permittivity tensor of the dusty plasma in the laboratory frame. Obtaining the dispersion relation for dust-acoustic waves and considering the filamentation instability, the establishment time of the filamentation structure and the instability development threshold are derived. Moreover, it is shown that the current layer divides into separate current filaments.

Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Haghtalab, T. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand, 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran, 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Features of coal dust dynamics at action of differently oriented forces in granular filtering medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of the coal dust particles transportation and structurization in the experimental horizontal model of air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules as in the iodine air filter at the nuclear power plant is researched. In the investigated case the vector of carrying away force of air flow and the vector of gravitation force are mutually perpendicular, and the scattering of the dust particles on the granules occurs in the normal directions. It is found that the phenomenon of non controlled spontaneous sharp increase of aerodynamic resistance in the iodine air filter under the big integral volumes of filtered air and the big masses of introduced coal dust particles is not observed at the described experimental conditions in distinction from the case of the parallel orientation of this forces as in the vertical iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant. The quantitative measurements of the main parameters of the process of the dust masses transportation and structurization are made on a ...

Neklyudov, I M; Poltinin, P Ya; Ledenyov, O P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Features of coal dust dynamics at action of differently oriented forces in granular filtering medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of the coal dust particles transportation and structurization in the experimental horizontal model of air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules as in the iodine air filter at the nuclear power plant is researched. In the investigated case the vector of carrying away force of air flow and the vector of gravitation force are mutually perpendicular, and the scattering of the dust particles on the granules occurs in the normal directions. It is found that the phenomenon of non controlled spontaneous sharp increase of aerodynamic resistance in the iodine air filter under the big integral volumes of filtered air and the big masses of introduced coal dust particles is not observed at the described experimental conditions in distinction from the case of the parallel orientation of this forces as in the vertical iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant. The quantitative measurements of the main parameters of the process of the dust masses transportation and structurization are made on a developed experimental model of the iodine air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules.

I. M. Neklyudov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin; O. P. Ledenyov

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

Effect of a polynomial arbitrary dust size distribution on dust acoustic solitons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation of dust-acoustic solitons when dust grains are size-distributed and ions adiabatically heated is conducted. The influence of an arbitrary dust size-distribution described by a polynomial function on the properties of dust acoustic waves is investigated. An energy-like integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived. The solitary solutions are shown to undergo a transformation into cnoidal ones under some physical conditions. The dust size-distribution can significantly affect both lower and upper critical Mach numbers for both solitons and cnoidal solutions.

Ishak-Boushaki, M.; Djellout, D.; Annou, R. [Faculty of Physics, USTHB, P.B. 32 El Alia, Bab-ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for removing sulfur oxide from combustion gas to form Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and for reducing the harmful effects of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 on auxiliary heat exchangers in which a sodium compound is injected into the hot combustion gas forming liquid Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 in a gas-gas reaction and the resultant gas containing Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is cooled to below about 1150.degree. K. to form particles of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 prior to contact with at least one heat exchanger with the cooling being provided by the recycling of combustion gas from a cooled zone downstream from the introduction of the cooling gas.

Im, Kwan H. (Lisle, IL); Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Metal Dusting of Heat-Resistant Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal dusting leads to disintegration of such alloys as iron and nickel-based into a “dust” of particulate metal, metal carbide, carbon, and/or oxide. It occurs in strongly carburising environments at 400-900°C. Literature survey has shown...

Al-Meshari, Abdulaziz I

294

Rigidly rotating cylinders of charged dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational field of a rigidly rotating cylinder of charged dust is found analytically. The general and all regular solutions are divided into three classes. The acceleration and the vorticity of the dust are given, as well as the conditions for the appearance of closed timelike curves.

B. V. Ivanov

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

295

asian dust source: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural dust sources globally account for 75 % of emissions; anthropogenic, 25%. North Africa accounts for 55 % of global dust emissions with only 8% being anthropogenic,...

296

african mineral dust: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laurent 19 Does the size distribution of mineral dust aerosols depend on the wind speed at emission? CERN Preprints Summary: The size distribution of mineral dust aerosols...

297

Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity can not be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

S. Schnee; J. Li; A. A. Goodman; A. I. Sargent

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Linear and nonlinear dust acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous magnetized dusty plasma with nonextensive electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of both linear and nonlinear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in an inhomogeneous magnetized collisional and warm dusty plasma (DP) consisting of Boltzmann ions, nonextensive electrons, and inertial dust particles is investigated. The number density gradients of all DP components besides the inhomogeneities of electrostatic potential and the initial dust fluid velocity are taken into account. The linear dispersion relation and a nonlinear modified Zakharov-Kusnetsov (MZK) equation governing the propagation of the three-dimensional DAWs are derived. The analytical solution of the MZK reveals the creation of both compressive and rarefactive DAW solitons in the proposed model. It is found that the inhomogeneity dimension parameter and the electron nonextensive parameter affect significantly the nonlinear DAW's amplitude, width, and Mach number. The relations of our findings with some astrophysical situations have been given.

El-Taibany, W. F., E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg, E-mail: eltaibany@hotmail.com; Selim, M. M.; Al-Abbasy, O. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta P. O. 34517 (Egypt); El-Bedwehy, N. A., E-mail: nab-elbedwehy@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta P. O. 34517 (Egypt)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

Morris, Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Fraser, Andrew Mcleod (Los Alamos, NM); Schultz, Larry Joe (Los Alamos, NM); Borozdin, Konstantin N. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich (Maynard, MA); Sossong, Michael James (Los Alamos, NM); Blanpied, Gary (Lexington, SC)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

Particle separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

Moosmuller, Hans (Reno, NV); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Reno, NV); Arnott, W. Patrick (Reno, NV)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mercury sorbent delivery system for flue gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention presents a device for the removal of elemental mercury from flue gas streams utilizing a layer of activated carbon particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag for use in a flue gas scrubbing system.

Klunder; ,Edgar B. (Bethel Park, PA)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

FRAGMENTATION AND EVOLUTION OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE EFFECT OF DUST HEATING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the effect of heating by luminosity sources in a simulation of clustered star formation. Our heating method involves a simplified continuum radiative transfer method that calculates the dust temperature. The gas temperature is set by the dust temperature. We present the results of four simulations; two simulations assume an isothermal equation of state and the two other simulations include dust heating. We investigate two mass regimes, i.e., 84 M{sub sun} and 671 M{sub sun}, using these two different energetics algorithms. The mass functions for the isothermal simulations and simulations that include dust heating are drastically different. In the isothermal simulation, we do not form any objects with masses above 1 M{sub sun}. However, the simulation with dust heating, while missing some of the low-mass objects, forms high-mass objects ({approx}20 M{sub sun}) which have a distribution similar to the Salpeter initial mass function. The envelope density profiles around the stars formed in our simulation match observed values around isolated, low-mass star-forming cores. We find the accretion rates to be highly variable and, on average, increasing with final stellar mass. By including radiative feedback from stars in a cluster-scale simulation, we have determined that it is a very important effect which drastically affects the mass function and yields important insights into the formation of massive stars.

Urban, Andrea; Evans, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Martel, Hugo [Departement de Physique, genie physique et optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC G1K 7P4 (Canada)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

303

Particle density distributions in Fermi gas superfluids: Differences between one- and two-channel models in the Bose-Einstein-condensation limit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the differences between one- and two-channel descriptions of fermionic gases with arbitrarily tunable attractive interactions; these two cases correspond to whether molecular bosonic degrees of freedom are omitted or included. We adopt the standard ground state wave function for the fermionic component associated with the BCS to BEC crossover problem: for weak attraction the system is in the BCS state while it crosses over continuously to a Bose-Einstein-condensed (BEC) state as the interaction strength is increased. Our analysis focuses on the BEC and near-BEC limit where the differences between the one- and two-channel descriptions are most notable, and where analytical calculations are most tractable. Among the differences we elucidate are the equations of state at general T below T{sub c} and related particle density profiles. We find a narrowing of the density profile in the two-channel problem relative to the one-channel analog. Importantly, we infer that the ratio between bosonic and fermionic scattering lengths depends on the magnetic detuning and is generally smaller than its one-channel counterpart. Future experiments will be required to determine to what extent this ratio varies with magnetic fields, as predicted here.

Stajic, Jelena; Levin, K. [James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Chen Qijin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Revamping AK-Ashland gas cleaning system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AK Steel`s (formerly Armco) BOF shop was using a static precipitator for the primary collection. The system was designed for full combustion in the gas collecting hoods. No secondary dust collection was in place. A detailed study on alternative solutions led to a completely different system in 1990, and an order was awarded to Mannesmann Demag Corp. (MDC) in Dec. 1990. The new gas collection system is using suppressed combustion with the capability to collect Co at a later stage. The gas cleaning uses the Mannesmann Demag Baumco scrubber with a venturi throat for gas flow control. All auxiliary components, water treatment plant, electric substations and sludge handling were designed and supplied by MDC. The secondary dust collection covers the hot metal and scrap charging into the BOF`s, reladling, desulfurization and deslagging by a pulse jet baghouse. All emission limits set by the EPA and guaranteed by MDC have been met by the systems installed.

Brandes, H.; Koerbel, R. [Mannesmann Demag Corp., Coraopolis, PA (United States); Haberkamp, K. [Mannesmann Demag Huttentechnik, Duisburg (Germany); Keeton, S. [AK Steel Corp., Ashland, KY (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Dust in the Radio Galaxy and Merger Remnant NGC 1316 (Fornax A)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present dust maps of NGC 1316 (Fornax A), a well-studied early-type galaxy located in the outskirts of the Fornax cluster. We used the Large APEX BOlometer CAmera (LABOCA), operating at 870 micron with an angular resolution of 19.5 arcseconds on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) 12m submillimeter telescope in Chile and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). WISE observes in four mid-infrared bands centered at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micron with angular resolutions ranging from 6 to 12 arcseconds. The WISE and LABOCA maps reveal emission from dust in the central 2 arcminutes of NGC 1316. The disturbed optical morphology with many shells and loops, the complex distribution of molecular gas and our dust maps are evidences of past merger activity or gas accretion in the galaxy. Combining the LABOCA flux measurement with existing mid- and far-infrared measurements, we estimate the temperature of the cold (~20 K) and warm (~55 K) dust components in the galaxy. This study will be extended to other sou...

Asabere, Bernard Duah; Winkler, Hartmut; Jarrett, Thomas; Leeuw, Lerothodi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effect of lift force on the aerodynamics of dust grains in the protoplanetary disk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We newly introduce lift force into the aerodynamics of dust grains in the protoplanetary disk. Although many authors have so far investigated the effects of the drag force, gravitational force and electric force on the dust grains, the lift force has never been considered as a force exerted on the dust grains in the gas disk. If the grains are spinning and moving in the fluid, then the lift force is exerted on them. We show in this paper that the dust grains can be continuously spinning due to the frequent collisions so that the lift force continues to be exerted on them, which is valid in a certain parameter space where the grain size is larger than ~ 1 m and where the distance from the central star is larger than 1 AU for the minimum mass solar nebula. In addition, we estimate the effects of the force on the grain motion and obtain the result that the mean relative velocity between the grains due to the lift force is comparable to the gas velocity in the Kepler rotational frame when the Stokes number and li...

Yamaguchi, Masaki S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Silica dust control when drilling concrete Page 1 of 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silica dust control when drilling concrete Page 1 of 2 Drilling into concrete releases a fine sandy and routinely drill into concrete are at risk of developing this disease. Controlling the dust Hammer drills are available with attached dust removal systems. These draw dust from the drill end, down the attachment

Knowles, David William

308

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

Merlino, Robert L.

309

Morphological Investigations of Fibrogenic Action of Estonian Oil Shale Dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dust produced in the mining and processing of Estonian oil shale is given. Histological examination of

V. A. Kung

310

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fine Particle (Nanoparticle) Emissions on Minnesota Highways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/oxidation t = 2 ms, p = 150 atm., =T 2500 K Ash Condensation atm.,t = 10 ms, p = 20 =T 1500 K Exit Tailpipe atm are formed through gas-to-particle conversion as exhaust cools and dilutes. Nanoparticle Formation Model Particle Dynamics can produce large changes in particle number due to small changes dilution and sampling

Minnesota, University of

312

Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

BNL-67852-AB CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANICS IN ATMOSPHERIC PARTICLES BY SINGLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aerosol or aerosol precursors, particle formation (gas to particle conversion), and growth is critical to a significant fraction of the total aerosol mass (often between 20 and 50%) and play an important role tend to be governed by complex gas - particle and particle - particle interactions, produce a rich

314

Global coherence of dust density waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

1988-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

Structural features of bicomponent dust Coulomb balls formed by the superposition of fields of different origin in plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A binary mixture of dust particles in plasma which are in an external electrostatic harmonic confining field as well as in the field consisting of gravitational, thermophoretic, and electrostatic force is simulated. The interparticle interaction is described by the Yukawa isotropic pair potential. The structural properties of the binary mixture of particles depending on composition are investigated. The segregation features of a system of particles of two species under the conditions of recent experiments on Coulomb ball formation are studied. It is shown that particles form a shell structure in which every shell contains only its own species of particles; in so doing, smaller-sized particles make up outer shells with respect to larger-sized particles. When the size difference between the particles becomes more and more pronounced, they are spatially separated up to the formation of two independent Coulomb balls.

Psakhie, S. G.; Zolnikov, K. P.; Kryzhevich, D. S.; Abdrashitov, A. V. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, 634021, Tomsk, pr. Akademicheskii, 2/1 (Russian Federation); Skorentsev, L. F. [Siberian Physico-Technical Institute, 634050, Tomsk, pl. Novosobornaya, 1 (Russian Federation)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Molecular Gas in Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge of the molecular component of the ISM is fundamental to understand star formation. The H2 component appears to dominate the gas mass in the inner parts of galaxies, while the HI component dominates in the outer parts. Observation of the CO and other lines in normal and starburst galaxies have questioned the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, and detection of CO in dwarfs have shown how sensitive the conversion f actor is to metallicity. Our knowledge has made great progress in recent years, because of sensitivity and spatial resolution improvements. Large-scale CO maps of nearby galaxies are now available, which extend our knowledge on global properties, radial gradients, and spiral structure of the molecular ISM. Millimetric interferometers reveal high velocity gradients in galaxy nuclei, and formation of embedded structures, like bars within bars. Galaxy interactions are very effective to enhance gas concentrations and trigger starbursts. Nuclear disks or rings are frequently observed, that concentrate the star formation activity. Since the density of starbursting galaxies is strongly increasing with redshift, the CO lines and the mm dust emission are a privileged tool to follow evolution of galaxies and observe the ISM dynamics at high redshift: they could give an answer about the debated question of the star-formation history, since many massive remote starbursts could be dust-enshrouded.

F. Combes

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Boll Weevil Control by Airplane Dusting.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENT STATIGH LiBRl BUILDINC XAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS FIN NO. 394 APRIL, 1929 DIVISION OF ENTOMOLOGY BOLL WEEVIL CONTROL BY AIR- PLANE DUSTING - A...~on with the School of Agriculture. rrjshand. unty: tv: SYNOPSIS The cotton acreage in Texas which has been protected against insects by airplane dusting increased from 3,000 acres in 1925 to approximateljr 50,000 acres in 1928, according to information...

Thomas, F. L. (Frank Lincoln)

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Extraplanar Dust and Star Formation in Nearby Edge-On Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present high-resolution ( 0.5 - 2.0. If Milky Way gas-to-dust relationships are appropriate, then these structures have gaseous column densities N_H > 10(21) cm(-2), with very large masses (>10(5) - 10(6) solar masses) and gravitational potential energies (> 10(51) - 10(52) ergs relative to z=0). The estimated column densities suggest molecular gas may be present, and with the estimated masses allows for the possibility of star formation in these dusty clouds. Recent star formation is the likely cause of the discrete H II regions, in some cases associated with relatively blue continuum sources, observed at heights 0.6 < |z| < 0.8 kpc above the disks of these galaxies. The presence of early-type stars at high-z in these galaxies may be related to the extraplanar dust structures seen in our images.

J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

320

Nano- and microscale particles and global electromagnetic resonances in the Earth-ionosphere cavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of nano-and microscale particles (dust grains) on the global electromagnetic (Schumann) cavity has been studied in the context of two possible mechanisms. First, the presence of charged microscale particles in the ionospheric plasma modifies the dispersion properties of the upper boundary of the Schumann cavity and, thus, affects its eigenfrequencies and quality factor. Second, there is a relation between the dust concentration in the atmosphere and lightning discharges, which excite Schumann resonances. Therefore, dust grains can enhance the energy pumping of the cavity, thereby increasing the amplitude of electromagnetic oscillations in it.

Besedina, Yu. N.; Popel, S. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geosphere Dynamics (Russian Federation)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 ºC and 2.0 kPa O2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil™ particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ~ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure – possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O2. This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ~ 0.03 – 0.04) of the flakes.

J.W. Davis; B.W.N. Fitzpatrick; J.P. Sharpe; A.A. Haasz

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Quenching dust mixtures: A new microgravity testing method using electric particulate suspensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric particulate suspension (EPS) is a combustion ignition system under development at Iowa State University for the evaluation of quenching effects of powders in microgravity (quenching distance, ignition energy, and flammability limits). Both walls and (inert) particles can be tested as quenching media. The EPS method has potential as a benchmark design for quenching powder flames that would provide NASA and the scientific community with a new fire safety standard. Because of its simplicity and size, it is also suitable for tests on the International Space Station and the Mars Rover. The EPS method also supports combustion modeling by providing accurate measurement of flame-quenching distance as an important parameter in laminar flame theory because it is closely related to characteristic flame thickness and flame structure. In microgravity, the EPS method is expected to produce dust suspensions that are highly uniform (before ignition) compared to 1-g, where gravity can cause stratification of the suspension. Microgravity will also permit increased concentrations of particles to be tested (for a given electric field strength). Several EPS experiments are reviewed, including X-Y laser scans for cloud stratification, particle velocity distribution evaluation by the use of particle tracking velocimetry/particle image velocimetry and a leak hole sampling rig, and measurement of particle slip velocity by the use of laser Doppler anemometry. Sample quenching and ignition energy curves are presented for aluminum powder and coal dust. Only ground-based data at 1-g are reported.

Colver, G.M.; Greene, N.; Shoemaker, D.; Kim, S.W.; Yu, T.U. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (US). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Dustbuster: a compact impact-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer for in situ analysis of cosmic dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a large target area with a reflectron, simultaneously optimizing mass resolution, particle detection. The resulting ions, with broad energy and angular distributions, are accelerated through a modified reflectron remote sensing, collection and analysis of dust grains that have survived impact on the Earth, capture

Stewart, Sarah T.

324

Void formation and dust cloud structure in (a)symmetric RF discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behaviour of dust particles in a discharge is the result of the concerted action of the charging process and forces like gravity, the ion and neutral drag force, and the thermophoretic force. Since the ion drag force plays a major role, the reactor geometry and the ion density profile are important parameters. In this paper we study the influence of the geometrical features of a radio-frequency discharge, such as asymmetry, ring electrodes, and a depression in the electrodes.

Goedheer, W.J.; Akdim, M.R.; Land, V. [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

The SCUBA Local Universe Galaxy Survey II. 450 micron data - evidence for cold dust in bright IRAS Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the second in a series of papers presenting results from the SCUBA Local Universe Galaxy Survey. In our first paper we provided 850 micron flux densities for 104 galaxies selected from the IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample and we found that the 60, 100 micron (IRAS) and 850 micron (SCUBA) fluxes could be adequately fitted by emission from dust at a single temperature. In this paper we present 450 micron data for the galaxies. With the new data, the spectral energy distributions of the galaxies can no longer be fitted with an isothermal dust model - two temperature components are now required. Using our 450 micron data and fluxes from the literature, we find that the 450/850 micron flux ratio for the galaxies is remarkably constant and this holds from objects in which the star formation rate is similar to our own Galaxy, to ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGS) such as Arp 220. The only possible explanation for this is if the dust emissivity index for all of the galaxies is ~2 and the cold dust component has a similar temperature in all galaxies (20-21 K). The dust masses estimated using the new temperatures are higher by a factor ~2 than those determined previously using a single temperature. This brings the gas-to-dust ratios of the IRAS galaxies into agreement with those of the Milky Way and other spiral galaxies which have been intensively studied in the submm.

Loretta Dunne; Stephen Eales

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hot Coal for Christmas: Dust Formation in the Swept-Up Shell Around The Peculiar Type Ib Supernova 2006jc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present evidence for the formation of dust grains in an unusual Type Ib SN based on late-time spectra of SN 2006jc. The progenitor suffered a giant outburst qualitatively similar to those seen in LBVs just 2 years prior to the SN, and we speculate that the dust formation we observe is an indirect consequence of that event. The key evidence for dust formation seen in our optical spectra is (1) the appearance of a strong continuum emission source at red wavelengths, and (2) fading of the redshifted sides of narrow HeI emission lines. These two observed characteristics provide the strongest case yet for dust formation in any Type Ib/c SN. Both developments occurred simultaneously between 51 and 75 days after peak brightness, which is quick compared to other dusty SNe. The high temperature of the dust implies carbon and not silicates, and we describe how infrared photometry may test this conjecture. Geometric considerations indicate dust formation occurring in the dense gas swept-up by the forward shock, and n...

Smith, Nathan; Filippenko, Alexei V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in inhomogeneous four-component dusty plasma with opposite charge polarity dust grains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reductive perturbation technique is employed to investigate the propagation properties of nonlinear dust acoustic (DA) waves in a four-component inhomogeneous dusty plasma (4CIDP). The 4CIDP consists of both positive- and negative-charge dust grains, characterized by different mass, temperature, and density, in addition to a background of Maxwellian electrons and ions. The inhomogeneity caused by nonuniform equilibrium values of particle densities, fluid velocities, and electrostatic potential leads to a significant modification to the nature of nonlinear DA solitary waves. It is found that this model reveals two DA wave velocities, one slow, ?{sub s}, and the other is fast, ?{sub f}. The nonlinear wave evolution is governed by a modified Kortweg-de Vries equation, whose coefficients are space dependent. Both the two soliton types; compressive and rarefactive are allowed corresponding to ?{sub s}. However, only compressive soliton is created corresponding to ?{sub f}. The numerical investigations illustrate the dependence of the soliton amplitude, width, and velocity on the plasma inhomogeneities in each case. The relevance of these theoretical results with 4CIDPs observed in a multi-component plasma configurations in the polar mesosphere is discussed.

El-Taibany, W. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta P. O. 34517 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta P. O. 34517 (Egypt)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Real-time airborne particle analyzer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An aerosol particle analyzer includes a laser ablation chamber, a gas-filled conduit, and a mass spectrometer. The laser ablation chamber can be operated at a low pressure, which can be from 0.1 mTorr to 30 mTorr. The ablated ions are transferred into a gas-filled conduit. The gas-filled conduit reduces the electrical charge and the speed of ablated ions as they collide and mix with buffer gases in the gas-filled conduit. Preferably, the gas filled-conduit includes an electromagnetic multipole structure that collimates the nascent ions into a beam, which is guided into the mass spectrometer. Because the gas-filled conduit allows storage of vast quantities of the ions from the ablated particles, the ions from a single ablated particle can be analyzed multiple times and by a variety of techniques to supply statistically meaningful analysis of composition and isotope ratios.

Reilly, Peter T.A.

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Large amplitude dust-acoustic solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasma with dust grains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Propagation of large amplitude dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves is investigated in electron-positron-ion plasmas in the presence of dust grains using Sagdeev potential method. It is shown that acceptable values of Mach number for propagation of the large amplitude DA solitary waves depend strongly on plasma parameters. It is also observed that the amplitude of DA solitary waves increases as both the Mach number M and dust charge Z{sub d} are increased. Furthermore, it is found that a dusty plasma with inertial dust fluid and Boltzmann distributed electrons, positrons, and ions admits only negative solitary potentials associated with nonlinear dust-acoustic waves. In addition, it is remarked that the formation of double layers is not possible in this plasma system.

Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Afsari-Ghazi, M.; Noori, K.; Irani, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Azarbaijan University of Shahid Madani, 51745-406, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

DUST IN A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITOR: SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF KEPLER'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the relatively poorly understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's supernova remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 {mu}m infrared (IR) spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 {mu}m, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength Infrared Spectrograph and Infrared Array Camera data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally heated dust emission from fast shocks (>1000 km s{sup -1}) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are {approx}80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km s{sup -1}) into moderate density material (n{sub 0} {approx} 50-250 cm{sup -3}) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P. [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Ghavamian, Parviz [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Long, Knox S. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sankrit, Ravi, E-mail: brian.j.williams@nasa.gov [SOFIA/USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S N211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

PARTICLES OF DIFFERENCE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is no longer appropriate, if it ever was, to think of atmospheric aerosols as homogeneous spheres of uniform composition and size. Within the United States, and even more globally, not only the mass loading but also the composition, morphology, and size distribution of atmospheric aerosols are highly variable, as a function of location, and at a given location as a function of time. Particles of a given aerodynamic size may differ from one another, and even within individual particles material may be inhomogeneously distributed, as for example, carbon spherules imbedded in much larger sulfate particles. Some of the particulate matter is primary, that is, introduced into the atmosphere directly as particles, such as carbon particles in diesel exhaust. Some is secondary, that is, formed in the atmosphere by gas-to-particle conversion. Much of the material is inorganic, mainly sulfates and nitrates resulting mainly from energy-related emissions. Some of the material is carbonaceous, in part primary, in part secondary, and of this material some is anthropogenic and some biogenic. While the heterogeneity of atmospheric aerosols complicates the problem of understanding their loading and distribution, it may well be the key to its solution. By detailed examination of the materials comprising aerosols it is possible to infer the sources of these materials. It may be possible as well to identify specific health impairing agents. The heterogeneity of aerosol particles is thus the key to identifying their sources, to understanding the processes that govern their loading and properties, and to devising control strategies that are both effective and efficient. Future research must therefore take cognizance of differences among aerosol particles and use these differences to advantage.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

U-GAS process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed an advanced coal gasification process. The U-GAS process has been extensively tested in a pilot plant to firmly establish process feasibility and provide a large data base for scale-up and design of the first commercial plant. The U-GAS process is considered to be one of the more flexible, efficient, and economical coal gasification technologies developed in the US during the last decade. The U-GAS technology is presently available for licensing from GDC, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of IGT. The U-GAS process accomplishes four important functions in a single-stage, fluidized-bed gasifier: It decakes coal, devolatilizes coal, gasifies coal, and agglomerates and separates ash from char. Simultaneously with coal gasification, the ash is agglomerated into spherical particles and separated from the bed. Part of the fluidizing gas enters the gasifier through a sloping grid. The remaining gas flows upward at a high velocity through the ash agglomerating device and forms a hot zone within the fluidized bed. High-ash-content particles agglomerate under these conditions and grow into larger and heavier particles. Agglomerates grow in size until they can be selectively separated and discharged from the bed into water-filled ash hoppers where they are withdrawn as a slurry. In this manner, the fluidized bed achieves the same low level of carbon losses in the discharge ash generally associated with the ash-slagging type of gasifier. Coal fines elutriated from the fluidized bed are collected in two external cyclones. Fines from the first cyclone are returned to the bed and fines from the second cyclone are returned to the ash agglomerating zone, where they are gasified, and the ash agglomerated with bed ash. The raw product gas is virtually free of tar and oils, thus simplifying ensuing heat recovery and purification steps.

Schora, F.C.; Patel, J.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

334

Extended silicate dust emission in PG QSOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper addresses the origin of the silicate emission observed in PG QSOs, based on observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Scenarios based on the unified model suggest that silicate emission in AGN arises mainly from the illuminated faces of the clouds in the torus at temperatures near sublimation. However, detections of silicate emission in Type 2 QSOs, and the estimated cool dust temperatures, argue for a more extended emission region.To investigate this issue we present the mid-infrared spectra of 23 QSOs. These spectra, and especially the silicate emission features at ~10 and ~18 mu can be fitted using dusty narrow line region (NLR) models and a combination of black bodies. The bolometric luminosities of the QSOs allow us to derive the radial distances and covering factors for the silicate-emitting dust. The inferred radii are 100-200 times larger than the dust sublimation radius, much larger than the expected dimensions of the inner torus. Our QSO mid-IR spectra are consistent with the bulk of the silicate dust emission arising from the dust in the innermost parts of the NLR.

M. Schweitzer; B. Groves; H. Netzer; D. Lutz; E. Sturm; A. Contursi; R. Genzel; L. J. Tacconi; S. Veilleux; D. -C. Kim; D. Rupke; A. J. Baker

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Flammability limits of dusts: Minimum inerting concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new flammability limit parameter has been defined as the Minimum Inerting Concentration (MIC). This is the concentration of inertant required to prevent a dust explosion regardless of fuel concentration. Previous experimental work at Fike in a 1-m{sup 3} spherical chamber has shown this flammability limit to exist for pulverized coal dust and cornstarch. In the current work, inerting experiments with aluminum, anthraquinone and polyethylene dusts as fuels were performed, using monoammonium phosphate and sodium bicarbonate as inertants. The results show that an MIC exists only for anthraquinone inerted with sodium bicarbonate. The other combustible dust and inertant mixtures did not show a definitive MIC, although they did show a strong dependence between inerting level and suspended fuel concentration. As the fuel concentration increased, the amount of inertant required to prevent an explosion decreased. Even though a definitive MIC was not found for most of the dusts an effective MIC can be estimated from the data. The use of MIC data can aid in the design of explosion suppression schemes.

Dastidar, A.G.; Amyotte, P.R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Going, J.; Chatrathi, K. [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)] [Fike Corp., Blue Springs, MO (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Structure and trapping of three-dimensional dust clouds in a capacitively coupled rf-discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this survey the recently found 'Coulomb balls' are discussed, which show an unusual kind of crystalline order. These three-dimensional dust clouds consisting of hundreds or thousands of micrometer-sized dust particles have a spherical shape and exist in a wide range of plasma conditions. Coulomb balls are optically highly transparent and have macroscopic dimensions of several millimeters in diameter. The clouds allow for the observation of each single particle and thus the complete reconstruction of the crystal structure by means of video microscopy techniques. The particles are arranged in distinct nested shells in which they form patterns with mostly five and six neighbors. The confinement of Coulomb balls by dielectric walls involves electric forces, surface charges, ion drag forces, and thermophoretic levitation. The thermophoretic force field is measured with tracer particles and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The electric forces are derived from simulations with the two-dimensional SIGLO-2D code. It is shown the the sum of all confining forces results in a stable potential well that describes levitation and spherical confinement of the Coulomb ball.

Arp, O.; Block, D.; Piel, A. [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-University, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Water adsorption on aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphite planer substrate; the result corresponds well with previous simulation work. Adsorption of both noble gas and water onto a single spherical nano particle and aggregates of spherical nano particles has been computed with the developed equation...

Nie, Chu

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Oblique interactions of dust density waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-excited dust density waves (DDWs) are studied in a striped electrode device. In addition to the usual perpendicularly (with respect to the electrode) propagating DDWs, which have been frequently observed in dusty plasma experiments on the ground, a low-frequency oblique mode is also observed. This low-frequency oblique DDW has a frequency much lower than the dust plasma frequency and its spontaneous excitation is observed even with a very low dust density. It is found that the low-frequency oblique mode can exist either separately or together with the usual perpendicular mode. In the latter case, a new mode arises as a result of the interactions between the perpendicular and the oblique modes. The experiments show that these three modes satisfy the wave coupling conditions in both the frequencies and the wave-vectors.

Wang, Zhelchui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yang - Fang [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE; Hou, Lujing [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE; Jiang, Ke [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE; Wu, De - Jin [CHINA; Thomas, Hubertus M [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE; Morfill, Gregor E [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cold condensation of dust in the ISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The condensation of complex silicates with pyroxene and olivine composition at conditions prevailing in molecular clouds has been experimentally studied. For this purpose, molecular species comprising refractory elements were forced to accrete on cold substrates representing the cold surfaces of surviving dust grains in the interstellar medium. The efficient formation of amorphous and homogeneous magnesium iron silicates at temperatures of about 12 K has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The gaseous precursors of such condensation processes in the interstellar medium are formed by erosion of dust grains in supernova shock waves. In the laboratory, we have evaporated glassy silicate dust analogs and embedded the released species in neon ice matrices that have been studied spectroscopically to identify the molecular precursors of the condensing solid silicates. A sound coincidence between the 10 micron band of the interstellar silicates and the 10 micron band of the low-temperature siliceous condensates can be...

Rouillé, Gaël; Krasnokutski, Serge A; Krebsz, Melinda; Henning, Thomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Mass production of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by metal dusting process with high yield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of carbon nanotubes over Fe-Ni nanoparticles supported alloy 304L. {yields} Production of carbon nanotubes with high yield (700-1000%) and low cost catalyst. {yields} Optimum growth condition is CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C under long term repetitive thermal cycling. {yields} Possibility of the mass production by metal dusting process with low cost. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube materials were synthesized over Fe-Ni nanoparticles generated during disintegration of the surface of alloy 304L under metal dusting environment. The metal dusting condition was simulated and optimized through exposing stainless steel samples during long term repetitive thermal cycling in CO/H{sub 2} = 1/1, total gas flow rate 100 cm{sup 3}/min, at 620 {sup o}C for 300 h. After reaction, surface morphology of the samples and also carbonaceous deposition which had grown on sample surfaces were examined by stereoscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results revealed that multi-wall carbon nanotubes could be formed over nanocatalyst generated on the alloy surface by exploiting metal dusting process. By optimization of reaction parameters the yields of carbon nanotube materials obtained were 700-1000%. Also it has been shown herein that the amount of carbon nanotube materials remarkably increases when the reaction time is extended up to 300 h, indicating a possibility of the mass production by this easy method.

Ghorbani, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, A.M., E-mail: Rashidiam@ripi.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastegari, S.; Mirdamadi, S. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alaei, M. [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), West Blvd. Azadi Sport Complex, P.O. Box 14665-1998, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dispersion relations for the dust-acoustic wave under experimental conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dust acoustic wave dispersion relation is tested to quantify its sensitivity to many physical processes that are important in laboratory dusty plasmas. It is found that inverse Landau damping and ion-neutral collisions contribute about equally to the growth rate ?{sub i}, pointing to the advantage of using a kinetic model for the instability. The growth rate ?{sub i} increases the most with an increase of dust number density, followed by an increase in ion-drift speed. The quantities that cause ?{sub i} to decrease the most when they are increased are the dust-neutral collision rate followed by the ion-neutral collision rate, ion collection current onto dust particles, and the ion thermal speed. In general, ?{sub i} is affected more than ?{sub r} by the choice of processes that are included. Strong Coulomb-coupling effects can be included in a compressibility term. The susceptibilities derived here can be combined in various ways in a dispersion relation to account for different combinations of physical processes.

Suranga Ruhunusiri, W. D., E-mail: suranga-ruhunusiri@uiowa.edu; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z {approx} 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 {mu}m Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M{sub tot}, stellar mass M{sub *}, gas mass M{sub g} , dust mass M{sub d} , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M{sub *} = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z {approx} 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M{sub tot} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }), dusty (M{sub d} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), and metal-rich (Z {approx} Z{sub Sun }) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR {approx} 200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). Our estimate of M{sub d} = 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and local starburst templates. This discrepancy of SED shapes could in turn explain the non-detection at submillimeter wavelengths of IR luminous (L{sub IR} Succeeds-Above-Single-Line-Equals-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) MIPS-LBGs.

Fan, X. L. [School of Physics and Electronics Information, Hubei University of Education, 430205 Wuhan (China); Pipino, A. [Institut fur Astronomie, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Matteucci, F., E-mail: fan@oats.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sezione di Astronomia, Universit a di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Algebraically general, gravito-electric rotating dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The class of gravito-electric, algebraically general, rotating `silent' dust space-times is studied. The main invariant properties are deduced. The number $t_0$ of functionally independent zero-order Riemann invariants satisfies $1\\leq t_0\\leq 2$ and special attention is given to the subclass $t_0=1$. Whereas there are no $\\Lambda$-term limits comprised in the class, the limit for vanishing vorticity leads to two previously derived irrotational dust families with $\\Lambda>0$, and the shear-free limit is the G\\"{o}del universe.

Lode Wylleman

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

344

Design of a new cotton dust sampler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIGURE Page Vertical elutriator cotton dust sampler The penetration curve of the VE which has a cutpoint of 9. 7 um and a slope of 1. 5 (Grimm, 1981) . . . . . . . 13 The penetration curve of the VE which has a cutpoint of 10. 5 um and a slope of l... of the cyclone cotton dust sampler 36 37 39 13 Cyclone sampler penetration curve which has a slope of 1. 31 and a cutpoint of 10. 1 um 45 14 Comparison of the penetration curves of the cyclone sampler and verticle elutriator 46 15 The relationship...

Hickman, Phillip Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Simple Cosmological Model with Relativistic Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct simple and useful approximation for the relativistic gas of massive particles. The equation of state is given by an elementary function and admits analytic solution of the Friedmann equation, including more complex cases when the relativistic gas of massive particles is considered together with radiation or with dominating cosmological constant. The model of relativistic gas may be interesting for the description of primordial Universe, especially as a candidate for the role of a Dark Matter.

Guilherme de Berredo-Peixoto; Ilya L. Shapiro; Flavia Sobreira

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

aeolian dust climate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of dust deposition, grain size, and mineralogical and chemical composition relative to climate and to type and lithology of dust source. The average silt and clay flux (rate of...

347

airborne respirable dust: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distributed Sensor Networks and Ad-hoc Networking 4 1.2.2 High Level Interpretation of Spatial Sensor Data 4 1.2.3 Distributed Processing 5 1.2.4 COTS Dust 6 2.0 COTS Dust...

348

Gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill is provided for comminuting solid ticles. The mill includes a housing enclosing a porous fluidizing gas diffuser plate, a baffled rotor and stator, a hollow drive shaft with lateral vents, and baffled gas exhaust exit ports. In operation, fluidizing gas is forced through the mill, fluidizing the raw material and milling media. The rotating rotor, stator and milling media comminute the raw material to be ground. Small entrained particles may be carried from the mill by the gas through the exit ports when the particles reach a very fine size.

Sadler, III, Leon Y. (Tuscaloosa, AL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Pseudopotentials of the particles interactions in complex plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the effective interaction potentials in a complex dusty plasma. The interaction of electrons with atoms and the interaction between dusty particles are studied by the method of the dielectric response function. In the effective interaction, potential between electron and atom the quantum effects of diffraction were taken into account. On the curve of the interaction potential between dust particles under certain conditions the oscillations can be observed.

Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Muratov, M. M. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, Tole bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

High Temperature Gas Reactors The Next Generation ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Proof Advanced Reactor and Gas Turbine #12;Flow through Power Conversion Vessel 8 #12;9 TRISO Fuel Particle1 High Temperature Gas Reactors The Next Generation ? Professor Andrew C Kadak Massachusetts of Brayton vs. Rankine Cycle · High Temperature Helium Gas (900 C) · Direct or Indirect Cycle · Originally

351

High Temperature Gas Reactors Briefing to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meltdown-Proof Advanced Reactor and Gas Turbine #12;TRISO Fuel Particle -- "Microsphere" · 0.9mm diameter · Utilizes gas turbine technology · Lower Power Density · Less Complicated Design (No ECCS) #12;AdvantagesHigh Temperature Gas Reactors Briefing to by Andrew C. Kadak, Ph.D. Professor of the Practice

352

An Alternate Approach to Determine the Explosibility of Dusts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dust cloud; a 10,000 Joule (10 kJ) flame is subsequently forced through the dust cloud and the resulting pressure rise is measured. If the pressure rise exceeds one bar (14.5 psig), it is assumed that a deflagration occurred, and the dust is classified...

Ganesan, Balaji

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

USING THE X-RAY DUST SCATTERING HALO OF CYGNUS X-1 TO DETERMINE DISTANCE AND DUST DISTRIBUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed study of the X-ray dust scattering halo of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 based on two Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observations. Using 18 different dust models, including ...

Xiang, Jingen

354

Study of metal dusting phenomenon and development of materials resistant to metal dusting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deposition of carbon from carbonaceous gaseous environments is prevalent in many chemical and petrochemical processes such as reforming systems, syngas production systems, iron reduction plants, and others. One of the major consequences of carbon deposition is the degradation of structural materials by a phenomenon known as metal dusting. There are two major issues of importance in metal dusting. First is formation of carbon and subsequent deposition of carbon on metallic materials. Second is the initiation of metal dusting degradation of the alloy. Details are presented on a research program that is underway at Argonne National Laboratory to study the metal dusting phenomenon from a fundamental scientific base involving laboratory research in simulated process conditions and field testing of materials in actual process environments. The project has participation from the US chemical industry, alloy manufacturers, and the Materials Technology Institute, which serves the chemical process industry.

Natesan, K.

2002-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

Three-dimensional stability of dust-ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized multicomponent dusty plasma with negative ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the small-k expansion perturbation method, the three-dimensional stability of dust-ion acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) in a magnetized multicomponent dusty plasma containing negative heavy ions and stationary variable-charge dust particles is analyzed. A nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation adequate for describing these solitary structures is derived. Moreover, the basic features of the DIASWs are studied. The determination of the stability region leads to two different cases depending on the oblique propagation angle. In addition, the growth rate of the produced waves is estimated. The increase of either the negative ion number density or their temperatures or even the number density of the dust grains results in reducing the wave growth rate. Finally, the present results should elucidate the properties of DIASWs in a multicomponent plasma with negative ions, particularly in laboratory experiment and plasma process.

El-Taibany, W. F.; El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta Branch, P.O. 34517, Damietta El-Gedida (Egypt); El-Bedwehy, N. A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta Branch, P.O. 34517, Damietta El-Gedida (Egypt)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Recycling of electric-arc-furnace dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is one of the largest solid waste streams produced by steel mills, and is classified as a waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Successful recycle of the valuable metals (iron, zinc, and lead) present in the dust will result in resource conservation while simultaneously reducing the disposal problems. Technical feasibility of a novel recycling method based on using hydrogen as the reductant was established under this project through laboratory experiments. Sponge iron produced was low in zinc, cadmium, and lead to permit its recycle, and nontoxic to permit its safe disposal as an alternative to recycling. Zinc oxide was analyzed to contain 50% to 58% zinc by weight, and can be marketed for recovering zinc and lead. A prototype system was designed to process 2.5 tons per day (600 tons/year) of EAF dust, and a preliminary economic analysis was conducted. The cost of processing dust by this recycling method was estimated to be comparable to or lower than existing methods, even at such low capacities.

Sresty, G.C.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The general double-dust solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational field of two identical rotating and counter-moving dust beams is found in full generality. The solution depends on an arbitrary function and a parameter. Some of its properties are studied. Previous particular solutions are derived as subcases.

B. V. Ivanov

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

358

REVIEW OF PARTICLE PHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.3. Particle Physics Information Platforms . . . . . . . . .14. Particle Physics Education and Outreach

Beringer, Juerg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Review of Particle Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . .ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . . . 12.

Nakamura, Kenzo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Arbitrary amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized suprathermal dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The linear and nonlinear dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) wave propagating obliquely with respect to an external magnetic field is studied in a magnetized complex plasma which consists of a cold ion fluid, superthermal electrons, and static dust particles. The propagation properties of two possible modes (in the linear regime) are investigated. It is found that the electron suprathermality and the electron population decrease the phase velocities of both modes, while obliqueness leads to increase of separation between two modes. An energy-like equation derived to describe the nonlinear evolution of DIA solitary waves. The influences of electron suprathermality, obliqueness, and electron population on the existence domain of solitary waves and the soliton characteristics are examined. It is shown that the existence domain of the DIA soliton and its profile are significantly depending on the deviation of electrons from thermodynamic equilibrium, electrons population, and obliqueness. It is also found that the suprathermal plasma supports the DIA solitons with larger amplitude.

Shahmansouri, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak 38156-8-8349 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alinejad, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167, Iran and Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ON THE EVOLUTION OF DUST MINERALOGY, FROM PROTOPLANETARY DISKS TO PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineralogical studies of silicate features emitted by dust grains in protoplanetary disks and solar system bodies can shed light on the progress of planet formation. The significant fraction of crystalline material in comets, chondritic meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles indicates a modification of the almost completely amorphous interstellar medium dust from which they formed. The production of crystalline silicates, thus, must happen in protoplanetary disks, where dust evolves to build planets and planetesimals. Different scenarios have been proposed, but it is still unclear how and when this happens. This paper presents dust grain mineralogy (composition, crystallinity, and grain size distribution) of a complete sample of protoplanetary disks in the young Serpens cluster. These results are compared to those in the young Taurus region and to sources that have retained their protoplanetary disks in the older Upper Scorpius and {eta} Chamaeleontis stellar clusters, using the same analysis technique for all samples. This comparison allows an investigation of the grain mineralogy evolution with time for a total sample of 139 disks. The mean cluster age and disk fraction are used as indicators of the evolutionary stage of the different populations. Our results show that the disks in the different regions have similar distributions of mean grain sizes and crystallinity fractions ({approx}10%-20%) despite the spread in mean ages. Furthermore, there is no evidence of preferential grain sizes for any given disk geometry nor for the mean cluster crystallinity fraction to increase with mean age in the 1-8 Myr range. The main implication is that a modest level of crystallinity is established in the disk surface early on ({<=}1 Myr), reaching an equilibrium that is independent of what may be happening in the disk midplane. These results are discussed in the context of planet formation, in comparison with mineralogical results from small bodies in our own solar system.

Oliveira, Isa; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Olofsson, Johan [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pontoppidan, Klaus M. [California Institute of Technology, Division for Geological and Planetary Sciences, MS 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Augereau, Jean-Charles [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); MerIn, Bruno, E-mail: oliveira@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Herschel Science Center, European Space Agency (ESA), P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada (Madrid) (Spain)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

HIGH-RESOLUTION FINITE VOLUME METHODS FOR DUSTY GAS JETS AND MARICA PELANTI AND RANDALL J. LEVEQUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(since the sound speed is zero in the absence of pressure) and have a degenerate structure in which delta is lower than the sound speed of the pure gas phase, and can be substantially lower at high dust densities" (though in some contexts it could represent liquid droplets) and the mixture as a "dusty gas". Dusty gas

LeVeque, Randy

363

Quantifying the Heating Sources for Mid-infrared Dust Emissions in Galaxies: The Case of M 81  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the newly available SPIRE images at 250 and 500 micron from Herschel Space Observatory, we study quantitative correlations over a sub-kpc scale among three distinct emission components in the interstellar medium of the nearby spiral galaxy M 81 (NGC 3031): (a) $I_{8}$ or $I_{24}$, the surface brightness of the mid-infrared emission observed in the Spitzer IRAC 8 or MIPS 24 micron band, with $I_8$ and $I_{24}$ being dominated by the emissions from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs) of dust, respectively; (b) $I_{500}$, that of the cold dust continuum emission in the Herschel SPIRE 500 micron band, dominated by the emission from large dust grains heated by evolved stars, and (c) $I_{{\\rm H}\\alpha}$, a nominal surface brightness of the H$\\alpha$ line emission, from gas ionized by newly formed massive stars. The results from our correlation study, free from any assumption on or modeling of dust emissivity law or dust temperatures, present solid evidence for significant heati...

Lu, Nanyao; Boselli, A; Baes, M; Wu., H; Madden, S C; De Looze, I; Rémy-Ruyer, A; Boquien, M; Wilson, C D; Galametz, M; Lam, M I; Cooray, A; Spinoglio, L; Zhao, Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

FORMULATION OF NON-STEADY-STATE DUST FORMATION PROCESS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The non-steady-state formation of small clusters and the growth of grains accompanied by chemical reactions are formulated under the consideration that the collision of key gas species (key molecule) controls the kinetics of dust formation process. The formula allows us to evaluate the size distribution and condensation efficiency of dust formed in astrophysical environments. We apply the formulation to the formation of C and MgSiO{sub 3} grains in the ejecta of supernovae, as an example, to investigate how the non-steady effect influences the formation process, condensation efficiency f{sub con,{sub ?}}, and average radius a{sub ave,{sub ?}} of newly formed grains in comparison with the results calculated with the steady-state nucleation rate. We show that the steady-state nucleation rate is a good approximation if the collision timescale of key molecule ?{sub coll} is much smaller than the timescale ?{sub sat} with which the supersaturation ratio increases; otherwise the effect of the non-steady state becomes remarkable, leading to a lower f{sub con,{sub ?}} and a larger a{sub ave,{sub ?}}. Examining the results of calculations, we reveal that the steady-state nucleation rate is applicable if the cooling gas satisfies ? ? ?{sub sat}/?{sub coll} ?> 30 during the formation of dust, and find that f{sub con,{sub ?}} and a{sub ave,{sub ?}} are uniquely determined by ?{sub on} at the onset time t{sub on} of dust formation. The approximation formulae for f{sub con,{sub ?}} and a{sub ave,{sub ?}} as a function of ?{sub on} could be useful in estimating the mass and typical size of newly formed grains from observed or model-predicted physical properties not only in supernova ejecta but also in mass-loss winds from evolved stars.

Nozawa, Takaya [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Kozasa, Takashi, E-mail: takaya.nozawa@ipmu.jp [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

Analysis of dust samples collected from spent nuclear fuel interim storage containers at Hope Creek, Delaware, and Diablo Canyon, California.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potentially corrosive environments may form on the surface of spent nuclear fuel dry storage canisters by deliquescence of deposited dusts. To assess this, samples of dust were collected from in-service dry storage canisters at two near-marine sites, the Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon storage installations, and have been characterized with respect to mineralogy, chemistry, and texture. At both sites, terrestrially-derived silicate minerals, including quartz, feldspars, micas, and clays, comprise the largest fraction of the dust. Also significant at both sites were particles of iron and iron-chromium metal and oxides generated by the manufacturing process. Soluble salt phases were minor component of the Hope Creek dusts, and were compositionally similar to inland salt aerosols, rich in calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. At Diablo Canyon, however, sea-salt aerosols, occurring as aggregates of NaCl and Mg-sulfate, were a major component of the dust samples. The seasalt aerosols commonly occurred as hollow spheres, which may have formed by evaporation of suspended aerosol seawater droplets, possibly while rising through the heated annulus between the canister and the overpack. The differences in salt composition and abundance for the two sites are attributed to differences in proximity to the open ocean and wave action. The Diablo Canyon facility is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, while the Hope Creek facility is on the shores of the Delaware River, several miles from the open ocean.

Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David George

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluating chemical and physical properties of grain dust for use in an explosion hazard indicator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 06 iIm 15. 0 0 ) 15. 6 10. 0 5. 0 3 4 7. 2 8. 5 5 6 4 0 . . . 3. 3 1. 7 1. 7 14 1 ~ 5 12 3. 0 0. 0 O CV O Yl CO O CO O N I I I O O ICI I CI O CC I CI cn 4 0 CV ch I CO I O O CO I O I O C: CI I Particle Size Ranges... 3 Q 2. 1 0. 6 0. 6 I CI CI 6 IO Yl CD 0 CI P4 I I I I I I CI N N 0 Yl (O I CI C) I U3 CI co I I CI CI CI I m Particle Size Ranges, um FIG. 14 Coulter Counter particle size distribution of rice dust, 30. 0 25. 0 20. 0 Mean...

Plemons, Dorothy Sue

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

THE DUST BUDGET OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: ARE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS THE PRIMARY DUST SOURCE AT LOW METALLICITY?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We estimate the total dust input from the cool evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using the 8 {mu}m excess emission as a proxy for the dust-production rate (DPR). We find that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars produce (8.6-9.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} of dust, depending on the fraction of far-infrared sources that belong to the evolved star population (with 10%-50% uncertainty in individual DPRs). RSGs contribute the least (<4%), while carbon-rich AGB stars (especially the so-called extreme AGB stars) account for 87%-89% of the total dust input from cool evolved stars. We also estimate the dust input from hot stars and supernovae (SNe), and find that if SNe produce 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} of dust each, then the total SN dust input and AGB input are roughly equivalent. We consider several scenarios of SN dust production and destruction and find that the interstellar medium (ISM) dust can be accounted for solely by stellar sources if all SNe produce dust in the quantities seen around the dustiest examples and if most SNe explode in dense regions where much of the ISM dust is shielded from the shocks. We find that AGB stars contribute only 2.1% of the ISM dust. Without a net positive contribution from SNe to the dust budget, this suggests that dust must grow in the ISM or be formed by another unknown mechanism.

Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sargent, B. A. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Srinivasan, S. [UPMC-CNRS UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Riebel, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); McDonald, I. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Van Loon, J. Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Clayton, G. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Sloan, G. C., E-mail: mboyer@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

Particle detection systems and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

369

This simple heuristic model describes the basic observed scale sizes of the dust emission in NGC 1068. But how does it relate to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a homogeneous one. Turbulent motions of these clouds with average velocities kvTl classes: compact tori14 , where the dust fills a thick cylinder (with an axial hole) of a few parsecs as given by the outflow cone of ionized gas is inclined by only ,58 out of the plane of sky18 , thus

Khare, Sanjay V.

370

Particle Transport in Parallel-Plate Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major cause of semiconductor yield degradation is contaminant particles that deposit on wafers while they reside in processing tools during integrated circuit manufacturing. This report presents numerical models for assessing particle transport and deposition in a parallel-plate geometry characteristic of a wide range of single-wafer processing tools: uniform downward flow exiting a perforated-plate showerhead separated by a gap from a circular wafer resting on a parallel susceptor. Particles are assumed to originate either upstream of the showerhead or from a specified position between the plates. The physical mechanisms controlling particle deposition and transport (inertia, diffusion, fluid drag, and external forces) are reviewed, with an emphasis on conditions encountered in semiconductor process tools (i.e., sub-atmospheric pressures and submicron particles). Isothermal flow is assumed, although small temperature differences are allowed to drive particle thermophoresis. Numerical solutions of the flow field are presented which agree with an analytic, creeping-flow expression for Re < 4. Deposition is quantified by use of a particle collection efficiency, which is defined as the fraction of particles in the reactor that deposit on the wafer. Analytic expressions for collection efficiency are presented for the limiting case where external forces control deposition (i.e., neglecting particle diffusion and inertia). Deposition from simultaneous particle diffusion and external forces is analyzed by an Eulerian formulation; for creeping flow and particles released from a planar trap, the analysis yields an analytic, integral expression for particle deposition based on process and particle properties. Deposition from simultaneous particle inertia and external forces is analyzed by a Lagrangian formulation, which can describe inertia-enhanced deposition resulting from particle acceleration in the showerhead. An approximate analytic expression is derived for particle velocity at the showerhead exit as a function of showerhead geometry, flow rate, and gas and particle properties. The particle showerhead-exit velocity is next used as an initial condition for particle transport between the plates to determine whether the particle deposits on the wafer, as a function of shower-head-exit particle velocity, the plate separation, flow rate, and gas and particle properties. Based on the numerical analysis, recommendations of best practices are presented that should help tool operators and designers reduce particle deposition in real tools. These guidelines are not intended to replace detailed calculations, but to provide the user with a general feel for inherently-clean practices.

Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Properties of comet 9P/Tempel 1 dust immediately following excavation by Deep Impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyzed Deep Impact High Resolution Instrument (HRI) images acquired within the first seconds after collision of the Deep Impact impactor with the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1. These images reveal an optically thick ejecta plume that casts a shadow on the surface of the nucleus. Using the 3D radiative transfer code HYPERION we simulated light scattering by the ejecta plume, taking into account multiple scattering of light from the ejecta, the surrounding nuclear surface and the actual observational geometry (including an updated plume orientation geometry that accounts for the latest 9P/Tempel 1 shape model). Our primary dust model parameters were the number density of particles, their size distribution and composition. We defined the composition through the density of an individual particle and the ratio of its material constituents, which we considered to be refractories, ice and voids. The results of our modeling indicate a dust/ice mass ratio for the ejecta particles of at least 1. To further constrai...

Nagdimunov, Lev; Wolff, Michael; A'Hearn, Michael F; Farnham, Tony L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Differences in pulmonary responses of rats, other animals, and humans to chronic inhalation of silica and other particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulmonary carcinogenicity of quartz in rats supports the plausibility of silica-induced lung cancer in humans. However, pulmonary responses of rats to dusts differ from those of other rodents, and may differ from those of humans. Dust-exposed rats have a greater propensity than mice or hamsters for epithelial hyperplasia, metaplasia, and fibrosis. Lung tumors occur in rats, but not mice or hamsters, treated with quartz, or exposed chronically to several other dusts. There are few opportunities for directly comparing the susceptibilities of rats and humans to dust-induced lung tumors. Because of the uncertain human responses to silica and many other particles, the negative human lung cancer response to coal dust may provide the best opportunity to calibrate responses of rats against those of humans. Historical dust lung burdens in coal miners were in the range of those associated with carcinogenicity in rats exposed to several dusts, but the carcinogenicity of coal dust in rats is unknown. The usefulness of tumor data from rats for predicting human lung cancer risk from inhaled silica and other dusts remains uncertain.

Mauderly, J.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Structural properties of dusty plasma in direct current and radio frequency gas discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents radial distribution functions of dust particles obtained experimentally in dc and rf discharges. Pressure and interaction energy of dusty particles were calculated on the basis of these functions. The Langevin dynamics computer simulation for each experiment was performed. The comparisons with computer simulations are made.

Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Dosbolayev, M. K. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, Tole bi 96a, Almaty, 050012 (Kazakhstan)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Three-dimensional computer modeling of particulate flow around dust monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SOLA-DM is a three-dimensional finite-difference computer code designed to model the dynamics of an incompressible fluid and the transport of discrete particulate material around obstacles impervious to flow. The numerical methods used in this code are described. SOLA-DM was used to predict the particle flux sampled by the 10-mm Dorr-Oliver Cyclone and MINIRAM dust monitors. Various geometric and dynamic variations of monitor and airflow combinations were tested. The code predictions are shown in computer-generated graphic plots.

Nichols, B.D.; Gregory, W.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Classical thermodynamics of particles in harmonic traps Martin Ligarea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the heat capacities. I also consider cyclic thermodynamic processes in a harmonically confined gas. © 2010 of state for a gas of N noninteract- ing particles in a rigid volume V is derived in almost every text and pressure vary with position within such traps, and the volume of the gas is not well defined

Ligare, Martin

376

The effect of dust size distribution on quantum dust acoustic wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the quantum hydrodynamics theory, a proposed model for quantum dust acoustic waves (QDAWs) is presented including the dust size distribution (DSD) effect. A quantum version of Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived adequate for describing QDAWs. Two different DSD functions are applied. The relevance of the wave velocity, amplitude, and width to the DSD is investigated numerically. The quantum effect changes only the soliton width. A brief conclusion is presented to the current findings and their relevance to astrophysics data is also discussed.

El-Labany, S. K.; El-Taibany, W. F.; Behery, E. E. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta Branch, Damietta El-Gedida, P.O. 34517 (Egypt); El-Siragy, N. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta, P.O. 31527 (Egypt)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition.

Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

Old supernova dust factory revealed at the Galactic center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust formation in supernova ejecta is currently the leading candidate to explain the large quantities of dust observed in the distant, early Universe. However, it is unclear whether the ejecta-formed dust can survive the hot interior of the supernova remnant (SNR). We present infrared observations of ~0.02 $M_\\odot$ of warm (~100 K) dust seen near the center of the ~10,000 yr-old Sgr A East SNR at the Galactic center. Our findings signify the detection of dust within an older SNR that is expanding into a relatively dense surrounding medium ($n_e$ ~ 100 $\\mathrm{cm}^{-3}$) and has survived the passage of the reverse shock. The results suggest that supernovae may indeed be the dominant dust production mechanism in the dense environment of early Universe galaxies.

Lau, Ryan M; Morris, Mark R; Li, Zhiyuan; Adams, Joseph D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The heating mechanism for the warm/cool dust in powerful, radio-loud AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uncertainty surrounding the nature of the heating mechanism for the dust that emits at mid- to far-IR (MFIR) wavelengths in active galaxies limits our understanding of the links between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxy evolution, as well as our ability to interpret the prodigious infrared and sub-mm emission of some of the most distant galaxies in the Universe. Here we report deep Spitzer observations of a complete sample of powerful, intermediate redshift (0.05 power, as traced by [OIII]5007 emission, is strongly correlated with both the mid-IR (24 micron) and the far-IR (70 micron) luminosities, however, with increased scatter in the 70 micron correlation. A major cause of this increased scatter is a group of objects that falls above the main correlation and displays evidence for prodigious recent star formation activity at optical wavelengths, along with relatively cool MFIR colours. These results provide evidence that illumination by the AGN is the primary heating mechanism for the dust emitting at both 24 and 70 microns, with starbursts dominating the heating of the cool dust in only 20 -- 30% of objects. This implies that powerful AGN are not always accompanied by the type of luminous starbursts that are characteristic of the peak of activity in major gas-rich mergers.

C. Tadhunter; D. Dicken; J. Holt; K. Inskip; R. Morganti; D. Axon; C. Buchanan; R. González Delgado; P. Barthel; I. van Bemmel

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Zinc recovery by ultrasound acid leaching of double kiln treated electric arc furnace dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to convert 70,000 tons a year of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust into an environmentally safe or recyclable product has encouraged studies to reclaim zinc from this waste material. Successful characterization of a double-kiln calcine, produced from EAF dust, has shown that the calcine pellets consisted mainly of zinc oxide plates with some iron oxide particles. Preliminary leaching tests using hydrochloric and sulfuric acids indicated that this calcine is suitable for selective ultrasound leaching of zinc. A factorially designed screening test using hydrochloric acid showed that ultrasound significantly lowered iron dissolution and increased zinc dissolution, thus enhancing the selective leaching of zinc. Ultrasound, temperature, air bubbling rate and acidity increased the sulfuric acid selectivity, while fluorosilicic acid was not selective. Reactor characterization through ultrasonic field measurements led to the selection of reactor and ultrasound bath, which were utilized to enhance the selectivity of a laboratory scale sulfuric acid leaching of a double-kiln treated electric arc furnace dust. Results indicated that ultrasonic leaching of this calcine is a satisfactory technique to selectively separate zinc from iron. After further iron removal by precipitation and cementation of nickel, it was possible to electrowin zinc from the leach liquor under common industrial conditions, with current efficiencies from 86% through 92% being observed. Calcine washing showed that a substantial chloride removal is possible, but fluoride ion in the electrolyte caused deposit sticking during electrowinning.

Barrera Godinez, J.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Morphology hypothesized to influence aerosol particle deliquescencew A. L. Mifflin, M. L. Smith and S. T. Martin*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the particle bearing aqueous solution is equal to that of the solid particle surrounded by gas-phase water, however, such as particle coatings that slow gas-particle water exchange, can inhibit deliquescence, shifting the limiting process from a thermo- dynamic threshold to a kinetic limitation on the mass transfer

382

Dust acoustic shock waves in two temperatures charged dusty grains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reductive perturbation method has been used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation and modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger for dust acoustic shock waves in a homogeneous unmagnetized plasma having electrons, singly charged ions, hot and cold dust species with Boltzmann distributions for electrons and ions in the presence of the cold (hot) dust viscosity coefficients. The behavior of the shock waves in the dusty plasma has been investigated.

El-Shewy, E. K. [Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Science and Arts College in Al-Rass, Physics Department, Qassim University, Al-Rass Province (Saudi Arabia); Abdelwahed, H. G. [Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department, Alkharj University, Al-kharj (Saudi Arabia); Elmessary, M. A. [Engineering Mathematics and Physics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Brane world solutions of perfect fluid in the background of a bulk containing dust or cosmological constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper presents some solutions to the five dimensional Einstein equations due to a perfect fluid on the brane with pure dust filling the entire bulk in one case and a cosmological constant (or vacuum) in the bulk for the second case. In the first case, there is a linear relationship between isotropic pressure, energy density and the brane tension, while in the second case, the perfect fluid is assumed to be in the form of chaplygin gas. Cosmological solutions are found both for brane and bulk scenarios and some interesting features are obtained for the chaplygin gas on the brane which are distinctly different from the standard cosmology in four dimensions.

Tanwi Bandyopadhyay; Subenoy Chakraborty; Asit Banerjee

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral components in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05Wm?2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17Wm?2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, ?0.05 and ?0.17Wm?2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.

Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for assessing aerosol effects on cold season precipitation in California.

Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

386

Space Dust Analysis Could Provide Clues to Solar System Origins  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of oxygen. Isotope analysis could help confirm that the dust originated outside the solar system, but it's a process that would destroy the precious samples. For now,...

387

aeolian dust archived: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

classifications of the ionizing stars to examine the role of stellar sources on dust heating and processing. Our infrared observations show surprisingly little correlation...

388

adiabatic dust charge: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a transition between states. The first result Petta, Jason 12 Charging and Growth of Fractal Dust Grains CERN Preprints Summary: The structure and evolution of aggregate grains...

389

CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ?} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ?3 to 0.5 ?m. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 ?m silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); D'Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Espaillat, C. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sargent, B. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Hernández, J., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx, E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía (CIDA), Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a,*, Randal J. Southard a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on gravimetric soil water content (GWC) and soil texture. A mechanical laboratory dust generator was used to testSoil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a Soil particle size distribution Soil water content a b s t r a c t Management of soils to reduce

Ahmad, Sajjad

391

PROBING INTERSTELLAR DUST WITH INFRARED ECHOES FROM THE Cas A SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the analysis of an Infrared Spectrograph 5-38 {mu}m spectrum and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer photometric measurements of an infrared echo near the Cassiopeia A (Cas A) supernova (SN) remnant observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have modeled the recorded echo accounting for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), quantum-heated carbon and silicate grains, as well as thermal carbon and silicate particles. Using the fact that optical light-echo spectroscopy has established that Cas A originated from a Type IIb SN explosion showing an optical spectrum remarkably similar to the prototypical Type IIb SN 1993J, we use the latter to construct template data input for our simulations. We are then able to reproduce the recorded infrared echo spectrum by combining the emission of dust heated by the UV burst produced at the shock breakout after the core-collapse and dust heated by optical light emitted near the visual maximum of the SN light curve, where the UV burst and optical light curve characteristics are based on SN 1993J. We find a mean density of {approx}680 H cm{sup -3} for the echo region, with a size of a few light years across. We also find evidence of dust processing in the form of a lack of small PAHs with less than {approx}300 carbon atoms, consistent with a scenario of PAHs destruction by the UV burst via photodissociation at the estimated distance of the echo region from Cas A. Furthermore, our simulations suggest that the weak 11 {mu}m features of our recorded infrared echo spectrum are consistent with a strong dehydrogenated state of the PAHs. This exploratory study highlights the potential of investigating dust processing in the interstellar medium through infrared echoes.

Vogt, Frederic P. A. [Mount Stromlo Observatory, Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Besel, Marc-Andre; Krause, Oliver; Dullemond, Cornelis P., E-mail: fvogt@mso.anu.edu.au [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Particle Astrophysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr.presentationsParticipant ObligationsParticle

393

The application of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and electron microprobe analysis to the study of dusts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 500,000 tons of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is generated each year in the US. The mineralogy and characterization of this dust is being studied to determine the phases and relationships of the valuable zinc, the hazardous lead, cadmium, and chromium, and the deleterious chlorine and fluorine. EAF dust averages 15--20% zinc and is therefore a potential source for 100,000 tons of zinc per year. The major mineralogical phases of EAF dust are franklinite (ZnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), magnetite (FeFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), jacobsite (MnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), solid solutions between franklinite-magnetite-jacobsite, and zincite (ZnO). Franklinite, magnetite, and jacobsite solid solutions commonly are cruciform or dendritic crystals in a Ca-Fe-Si matrix and contain up to 5% chromium. Magnetite also occurs as spheres partially oxidized to hematite (Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]) along its octahedral planes. The dust particles are predominantly in the form of spheres and broken spheres, ranging in size from 200 [mu]m to less than 1 [mu]m. Although many spheres are in the size ranges of 40--50 [mu]m and 10--20 [mu]m, most are less than 1 [mu]m in diameter. Automated scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) probed 118 particles in search of chlorine phases. Chlorine-bearing lime (CaO) was identified by that SEM study. In addition, chlorine is present as hydrophylite (CaCl[sub 2]) and sylvite (KCl). Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used to sputter the outer 180[angstrom] layer of the dust particles to search for the possible presence of cotunnite (PbCl[sub 2]) coatings, but none were detected. Minor phases detected include chalcopyrite (CuFeS[sub 2]), sphalerite (ZnS), pyrite (FeS[sub 2]), and coke.

Hagni, A.M.; Hagni, R.D. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Measurement and modeling of the Saharan dust radiative impact: Overview of the Saharan Dust Experiment (SHADE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Climate Change (IPCC), 2001]. Among the different aerosol types, mineral dust is one of the major to their scattering and absorbing properties that affect the solar radiation, they also perturb the terrestrial but they still represent one of the largest uncer- tainties in climate change studies [Intergovernmental Panel

Highwood, Ellie

395

Direct Characterization of Airborne Particles Associated with Arsenic-rich Mine Tailings: Particle Size Mineralogy and Texture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Windblown and vehicle-raised dust from unvegetated mine tailings can be a human health risk. Airborne particles from As-rich abandoned Au mine tailings from Nova Scotia, Canada have been characterized in terms of particle size, As concentration, As oxidation state, mineral species and texture. Samples were collected in seven aerodynamically fractionated size ranges (0.5-16 {micro}m) using a cascade impactor deployed at three tailings fields. All three sites are used for recreational activities and off-road vehicles were racing on the tailings at two mines during sample collection. Total concentrations of As in the <8 {micro}m fraction varied from 65 to 1040 ng/m{sup 3} of air as measured by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The same samples were analysed by synchrotron-based microfocused X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy ({micro}XANES) and X-ray diffraction ({micro}XRD) and found to contain multiple As-bearing mineral species, including Fe-As weathering products. The As species present in the dust were similar to those observed in the near-surface tailings. The action of vehicles on the tailings surface may disaggregate material cemented with Fe arsenate and contribute additional fine-grained As-rich particles to airborne dust. Results from this study can be used to help assess the potential human health risks associated with exposure to airborne particles from mine tailings.

M Corriveau; H Jamieson; M Parsons; J Campbell; A Lanzirotti

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ultrafast gas switching experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

ARM - PI Product - Niamey Dust Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethaneProductsCSSEFProductsMerged andAerosol OpticalDust

398

DOE/El%0297 Dust. Category  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic Reading2Q)382 THE HUMANlviA,'{ '297 Dust.

399

Effects of dust size distribution on dust negative ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dust negative ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized multi-ion dusty plasma containing hot isothermal electron, ions (light positive ions and heavy negative ions) and extremely massive charge fluctuating dust grains are investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. How the dust size distribution affect the height and the thickness of the nonlinear solitary wave are given. It is noted that the characteristic of the solitary waves are different with the different dust size distribution. The magnitude of the external magnetic field also affects the solitary wave form.

Ma, Yi-Rong; Qi, Xin; Sun, Jian-An; Duan, Wen-Shan [Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)] [Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Yang, Lei [Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) [Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

AN EXTRACTION AND CURATION TECHNIQUE FOR PARTICLES CAPTURED IN AEROGEL COLLECTORS. A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust captured in aerogel collectors. The curation strategy (or strategies) for STAR-DUST remain to be defined. Here we present a technique for curation of particles captured in aerogel which will simultaneously preserve the entire particle track, and could allow for the elemental in situ analysis of both the particle residue at the terminus of the track and any particle residues located along the track. This builds on work that we have previously reported elsewhere[1]. developed a technique for extracting aerogel wedge-shaped “keystones ” that satisfy this requirement. In Fig. 1 we show top and side views of such an extracted wedge, containing a captured particle (Fig. 2) and its track. In Fig. 3, we show the excavated “pit”, demonstrating that there is essentially no disturbance beyond the extraction region. Even very long

unknown authors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Performance characteristics of PM??? samplers in the presence of agricultural dusts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, these samplers are not tested in the presence of agriculture dusts, which have a larger mass median diameter (MMD) than urban dusts. This research addressed the performance characteristics of PM??? samplers in the presence of agricultural dusts. Tests in a...

Pargmann, Amber Rae

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Particle Pressures in Fluidized Beds. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction): they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, we inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined)and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Particle pressures in fluidized beds. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction), they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, the authors inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds; the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined) and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The application scope of the reductive perturbation method and the upper limit of the dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dust acoustic solitary waves have been numerically investigated by using one dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell method. By comparing the numerical results with those obtained from the traditional reductive perturbation method, it is found that there exist the maximum dimensionless amplitude and propagation speed of the dust acoustic solitary wave. And these limitations of the solitary wave are explained by using the Sagdeev potential technique. Furthermore, it is noticed that although ? ? 1 is required in the reductive perturbation method generally, the reductive perturbation method is also valid for ??

Qi, Xin; Xu, Yan-xia; Duan, Wen-shan, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 Gansu (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 Gansu (China); Yang, Lei, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 Gansu (China) [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 Gansu (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Dust production from sub-solar to super-solar metallicity in Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the dust chemistry and growth in the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) star models computed with the COLIBRI code, at varying initial mass and metallicity (Z=0.001, 0.008, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06). A relevant result of our analysis deals with the silicate production in M-stars. We show that, in order to reproduce the observed trend between terminal velocities and mass-loss rates in Galactic M-giants, one has to significantly reduce the efficiency of chemisputtering by H2 molecules, usually considered as the most effective dust destruction mechanism. This indication is also in agreement with the most recent laboratory results, which show that silicates may condense already at T=1400 K, instead than at Tcond=1000 K, as obtained by models that include chemisputtering. From the analysis of the total dust ejecta, we find that the total dust-to-gas ejecta of intermediate-mass stars are much less dependent on metallicity than usually assumed. In a broader contex...

Ambra, Nanni; Paola, Marigo; Léo, Girardi; Atefeh, Javadi; Jacco, van Loon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ANALYSIS OF DUST DELIQUESCENCE FOR FEP SCREENING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential for penetration of the Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) waste package outer barrier by localized corrosion due to the deliquescence of soluble constituents in dust present on waste package surfaces. The results support a recommendation to exclude deliquescence-induced localized corrosion (pitting or crevice corrosion) of the outer barrier from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Preparation of this report, and supporting laboratory studies and calculations, were performed as part of the planned effort in Work Package AEBM21, as implemented in ''Technical Work Plan for: Screening Evaluation for Dust Deliquescence and Localized Corrosion'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172804]), by Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC, and staff from three national laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis and conclusions presented in this report are quality affecting, as determined in the controlling technical work plan. A summary of background information, based on work that was not performed under a quality assurance program, is provided as Appendix E. In this instance, the use of unqualified information is provided for transparency and corroboration only, and is clearly separated from uses of qualified information. Thus, the qualification status of this information does not affect the conclusions of this report. The acceptance criteria addressed in Sections 4.2 and 7.2 were changed from the technical work plan in response to review comments received during preparation of this report.

C. Bryan

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Molecular gas in nearby powerful radio galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission from the central region of nearby 3CR radio galaxies (z$gas content is below 10$^9$ \\msun. Their individual CO emission exhibit, for 5 cases, a double-horned line profile that is characteristic of an inclined rotating disk with a central depression at the rising part of its rotation curve. The inferred disk or ring distributions of the molecular gas is consistent with the observed presence of dust disks or rings detected optically in the cores of the galaxies. We reason that if their gas originates from the mergers of two gas-rich disk galaxies, as has been invoked to explain the molecular gas in other radio galaxies, then these galaxies must have merged a long time ago (few Gyr or more) but their remnant elliptical galaxies only recently (last 10$^7$ years or less) become active radio galaxies. Instead, we argue the the cannibalism of gas-rich galaxies provide a simpler explanation for the origin of molecular gas in the elliptical hosts of radio galaxies (Lim et al. 2000). Given the transient nature of their observed disturbances, these galaxies probably become active in radio soon after the accretion event when sufficient molecular gas agglomerates in their nuclei.

S. Leon; J. Lim; F. Combes; D. Van-Trung

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

409

Dynamics of Finite Dust Clouds in a Magnetized Anodic Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response to an external modulation voltage of small dust clouds confined in an anodic plasma is studied. Dust density waves are excited when the cloud is larger than a wavelength, whereas a sloshing and stretching motion is found for smaller clouds. The wave dispersion shows similarities with waveguide modes.

Piel, A.; Pilch, I.; Trottenberg, T. [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts University, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505-6315 (United States)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

410

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric dust dispersion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of regional dust modelling to the wind speed and the emissions schemes: Impact on the hourly dust previsibility Summary: - Atmospheres , under revision Menut L., 2008,...

411

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne house dust Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of regional dust modelling to the wind speed and the emissions schemes: Impact... on the hourly dust previsibility Laurent MENUT (1), Cyril MOULIN (2), Isabelle CHIAPELLO (3)...

412

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum dust explosion Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

retention Explosion with air 100 Tungsten Activation 100-400 Dust... of traditional plasma diagnostics. Who has resources, time to tackle it ? 12;Dust diagnostics in ITER ?...

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - abrasive dusts avaliacao Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

field observations indicate that dust production occurs via self-abrasion... , dust production reportedly occurred by a "self-abrasion" process of saltating diatomite flakes,...

414

Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Zboray, James A. (Irvine, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Processing electric arc furnace dust into saleable chemical products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern steel industry uses electric arc furnace (EAF) technology to manufacture steel. A major drawback of this technology is the production of EAF dust, which is listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The annual disposal of approximately 0.65 million tons of EAF dust in the United States and Canada is an expensive, unresolved problem for the steel industry. EAF dust byproducts are generated during the manufacturing process by a variety of mechanisms. The dust consists of various metals (e.g., zinc, lead, cadmium) that occur as vapors at 1,600{degrees}C (EAF hearth temperature); these vapors are condensed and collected in a baghouse. The production of one ton of steel will generate approximately 25 pounds of EAF dust as a byproduct, which is currently disposed of in landfills.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The ecology of dust: local- to global-scale perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission and redistribution of dust due to wind erosion in drylands drives major biogeochemical dynamics and provides important aeolian environmental connectivity at scales from individual plants up to the global scale. Yet, perhaps because most relevant research on aeolian processes has been presented in a geosciences rather than ecological context, most ecological studies do not explicitly consider dust-driven processes. To bridge this disciplinary gap, we provide a general overview of the ecological importance of dust, examine complex interactions between wind erosion and ecosystem dynamics from the plant-interspace scale to regional and global scales, and highlight specific examples of how disturbance affects these interactions and their consequences. Changes in climate and intensification of land use will both likely lead to increased dust production. To address these challenges, environmental scientists, land managers and policy makers need to more explicitly consider dust in resource management decisions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Jason P [UA; Belnap, Jayne [NON LANL; Breshears, David D [UA; Neff, Jason [CU; Okin, Gregory S [UCLA; Painter, Thomas H [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Ravi, Sujith [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Reheis, Marith C [UCLA; Reynolds, Richard L [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Existence domains of dust-acoustic solitons and supersolitons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the Sagdeev potential method, the existence of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons and supersolitons is investigated in a plasma comprising cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, Boltzmann electrons, and non-thermal ions. This model supports the existence of positive potential supersolitons in a certain region in parameter space in addition to regular solitons having negative and positive potentials. The lower Mach number limit for supersolitons coincides with the occurrence of double layers whereas the upper limit is imposed by the constraint that the adiabatic positive dust number density must remain real valued. The upper Mach number limits for negative potential (positive potential) solitons coincide with limiting values of the negative (positive) potential for which the negative (positive) dust number density is real valued. Alternatively, the existence of positive potential solitons can terminate when positive potential double layers occur.

Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, PO Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa)] [South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science, PO Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)] [University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Road, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India)] [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Sheath formation under collisional conditions in presence of dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sheath formation is studied for collisional plasma in presence of dust. In common laboratory plasma, the dust acquires negative charges because of high thermal velocity of the electrons. The usual dust charging theory dealing with the issue is that of the Orbit Motion Limited theory. However, the theory does not find its application when the ion neutral collisions are significantly present. An alternate theory exists in literature for collisional dust charging. Collision is modeled by constant mean free path model. The sheath is considered jointly with the bulk of the plasma and a smooth transition of the plasma profiles from the bulk to the sheath is obtained. The various plasma profiles such as the electrostatic force on the grain, the ion drag force along with the dust density, and velocity are shown to vary spatially with increasing ion neutral collision.

Moulick, R., E-mail: rakesh.moulick@gmail.com; Goswami, K. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782402, Guwahati (India)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Control of metal dusting corrosion in Ni-base alloys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal dusting is a major issue in plants used in the production of hydrogen-and methanol-reformer systems, and syngas (H{sub 2}/CO mixtures) systems that are pertinent to the chemical and petrochemical industries. Usually, metal dusting corrosion has two stages: incubation and growth resulting in propagation of metal dusting pits. The two stages were studied by scanning electron microscopy and profile mapping to evaluate the scale of the surface oxide in the initiation and propagation of metal dusting attack. The initiation occurs because of the presence of defects, and the propagation is determined by the diffusion of carbon into the alloy. The carbon diffusion pathways can be blocked by periodically oxidizing alloy surface at moderate temperatures in controlled atmospheres. It was concluded that metal dusting degradation can be mitigated by selecting an alloy with a long incubation time and subjecting it to intermediate oxidation.

Zeng, Z.; Natesan, K.; Energy Technology

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Integrated flue gas processing method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system and process for flue gas processing to remove both gaseous contaminants such as sulfur dioxide and particulate matter such as flyash integrates spray scrubbing apparatus and wet electrostatic precipitation apparatus and provides for the advantageous extraction and utilization of heat present in the flue gas which is being processed. The integrated system and process utilizes a spray scrubbing tower into which the flue gas is introduced and into which aqueous alkali slurry is introduced as spray for sulfur dioxide removal therein. The flue gas leaves the tower moisture laden and enters a wet electrostatic precipitator which includes a heat exchanger where flyash and entrained droplets in the flue gas are removed by electrostatic precipitation and heat is removed from the flue gas. The cleaned flue gas exits from the precipitator and discharges into a stack. The heat removed from the flue gas finds use in the system or otherwise in the steam generation plant. The wet electrostatic precipitator of the integrated system and process includes a portion constructed as a cross flow heat exchanger with flue gas saturated with water vapor moving vertically upwards inside tubes arranged in a staggered pattern and ambient air being pulled horizontally across the outside of those tubes to cool the tube walls and thereby remove heat from the flue gas and cause condensation of water vapor on the inside wall surfaces. The condensate washes the electrostatically collected flyash particles down from the inside tube walls. The heat that is extracted from the saturated flue gas in the wet electrostatic precipitator heat exchanger may be utilized in several different ways, including: (1) for flue gas reheat after the wet electrostatic precipitator; (2) for preheating of combustion air to the steam generator boiler; and, (3) for heating of buildings.

Bakke, E.; Willett, H.P.

1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Metal oxide membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for formation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation. 4 figs.

Anderson, M.A.; Webster, E.T.; Xu, Q.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Metal oxide membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Webster, Elizabeth T. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Plainsboro, NJ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Digital image processing applications in the ignition and combustion of char/coal particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure, and reduced bed heights in fluidized beds increase the volatile yields. Once released, volatiles undergo oxidation in the gas phase. During the volatile combustion period, the gas temperature is much higher than the particle temperatures... still reach the particle surface and heterogeneous combustion of fixed carbon and in situ volatile matter can proceed in parallel with gas phase combustion. Extensive theoretical and experimental studies characterizing char/coal isolated particles...

Kharbat, Esam Tawfiq

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Ordered dust structures in a glow discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly ordered three-dimensional dust structures are created in a striated glow discharge, and their horizontal cross-sectional images are analyzed. Calculated correlation functions, local correlation parameters, and corresponding approximations are used to classify the state of a structure according to the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY) two-dimensional melting theory and a phenomenological approach. An orientational map based on an orientational parameter is proposed to expose domains in a cross section of a structure. It is shown that a plasma crystal is a polycrystal consisting of hexagonal domains (crystallites). Thermophoretic forces are used to create corners of various angles in the perimeter of the structure. Transition between hexagonal and square cell shapes is observed.

Karasev, V. Yu., E-mail: plasmadust@yandex.ru; Ivanov, A. Yu.; Dzlieva, E. S.; Eikhval'd, A. I. [St. Petersburg State University, Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Method for improved gas-solids separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from when it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel.

Kusik, Charles L. (Lincoln, MA); He, Bo X. (Newton, MA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method for improved gas-solids separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from where it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel. 4 figs.

Kusik, C.L.; He, B.X.

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensitive material comprising SnO2 nanocrystals doped with In2O3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

428

Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and methods of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensitive material comprising SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals doped with In.sub.2O.sub.3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making th