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1

Anomalous kinetic energy of a system of dust particles in a gas discharge plasma  

SciTech Connect

The system of equations of motion of dust particles in a near-electrode layer of a gas discharge has been formulated taking into account fluctuations of the charge of a dust particle and the features of the nearelectrode layer of the discharge. The molecular dynamics simulation of the system of dust particles has been carried out. Performing a theoretical analysis of the simulation results, a mechanism of increasing the average kinetic energy of dust particles in the gas discharge plasma has been proposed. According to this mechanism, the heating of the vertical oscillations of dust particles is initiated by induced oscillations generated by fluctuations of the charge of dust particles, and the energy transfer from vertical to horizontal oscillations can be based on the parametric resonance phenomenon. The combination of the parametric and induced resonances makes it possible to explain an anomalously high kinetic energy of dust particles. The estimate of the frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the respective experimental values.

Norman, G. E., E-mail: norman@ihed.ras.ru; Stegailov, V. V., E-mail: stegailov@gmail.com; Timofeev, A. V., E-mail: timofeevalvl@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Comparison Between Dust Particle Generation In CH4 or CH4/N2 Mixing RF Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Dust particles have been spontaneously generated either in pure CH4 or in CH4/N2 r.f. plasmas. The dust particle formation results from homogeneous nucleation in the plasma and is detected by laser light scattering (Ar+, {lambda} = 514.5 nm). The temporal and spatial behaviour of dust particles is studied. In pure methane gas, particles are trapped in well defined clouds at the plasma sheath boundaries. In a CH4/N2 mixture, the nitrogen addition leads to an expansion of the clouds. For nitrogen contents higher than 50%, the space between the electrodes is nearly completely filled with dust particles leading to plasma instabilities and a void appears in the center of the discharge. The particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.8-2 {mu}m. For nitrogen-rich plasmas, the particles growth is improved and leads to a rough shape with an orange-peel-type surface texture.

Pereira, Jeremy; Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre [LASEP, Faculte des Sciences, Universite d'Orleans, Site de Bourges, rue G.Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France)

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Diffusion Dynamics of Charged Dust Particles in Capacitively Coupled RF Discharge System  

SciTech Connect

Dusty plasma is loosely defined as electron-ion plasma with additional charged components of micron-sized dust particles. In this study, we developed a particle diagnostic technique based on light scattering and particle tracking velocimetry to investigate the dynamics of micron-sized titanium oxide particles in Argon gas capacitively coupled rf-discharge. The particle trajectories are constructed from sequence of image frames and treated as sample paths of charged Brownian motion. At specific sets of plasma parameters, disordered liquid-like dust particle configuration are observed. Mean-square-displacement of the particle trajectories are determined to characterize the transport dynamics. We showed that the dust particles in disordered liquid phase exhibit anomalous diffusion with different scaling exponents for short and large time scales, indicating the presence of slow and fast modes which can be related to caging effect and dispersive transport, respectively.

Chew, W. X.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.; Tan, K. S. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect

The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

Filippov, A. V., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Babichev, V. N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, State Research Center of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Pal', A. F. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, State Research Center of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Petrov, O. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, State Research Center of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Stochastic fluctuations of dust particle charge in RF discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to RF oscillations, intrinsic stochastic fluctuations due to the discreteness of electrons and ions could be important to the charging of a dust particle in RF discharges. These fluctuations are studied in the present work for three cases [M. Bacharis et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 19, 025002 (2010)] relevant to RF discharges employing a recently proposed model [B. Shotorban, Phys. Rev. E 83, 066403 (2011)] valid for stochastic charging at nonstationary states. The cases are concerned with a time varying electron number density relevant to sheaths, a time varying electric field relevant to the bulk plasma, and a time-dependent bi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons in a low pressure discharge. Two dust particles with different sizes are individually studied in each case. The radius of one is ten times larger than the radius of the other. In all of the cases, for the larger dust particle, the root-mean-squre of charge stochastic fluctuations is about an order of magnitude smaller than the amplitude of RF charge oscillations, while for the smaller dust particle, they are comparable in magnitude.

Shotorban, B. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Effects of plasma particle trapping on dust-acoustic solitary waves in an opposite polarity dust-plasma medium  

SciTech Connect

Dust acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma containing dust of opposite polarity (adiabatic positive and negative dust), non-isothermal electrons and ions (following vortex like distribution) are theoretically investigated by employing pseudo-potential approach, which is valid for arbitrary amplitude structures. The propagation of small but finite amplitude solitary structures is also examined by using the reductive perturbation method. The basic properties of large (small) amplitude solitary structures are investigated by analyzing the energy integral (modified Korteweg-de Vries equation). It is shown that the effects of dust polarity, trapping of plasma particles (electrons and ions), and temperatures of dust fluids significantly modify the basic features of the dust-acoustic solitary structures that are found to exist in such an opposite polarity dust-plasma medium. The relevance of the work in opposite polarity dust-plasma, which may occur in cometary tails, upper mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, is briefly discussed.

Ahmad, Zulfiqar [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, 25000 Peshawar (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics, Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

FRAGMENTATION AND EVOLUTION OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS. III. THE EFFECT OF DUST AND GAS ENERGETICS  

SciTech Connect

Dust and gas energetics are incorporated into a cluster-scale simulation of star formation in order to study the effect of heating and cooling on the star formation process. We build on our previous work by calculating separately the dust and gas temperatures. The dust temperature is set by radiative equilibrium between heating by embedded stars and radiation from dust. The gas temperature is determined using an energy-rate balance algorithm which includes molecular cooling, dust-gas collisional energy transfer, and cosmic-ray ionization. The fragmentation proceeds roughly similarly to simulations in which the gas temperature is set to the dust temperature, but there are differences. The structure of regions around sink particles has properties similar to those of Class 0 objects, but the infall speeds and mass accretion rates are, on average, higher than those seen for regions forming only low-mass stars. The gas and dust temperature have complex distributions not well modeled by approximations that ignore the detailed thermal physics. There is no simple relationship between density and kinetic temperature. In particular, high-density regions have a large range of temperatures, determined by their location relative to heating sources. The total luminosity underestimates the star formation rate at these early stages, before ionizing sources are included, by an order of magnitude. As predicted in our previous work, a larger number of intermediate-mass objects form when improved thermal physics is included, but the resulting initial mass function (IMF) still has too few low-mass stars. However, if we consider recent evidence on core-to-star efficiencies, the match to the IMF is improved.

Martel, Hugo [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada); Urban, Andrea [Sapling Learning, Inc., 2815 Exposition Blvd, Austin, TX 78703 (United States); Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

Kinetic theory of magnetized dusty plasmas with dust particles charged by collisional processes and by photoionization  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we detail the derivation of a plasma kinetic theory leading to the components of the dielectric tensor for a magnetized dusty plasma with variable charge on the dust particles, considering that the dust component of the plasma contains spherical dust particles with different sizes, which are charged both by inelastic collisions of electrons and ions and by photoionization.

Galvao, R. A.; Ziebell, L. F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Particle creation in (2+1) circular dust collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the quantum particle creation during the circularly symmetric collapse of a 2+1 dust cloud, for the cases when the cosmological constant is either zero or negative. We derive the Ford-Parker formula for the 2+1 case, which can be used to compute the radiated quantum flux in the geometric optics approximation. It is shown that no particles are created when the collapse ends in a naked singularity, unlike in the 3+1 case. When the collapse ends in a BTZ black hole, we recover the expected Hawking radiation. 1

Sashideep Gutti; T. P. Singh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Upper limit on the gas density in the Beta-Pictoris system: On the effect of gas drag on the dust dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate in this paper the effect of gas drag on the dynamics of the dust particles in the edge-on Beta-Pictoris disc in order to derive an upper limit on the mass of gas in this system. Our study is motivated by the large uncertainties on the amount of gas in the Beta-Pictoris disc currently found in the literature. The dust particles are assumed to originate from a colliding annulus of planetesimals peaked around 100AU from the central star as proposed by Augereau et al.(2001). We consider the various gas densities that have been inferred from independent observing techniques and we discuss their impact on the dust dynamics and on the disc profile in scattered light along the midplane. We show that the observed scattered light profile of the disc cannot be properly reproduced if hydrogen gas number density at 117AU exceeds 10**4 cm**-3. This corresponds to an upper limit on the total gas mass of about 0.4 Mearth assuming the gas density profile inferred by Brandeker et al.(2004) and thus to a gas to dust mass ratio smaller than 1. Our approach therefore provides an independent diagnostic for a gas depletion in the Beta-Pictoris system relative to the dust disc. Such an approach could also be used to constrain the gas content of recently identified systems like the edge-on disc around AUmic.

P. Thebault; J. -C Augereau

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Gas-cooling by dust during dynamical fragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that the abrupt switch, from hierarchical clustering on scales larger than 0.04 pc, to binary (and occasionally higher multiple) systems on smaller scales, which Larson has deduced from his analysis of the grouping of pre-Main-Sequence stars in Taurus, arises because pre-protostellar gas becomes thermally coupled to dust at sufficiently high densities. The resulting change from gas-cooling by molecular lines at low densities to gas-cooling by dust at high densities enables the matter to radiate much more efficiently, and hence to undergo dynamical fragmentation. We derive the domain where gas-cooling by dust facilitates dynamical fragmentation. Low-mass (i.e. solar mass) clumps - those supported mainly by thermal pressure - can probably access this domain spontaneously, albeit rather quasistatically, provided they exist in a region where external perturbations are few and far between. More massive clumps probably require an impulsive external perturbation, for instance a supersonic collision with another clump, in order for the gas to reach sufficiently high density to couple thermally to the dust. Impulsive external perturbations should promote fragmentation, by generating highly non-line ar substructures which can then be amplified by gravity during the subsequent collapse.

A. P. Whitworth; H. M. J. Boffin; N. Francis

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Optical Investigations of Dust Particles Distribution in RF and DC Discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical emission spectroscopy is used to study dust particles movement and conditions of a formation of ordered plasma-dust structures in a capacitively coupled RF discharge. 3D binocular diagnostics of plasma-dust structures in dc discharge was made.

Ramazanov, T. S.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Amangaliyeva, R. Zh. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 96a Tole Bi St., Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Filatova, I. I.; Azharonok, V. V. [B. I. Stepanov Institute of Physics NAS of Belarus, Nezavisimosti Ave., 68, 220072, Minsk (Belarus)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Three-dimensional reconstruction of dust particle trajectories in the NSTXa... W. U. Boeglin,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Roquemore,2 and R. Maqueda3 1 Physics Department, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street to be controlled for safety reasons.1 Research into dust behavior in fusion devices includes the formation of dust ac- curately the difference of the particle's brightness and the surrounding background light should

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

15

Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions  

SciTech Connect

Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of particular interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation with respect to liquid water similar to atmospheric conditions. In this study the sub-saturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols was determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were used. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser and the water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter, ?. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived ? values between 0.00 and 0.02. The latter value can be idealized as a particle consisting of 96.7% (by volume) insoluble material and ~3.3% ammonium sulfate. Pure clay aerosols were found to be generally less hygroscopic than real desert dust particles. All illite and montmorillonite samples had ?~0.003, kaolinites were least hygroscopic and had ?=0.001. SD (?=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (?=0.007) and ATD (?=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles while immersed in an aqueous medium during atomization, thus indicating that specification of the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. Any atmospheric processing of fresh mineral dust which leads to the addition of more than ~3% soluble material is expected to significantly enhance hygroscopicity and CCN activity.

Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Dust-to-gas ratio and star formation history of blue compact dwarf galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the origin of the observed large variety in dust-to-gas ratio among blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs). By applying our chemical evolution model, we find that the dust destruction can largely suppress the dust-to-gas ratio when the metallicity of a BCD reaches $12+\\log{\\rm (O/H)}\\sim 8$, i.e., a typical metallicity level of BCDs. We also show that dust-to-gas ratio is largely varied owing to the change of dust destruction efficiency that has two effects: (i) a significant contribution of Type Ia supernovae to total supernova rate; (ii) variation of gas mass contained in a star-forming region. While mass loss from BCDs was previously thought to be the major cause for the variance of dust-to-gas ratio, we suggest that the other two effects are also important. We finally discuss the intermittent star formation history, which naturally explains the large dispersion of dust-to-gas ratio among BCDs.

H. Hirashita; Y. Y. Tajiri; H. Kamaya

2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

17

Numerical study of an electrostatic plasma sheath containing two species of charged dust particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-fluid model is used to study the dynamics of a dusty plasma sheath consists of electrons, ions, and two species of charged dust particles, i.e., nano-size and micron-size particles. It is found that, when the sheath is dominated by the nano-size dust grains, spatially periodic fluctuations are developed in the profiles of the sheath potential, and the number density and velocity of the plasma and dust particles. Due to inertial effects, the fluctuations in the parameters of the micron-size grains are much lower than those of the other parameters. The competition between the electric and ion drag forces plays the primary role in development of the fluctuations. The spatial period of the fluctuations is approximately a few Debye lengths and their amplitude depends on the plasma and dust parameters. The fluctuations are reduced by the increase in the radius, mass density, and Mach number of the nano-size particles, as well as the density and Mach number of the ions. But, they are enhanced by the increase in the plasma number density and the electron temperature. The sheath thickness demonstrates a non-monotonic behavior against variation of the nanoparticle parameters, i.e., it first decreases quickly, shows a minimum, and then increases. However, the sheath width always decreases with the plasma number density and ion Mach number, while grows linearly with the electron temperature.

Foroutan, G. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhoundi, A. [Nanostructure Material Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Gas turbine engines with particle traps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine engine (10) incorporates a particle trap (46) that forms an entrapment region (73) in a plenum (24) which extends from within the combustor (18) to the inlet (32) of a radial-inflow turbine (52, 54). The engine (10) is thereby adapted to entrap particles that originate downstream from the compressor (14) and are otherwise propelled by combustion gas (22) into the turbine (52, 54). Carbonaceous particles that are dislodged from the inner wall (50) of the combustor (18) are incinerated within the entrapment region (73) during operation of the engine (10).

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ); Sumner, D. Warren (Phoenix, AZ); Sheoran, Yogendra (Scottsdale, AZ); Judd, Z. Daniel (Phoenix, AZ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

PHOTOELECTRIC CROSS-SECTIONS OF GAS AND DUST IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS  

SciTech Connect

We provide simple polynomial fits to the X-ray photoelectric cross-sections (0.03 keV < E < 10 keV) for mixtures of gas and dust found in protoplanetary disks. Using the solar elemental abundances of Asplund et al., we treat the gas and dust components separately, facilitating the further exploration of evolutionary processes such as grain settling and gain growth. We find that blanketing due to advanced grain growth (a{sub max} > 1 {mu}m) can reduce the X-ray opacity of dust appreciably at E{sub X} {approx} 1 keV, coincident with the peak of typical T Tauri X-ray spectra. However, the reduction of dust opacity by dust settling, which is known to occur in protoplanetary disks, is probably a more significant effect. The absorption of 1-10 keV X-rays is dominated by gas opacity once the dust abundance has been reduced to about 1% of its diffuse interstellar value. The gas disk establishes a floor to the opacity at which point X-ray transport becomes insensitive to further dust evolution. Our choice of fitting function follows that of Morrison and McCammon, providing a degree of backward compatibility.

Bethell, T. J.; Bergin, Edwin A., E-mail: tbethell@umich.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dense Star-forming Gas and Dust in the Magellanic Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early stages of star formation are closely related to the ambient conditions in the interstellar medium. Important questions such as dust abundance, size distribution, temperature distribution, fraction of molecular gas, fraction of dense gas, gas surface density and total amount of gas and dust require separation of metallicity and radiation effects. The Magellanic Clouds provide an ideal laboratory to carry out such studies. They are prominent targets for space observatories (Spitzer, Herschel), but an important role remains for large groundbased facilities, such as a 25 m class sub-millimeter telescope on Dome C.

Israel, F P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the direction of the gravitation force in the horizontal iodine air filter are orthogonal, hence the effective accumulation of the small dispersive coal dust particles takes place at the bottom of absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter. It is found that the air dust aerosol stream flow in the horizontal iodine air filter is not limited by the appearing structures, made of the precipitated small dispersive coal dust particles, in distinction from the vertical iodine air filter, in the process of long term operation of the iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

Charging and de-charging of dust particles in bulk region of a radio frequency discharge plasma  

SciTech Connect

An analysis to investigate the effect of the dust particle size and density on the floating potential of the dust particles of uniform radius and other plasma parameters in the bulk region plasma of a RF-discharge in collisionless/collisional regime has been presented herein. For this purpose, the average charge theory based on charge balance on dust and number balance of plasma constituents has been utilized; a derivation for the accretion rate of electrons corresponding to a drifting Maxwellian energy distribution in the presence of an oscillatory RF field has been given and the resulting expression has been used to determine the floating potential of the dust grains. Further, the de-charging of the dust grains after switching off the RF field has also been discussed.

Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Misra, Shikha; Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Investigation of plasma-dust structures in He-Ar gas mixture  

SciTech Connect

The paper reports on the first experiments with plasma-dust formations in dc gas discharge plasma for a He-Ar mixture. It is shown that the choice of light and heavy gases for the mixture suppresses ion heating in electric field under the conventional conditions of experiments and results in a supersonic jet with high Mach numbers. Distribution functions for drifting ions in the gas mixture are calculated for various mixture concentrations, electric field strengths, and gas pressures.

Maiorov, S. A. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Dosbolayev, M. K. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, Tole bi 96a, Almaty, 050012 (Kazakhstan)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved binary and tertiary gas mixtures for gas-filled particle detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one gas or mixture of two gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a gas (Ar) having a very small cross section at and below aout 0.5 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electron field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); McCorkle, Dennis L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, David V. (Knoxville, TN); Carter, James G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the directi...

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Apparatus for dusting off gas by filtration and aspiration cleaning of filter, and application to combustion gases  

SciTech Connect

Method and apparatus for dusting off gases by filtration and cleaning of filter by aspiration and application thereof to combustion gases are disclosed. This invention relates to the filtration of dust loaded gases, and, in particular, combustion gases in the hot state. It consists of passing gases to be dusted off from top to bottom over a bed of pulverulent material, in particular, a sand bed and cleaning the upper layer of said bed by aspiration of dusts deposited thereon. This invention is particularly adapted for dusting off combustion gases from boilers or thermal power stations or gases to be supplied to gas turbines.

Merry, J.

1982-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

27

Dust cluster explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for the dust cluster explosion where micron/sub-micron sized particles are accelerated at the expense of plasma thermal energy, in the afterglow phase of a complex plasma discharge is proposed. The model is tested by molecular dynamics simulations of dust particles in a confining potential. The nature of the explosion (caused by switching off the discharge) and the concomitant dust acceleration is found to depend critically on the pressure of the background neutral gas. At low gas pressure, the explosion is due to unshielded Coulomb repulsion between dust particles and yields maximum acceleration, while in the high pressure regime it is due to shielded Yukawa repulsion and yields much feebler acceleration. These results are in agreement with experimental findings. Our simulations also confirm a recently proposed electrostatic (ES) isothermal scaling relation, P{sub E}{proportional_to}V{sub d}{sup -2} (where P{sub E} is the ES pressure of the dust particles and V{sub d} is the confining volume).

Saxena, Vikrant [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Avinash, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi (India); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Collision probabilities of migrating small bodies and dust particles with planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilities of collisions of migrating small bodies and dust particles produced by these bodies with planets were studied. Various Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, long-period comets, trans-Neptunian objects, and asteroids were considered. The total probability of collisions of any considered body or particle with all planets did not exceed 0.2. The amount of water delivered from outside of Jupiter's orbit to the Earth during the formation of the giant planets could exceed the amount of water in Earth's oceans. The ratio of the mass of water delivered to a planet by Jupiter-family comets or Halley-type comets to the mass of the planet can be greater for Mars, Venus, and Mercury, than that for Earth.

Ipatov, S I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

Water formation on bare grains: When the chemistry on dust impacts interstellar gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Water together with O2 are important gas phase ingredients to cool dense gas in order to form stars. On dust grains, H2 O is an important constituent of the icy mantle in which a complex chemistry is taking place, as revealed by hot core observations. The formation of water can occur on dust grain surfaces, and can impact gas phase composition. Aims. The formation of molecules such as OH, H2 O, HO2, H2 O2, as well as their deuterated forms and O2 and O3 is studied in order to assess how the chemistry varies in different astrophysical environments, and how the gas phase is affected by grain surface chemistry. Methods. We use Monte Carlo simulations to follow the formation of molecules on bare grains as well as the fraction of molecules released into the gas phase. We consider a surface reaction network, based on gas phase reactions, as well as UV photo-dissociation of the chemical species. Results. We show that grain surface chemistry has a strong impact on gas phase chemistry, and that this chemistry...

Cazaux, S; Marseille, M; Spaans, M; Caselli, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Carbon Formation and Metal Dusting in Hot-Gas Cleanup Systems of Coal Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

There are several possible materials/systems degradation modes that result from gasification environments with appreciable carbon activities. These processes, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive, include carbon deposition, carburization, metal dusting, and CO disintegration of refractories. Carbon formation on solid surfaces occurs by deposition from gases in which the carbon activity (a sub C) exceeds unity. The presence of a carbon layer CO can directly affect gasifier performance by restricting gas flow, particularly in the hot gas filter, creating debris (that may be deposited elsewhere in the system or that may cause erosive damage of downstream components), and/or changing the catalytic activity of surfaces.

Tortorelli, Peter F.; Judkins, Roddie R.; DeVan, Jackson H.; Wright, Ian G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of...

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

Postma, Arlin K. (Halfway, OR)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Carbon formation and metal dusting in hot-gas cleanup systems of coal gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

The product gas resulting from the partial oxidation of Carboniferous materials in a gasifier is typically characterized by high carbon and sulfur, but low oxygen, activities and, consequently, severe degradation of the structural and functional materials can occur. The objective of this task was to establish the potential risks of carbon deposition and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes by examining the current state of knowledge regarding these phenomena, making appropriate thermochemical calculations for representative coal gasifiers, and addressing possible mitigation methods. The paper discusses carbon activities, iron-based phase stabilities, steam injection, conditions that influence kinetics of carbon deposition, and influence of system operating parameters on carbon deposition and metal dusting.

Judkins, R.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Gas insulated transmission line having tapered particle trapping ring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, insulating supports and an insulating gas. A particle-trapping ring is secured to each insulating support, and it is comprised of a central portion and two tapered end portions. The ends of the particle trapping ring have a smaller diameter than the central portion of the ring, so as to enable the use of the particle trapping ring in a curved transmission line.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Background dust emission following grassland fire: a snapshot across the particle-size spectrum highlights how high-resolution measurements enhance detection  

SciTech Connect

Dust emission rates vary temporally and with particle size. Many studies of dust emission focus on a particular temporal scale and the portion of the particle-size spectrum associated with a single instrument; fewer studies have assessed dust emission across the particle-size spectrum and associated temporal scales using multiple instruments. Particularly lacking are measurements following disturbances such as fire that are high-resolution and focused on finer particles - those with direct implications for human health and potential for long-distance biogeochemical transport - during less windy but more commonly occurring background conditions. We measured dust emissions in unburned and burned semiarid grassland using four different instruments spanning different combinations of temporal resolution and particle-size spectrum: Big Springs Number Eight (BSNE) and Sensit instruments for larger saltating particles, DustTrak instruments for smaller suspended particles, and Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) samplers for measuring the entire range of particle sizes. Unburned and burned sites differed in vegetation cover and aerodynamic roughness, yet surprisingly differences in dust emission rates were only detectable for saltation using BSNE and for smaller aerosols using DustTrak. Our results, surprising in the lack of consistently detected differences, indicate that high-resolution DustTrak measurements offered the greatest promise for detecting differences in background emission rates and that BSNE samplers, which integrate across height, were effective for longer intervals. More generally, our results suggest that interplay between particle size, temporal resolution, and integration across time and height can be complex and may need to be considered more explicitly for effective sampling for background dust emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Luis M [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Field, Jason P [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Villegas, Juan C [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Brehsears, David D [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Law, Darin J [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Urgeghe, Anna M [UNIV OF ARIZONA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Heterogeneous chemistry of atmospheric mineral dust particles and their resulting cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global emissions of reactive chlorine from anthropogenic andnatural sources: Reactive Chlorine Emissions Inventory, J.Mineral dust is a sink for chlorine in the marine boundary

Sullivan, Ryan Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Global Gas and Dust budge of the Large Magellanic Cloud --- Importance of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is still an unresolved problem how much AGB stars can contribute to the overall gas and dust enrichment processes in the interstellar medium within galaxies. We start tackling this problem, by using our test case observational data from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), from which we obtain the global gas and dust budget. The photometric data from the LMC is obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We established an infrared colour classification scheme to select AGB stars, which are based on spectroscopically identified AGB stars. We further confirm a correlation between the Spitzer colour and mass-loss rate, which leads to a measurement of the total mass-loss rate from the entire AGB population in the LMC. Indeed, AGB stars are an important gas and dust source.

Matsuura, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

H2O Maser Emission in Circumstellar Envelopes around AGB Stars: Physical Conditions in Gas-Dust Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pumping of 22.2-GHz H$_2$O masers in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch stars has been simulated numerically. The physical parameters adopted in the calculations correspond to those of the circumstellar envelope around IK Tau. The one-dimensional plane-parallel structure of the gas-dust cloud is considered. The statistical equilibrium equations for the H$_2$O level populations and the thermal balance equations for the gas-dust cloud are solved self-consistently. The calculations take into account 410 rotational levels belonging to the five lowest vibrational levels of H$_2$O. The stellar radiation field is shown to play an important role in the thermal balance of the gas-dust cloud due to the absorption of emission in rotational-vibrational H$_2$O lines. The dependence of the gain in the 22.2-GHz maser line on the gas density and H$_2$O number density in the gas-dust cloud is investigated. Gas densities close to the mean density of the stellar wind, 10$^7-10^8$ cm$^{-3}$, and a high re...

Nesterenok, Aleksandr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

New particle-control techniques for gas-insulated apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The feasibilities of two new methods of controlling contaminating particles in gas-insulated apparatus have been experimentally investigated. The first method is to coat the particles with an insulating layer: for the first time it was found that (1) coatings can render harmless particles that would otherwise lower the withstand voltage by factors of 2 to 5 and (2) coatings can be formed on particles residing in the system. The second method, trapping particles in an insulating material, was found effective also, and suitable materials were compounded for different temperature ranges.

Pace, M.O.; Adcock, J.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Modified theory of secondary electron emission from spherical particles and its effect on dust charging in complex plasma  

SciTech Connect

The authors have modified Chow's theory of secondary electron emission (SEE) to take account of the fact that the path length of a primary electron in a spherical particle varies between zero to the diameter or x{sub m} the penetration depth depending on the distance of the path from the centre of the particle. Further by including this modified expression for SEE efficiency, the charging kinetics of spherical grains in a Maxwellian plasma has been developed; it is based on charge balance over dust particles and number balance of electrons and ionic species. It is seen that this effect is more pronounced for smaller particles and higher plasma temperatures. Desirable experimental work has also been discussed.

Misra, Shikha [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Department of Education Building, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antin...

Ledenyov, Oleg P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

Cookson, A.H.

1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

STAR FORMATION AND DISTRIBUTIONS OF GAS AND DUST IN THE CIRCINUS CLOUD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results of a study on the Circinus cloud based on {sup 13}CO (J = 1 - 0) data as well as visual to near-infrared (JHK{sub S}) extinction maps, to investigate the distributions of gas and dust around the cloud. The global {sup 13}CO distribution of the Circinus cloud is revealed for the first time, and the total molecular mass of the cloud is estimated to be 2.5 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun} for the assumed distance 700 pc. Two massive clumps in the cloud, called Circinus-W and Circinus-E, have a mass of {approx}5 x 10{sup 3} M{sub sun}. These clumps are associated with a number of young stellar objects (YSOs) searched for in the literature, indicating that they are the most active star-forming sites in Circinus. All of the extinction maps show good agreement with the {sup 13}CO distribution. We derived the average N({sup 13}CO)/A{sub V} ratio in the Circinus cloud to be 1.25 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1} by comparing the extinction maps with the {sup 13}CO data. The extinction maps also allowed us to probe into the reddening law over the Circinus cloud. We found that there is a clear change in dust properties in the densest regions of Circinus-W and Circinus-E, possibly due to grain growth in the dense cloud interior. Among the YSOs found in the literature, we attempted to infer the ages and masses of the H{alpha} emission-line stars forming in the two clumps, and found that they are likely to be younger than 1 Myr, having a relatively small mass of {approx}<2 M{sub sun} at the zero-age main sequence.

Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito, E-mail: ikura@u-gakugei.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan)

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

High voltage gas insulated transmission line with continuous particle trapping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a novel high voltage gas insulated transmission line utilizing insulating supports spaced at intervals with snap-in means for supporting a continuous trapping apparatus and said trapping apparatus having perforations and cutouts to facilitate trapping of contaminating particles and system flexibility.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Influence by small dispersive coal dust particles of different fractional consistence on characteristics of iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of research is to determine the influence by the small dispersive coal dust particles of the different fractional consistence on the technical characteristics of the vertical iodine air filter at nuclear power plant. The research on the transport properties of the small dispersive coal dust particles in the granular filtering medium of absorber in the vertical iodine air filter is completed in the case, when the modeled aerodynamic conditions are similar to the real aerodynamic conditions. It is shown that the appearance of the different fractional consistence of small dispersive coal dust particles with the decreasing dimensions down to the micro and nano sizes at the action of the air dust aerosol stream normally results in a significant change of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles masses in the granular filtering medium of an absorber in the vertical iodine air filter, changing the vertical iodine air filter aerodynamic characteristics. The precise characterization of the aerodynamic resistance of a model of the vertical iodine air filter is completed. The comparative analysis of the technical characteristics of the vertical and horizontal iodine air filters is also made.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

48

N-BODY SIMULATION OF PLANETESIMAL FORMATION THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF A DUST LAYER IN LAMINAR GAS DISK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the formation process of planetesimals from the dust layer by the gravitational instability in the gas disk using local N-body simulations. The gas is modeled as a background laminar flow. We study the formation process of planetesimals and its dependence on the strength of the gas drag. Our simulation results show that the formation process is divided into three stages qualitatively: the formation of wake-like density structures, the creation of planetesimal seeds, and their collisional growth. The linear analysis of the dissipative gravitational instability shows that the dust layer is secularly unstable although Toomre's Q value is larger than unity. However, in the initial stage, the growth time of the gravitational instability is longer than that of the dust sedimentation and the decrease in the velocity dispersion. Thus, the velocity dispersion decreases and the disk shrinks vertically. As the velocity dispersion becomes sufficiently small, the gravitational instability finally becomes dominant. Then wake-like density structures are formed by the gravitational instability. These structures fragment into planetesimal seeds. The seeds grow rapidly owing to mutual collisions.

Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: michikoshi@cfca.j, E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.j, E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.j [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is preved by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

Postma, A.K.

1984-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Heterogeneous chemistry of atmospheric mineral dust particles and their resulting cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecular marker of biomass combustion particles (Schauer etproduced from biomass and biofuel combustion typicallyof chlorine include coal combustion, biomass burning, and

Sullivan, Ryan Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

Durham, M.D.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel  

SciTech Connect

The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself.

Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

A quadrature-based third-order moment method for dilute gas-particle flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dilute gas-particle flows can be described by a kinetic equation containing terms for spatial transport, gravity, fluid drag, and particle-particle collisions. However, the direct numerical solution of the kinetic equation is intractable for most applications ... Keywords: Boltzmann equation, Gas-particle flows, Kinetic equation, Quadrature method of moments, Velocity distribution function

R. O. Fox

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given voltage. Particle fluxes ranging from a few tens of particle per second up to thousands of particles per second have been achieved using this simple device. To achieve higher dust injection speed, another key consideration is how to accelerate dust at controlled amount. In addition to gravity, other possible acceleration mechanisms include electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration. Features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. We will also describe laboratory experiments on dust acceleration.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yangfang [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

56

Novel instrument for Dust Astronomy: Dust Telescope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of dust particles in space can tell us about their origin and interaction with the space environment that helps understanding the evolution of the solar system and the universe.1 2 There has been a significant advancement in dust detector/analyzer ...

Zoltan Sternovsky; Eberhard Grun; Keith Drake; Jianfeng Xie; Mihaly Horanyi; Ralf Srama; Sascha Kempf; Frank Postberg; Anna Mocker; Siegfried Auer; Harald Kruger

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Profitability Comparison Between Gas Turbines and Gas Engine in Biomass-Based Power Plants Using Binary Particle Swarm Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper employs a binary discrete version of the classical Particle Swarm Optimization to compare the maximum net present value achieved by a gas turbines biomass plant and a gas engine biomass plant. The proposed algorithm determines the optimal ...

P. Reche López; M. Gómez González; N. Ruiz Reyes; F. Jurado

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hobbs, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Hobbs, D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Liquid noble gas detectors for low energy particle physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the current status of liquid noble gas radiation detectors with energy threshold in the keV range, wich are of interest for direct dark matter searches, measurement of coherent neutrino scattering and other low energy particle physics experiments. Emphasis is given to the operation principles and the most important instrumentation aspects of these detectors, principally of those operated in the double-phase mode. Recent technological advances and relevant developments in photon detection and charge readout are discussed in the context of their applicability to those experiments.

Vitaly Chepel; Henrique Araújo

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Preformed transient gas channels for laser wakefield particle acceleration  

SciTech Connect

Acceleration of electrons by laser-driven plasma wake fields is limited by the range over which a laser pulse can maintain its intensity. This distance is typically given by the Rayleigh range for the focused laser beam, usually on the order of 0.1 mm to 1 mm. For practical particle acceleration, interaction distances on the order of centimeters are required. Therefore, some means of guiding high intensity laser pulses is necessary. Light intensities on the order of a few times 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} are required for laser wakefield acceleration schemes using near IR radiation. Gas densities on the order of or greater than 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} are also needed. Laser-atom interaction studies in this density and intensity regime are generally limited by the concomitant problems in beam propagation introduced by the creation of a plasma. In addition to the interaction distance limit imposed by the Rayleigh range, defocusing of the high intensity laser pulse further limits the peak intensity which can be achieved. To solve the problem of beam propagation limitations in laser-plasma wakefield experiments, two potential methods for creating transient propagation channels in gaseous targets are investigated. The first involves creation of a charge-neutral channel in a gas by an initial laser pulse, which then is ionized by a second, ultrashort, high-intensity pulse to create a waveguide. The second method involves the ionization of a gas column by an ultrashort pulse; a transient waveguide is formed by the subsequent expansion of the heated plasma into the neutral gas.

Wood, W.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Impact of Desert Dust Radiative Forcing on Sahel Precipitation: Relative Importance of Dust Compared to Sea Surface Temperature Variations, Vegetation Changes, and Greenhouse Gas Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of direct radiative forcing of desert dust aerosol in the change from wet to dry climate observed in the African Sahel region in the last half of the twentieth century is investigated using simulations with an atmospheric general ...

Masaru Yoshioka; Natalie M. Mahowald; Andrew J. Conley; William D. Collins; David W. Fillmore; Charles S. Zender; Dani B. Coleman

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

TWO INTERSTELLAR DUST CANDIDATES FROM THE STARDUST AEROGEL INTERSTELLAR DUST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TWO INTERSTELLAR DUST CANDIDATES FROM THE STARDUST AEROGEL INTERSTELLAR DUST COLLECTOR A. J, and is expected to have collected several dozen contemporary interstellar dust particles in aerogel and aluminum@home, we have so far identified 28 tracks in the aerogel collectors. We report on the results

64

Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antinodes of the acoustic waves are positioned. Finally, we completed the comparative analysis of the theoretical calculations with the experimental results, obtained for the cases of: 1) the experimental aerodynamic modeling of physical processes of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF; and 2) the gamma-activation spectroscopy analysis of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF. We made the innovative propositions on the necessary technical modifications with the purpose to improve the IAF technical characteristics and increase its operational time at the nuclear power plant (NPP), going from the completed precise characterization of the IAF parameters at the long term operation.

Oleg P. Ledenyov; Ivan M. Neklyudov

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance November 16, 2009 - 1:12pm Addthis As part of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program, the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program has achieved a new international record for irradiation testing of next-generation particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). The AGR Fuel Development Program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 2002 to develop the advanced fabrication and characterization technologies, and provide irradiation and safety performance data required to license TRISO particle fuel for the NGNP and future HTGRs. The AGR

66

Computational Predictions and Experimental Measurements of the Performance of a Louver Particle Separator for Use in Gas Turbine Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas turbine engines that power aircraft operate in harsh environments where solid particles, such as sand, are ingested into the engine. Solid particles damage aircraft… (more)

Musgrove, Grant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

Hering, Susanne V. (Berkeley, CA); Goldstein, Allen H. (Orinda, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

68

4-D Particle Tracking Velocimetry Applied to Gas-Liquid Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-D Particle Tracking Velocimetry Applied to Gas-Liquid Reactors Michael St¨ohr12 , Christoph Garbe bubbles through space and time (4-D) in a liquid container, e.g. in a gas-liquid reactor. The method cameras looking into the gas-liquid reactor. The air bubbles are visualized by light refracted

Garbe, Christoph S.

69

Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Gas turbine-steam power plant  

SciTech Connect

The pressure vessel of the gas turbine-steam power plant is provided with a recuperator and a heat exchanger in order to reduce the temperature of the hot flue gas before separating out gas-entrained particles. The dust separator is connected to the recuperator on a secondary side so that the hot gas can be reheated for delivery to the gas turbine. By cooling the flue gas before entering the separator, use can be made of electrostatic dust filters or cloth filters.

Aguet, E.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

An integrated performance model for high temperature gas cooled reactor coated particle fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of coated fuel particles is essential for the development and deployment of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) systems for future power generation. Fuel performance modeling is indispensable for understanding ...

Wang, Jing, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel chemistry model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first portion of this work is a comprehensive analysis of the chemical environment in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO fuel particle. Fission product inventory versus burnup is calculated. Based on those ...

Diecker, Jane T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Oxidation of Flash Reduced Iron Particles in Various Gas Mixtures ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decomposition of Methane during Oxide Reduction Using Natural gas · Delivering a National Process Design Unit with Industry Support · Development of a ...

74

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine Dr. Fletcher Miller SDSU Department of Mechanical Engineering Abstract Solar thermal power for electricity will describe the design of a high temperature solar receiver capable of driving a gas turbine for power

Ponce, V. Miguel

75

Particle Dynamics In A Turbulent Particle-Gas Suspension At High Stokes Number.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Particle laden turbulent flows find applications in many industrial processes such as energy conversion, air pollution control etc. In these types of flows, there are… (more)

Goswami, Partha Sarathi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Graphite Dust Deflagration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The graphite moderators of retired gas-cooled nuclear reactors present a difficult challenge during demolition activities. As part of the EPRI graphite initiative on the technical issues involved in the management and disposal of irradiated nuclear graphite, this report examines the international data on dust deflagration relevant to the decommissioning of graphite-moderated reactors. The report concludes that the risk of an explosion involving graphite dust during decommissioning is extremely low, and s...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Graphite Dust Deflagration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The graphite moderators of retired gas-cooled nuclear reactors present a difficult challenge during demolition activities. As part of the EPRI graphite initiative on the technical issues involved in the management and disposal of irradiated nuclear graphite, EPRI Report 1014797 Graphite Dust Deflagration: A Review of International Data with Particular Reference to the Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Reactors (March 2007) examined the international data on dust deflagration relevant to the decommiss...

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

Gas-liquid transition in the model of particles interacting at high energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An application of the ideas of the inertial confinement fusion process in the case of particles interacting at high energy is investigated. A possibility of the gas-liquid transition in the gas is considered using different approaches. In particular, a shock wave description of interactions between particles is studied and a self-similar solution of Euler's equation is discussed. Additionally, Boltzmann equation is solved for self-consistent field (Vlasov's equation) in linear approximation for the case of a gas under external pressure and the corresponding change of Knudsen number of the system is calculated.

S. Bondarenko; K. Komoshvili

2012-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

Vertically aligned gas-insulated transmission line having particle traps at the inner conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas insulated electrical apparatus having first and second conductors separated by an insulating support within an insulating gas environment, and particle traps disposed along the surface of the high potential conductor for trapping and inactivating foreign particles which may be present within the insulating gas medium. Several embodiments of the invention were developed which are particularly suited for vertically aligned gas insulated transmission lines. The particle traps are grooves or cavities formed into the walls of the tubular inner conductor, without extending into the hollow portion of the conductor. In other embodiments, the traps are appendages or insert flanges extending from the inner conductor, with the insulator supports contacting the appendages instead of the inner conductor.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Means and method for the destruction of particles entrained in a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for the destruction of particles entrained in a gas stream are disclosed. Destruction in the context of the subject invention means the fragmentation and/or vaporization of particles above a certain size limit. The subject invention contemplates destroying such particles by exposing them to intense bursts of laser light, such light having a frequency approximately equal to or less than the mean size of such particles. This invention is particularly adopted to the protection of turbine blades in open cycle coal-fired turbine systems. Means for introducing various chemical species and activating them by exposure to laser light are also disclosed.

Botts, Thomas E. (Wading River, NY); Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ionization and scintillation response of high-pressure xenon gas to alpha particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-pressure xenon gas is an attractive detection medium for a variety of applications in fundamental and applied physics. In this paper we study the ionization and scintillation detection properties of xenon gas at 10 bar pressure. For this purpose, we use a source of alpha particles in the NEXT-DEMO time projection chamber, the large scale prototype of the NEXT-100 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, in three different drift electric field configurations. We measure the ionization electron drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion, and compare our results to expectations based on available electron scattering cross sections on pure xenon. In addition, two types of measurements addressing the connection between the ionization and scintillation yields are performed. On the one hand we observe, for the first time in xenon gas, large event-by-event correlated fluctuations between the ionization and scintillation signals, similar to that already observed in liquid xenon. On the other hand, we study the field dependence of the average scintillation and ionization yields. Both types of measurements may shed light on the mechanism of electron-ion recombination in xenon gas for highly-ionizing particles. Finally, by comparing the response of alpha particles and electrons in NEXT-DEMO, we find no evidence for quenching of the primary scintillation light produced by alpha particles in the xenon gas.

NEXT Collaboration; V. Álvarez; F. I. G. M. Borges; S. Cárcel; S. Cebrián; A. Cervera; C. A. N. Conde; T. Dafni; J. Díaz; M. Egorov; R. Esteve; P. Evtoukhovitch; L. M. P. Fernandes; P. Ferrario; A. L. Ferreira; E. D. C. Freitas; V. M. Gehman; A. Gil; A. Goldschmidt; H. Gómez; J. J. Gómez-Cadenas; D. González-Díaz; R. M. Gutiérrez; J. Hauptman; J. A. Hernando Morata; D. C. Herrera; I. G. Irastorza; M. A. Jinete; L. Labarga; A. Laing; I. Liubarsky; J. A. M. Lopes; D. Lorca; M. Losada; G. Luzón; A. Marí; J. Martín-Albo; T. Miller; A. Moiseenko; F. Monrabal; C. M. B. Monteiro; F. J. Mora; L. M. Moutinho; J. Muñoz Vidal; H. Natal da Luz; G. Navarro; M. Nebot-Guinot; D. Nygren; C. A. B. Oliveira; R. Palma; J. Pérez; J. L. Pérez Aparicio; J. Renner; L. Ripoll; A. Rodríguez; J. Rodríguez; F. P. Santos; J. M. F. dos Santos; L. Segui; L. Serra; D. Shuman; A. Simón; C. Sofka; M. Sorel; J. F. Toledo; A. Tomás; J. Torrent; Z. Tsamalaidze; D. Vázquez; J. F. C. A. Veloso; R. Webb; J. T White; N. Yahlali

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Particle trap with dielectric barrier for use in gas insulated transmission lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping electrode is disposed within the outer sheath, and the electrode has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the apertured electrode. 7 figs.

Dale, S.J.

1982-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Particle trap with dielectric barrier for use in gas insulated transmission lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping electrode is disposed within the outer sheath, and the electrode has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the apertured electrode.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Lagrangian Prediction Of Disperse Gas-Particle Flow In Cyclone Separators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disperse multiphase flows are very common for processes in mechanical and thermal process technology (e.g. gas--particle or gas--droplet flows, coal combustion, pneumatical conveying, erosion phenomena). Processes for the separation of solid particles from gases or fluids and for the classification and particle size analysis are an important field of interest in process technology. The paper deals with a 3--dimensional Lagrangian approach for the prediction of disperse multiphase flows. The underlying numerical algorithm is based on the PSI--cell approach, where trajectories of a large number of particles are calculated from the equations of motion of the disperse phase. The time--averaged equations of fluid motion are solved by the program package FAN--3D developed by Peri'c and Lilek and modified for gas-particle flow calculations by the authors. The most fundamental features of FAN--3D are : ffl use of non--orthogonal, boundary fitted, numerical grids with arbitrary hexahedral cont...

Thomas Frank; Th. Frank; Qiang Yu; Erik Wassen; Q. Yu

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Closures for Course-Grid Simulation of Fluidized Gas-Particle Flows  

SciTech Connect

Gas-particle flows in fluidized beds and riser reactors are inherently unstable, and they manifest fluctuations over a wide range of length and time scales. Two-fluid models for such flows reveal unstable modes whose length scale is as small as ten particle diameters. Yet, because of limited computational resources, gas-particle flows in large fluidized beds are invariably simulated by solving discretized versions of the two-fluid model equations over a coarse spatial grid. Such coarse-grid simulations do not resolve the small-scale spatial structures which are known to affect the macroscale flow structures both qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus there is a need to develop filtered two-fluid models which are suitable for coarse-grid simulations and capturing the effect of the small-scale structures through closures in terms of the filtered variables. The overall objective of the project is to develop validated closures for filtered two-fluid models for gas-particle flows, with the transport gasifier as a primary, motivating example. In this project, highly resolved three-dimensional simulations of a kinetic theory based two-fluid model for gas-particle flows have been performed and the statistical information on structures in the 100-1000 particle diameters length scale has been extracted. Based on these results, closures for filtered two-fluid models have been constructed. The filtered model equations and closures have been validated against experimental data and the results obtained in highly resolved simulations of gas-particle flows. The proposed project enables more accurate simulations of not only the transport gasifier, but also many other non-reacting and reacting gas-particle flows in a variety of chemical reactors. The results of this study are in the form of closures which can readily be incorporated into existing multi-phase flow codes such as MFIX (www.mfix.org). Therefore, the benefits of this study can be realized quickly. The training provided by this project has prepared a PhD student to enter research and development careers in DOE laboratories or chemicals/energy-related industries.

Sankaran Sundaresan

2010-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

Atmospheric boundary layer parameters necessary for calculation of gas and particle deposition velocities were directly measured from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results Atmospheric boundary layer parameters necessary for calculation of gas and particle hourly gas and particle deposition velocities. Acknowledgements · Staffs at the Lost Dutchman State Park, Desert Botanical Garden, and White Tank Mountain Regional Park. · Fred Peña, Department of Chemical

Hall, Sharon J.

88

DENSE GAS TRACERS IN PERSEUS: RELATING THE N{sub 2}H{sup +}, NH{sub 3}, AND DUST CONTINUUM PROPERTIES OF PRE- AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES  

SciTech Connect

We investigate 35 prestellar cores and 36 protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud. We find a very tight correlation between the physical parameters describing the N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} gas. Both the velocity centroids and the line widths of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} correlate much better than either species correlates with CO, as expected if the nitrogen-bearing species are probing primarily the dense core gas where the CO has been depleted. We also find a tight correlation in the inferred abundance ratio between N{sub 2}H{sup +} and para-NH{sub 3} across all cores, with N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) = 22 +- 10. We find a mild correlation between NH{sub 3} (and N{sub 2}H{sup +}) column density and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum derived H{sub 2} column density for prestellar cores, N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(H{sub 2}) {approx}10{sup -8}, but do not find a fixed ratio for protostellar cores. The observations suggest that in the Perseus molecular cloud the formation and destruction mechanisms for the two nitrogen-bearing species are similar, regardless of the physical conditions in the dense core gas. While the equivalence of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} as powerful tracers of dense gas is validated, the lack of correspondence between these species and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum observations for protostellar cores is disconcerting and presently unexplained.

Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Tafalla, Mario, E-mail: doug.johnstone@nrc-cnrc.gc.c [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

COARSE-GRID SIMULATION OF REACTING AND NON-REACTING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

Many processes involved in coal utilization involve handling of fine particles, their pneumatic transport, and their reactions in fluidized beds, spouted beds and circulating fluidized beds. One of the factors limiting our ability to simulate these processes is the hydrodynamics encountered in them. Two major issues that contribute to this limitation are lack of good and computationally expedient models for frictional interaction between particles, and models to capture the consequences of mesoscale structures that are ubiquitous in gas-solid flows. This project has focused on the development of these models through a combination of computer simulations and experiments. The principal goal of this project, funded under the ''DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative'' is better simulation of circulating fluidized bed performance. The principal challenge funded through this cooperative agreement is to devise sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures and implement them in the open-domain CFD code MFIX. During the course of this project, we have made the following specific advances. (a) We have demonstrated unequivocally that sub-grid models are essential to capture, even qualitatively correctly, the macroscale flow structures in gas-particle flows in vertical risers. To this end, we developed sub-grid models of different levels of detail and exposed the sensitivity of the results obtained in coarse-grid simulations of gas-particle flow in a riser to the level of sophistication of the sub-grid models. (b) We have demonstrated that sub-grid model for the fluid-particle drag force is the most important additional feature and that the corrections for the granular phase viscosity and pressure are of secondary importance. We have also established that sub-grid models for dispersion of heat and mass are of secondary importance only. (c) We have brought forth the general character of the sub-grid model for the drag force. (d) We have performed for the first time in the literature a detailed analysis of the impact of unipolar electrostatic charges on gas-particle flow characteristics in a riser. (e) We have examined in detail the effect of wall friction and particle-particle contact (frictional) stresses on fluidization and defluidization behavior of particle assemblies, and brought forth their importance for stable operation of standpipes in a circulating fluidized bed circuit. (f) We have demonstrated that the general characteristics of contact stresses in particle assemblies and wall friction are similar for many different particles, establishing that a simple model framework can be widely applicable. (g) We have developed constitutive models for frictional regime, implemented them in MFIX and demonstrated the capability of simulating dense gas-solid flows in the frictional regime. (h) We have also performed detailed experiments to expose the nature of the stick-slip flows in silos, as a simple model system for under-aerated standpipes. All theoretical advances made in the study are implemented in MFIX and are available for public use.

Sankaran Sundaresan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Novel methods for respirable dust removal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Two novel devices with potential for controlling emissions of dust particles in the respirable size range (0.3 to 3 microns) are the electrostatically enhanced cyclone (or electrocyclone) and acoustic agglomeration. The electrocyclone combines electrostatic, inertial forces and larger unit size compared to conventional cyclones to achieve improved performance. The acoustic agglomerator uses an oscillating acoustic flow field to cause particle collision and agglomeration. The resulting large particles are then more readily separable by conventional methods. The application of these novel methods to respirable dust control in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and conventional pulverized coal combustion for electric power generation is explored in this study. In a PFBC power plant, dust particles entrained in the combustion gases must be removed at high temperature and pressure in order to protect a gas turbine from erosion. A key technical issue in this application is whether the hot gas cleanup equipment can satisfy the NSPS, or whether supplementary stack gas cleanup, such as a baghouse, is required downstream of the gas turbine. The potential of both the electrocyclone and the acoustic agglomerator for achieving NSPS ahead of the gas turbine has been assessed. In conventional PC power plants, particulate cleanup is normally accomplished with electrostatic precipitators. However, plants burning low sulfur western coals have experienced difficulty achieving adequate particulate emissions control with electrostatic precipitators, due to the high resistivity of the coal ash. For these applications the electrocyclone or an acoustic agglomerator coupled with either an electrocyclone or more conventional removal technique, might prove attractive. The principal conclusions drawn from the work performed and the recommendations based on the results are detailed. (LTN)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

Durham, M.D.

1992-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

93

On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors for Individual Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Title On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors for Individual Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Dallmann, Timothy R., Steven J. DeMartini, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Scott C. Herndon, Timothy B. Onasch, Ezra C. Wood, and Robert A. Harley Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 46 Issue 15 Pagination 8511-8518 Abstract Pollutant concentrations in the exhaust plumes of individual diesel trucks were measured at high time resolution in a highway tunnel in Oakland, CA, during July 2010. Emission factors for individual trucks were calculated using a carbon balance method, in which pollutants measured in each exhaust plume were normalized to measured concentrations of carbon dioxide. Pollutants considered here include nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, ethene, and black carbon (BC), as well as optical properties of emitted particles. Fleet-average emission factors for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and BC respectively decreased 30 ± 6 and 37 ± 10% relative to levels measured at the same location in 2006, whereas a 34 ± 18% increase in the average NO2 emission factor was observed. Emissions distributions for all species were skewed with a small fraction of trucks contributing disproportionately to total emissions. For example, the dirtiest 10% of trucks emitted half of total NO2 and BC emissions. Emission rates for NO2 were found to be anticorrelated with all other species considered here, likely due to the use of catalyzed diesel particle filters to help control exhaust emissions. Absorption and scattering cross-section emission factors were used to calculate the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, at 532 nm) for individual truck exhaust plumes, which averaged 0.14 ± 0.03.

94

Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

Stephenson, M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

"Liquid-gas" transition in the supercritical region: Fundamental changes in the particle dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, we have proposed a new dynamic line on the phase diagram in the supercritical region. Crossing this line corresponds to the radical changes of the fluid properties. Here, we focus on the dynamics of model Lennard-Jones and Soft-Sphere fluids. We show that the change of the dynamics from the liquid-like to gas-like can be established on the basis of the velocity autocorrelation function and mean-square displacement. Using the rigorous criterion, we show that the crossover of particle dynamics and key liquid properties occurs at the same line. We further show that positive sound dispersion disappears in the vicinity of this line in both kinds of systems. The dynamic line bears no relationship to the existence of the critical point. We find that the region of existence of liquid-like dynamics narrows with the increase of the exponent of the repulsive part of inter-particle potential.

V. V. Brazhkin; Yu. D. Fomin; A. G. Lyapin; V. N. Ryzhov; E. N. Tsiok; Kostya Trachenko

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Relaxation dynamics of a quantum Brownian particle in an ideal gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how the quantum analog of the Fokker-Planck equation for describing Brownian motion can be obtained as the diffusive limit of the quantum linear Boltzmann equation. The latter describes the quantum dynamics of a tracer particle in a dilute, ideal gas by means of a translation-covariant master equation. We discuss the type of approximations required to obtain the generalized form of the Caldeira-Leggett master equation, along with their physical justification. Microscopic expressions for the diffusion and relaxation coefficients are obtained by analyzing the limiting form of the equation in both the Schroedinger and the Heisenberg picture.

Bassano Vacchini; Klaus Hornberger

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hybrid particle traps and conditioning procedure for gas insulated transmission lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner condor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping ring is disposed within the outer sheath, and the trapping ring has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the trapping ring along an arc. A support sheet having an adhesive coating thereon is secured to the trapping ring and disposed on the outer sheath within the low field region formed between the trapping ring and the outer sheath. A conditioning method used to condition the transmission line prior to activation in service comprises applying an AC voltage to the inner conductor in a plurality of voltage-time steps, with the voltage-time steps increasing in voltage magnitude while decreasing in time duration.

Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Churchill, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Dynamic Contact Failure of Two Brittle Particles under Compression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This method allow the particle fracturing behavior to be imaged through the specimen thickness without the disturbance from the impact-induced dust. The dust ...

100

Heterogeneous Reactions on Mineral Dust: Surface Reactions of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactions on Mineral Dust: Surface Reactions of Sulfur Dioxide, Ozone, Nitric and Acetic Acid on Oxide and Carbonate Particles Speaker(s): Vicki Grassian Date: June 14,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

COARSE-GRID SIMULATION OF REACTING AND NON-REACTING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal of this project, funded under the ''DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative'' is virtual demonstration of circulating fluidized bed performance. We had proposed a ''virtual demonstration tool'', which is based on the open-domain CFD code MFIX. The principal challenge funded through this grant is to devise and implement in this CFD code sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures. Within the past year, which was the third year of the project, we have made the following specific advances. (a) We have completed a study of the impact of sub-grid models of different levels of detail on the results obtained in coarse-grid simulations of gas-particle flow. (b) We have also completed a study of a model problem to understand the effect of wall friction, which was proved in our earlier work to be very important for stable operation of standpipes in a circulating fluidized bed circuit. These are described in a greater detail in this report.

Sankaran Sundaresan

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Growth of Dust as the Initial Step Toward Planet Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the results of laboratory measurements and theoretical models concerning the aggregation of dust in protoplanetary disks, as the initial step toward planet formation. Small particles easily stick when they collide and form aggregates with an open, often fractal structure, depending on the growth process. Larger particles are still expected to grow at collision velocities of about 1m/s. Experiments also show that, after an intermezzo of destructive velocities, high collision velocities above 10m/s on porous materials again lead to net growth of the target. Considerations of dust-gas interactions show that collision velocities for particles not too different in surface-to-mass ratio remain limited up to sizes about 1m, and growth seems to be guaranteed to reach these sizes quickly and easily. For meter sizes, coupling to nebula turbulence makes destructive processes more likely. Global aggregation models show that in a turbulent nebula, small particles are swept up too fast to be consistent with observations of disks. An extended phase may therefore exist in the nebula during which the small particle component is kept alive through collisions driven by turbulence which frustrates growth to planetesimals until conditions are more favorable for one or more reasons.

C. Dominik; J. Blum; J. Cuzzi; G. Wurm

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

Dust Charging and Transport on Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we review laboratory studies of dust transport on surfaces in plasmas, performed for a number of different mechanisms: 1) Dust particles were levitated in plasma sheaths by electrostatic forces balancing the gravitational force. 2) Dust was observed to spread over and lift off a surface that repels electrons in a plasma. 3) Dust was transported on surfaces having different secondary electron yields in plasma with an electron beam as a consequence of differential charging. 4) We also report a mechanism of dust transport by electric fields occurring at electron beam impact/shadow boundaries. These processes are candidates to explain the formation of dust ponds that were recently observed in craters on the asteroid Eros by the NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft.

Wang, X. [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust And Atmospheric Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Robertson, S. [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust And Atmospheric Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Horanyi, M. [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust And Atmospheric Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

Propagation of nonlinear dust magnetoacoustic waves in cylindrical geometry  

SciTech Connect

The cylindrical dust magnetoacoustic shocks in dissipative and solitons in non-dissipative dust-ion plasmas are studied. The dust particles are assumed to be fully negatively charged so that the density of electrons in comparison with dust and ions is negligible. The cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries Burgers and cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equations are derived for dust magnetosonic waves by employing the reductive perturbation method. It is found that dust plasma parameters such as dust charge number, dust density, and ion temperature have strong influence on the profile of dust magnetoacoustic shocks and solitons. The results are also obtained numerically by using the data from laboratory experiments on dusty plasmas.

Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division (TPPD), PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) and Department of Physics and Applied Physics (DPAM), PIEAS, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

FORMING PLANETESIMALS BY GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY. II. HOW DUST SETTLES TO ITS MARGINALLY STABLE STATE  

SciTech Connect

Dust at the midplane of a circumstellar disk can become gravitationally unstable and fragment into planetesimals if the local dust-to-gas ratio {mu}{sub 0} {identical_to} {rho}{sub d}/{rho}{sub g} is sufficiently high. We simulate how dust settles in passive disks and ask how high {mu}{sub 0} can become. We implement a hybrid scheme that alternates between a one-dimensional code to settle dust and a three-dimensional shearing box code to test for dynamical stability. This scheme allows us to explore the behavior of small particles having short but non-zero stopping times in gas: 0 < t{sub stop}<< the orbital period. The streaming instability is thereby filtered out. Dust settles until Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instabilities at the top and bottom faces of the dust layer threaten to overturn the entire layer. In this state of marginal stability, {mu}{sub 0} = 2.9 for a disk whose bulk (height-integrated) metallicity {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} is solar-thus {mu}{sub 0} increases by more than two orders of magnitude from its well-mixed initial value of {mu}{sub 0,init} = {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} = 0.015. For a disk whose bulk metallicity is 4x solar ({mu}{sub 0,init} = {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} = 0.06), the marginally stable state has {mu}{sub 0} = 26.4. These maximum values of {mu}{sub 0}, which depend on the background radial pressure gradient, are so large that gravitational instability of small particles is viable in disks whose bulk metallicities are just a few ({approx}<4) times solar. Our result supports earlier studies that assumed that dust settles until the Richardson number Ri is spatially constant. Our simulations are free of this assumption but provide evidence for it within the boundaries of the dust layer, with the proviso that Ri increases with {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} in the same way that we found in Paper I. Because increasing the dust content decreases the vertical shear and increases stability, the midplane {mu}{sub 0} increases with {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} in a faster than linear way, so fast that modest enhancements in {Sigma}{sub d}/{Sigma}{sub g} can spawn planetesimals directly from small particles.

Lee, Aaron T.; Chiang, Eugene [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Asay-Davis, Xylar [Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Barranco, Joseph, E-mail: a.t.lee@berkeley.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for powering a gas turbine or to supply industrial processin conjunetion with a gas turbine system providing severalincluding heating a gas to operate a turbine (4), providing

Hunt, Arlon J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Dust trajectory sensor: Accuracy and data analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Gruen, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008)] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Gruen, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010)]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1 deg. in direction.

Xie, J.; Horanyi, M. [NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, and Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Departments of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Sternovsky, Z. [NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, and Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Gruen, E.; Duncan, N.; Drake, K.; Le, H. [NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, and Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Auer, S. [A and M Associates, P. O. Box 421, Basye, Virginia 22810 (United States); Srama, R. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg 69029 (Germany); Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Kuwaiti Atmospheric Dust and Synthetic Dusts: Effects on the Pressure Drop and Fractional Efficiency of HEPA Filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of clean air to the indoor air quality affecting the well-being of human occupants and rising energy consumption has highlighted the critical role of air filter performance. Actual performance of air filters installed in air handling units in Kuwait tends to deviate from the performance predicted by laboratory results. Therefore, accurate filter performance prediction is important to estimate filter lifetime, and to reduce energy and maintenance operating costs. To ensure appropriate filter selection for a specific application, particulate contaminants existing in the Kuwaiti atmospheric dust were identified and characterized both physically and chemically and compared to the synthetic dust used in laboratories. This paper compares the physical and chemical characterization Kuwaiti atmospheric dust with the available commercial synthetic dusts. It also tests full scale HEPA pleated V-shaped filters used in Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and gas turbine applications to study the effect of different synthetic dust types and their particle size distributions on the pressure drop and fractional efficiency using DEHS testing according to DIN 1822.

Al-Attar, I.; Wakeman, R. J.; Tarleton, E. S.; Husain, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Dust Studies in DIII-D and TEXTOR  

SciTech Connect

Studies of naturally occurring and artificially introduced carbon dust are conducted in DIII-D and TEXTOR. In DIII-D, dust does not present operational concerns except immediately after entry vents. Submicron sized dust is routinely observed using Mie scattering from a Nd:Yag laser. The source is strongly correlated with the presence of Type I edge localized modes (ELMs). Larger size (0.005-1 mm diameter) dust is observed by optical imaging, showing elevated dust levels after entry vents. Inverse dependence of the dust velocity on the inferred dust size is found from the imaging data. Direct heating of the dust particles by the neutral beam injection (NBI) and acceleration of dust particles by the plasma flows are observed. Energetic plasma disruptions produce significant amounts of dust. Large flakes or debris falling into the plasma may result in a disruption. Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust is studied in DIII-D and TEXTOR by introducing micron-size dust in plasma discharges. In DIII-D, a sample holder filled with {approx}30 mg of dust is introduced in the lower divertor and exposed to high-power ELMing H-mode discharges with strike points swept across the divertor floor. After a brief exposure ({approx}0.1 s) at the outer strike point, part of the dust is injected into the plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3 and resulting in a twofold increase of the radiated power. In TEXTOR, instrumented dust holders with 1-45 mg of dust are exposed in the scrape-off layer 0-2 cm radially outside of the last closed flux surface in discharges heated with neutral beam injection (NBI) power of 1.4 MW. At the given configuration of the launch, the dust did not penetrate the core plasma and only moderately perturbed the edge plasma, as evidenced by an increase of the edge carbon content.

Rudakov, D L; Litnovsky, A; West, W P; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D; Brezinsek, S; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Hollmann, E M; Huber, A; Hyatt, A W; Krasheninnikov, S I; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Pigarov, A Y; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Smirnov, R D; Sharpe, J P; Solomon, W M; Watkins, J G; Wong, C C

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Numerical Simulation of Dust Lifting within Dust Devils—Simulation of an Intense Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on an advanced dust devil–scale large-eddy simulation (LES) model, the atmosphere flow of a modeled dust devil in a quasi–steady state was first simulated to illustrate the characteristics of the gas phase field in the mature stage, ...

Zhaolin Gu; Yongzhi Zhao; Yun Li; Yongzhang Yu; Xiao Feng

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

STUDY OF CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBMICRON COAL PARTICLES DISPERSED IN AIR AND CAPTURE OF COAL PARTICLES BY WATER DROPS IN A SCRUBBING COLUMN.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Present day water spray based dust removal technologies do not effectively remove respirable submicron coal and silica dust particles in the underground coal mines causing… (more)

Chakravorty, Utshab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Photochemical Oxidant Processes in the Presence of Dust: An Evaluation of the Impact of Dust on Particulate Nitrate and Ozone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of dust on the tropospheric photochemical oxidant cycle is studied through the use of a detailed coupled aerosol and gas-phase chemistry model. Dust is a significant component of the troposphere throughout Asia and provides a ...

Yang Zhang; Young Sunwoo; Veerabhadra Kotamarthi; Gregory R. Carmichael

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Dust feed mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

Milliman, Edward M. (Benton City, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Dust-feed mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

Milliman, E.M.

1981-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Secondary Electron Emission from Dust and Its Effect on Charging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen plasma is produced in a plasma chamber by striking discharge between incandescent tungsten filaments and the permanent magnetic cage [1], which is grounded. The magnetic cage has a full line cusped magnetic field geometry used to confine the plasma elements. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to study the plasma parameters in various discharge conditions. The charge accumulated on the dust particles is calculated using the capacitance model and the dust current is measured by the combination of a Faraday cup and an electrometer at different discharge conditions. It is found Secondary electron emission from dust having low emission yield effects the charging of dust particles in presence of high energetic electrons.

Saikia, B. K.; Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

GRAIN SORTING IN COMETARY DUST FROM THE OUTER SOLAR NEBULA  

SciTech Connect

Most young stars are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. Close to the hot stars, amorphous dust grains from the parent molecular cloud are reprocessed into crystals that are then distributed throughout the accretion disk. In some disks, there is a reduction in crystalline grain size with heliocentric distance from the star. We investigated crystalline grain size distributions in chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) believed to be from small, icy bodies that accreted in outer regions of the solar nebula. The grains are Mg-rich silicates and Fe-rich sulfides, the two most abundant minerals in CP IDPs. We find that they are predominantly <0.25 {mu}m in radius with a mean grain size that varies from one CP IDP to another. We report a size-density relationship between the silicates and sulfides. A similar size-density relationship between much larger silicate and sulfide grains in meteorites from the asteroid belt is ascribed to aerodynamic sorting. Since the silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs are theoretically too small for aerodynamic sorting, their size-density relationship may be due to another process capable of sorting small grains.

Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Ishii, H. A. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Brownlee, D. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kearsley, A. T. [Department of Mineralogy, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, M. J.; Price, M. C., E-mail: P.Wozniakiewicz@kent.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)  

SciTech Connect

Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at various planes. Together, these two techniques can provide the needed local solids flow dynamic information for the same setup under identical operating conditions, and the data obtained can be used as a benchmark for development, and refinement of the appropriate riser models. For the above reasons these two techniques were implemented in this study on a fully developed section of the riser. To derive the global mixing information in the riser, accurate solids RTD is needed and was obtained by monitoring the entry and exit of a single radioactive tracer. Other global parameters such as Cycle Time Distribution (CTD), overall solids holdup in the riser, solids recycle percentage at the bottom section of the riser were evaluated from different solids travel time distributions. Besides, to measure accurately and in-situ the overall solids mass flux, a novel method was applied.

Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

2005-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

Measurement of nicotine in household dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical method of measuring nicotine in house dust was optimized and associations among three secondhand smoking exposure markers were evaluated, i.e., nicotine concentrations of both house dust and indoor air, and the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked daily in a household. We obtained seven house dust samples from self-reported nonsmoking homes and 30 samples from smoking homes along with the information on indoor air nicotine concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked daily from an asthma cohort study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. House dust nicotine was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using our optimized method, the median concentration of nicotine in the dust of self-reported nonsmoking homes was 11.7 ng/mg while that of smoking homes was 43.4 ng/mg. We found a substantially positive association (r=0.67, P<0.0001) between house dust nicotine concentrations and the numbers of cigarettes smoked daily. Optimized analytical methods showed a feasibility to detect nicotine in house dust. Our results indicated that the measurement of nicotine in house dust can be used potentially as a marker of longer term SHS exposure.

Kim, Sungroul [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Institute for Global Tobacco Control, 627 N. Washington Street, 2nd Floor Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)], E-mail: srkim@jhsph.edu; Aung, Ther; Berkeley, Emily [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Diette, Gregory B. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Breysse, Patrick N. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modular ultrahigh vacuum-compatible gas-injection system with an adjustable gas flow for focused particle beam-induced deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas-injection system (GIS) heats up a powdery substance and transports the resulting gas through a capillary into a vacuum chamber. Such a system can be used to guide a (metal)organic precursor gas very close to the focal area of an electron or ion beam, where a permanent deposit is created and adheres to the substrate. This process is known as focused particle beam-induced deposition. The authors present design principles and give construction details of a GIS suitable for ultrahigh vacuum usage. The GIS is composed of several self-contained components which can be customized rather independently. It allows for a continuously adjustable gas-flow rate. The GIS was attached to a standard scanning electron microscope (JEOL 6100) and tested with the tungsten precursor W(CO){sub 6}. The analysis of the deposits by means of atomic force microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy provides clear evidence that excellent gas-flow-rate stability and ensuing growth rate and metal-content reproducibility are experienced.

Klingenberger, D.; Huth, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Influence of Dust on the Absorptivity of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to model and quantify the increase of the absorptivity of radiant barriers caused by the accumulation of dust on the surface of radiant barriers. This research was the continuation of a previous work by the author at Texas A&M University in which a radiation energy balance inside the attic enclosure was developed. The particles were considered as flat, circular planes, all having the same radii. That early model showed that there was a linear relationship between the fraction of area of the foil covered by dust and the mean absorptivity of the dusty radiant barrier. In the present work, it was found that the assumption of treating the dust particles as plane circles, underestimated the effective area of the particles by about 20%. Experimental measurements indicated that dust particles achieved the same temperature as the radiant barrier. The new model used the linear relationship just described, and simulated the dust particles as flat circular planes having random radii and laying in random locations within the radiant barrier surface. The new model calculated the fraction of radiant barrier area covered by particles using a digital array in which the clean barrier was represented as zeroes and the dust particles were represented as a set of ones appropriately dimensioned inside the array. The experimentation used natural dust and Arizona Road Test Dust. Using an infrared emissometer, the emissivities (absorptivities) of the clean and dusty barriers were measured and using an electronic scale, the dust loading was measured. An electron microscope was used to experimentally find the fraction of radiant barrier covered by the dust particles to correlate the experimentally found absorptivity with the experimentally found fraction of dust coverage. The limited experimental data available were also used to correlate the absorptivity of the dusty radiant barrier with the time of dust accumulation and the location of the barrier inside the attic. A linear relationship between the absorptivity and the time of dust accumulation was found that can be applied to predict future barrier effectiveness based upon the rate of dust accumulation for a given location.

Noboa, Homero L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

L. C. Cadwallader

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

He Puff System For Dust Detector Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

Local detection of surface dust is needed for the safe operation of next-step magnetic fusion devices such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a 5 cm x 5 cm grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 50 V, has been developed to detect dust on remote surfaces and was successfully tested for the first time on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). We report on a helium puff system that clears residual dust from this detector and any incident debris or fibers that might cause a permanent short circuit. The entire surface of the detector was cleared of carbon particles by two consecutive helium puffs delivered by three nozzles of 0.45 mm inside diameter. The optimal configuration was found to be with the nozzles at an angle of 30o with respect to the surface of the detector and a helium backing pressure of 6 bar. __________________________________________________

B. Rais, C.H. Skinner A.L. Roquemore

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Dust Accelerator Facility of the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA Lunar Institute's Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies has recently completed the construction of a new experimental facility to study hypervelocity dust impacts. The installation includes a 3 MV Pelletron, accelerating small particles in the size range of 0.1 to few microns to velocities in the range of 1 to 100 km/s. Here we report the capabilities of our facility, and the results of our first experiments.

Horanyi, M.; Colette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Kempf, S.; Munsat, T.; Robertson, S.; Shu, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Wang, X. [NASA Lunar Science Institute Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 80309 (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

125

Composition of carbonaceous smoke particles from prescribed burning of a Canadian boreal forest: 1. Organic aerosol characterization by gas chromatography  

SciTech Connect

In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as smoke particles from a Canadian boreal forest prescribed burn. Of special interest are (1) the molecular identity of polar organic aerosols, and (2) the amount of polar organic matter relative to the total mass of aerosol particulate carbon. Organic extracts of smoke aerosol particles show complex distributions of the lipid compounds when analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The molecular constituents present as smoke aerosol are grouped into non-polar (hydrocarbons) and polar {minus}2 oxygen atoms) subtractions. The dominant chemical species found in the boreal forest smoke aerosol are unaltered resin compounds (C20 terpenes) which are abundant in unburned conifer wood, plus thermally altered wood lignins and other polar aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results show that smoke aerosols contain molecular tracers which are related to the biofuel consumed. These smoke tracers can be related structurally back to the consumed softwood and hardwood vegetation. In addition, combustion of boreal forest materials produces smoke aerosol particles that are both oxygen-rich and chemically complex, yielding a carbonaceous aerosol matrix that is enriched in polar substances. As a consequence, emissions of carbonaceous smoke particles from large-scale combustion of boreal forest land may have a disproportionate effect on regional atmospheric chemistry and on cloud microphysical processes.

Mazurek, M.A.; Laterza, C.; Newman, L.; Daum, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Winstead, E.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, Hampton, VA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Misers gold dust collection and cloud characterization  

SciTech Connect

MISERS GOLD was a surface detonation of 2445 tons of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil blasting agent conducted by the Defense Nuclear Agency for a variety of research purposes. This report presents the results of an experiment designed to study the dust cloud over the 24-hour period following the detonation. The cloud was sampled by aircraft to obtain material needed to characterize the quantity of dust lofted, the source regions of the cloud, and the size, shape, and mineralogical characteristics of the particles. Elemental tracers and organic dyes were emplaced in the charge and in surrounding areas. Analyses were done by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), fluorimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Tracer data define the source regions of the dust cloud. Extensive particle size distribution data were obtained. 12 figs.

Mason, A.S.; Finnegan, D.L.; Bayhurst, G.K.; Raymond, R. Jr.; Hagan, R.C.; Luedemann, G.; Wohletz, K.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Iron mobilization in North African dust.  

SciTech Connect

Iron is an essential nutrient for phytoplankton. Although iron-containing dust mobilized from arid regions supplies the majority of the iron to the oceans, the key flux in terms of the biogeochemical response to atmospheric deposition is the amount of soluble or bioavailable iron. Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by anthropogenic pollutants (e.g. sulfuric acid) may transform insoluble iron into soluble forms. Previous studies have suggested higher iron solubility in smaller particles, as they are subject to more thorough atmospheric processing due to a longer residence time than coarse particles. On the other hand, the specific mineralogy of iron in dust may also influence the particulate iron solubility in size. Compared to mineral dust aerosols, iron from combustion sources could be more soluble, and found more frequently in smaller particles. Internal mixing of alkaline dust with iron-containing minerals could significantly reduce iron dissolution in large dust aerosols due to the buffering effect, which may, in contrast, yield higher solubility in smaller particles externally mixed with alkaline dust (Ito and Feng, 2010). Here, we extend the modeling study of Ito and Feng (2010) to investigate atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols from African dust. In contrast to Asian dust, we used a slower dissolution rate for African dust in the fine mode. We compare simulated fractional iron solubility with observations. The inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution during long-range transport to the Atlantic Ocean: only a small fraction of iron (<0.2%) dissolves from illite in coarsemode dust aerosols with 0.45% soluble iron initially. In contrast, a significant fraction (1-1.5%) dissolves in fine-mode dust aerosols due to the acid mobilization of the iron-containing minerals externally mixed with carbonate minerals. Consequently, the model generally reproduces higher iron solubility in smaller particles as suggested by measurements over the Atlantic Ocean. Our results imply that the dissolution of iron in African dust is generally slower than that in Asian dust. Conventionally, dust is assumed as the major supply of bioavailable iron with a constant solubility at 1-2% to the remote ocean. Therefore, the timing and location of the atmospheric iron input to the ocean with detailed modeling of atmospheric processing could be different from those previously assumed. Past and future changes in aerosol supply of bioavailable iron might play a greater role in the nutrient supply for phytoplankton production in the upper ocean, as global warming has been predicted to intensify stratification and reduce vertical mixing from the deep ocean. Thus the feedback of climate change through ocean uptake of carbon dioxide as well as via aerosol-cloud interaction might be modified by the inclusion of iron chemistry in the atmosphere.

Ito, A.; Feng, Y. (Environmental Science Division); (Research Inst. for Global Change)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Detection of Alpha Particles and Low Energy Gamma Rays by Thermo-Bonded Micromegas in Xenon Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micromegas is a type of micro-pattern gaseous detector currently under R&D for applications in rare event search experiments. Here we report the performance of a Micromegas structure constructed with a micromesh thermo-bonded to a readout plane, motivated by its potential application in two-phase xenon detectors for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. The study is carried out in pure xenon at room temperature. Measurements with alpha particles from the Americium-241 source showed that gas gains larger than 200 can be obtained at xenon pressure up to 3 atm. Gamma rays down to 8 keV were observed with such a device.

Yuehuan Wei; Liang Guan; Zhiyong Zhang; Qing Lin; Xiaolian Wang; Kaixuan Ni; Tianchi Zhao

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

Predict particle collection in spray towers  

SciTech Connect

Spray tower wet scrubbers are used for control of particulates (as well as gaseous pollutants). The author has found that in cocurrent spray scrubbers, the most important parameter in determining particle collection efficiency is inlet dust particle size, followed by (in decreasing order of importance) gas velocity, collector droplet size, liquid-to-gas ratio, and length of scrubber. In countercurrent scrubbers, the most important parameters are collector droplet size, liquid-to-gas ratio, length of scrubber, and gas velocity. Note that some of these factors are directly related to collection, and some are related indirectly. This article provides equations, based on theoretical considerations and empirical data, for predicting particle collection efficiencies. The parameter ranges covered are typical of those encountered in the practical operation of conventional spray towers that use a ``cool`` (or cooled) inlet gas stream, so the equations are applicable to many industrial spray tower systems. The results are limited based on the ranges of the parameters evaluated, and while it may be possible to extrapolate beyond that, this has not been verified. (The initial model was for a flue-gas desulfurization system at a large power station that requires both particulate removal and SO{sub 2} absorption.)

Hesketh, H.E. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor III provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 lunar module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future lunar lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage on radiators and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

Katzan, C.M.; Edwards, J.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

CONTROL OF INTERFACIAL DUST CAKE TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY OF MOVING BED GRANULAR FILTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to improve the performance of moving bed granular filters for gas cleaning at high temperatures and pressures. A second objective is to better understand dust capture interfacial phenomena and cake formation in moving bed filters. The experimental bed tested in the present study has several unique design features configured as cold flow, axially symmetric, counter-current flow to simulate a filter operating at high temperatures (1088 K) and elevated pressures (10 atmospheres). The granular filter is evaluated in two separate performance studies: (1) optimization of particle collection efficiency and bed pressure drop in a factorial study at near-atmospheric operating pressures through appropriate use of granular bed materials, particle sizes, and feed rates; and (2) high temperature and high pressure model simulation conducted at above-atmospheric pressures and room temperature utilizing dust and granular flow rates, granular size, system pressure, and superficial velocity. The factorial study involves a composite design of 16 near-atmospheric tests, while the model simulation study is comprised of 7 above-atmospheric tests. Similarity rules were validated in tests at four different mass dust ratios and showed nearly constant collection efficiencies ({approx} 99.5 {+-} 0.3%) for operating pressures of 160 kPa gage (23.2 psig) at room temperature (20 C), which simulates the hydrodynamic conditions expected for typical gasification streams (1088 K, 10 atmospheres). An important outcome from the near-atmospheric pressure studies are relationships developed using central composite design between the independent variables, superficial velocity (0.16-0.22 m/s), dust feed rate (0.08-0.74 kg/hr), and granular flow rate (3.32-15.4 kg/hr). These operating equations were optimized in contour plots for bed conditions that simultaneously satisfy low-pressure drop and high particle collection efficiency.

Robert C. Brown; Gerald M. Colver

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors for Charged-Particle Tracking and Muon Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community, this white paper outlines a roadmap for further development of Micro-pattern Gas Detectors for tracking and muon detection in HEP experiments. We briefly discuss technical requirements and summarize current capabilities of these detectors with a focus of operation in experiments at the energy frontier in the medium-term to long-term future. Some key directions for future R&D on Micro-pattern Gas Detectors in the U.S. are suggested.

M. Hohlmann; V. Polychronakos; A. White; J. Yu

2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

133

Particle number fluctuations in nuclear collisions within excluded volume hadron gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiplicity fluctuations are studied in the van der Waals excluded volume hadron-resonance gas model. The calculations are done in the grand canonical ensemble within the Boltzmann statistics approximation. The scaled variances for positive, negative and all charged hadrons are calculated along the chemical freeze-out line of nucleus-nucleus collisions at different collision energies. The multiplicity fluctuations are found to be suppressed in the van der Waals gas. The numerical calculations are presented for two values of hard-core hadron radius, $r=0.3$ fm and 0.5 fm, as well as for the upper limit of the excluded volume suppression effects.

M. I. Gorenstein; M. Hauer; D. O. Nikolajenko

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

Determination of filter-cake thicknesses from on-line flow measurements and gas/particle transport modeling  

SciTech Connect

The use of cylindrical candle filters to remove fine ({approx}0.005 mm) particles from hot ({approx}500- 900{degrees}C) gas streams currently is being developed for applications in advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies. Successfully deployed with hot-gas filtration, PFBC and IGCC technologies will allow the conversion of coal to electrical energy by direct passage of the filtered gases into non-ruggedized turbines and thus provide substantially greater conversion efficiencies with reduced environmental impacts. In the usual approach, one or more clusters of candle filters are suspended from a tubesheet in a pressurized (P {approx_lt}1 MPa) vessel into which hot gases and suspended particles enter, the gases pass through the walls of the cylindrical filters, and the filtered particles form a cake on the outside of each filter. The cake is then removed periodically by a backpulse of compressed air from inside the filter, which passes through the filter wall and filter cake. In various development or demonstration systems the thickness of the filter cake has proved to be an important, but unknown, process parameter. This paper describes a physical model for cake and pressure buildups between cleaning backpulses, and for longer term buildups of the ``baseline`` pressure drop, as caused by incomplete filter cleaning and/or re-entrainment. When combined with operating data and laboratory measurements of the cake porosity, the model may be used to calculate the (average) filter permeability, the filter-cake thickness and permeability, and the fraction of filter-cake left on the filter by the cleaning backpulse or re-entrained after the backpulse. When used for a variety of operating conditions (e.g., different coals, sorbents, temperatures, etc.), the model eventually may provide useful information on how the filter-cake properties depend on the various operating parameters.

Smith, D.H.; Powell, V. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Ibrahim, E. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Ferer, M. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Physics; Ahmadi, G. [National Research Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Smart Dust Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at putting a complete sensingcommunication platform inside a cubic millimeter, including power supply, analog and digital electronics, etc. Thousands or millions of these dust...

136

The Dust Tail of Asteroid (3200) Phaethon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a comet-like tail on asteroid (3200) Phaethon when imaged at optical wavelengths near perihelion. In both 2009 and 2012, the tail appears >=350" (2.5x10^8 m) in length and extends approximately in the projected anti-solar direction. We interpret the tail as being caused by dust particles accelerated by solar radiation pressure. The sudden appearance and the morphology of the tail indicate that the dust particles are small, with an effective radius ~1 micrometer and a combined mass ~3x10^5 kg. These particles are likely products of thermal fracture and/or desiccation cracking under the very high surface temperatures (~1000 K) experienced by Phaethon at perihelion. The existence of the tail confirms earlier inferences about activity in this body based on the detection of anomalous brightening. Phaethon, the presumed source of the Geminid meteoroids, is still active.

Jewitt, David; Agarwal, Jessica

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Instituet fuer Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -7} torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -10} torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

Shu, Anthony; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kempf, Sascha; Thomas, Evan [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Northway, Paige [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Gruen, Eberhard [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Mocker, Anna [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); IRS, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Munsat, Tobin [Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Srama, Ralf [MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); IRS, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); and others

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Dust distribution in disks supplied by small bodies: Is the Beta Pictoris disk a gigantic multi-cometary tail?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have evaluated the spatial distribution of dust in disks supplied by colliding or evaporating bodies spread in a small belt. The gradient of the distribution of dust expelled by radiation pressure is generally steeper than the one observed around \\bp. It follows that, to generate the \\bp\\ disk distribution in such a way, one should extract relatively more small particles in the production process: thanks to radiation forces, these smaller particles have large eccentricities and thus could be seen at very large distances from their injection place. The evaporation process of comet-like bodies moving slowly inwards may yield the necessary particle size distribution. It is interesting to note that this dynamical description is able to account for the main observational properties of the \\bp\\ disk, such as the power law distribution with possibly a change in slope, the asymmetry at large distances, and the total mass, all of which have remained unexplained up to now. If confirmed, this scenario may indicate that the \\bp\\ disk could be looked on as a gigantic multi-cometary tail with its natural constituents: gas and dust.

A. Lecavelier des Etangs; A. Vidal-Madjar; R. Ferlet

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

Douglas W. Marshall

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

Charles M Barnes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber  

SciTech Connect

Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Influence of Dust on the Emissivity of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of the radiant heat transfer in attics containing dusty radiant barriers was developed. The geometrical model was a triangular enclosure in which the temperatures of the enclosing surfaces were known. The dust particles were simulated as areas of diameter equal to the mean diameter of the real dust to be analyzed and an emissivity substantially larger than the emissivity of the radiant barrier. Several shape factors were calculated using shape factor algebra, including a procedure to find the shape factor between a small rectangle and a triangular surface perpendicular to the rectangular plane. The thermal model was developed using the "Net Radiation Method" in which the net heat exchange between the surfaces surrounding the enclosure was found by solving a system of equations that has as many equations as the number of surfaces involved in the calculations. This led to the necessity of solving a very large system of equations in order to account for the dust particles in a representative amount. The solution of the system of equations provided the heat flux for each element of the enclosure. Finally, replacing the radiant barrier and the dust particles for an equivalent surface corresponding to the dusty radiant barrier provided the means to calculate the emissivity of this dusty radiant barrier. The theoretical model was tested to assess its validity. The experimentation was carried out using a reflection emissometer to measure the increase of the emissivity of aluminum radiant barrier when known quantities of dust were artificially applied to it. The experimental results showed good agreement with the theoretical model. A linear relationship between the emissivity and the area of dust coverage was found. The simple relation developed can be used in future research which still has to deal with the determination of the area of dust coverage by using the geometrical model of dust superposition or other statistical model to simulate the random location of random size dust particles over the radiant barrier.

Noboa, Homero L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dust Deserves More than the Brush-Off | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dust Deserves More than the Brush-Off Dust Deserves More than the Brush-Off Dust Deserves More than the Brush-Off July 6, 2012 - 10:35am Addthis The dust particles act as a "heat pump" drawing heat from the sun and surface, and attracting moisture from the Gulf of California and the Gulf of Mexico. Without dust, rainfall would be up to 40 percent less over Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. | Creative Commons photo by Jared The dust particles act as a "heat pump" drawing heat from the sun and surface, and attracting moisture from the Gulf of California and the Gulf of Mexico. Without dust, rainfall would be up to 40 percent less over Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. | Creative Commons photo by Jared

144

Radiative Forcing of Climate By Ice-Age Atmospheric Dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During glacial periods, dust deposition rates and inferred atmospheric concentrations were globally much higher than present. According to recent model results, the large enhancement of atmospheric dust content at the last glacial maximum (LGM) can be explained only if increases in the potential dust source areas are taken into account. Such increases are to be expected, due to e#ects of low precipitation and low atmospheric (CO 2 ) on plant growth. Here the modelled three-dimensional dust fields from Mahowald et al. and modelled seasonally varying surface-albedo fields derived in a parallel manner, are used to quantify the mean radiative forcing due to modern (non-anthropogenic) and LGM dust. The e#ect of mineralogical provenance on the radiative properties of the dust is taken into account, as is the range of optical properties associated with uncertainties about the mixing state of the dust particles. The high-latitude (poleward of 45#) mean change in forcing (LGM minus modern) is estimated to be small (--0.9 to +0.2 W m ), especially when compared to nearly --20 W m due to reflection from the extended ice sheets. Although the net e#ect of dust over ice sheets is a positive forcing (warming), much of the simulated high-latitude dust was not over the ice sheets, but over unglaciated regions close to the expanded dust source region in central Asia. In the tropics the change in forcing is estimated to be overall negative, and of similarly large magnitude (--2.2 to --3.2 W m ) to the radiative cooling e#ect of low atmospheric (CO 2 ). Thus, the largest long-term climatic e#ect of the LGM dust is likely to have been a cooling of the tropics. Low tropical sea-surface temperatures, low atmospheric (CO 2 ) and high atmospheric dust loading may be mutually reinforcin...

T. Claquin; C. Roelandt; K.E. Kohfeld; S.P. Harrison; I. Tegen; I.C. Prentice; Y. Balkanski; Prentice Æ Y. Balkanski; G. Bergametti; Æ N. Mahowald; Æ M. Schulz; M. Schulz; Æ K. E. Kohfeld; Æ K. E. Kohfeld; C. Roelandt; C. Roelandt; Æ S. P. Harrison; Æ S. P. Harrison; Æ S. P. Harrison; G. Bergametti; H. Rodhe; Æ H. Rodhe; M. Hansson; M. Hansson; N. Mahowald; N. Mahowald

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

146

Tracking shocked dust: State estimation for a complex plasma during a shock wave  

SciTech Connect

We consider a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma crystal excited by an electrostatically-induced shock wave. Dust particle kinematics in such a system are usually determined using particle tracking velocimetry. In this work we present a particle tracking algorithm which determines the dust particle kinematics with significantly higher accuracy than particle tracking velocimetry. The algorithm uses multiple extended Kalman filters to estimate the particle states and an interacting multiple model to assign probabilities to the different filters. This enables the determination of relevant physical properties of the dust, such as kinetic energy and kinetic temperature, with high precision. We use a Hugoniot shock-jump relation to calculate a pressure-volume diagram from the shocked dust kinematics. Calculation of the full pressure-volume diagram was possible with our tracking algorithm, but not with particle tracking velocimetry.

Oxtoby, Neil P.; Ralph, Jason F.; Durniak, Celine; Samsonov, Dmitry [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

INTERPRETATION OF (596) SCHEILA'S TRIPLE DUST TAILS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strange-looking dust cloud around asteroid (596) Scheila was discovered on 2010 December 11.44-11.47. Unlike normal cometary tails, it consisted of three tails and faded within two months. We constructed a model to reproduce the morphology of the dust cloud based on the laboratory measurement of high-velocity impacts and the dust dynamics. As a result, we succeeded in reproducing the peculiar dust cloud by an impact-driven ejecta plume consisting of an impact cone and downrange plume. Assuming an impact angle of 45 Degree-Sign , our model suggests that a decameter-sized asteroid collided with (596) Scheila from the direction of ({alpha}{sub im}, {delta}{sub im}) = (60 Degree-Sign , -40 Degree-Sign ) in J2000 coordinates on 2010 December 3. The maximum ejection velocity of the dust particles exceeded 100 m s{sup -1}. Our results suggest that the surface of (596) Scheila consists of materials with low tensile strength.

Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hanayama, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao; Sarugaku, Yuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Fujiwara, Hideaki; Terada, Hiroshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hsieh, Henry H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Vaubaillon, Jeremie J. [Observatoire de Paris, I.M.C.C.E., Denfert Rochereau, Bat. A., FR-75014 Paris (France); Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asaguchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Ohta, Kouji [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hamanowa, Hiromi [Hamanowa Astronomical Observatory, Motomiya, Fukushima 969-1204 (Japan); Kim, Junhan [Yangcheon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Jeonghyun [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Nakamura, Akiko M., E-mail: ishiguro@snu.ac.kr [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

INTERSTELLAR DUST MODULE FOR THE ESA METEOROID MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ESA meteoroid model predicts impacts of meteoroids in the mass range between 10 ?18 to 10 0 g on spacecraft surfaces. It covers heliocentric distances from 0.3 to 20 AU. Measurements of the dust detector on board the highly successful joint ESA/NASA mission Ulysses have shown, that the flux of meteoroids with masses between 10 ?15 and 10 ?12 g is, at least in the outer Solar System, dominated by interstellar dust grains that traverse the Solar System as it travels through the local interstellar cloud. We present a simple semi-analytic interstellar dust model that can easily be included in the ESA meteoroid model, together with a more precise determination of the flux direction of the interstellar dust stream. The model is based on the assumption that interstellar dust dynamics have two effects: solar gravitation and radiation pressure determines the spatial distribution, and Lorentz-interaction of the charged particles creates a temporal variation. 1.

R. Jehn; N. Altobelli; V. Dikarev; E. Grün

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Electrostatic dust detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for detecting dust in a variety of environments which can include radioactive and other hostile environments both in a vacuum and in a pressurized system. The apparatus consists of a grid coupled to a selected bias voltage. The signal generated when dust impacts and shorts out the grid is electrically filtered, and then analyzed by a signal analyzer which is then sent to a counter. For fine grids a correlation can be developed to relate the number of counts observed to the amount of dust which impacts the grid.

Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

Apparatus to collect, classify, concentrate, and characterize gas-borne particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerosol lab-on-a-chip (ALOC) integrates one or more of a variety of aerosol collection, classification, concentration (enrichment), and characterization processes onto a single substrate or layered stack of such substrates. By taking advantage of modern micro-machining capabilities, an entire suite of discrete laboratory aerosol handling and characterization techniques can be combined in a single portable device that can provide a wealth of data on the aerosol being sampled. The ALOC offers parallel characterization techniques and close proximity of the various characterization modules helps ensure that the same aerosol is available to all devices (dramatically reducing sampling and transport errors). Micro-machine fabrication of the ALOC significantly reduces unit costs relative to existing technology, and enables the fabrication of small, portable ALOC devices, as well as the potential for rugged design to allow operation in harsh environments. Miniaturization also offers the potential of working with smaller particle sizes and lower pressure drops (leading to reduction of power consumption).

Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wally, Karl (Lafayette, CA); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effects of dry bulk density and particle size fraction on gas transport parameters in variably saturated landfill cover soil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > The effects of soil physical properties on gas transport parameters were investigated. > Higher values of D{sub p} and k{sub a} exhibited in the '+gravel' than the '-gravel' fraction at same soil-air content ({epsilon}). > Recent power law models for D{sub p} (WLR) and k{sub a} (RPL) were modified. > Model parameters were linearly related to easily measurable dry bulk density ({rho}{sub b}). - Abstract: Landfill sites are emerging in climate change scenarios as a significant source of greenhouse gases. The compacted final soil cover at landfill sites plays a vital role for the emission, fate and transport of landfill gases. This study investigated the effects of dry bulk density, {rho}{sub b}, and particle size fraction on the main soil-gas transport parameters - soil-gas diffusivity (D{sub p}/D{sub o}, ratio of gas diffusion coefficients in soil and free air) and air permeability (k{sub a}) - under variably-saturated moisture conditions. Soil samples were prepared by three different compaction methods (Standard and Modified Proctor compaction, and hand compaction) with resulting {rho}{sub b} values ranging from 1.40 to 2.10 g cm{sup -3}. Results showed that D{sub p} and k{sub a} values for the '+gravel' fraction (<35 mm) became larger than for the '-gravel' fraction (<2 mm) under variably-saturated conditions for a given soil-air content ({epsilon}), likely due to enhanced gas diffusion and advection through less tortuous, large-pore networks. The effect of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} was most pronounced for the '+gravel' fraction. Normalized ratios were introduced for all soil-gas parameters: (i) for gas diffusivity D{sub p}/D{sub f}, the ratio of measured D{sub p} to D{sub p} in total porosity (f), (ii) for air permeability k{sub a}/k{sub a,pF4.1}, the ratio of measured k{sub a} to k{sub a} at 1235 kPa matric potential (=pF 4.1), and (iii) for soil-air content, the ratio of soil-air content ({epsilon}) to total porosity (f) (air saturation). Based on the normalized parameters, predictive power-law models for D{sub p}({epsilon}/f) and k{sub a}({epsilon}/f) models were developed based on a single parameter (water blockage factor M for D{sub p} and P for k{sub a}). The water blockage factors, M and P, were found to be linearly correlated to {rho}{sub b} values, and the effects of dry bulk density on D{sub p} and k{sub a} for both '+gravel' and '-gravel' fractions were well accounted for by the new models.

Wickramarachchi, Praneeth, E-mail: praneeth1977@yahoo.co.uk [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Kawamoto, Ken; Hamamoto, Shoichiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nagamori, Masanao [Center for Environmental Science in Saitama, 914 Kamitanadare, Kazo, Saitama 347-0115 (Japan); Moldrup, Per [Environmental Engineering Section, Dept. of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 57, DK-9000 Aalborg (Denmark); Komatsu, Toshiko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method and apparatus for measuring surface density of explosive and inert dust in stratified layers  

SciTech Connect

A method for determining the surface density of coal dust on top of rock dust or rock dust on top of coal dust is disclosed which comprises directing a light source at either a coal or rock dust layer overlaying a substratum of the other, detecting the amount of light reflected from the deposit, generating a signal from the reflected light which is converted into a normalized output (V), and calculating the surface density from the normalized output. The surface density S.sub.c of coal dust on top of rock dust is calculated according to the equation: S.sub.c =1/-a.sub.c ln(V) wherein a.sub.c is a constant for the coal dust particles, and the surface density S.sub.r of rock dust on top of coal dust is determined by the equation: ##EQU1## wherein a.sub.r is a constant based on the properties of the rock dust particles. An apparatus is also disclosed for carrying out the method of the present invention.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Perlee, Henry E. (Bethel Park, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A WINDOWED HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER USING A SUSPENSION OF ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES AS THE SOLAR ABSORBER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a regenerated gas turbine sys- tem providing severaltemperature for powering a gas turbine or to supply indus-from the compressor of a gas turbine and passes on to the

Fisk, William J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fractal dust grains in plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

Huang, F. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Peng, R. D. [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Y. H. [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ye, M. F.; Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Ward, Jr., Jack A. (Oakmont, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Effect of energetic electrons on dust charging in hot cathode filament discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of energetic electrons on dust charging for different types of dust is studied in hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma is produced by hot cathode filament discharge method in a dusty plasma device. A full line cusped magnetic field cage is used to confine the plasma elements. To study the plasma parameters for various discharge conditions, a cylindrical Langmuir probe having 0.15 mm diameter and 10.0 mm length is used. An electronically controlled dust dropper is used to drop the dust particles into the plasma. For different discharge conditions, the dust current is measured using a Faraday cup connected to an electrometer. The effect of secondary emission as well as discharge voltage on charging of dust grains in hydrogen plasma is studied with different dust.

Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur 782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dust control for draglines  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring dust levels inside draglines reveals room for improvement in how filtration systems are used and maintained. The Australian firm BMT conducted a field test program to measure airflow parameters, dust fallout rates and dust concentrations, inside and outside the machine house, on four draglines and one shovel. The study involved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The article describes how the tests were made and gives results. It was not possible to say which of the two main filtration systems currently used on Australian draglines - Dynavane or Floseps - performs better. It would appear that more frequent maintenance and cleaning would increase the overall filtration performance and systems could be susceptible to repeat clogging in a short time. 2 figs., 1 photos.

Grad, P.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Benchmarking of the MIT High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel performance model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIT has developed a Coated Particle Fuel Performance Model to study the behavior of TRISO nuclear fuels. The code, TIMCOAT, is designed to assess the mechanical and chemical condition of populations of coated particles and ...

Stawicki, Michael A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices  

SciTech Connect

The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

F.Q.L. Friesen, B. John, C.H. Skinner, A.L. Roquemore and C.I. Calle

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluation of an electrostatic dust removal system with potential application in next-step fusion devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass, and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm{sup 3} volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 s. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

Friesen, F. Q. L. [Grinnell College, 1115 8th Avenue, Grinnell, Iowa 50112-1616 (United States); John, B. [Swarthmore College, 500 College Ave., Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 19081 (United States); Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Calle, C. I. [NASA Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory, Kennedy Space Center, Florida 32899 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dust explosion hazards due to blasting of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The conditions favoring secondary explosions of dust or gas accompanying the blasting of oil shale are the subject of continuing investigation by the Bureau of Mines. In the present study, oil shale dust was dispersed in a gallery and ignited by various blasting agents blown out of a cannon according to a standard testing procedure. Parallel tests were conducted in the Bureau's Experimental Mine to test propagation as well as ignition of oil shale dust. In both gallery and mine, the minimum explosion limits were determined as a function of dust loading, weight and type of blasting agent, and amount of added methane. The results of these experiments are compared with previous measurements using methane-air explosions as an initiation source. In view of recent mine dust sampling data, the main explosion hazard in nongassy oil shale mines is likely to be limited to the region of the face. But in gassy mines, dust-gas explosions could be expected to propagate considerable distances.

Richmond, J.K.; Beitel, F.P.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Secular Instability and Planetesimal Formation in the Dust Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Late in the gaseous phase of a protostellar disk, centimeter-sized bodies probably settle into a thin ``dust layer'' at the midplane. A velocity difference between the dust layer and the gas gives rise to turbulence, which prevents further settling and direct gravitational instability of the layer. The associated drag on the surface of the layer causes orbital decay in a few thousand years---as opposed to a few hundred years for an isolated meter-sized body. Within this widely-accepted theoretical framework, we show that the turbulent drag causes radial instabilities even if the selfgravity of the layer is negligible. We formulate axisymmetric, height-integrated dynamical equations for the layer that incorporate turbulent diffusion of mass and momentum in radius and height, vertical settling, selfgravity, and resistance to compression due to gas entrained within the dust layer. In steady-state, the equations describe the inward radial drift of a uniform dust layer. In perturbation, overdense rings form on an orbital timescale with widths comparable to the dust-layer thickness. Selfgravity is almost irrelevant to the linear growth rate but will eventually fragment and collapse the rings into planetesimals larger than a kilometer. We estimate that the drag instability is most efficient at 1 AU when most of the ``dust'' mass lies in the size range 0.1-10 meters.

J. Goodman; B. Pindor

1999-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Influence of Mesoscale Dynamics and Turbulence on Fine Dust Transport in Owens Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine dust particles emitted from Owens (dry) Lake in California documented during the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) of 2006 have been examined using surface observations and a mesoscale aerosol model. Air quality stations around Owens (...

Qingfang Jiang; Ming Liu; James D. Doyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Dust and Black Carbon in Seasonal Snow Across Northern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow is the most reflective natural surface on Earth. Its albedo (the fraction of sunlight reflected) can be reduced by small amounts of dark impurities such as dust and black carbon (BC) particles. This effect is significant for climate and the ...

Jianping Huang; Qiang Fu; Wu Zhang; Xin Wang; Rudong Zhang; Hao Ye; Stephen G. Warren

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ITP Materials: Poster - Development of Materials Resistant to Metal Dusting Degradation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metal dusting phenomenon metal dusting phenomenon in simulated process environments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ITP Materials, Sensors, and Automation, and Glass Project and Portfolio Review Meeting, June 21-24, Arlington, Virginia. K. Natesan, Z. Zeng, and D. L. Rink Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 Introduction Metal dusting is a metal loss process that occurs in hot reactive gases The prerequisite for metal dusting is that carbon activity in the gas phase has to be >>1 Metal ends up as fine powder Pitting and crevice attack are common forms

168

The spatial distribution of mineral dust and its shortwave radiative forcing over North Africa: Modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem) with the implementation of two dust emission schemes (GOCART and DUSTRAN) into two aerosol models (MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC) is applied over North Africa to investigate the modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments in simulating mineral dust and its shortwave (SW) radiative forcing. Model results of the spatial distribution of mineral dust and its radiative forcing are evaluated using measurements from the AMMA SOP0 campaign in January and February of 2006 over North Africa. Our study suggests that the size distribution of emitted dust can result in significant differences (up to 100%) in simulating mineral dust and its SW radiative forcing. With the same dust emission and dry deposition processes, two aerosol models, MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC, can yield large difference in size distributions of dust particles due to their different aerosol size treatments using modal and sectional approaches respectively. However, the difference between the two aerosol models in simulating the mass concentrations and the SW radiative forcing of mineral dust is small (< 10%). The model simulations show that mineral dust increases AOD by a factor of 2, heats the lower atmosphere (1-3 km) with a maximum rate of 0.7?0.5 K day-1 below 1 km, and reduces the downwelling SW radiation by up to 25 W m-2 on 24-hour average at surface, highlighting the importance of including dust radiative impact in understanding the regional climate of North Africa. When compared to the available measurements, WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of mineral dust and its radiative properties over North Africa, suggesting that the model can be used to perform more extensive simulations of regional climate over North Africa.

Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Johnson, Ben; McFarlane, Sally A.; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

ALPHA ATTENUATION DUE TO DUST LOADING  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies had been done in order to show the attenuation of alpha particles in filter media. These studies provided an accurate correction for this attenuation, but there had not yet been a study with sufficient results to properly correct for attenuation due to dust loading on the filters. At the Savannah River Site, filter samples are corrected for attenuation due to dust loading at 20%. Depending on the facility the filter comes from and the duration of the sampling period, the proper correction factor may vary. The objective of this study was to determine self-absorption curves for each of three counting instruments. Prior work indicated significant decreases in alpha count rate (as much as 38%) due to dust loading, especially on filters from facilities where sampling takes place over long intervals. The alpha count rate decreased because of a decrease in the energy of the alpha. The study performed resulted in a set of alpha absorption curves for each of three detectors. This study also took into account the affects of the geometry differences in the different counting equipment used.

Dailey, A; Dennis Hadlock, D

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

170

HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

Paul W. Humrickhouse

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Dust Prediction System with TOMS Initialization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dust prediction system, developed earlier at the University of Athens within the framework of the Mediterranean Dust Experiment (MEDUSE) project, was enhanced at Tel Aviv University to support the Israeli–American Mediterranean Israeli Dust ...

P. Alpert; S. O. Krichak; M. Tsidulko; H. Shafir; J. H. Joseph

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Climate Response to Soil Dust Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols upon climate is calculated. Two atmospheric GCM (AGCM) simulations are compared, one containing a prescribed seasonally varying concentration of dust aerosols, and the other omitting dust. ...

R. L. Miller; I. Tegen

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The deposition of carbon from carbonaceous gaseous environments is prevalent in many chemical and petrochemical processes such as, hydrogen-, ammonia-, and methanol-reforming systems, syngas production systems, and iron-ore reduction plants. One of the major consequences of carbon deposition is the degradation of structural materials by a phenomenon known as ''metal dusting''. There are two major issues of importance in metal dusting. First is formation of coke and subsequent deposition of coke on metallic structural components. Second is the initiation and subsequent propagation of metal dusting degradation of the structural alloy. In the past, we reported on the mechanism for metal dusting of Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present metal dusting data on both Fe- and Ni-base alloys after exposure in high and atmospheric pressure environments that simulate the gas chemistry in operating hydrogen reformers. We have also measured the progression of pits by measuring the depth as a function of exposure time for a variety of Fe- and Ni-base structural alloys. We have clearly established the role of transport of iron in forming a non-protective spinel phase in the initiation process and presence of carbon transfer channels in the oxide scale for the continued propagation of pits, by nano-beam X-ray analysis using the advance photon source (APS), Raman scattering, and SEM/EDX analysis. In this report, we have developed correlations between weight loss and pit progression rates and evaluated the effects of carbon activity, system pressure, and alloy chemistry, on weight loss and pit propagation. To develop pit propagation data for the alloys without incurring substantial time for the initiation of pits, especially for the Ni-base alloys that exhibit incubation times of thousands of hours, a pre-pitting method has been developed. The pre-pitted alloys exhibited pit propagation rates similar to those of materials tested without pre-pitting. We have also developed a substantial body of metal-dusting data on the performance of Fe- and Ni-base weldments. During the course of this project, we have developed new Ni-base and Cu-base alloys and tested them in simulated metal dusting environments at 1 atm and at high pressures. Results clearly showed superior performance of both classes of alloys in resisting metal dusting. We also developed an approach to mitigate metal dusting by performing an intermediate oxidation step for extending the life of alloys in which metal dusting has initiated and pits are in progression. Finally, we have analyzed several components that have failed in plants such as hydrogen plant, pilot plant reformer, and a gas boiler.

Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Dust in Protoplanetary Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We critically examine the best lines of evidence for grain growth in protoplanetary disks, based on modelling of observed spectral energy distributions and images of T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars. The data are consistent with millimeter-sized grains near disk midplanes, and micron-sized grains near disk surfaces. We review three channels by which grains can grow, including direct condensation from the vapor phase, grain-grain collisional sticking, and gravitational instability. The utility of dust in identifying as yet unseen extrasolar planets is highlighted.

Chiang, E I

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Dust in Protoplanetary Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We critically examine the best lines of evidence for grain growth in protoplanetary disks, based on modelling of observed spectral energy distributions and images of T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars. The data are consistent with millimeter-sized grains near disk midplanes, and micron-sized grains near disk surfaces. We review three channels by which grains can grow, including direct condensation from the vapor phase, grain-grain collisional sticking, and gravitational instability. The utility of dust in identifying as yet unseen extrasolar planets is highlighted.

E. I. Chiang

2003-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

Dawn Scates

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Method of removing SO.sub.2, NO.sub.X and particles from gas mixtures using streamer corona  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting sulfur dioxide and/or nitrogen oxide gases to acid mist and or particle aerosols is disclosed in which the gases are passed through a streamer corona discharge zone having electrodes of a wire-cylinder or wire-plate geometry.

Mizuno, Akira (Toyohashi, JP); Clements, Judson S. (Tallahassee, FL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a dispersion of very small particles suspended is a gas toa dispersion of very small particles suspended in a gas to

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evolution of Dust Extinction and Supernova Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have made a quantitative calculation for the systematic evolution of average extinction by interstellar dust in host galaxies of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae, by using a realistic model of photometric and chemical evolution of galaxies and supernova rate histories in various galaxy types. We find that average B band extinction at z \\sim 0.5 is typically 0.1-0.2 mag larger than present, under a natural assumption that dust optical depth is proportional to gas column density and gas metallicity. This systematic evolution causes average reddening with E(B-V) \\sim 0.025-0.05 mag with the standard extinction curve, and this is comparable with the observational uncertainty of the reddening of high-redshift supernovae. Therefore, our result does not contradict the observations showing no significant reddening in high-z supernovae. However, the difference in apparent magnitude between an open universe and a \\Lambda-dominated flat universe is only \\sim 0.2 mag at z \\sim 0.5, and hence this systematic evolution of extinction should be taken into account in a reliable measurement of cosmological parameters. Considering this uncertainty, we show that it is difficult to discriminate between an open and \\Lambda-dominated flat cosmologies from the current data.

Tomonori Totani; Chiaki Kobayashi

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

Milky Way Tomography IV: Dissecting Dust  

SciTech Connect

We use SDSS photometry of 73 million stars to simultaneously obtain best-fit main-sequence stellar energy distribution (SED) and amount of dust extinction along the line of sight towards each star. Using a subsample of 23 million stars with 2MASS photometry, whose addition enables more robust results, we show that SDSS photometry alone is sufficient to break degeneracies between intrinsic stellar color and dust amount when the shape of extinction curve is fixed. When using both SDSS and 2MASS photometry, the ratio of the total to selective absorption, R{sub V}, can be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 for most stars in high-extinction regions. These fits enable detailed studies of the dust properties and its spatial distribution, and of the stellar spatial distribution at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 30{sup o}). Our results are in good agreement with the extinction normalization given by the Schlegel et al. (1998, SFD) dust maps at high northern Galactic latitudes, but indicate that the SFD extinction map appears to be consistently overestimated by about 20% in the southern sky, in agreement with recent study by Schlafly et al. (2010). The constraints on the shape of the dust extinction curve across the SDSS and 2MASS bandpasses disfavor the reddening law of O'Donnell (1994), but support the models by Fitzpatrick (1999) and Cardelli et al. (1989). For the latter, we find a ratio of the total to selective absorption to be R{sub V} = 3.0 {+-} 0.1(random) {+-} 0.1 (systematic) over most of the high-latitude sky. At low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 5{sup o}), we demonstrate that the SFD map cannot be reliably used to correct for extinction because most stars are embedded in dust, rather than behind it, as is the case at high Galactic latitudes. We analyze three-dimensional maps of the best-fit R{sub V} and find that R{sub V} = 3.1 cannot be ruled out in any of the ten SEGUE stripes at a precision level of {approx} 0.1 - 0.2. Our best estimate for the intrinsic scatter of R{sub V} in the regions probed by SEGUE stripes is {approx} 0.2. We introduce a method for efficient selection of candidate red giant stars in the disk, dubbed 'dusty parallax relation', which utilizes a correlation between distance and the extinction along the line of sight. We make these best-fit parameters, as well as all the input SDSS and 2MASS data, publicly available in a user-friendly format. These data can be used for studies of stellar number density distribution, the distribution of dust properties, for selecting sources whose SED differs from SEDs for high-latitude main sequence stars, and for estimating distances to dust clouds and, in turn, to molecular gas clouds.

Berry, Michael; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Sesar, Branimir; /Caltech; Juric, Mario; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Schlafly, Edward F.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Bellovary, Jillian; /Michigan U.; Finkbeiner, Douglas; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Vrbanec, Dijana; /Zagreb U.; Beers, Timothy C.; /Natl. Solar Observ., Tucson; Brooks, Keira J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angstr¨om exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they overestimate the AOD and they transport too fine particles. The models also reproduce the dust transport across the Atlantic in the summer in terms of both AOD and AE but not so well in winter-spring nor the southward displacement of the dust cloud that is responsible of the dust transport into South America. Based on the dependency of AOD on aerosol burden and size distribution we use model bias with respect to AOD and AE to infer the bias of the dust emissions in Africa and the Middle East. According to this analysis we suggest that a range of possible emissions for North Africa is 400 to 2200 Tg yr?1 and in the Middle East 26 to 526 Tg yr?1.

Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, Stefan; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginnoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M.; Landing, W.; Liu, Xiaohong; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Heterogeneous Ice Generation in Midlevel Supercooled Stratiform Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dust aerosols have been regarded as effective ice nuclei (IN), but large uncertainties regarding their efficiencies remain. Here, four years of collocated CALIPSO and CloudSat measurements are used to quantify the impact of dust on heterogeneous ice generation in midlevel supercooled stratiform clouds (MSSCs) over the ‘dust belt’. The results show that the dusty MSSCs have an up to 20% higher mixed-phase cloud occurrence, up to 8 dBZ higher mean maximum Ze (Ze_max), and up to 11.5 g/m2 higher ice water path (IWP) than similar MSSCs under background aerosol conditions. Assuming similar ice growth and fallout history in similar MSSCs, the significant differences in Ze_max between dusty and non-dusty MSSCs reflect ice particle number concentration differences. Therefore, observed Ze_max differences indicate that dust could enhance ice particle concentration in MSSCs by a factor of 2 to 6 at temperatures colder than ?12°C. The enhancements are strongly dependent on the cloud top temperature, large dust particle concentration and chemical compositions. These results imply an important role of dust particles in modifying mixed-phase cloud properties globally.

Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Ming

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

Modeling the Dust Spectral Energy Distributions of Dwarf Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent efforts on the modeling of the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of dwarf galaxies are summarised here. The characterisation of the dust properties in these low metallicity environments is just unfolding, as a result of recently available mid-infrared to millimetre observations. From the limited cases we know to date, it appears that the hard radiation fields that are present in these star-bursting dwarf galaxies, as well as the rampent energetics of supernovae shocks and winds have modified the dust properties, in comparison with those in the Galaxy, or other gas and dust rich galaxies. The sophistication of the SED models is limited by the availability of detailed data in the mid infrared and particularly in the submillimetre to millimetre regime, which will open up in the near future with space-based missions, such as Herschel.

Suzanne C. Madden

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Particle impact damping: influence of material and size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, particle impact damping is measured for a cantilever beam with a particle-filled enclosure attached to its free end. Many particle materials are tested: lead spheres, steel spheres, glass spheres, tungsten carbide pellets, lead dust, steel dust, and sand. The effects of particle size are also investigated. Particle diameters are varied from about 0.2 mm to 3 mm. The experimental data collected is offered as a resourceful database for future development of an analytical model of particle impact damping.

Marhadi, Kun Saptohartyadi

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Time-resolved studies of particle effects in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time resolved signals in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are studied to determine the influence of experimental parameters on ICP-induced fractionation effects. Differences in sample composition and morphology, i.e., ablating brass, glass, or dust pellets, have a profound effect on the time resolved signal. Helium transport gas significantly decreases large positive signal spikes arising from large particles in the ICP. A binder for pellets also reduces the abundance and amplitude of spikes in the signal. MO{sup +} ions also yield signal spikes, but these MO{sup +} spikes generally occur at different times from their atomic ion counterparts.

Perdian, D.; Bajic, S.; Baldwin, D.; Houk, R.

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

Airborne Asian Dust: Case Study of Long-Range Transport and Implications for the Detection of Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of fine-grained Asian dust from its source (e.g., the Gobi Desert, Mongolia) to North America is a common springtime phenomenon. Because of its chemical composition (silicon, iron, aluminum, and calcium) and its particle size ...

J. J. Simpson; G. L. Hufford; R. Servranckx; J. Berg; D. Pieri

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Tanpopo cosmic dust collector: Silica aerogel production and bacterial DNA contamination analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrophobic silica aerogels with ultra-low densities have been designed and developed as cosmic dust capture media for the Tanpopo mission which is proposed to be carried out on the International Space Station. Glass particles as a simulated cosmic dust with 30 \\mu m in diameter and 2.4 g/cm^3 in density were successfully captured by the novel aerogel at a velocity of 6 km/s. Background levels of contaminated DNA in the ultra-low density aerogel were lower than the detection limit of a polymerase chain reaction assay. These results show that the manufactured aerogel has good performance as a cosmic dust collector and sufficient quality in respect of DNA contamination. The aerogel is feasible for the biological analyses of captured cosmic dust particles in the astrobiological studies.

Tabata, Makoto; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Yano, Hajime; Yamagishi, Akihiko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes  

SciTech Connect

The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Extraplanar Dust in the Edge-On Spiral NGC 891 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high-resolution (0.6 ? ?-0.65 ? ? ) optical broad-band images of the edge-on Sb galaxy NGC 891 obtained with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope. These BVR images reveal a complex network of hundreds of dust absorbing structures far from the mid-plane of the galaxy. The dust structures have a wide range of morphologies and are clearly visible to |z | ? 1021 cm ?2, with masses estimated to be more than 2 × 10 5 ? 5 × 10 6 M?, assuming Galactic gas-to-dust relationships. The gravitational potential energies of the individual dust structures, given their observed heights and derived masses, lie in the range of 20 ? 200 × 10 51 ergs, which represents the energy input of at least tens to hundreds of supernovae. Rough number counts of extraplanar dust features find ?>120 structures at |z |> 400 pc with apparent B-band extinction ?> 0.25 mag. If these have similar properties to those structures studied in detail, the mass of high-z gas associated with extraplanar dust in NGC 891 likely exceeds 2 × 10 8 M?, which is ?2 % of the total neutral ISM mass of the galaxy. The absorbing properties of extraplanar dust structures in NGC 891 are best fit with RV ? AV /E(B ? V) = 3.6 ± 0.4. A comparison of the new WIYN images with an archival Hubble Space Telescope image of the central region of NGC 891 suggests that the quantities we measure for the extraplanar dust features are not seriously affected by atmospheric blurring in the WIYN images. Some of the dust features seen in NGC 891 suggest supernova-driven galactic fountain or chimney phenomena are responsible for their production and are clearly associated with ionized gas structures thought to be tracing the violent disk-halo interface of this galaxy. However, other structures are not so readily associated with

J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

New insights into single-particle mixing state using aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K, and S during combustion of annual biomass, Energy Fuels,spherical combustion particles from biomass burning usingsuch as biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion, and dust

Pratt, Kerri Anne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

DUST-DRIVEN WIND FROM DISK GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We study gaseous outflows from disk galaxies driven by radiation pressure on dust grains. We include the effect of bulge and dark matter halo and show that the existence of such an outflow implies a maximum value of disk mass-to-light ratio. We show that the terminal wind speed is proportional to the disk rotation speed in the limit of a cold gaseous outflow, and that in general there is a contribution from the gas sound speed. Using the mean opacity of dust grains and the evolution of the luminosity of a simple stellar population, we then show that the ratio of the wind terminal speed (v{sub {infinity}}) to the galaxy rotation speed (v{sub c}) ranges between 2 and 3 for a period of {approx}10 Myr after a burst of star formation, after which it rapidly decays. This result is independent of any free parameter and depends only on the luminosity of the stellar population and the relation between disk and dark matter halo parameters. We briefly discuss the possible implications of our results.

Sharma, Mahavir; Nath, Biman B. [Raman Research Institute, Sadashiva Nagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Shchekinov, Yuri, E-mail: mahavir@rri.res.in, E-mail: biman@rri.res.in, E-mail: yus@sfedu.ru [Department of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov on Don 344090 (Russian Federation)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800ºC.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Simple Thermodynamical Theory for Dust Devils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the heat engine framework, a simple scaling theory for dust devils is proposed and compared to observations. This theory provides a simple physical interpretation for many of the observed characteristics of dust devils. In particular, it ...

Nilton O. Rennó; Matthew L. Burkett; Matthew P. Larkin

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Adding coal dust to coal batch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The granulometric composition of coke dust from the dry-slaking machine is determined. The influence of additions of 3-7% coke dust on the quality of industrial coking batch and the coke obtained by box coking is estimated. Adding 1% coke dust to coking batch does not markedly change the coke quality. Industrial equipment for the supply of dry-slaking dust to the batch is described.

V.S. Shved; A.V.Berezin [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Dispersion relation for pure dust Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect

Pure dust Bernstein waves are investigated using non-Maxwellian kappa and (r,q) distribution functions in a collisionless, uniform magnetized dusty plasma. Dispersion relations for both the distributions are derived by considering waves whose frequency is of the order of dust cyclotron frequency, and dispersion curves are plotted. It is observed that the propagation band for dust Bernstein waves is rather narrow as compared with that of the electron Bernstein waves. However, the band width increases for higher harmonics, for both kappa and (r,q) distributions. Effect of dust charge on dispersion curves is also studied, and one observes that with increasing dust charge, the dispersion curves shift toward the lower frequencies. Increasing the dust to ion density ratio ((n{sub d0}/n{sub i0})) causes the dispersion curve to shift toward the higher frequencies. It is also found that for large values of spectral index kappa ({kappa}), the dispersion curves approach to the Maxwellian curves. The (r,q) distribution approaches the kappa distribution for r = 0, whereas for r > 0, the dispersion curves show deviation from the Maxwellian curves as expected. Relevance of this work can be found in astrophysical plasmas, where non-Maxwellian velocity distributions as well as dust particles are commonly observed.

Deeba, F. [National Tokamak Fusion Program, PAEC, P.O. Box 3329, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Zahoor [National Tokamak Fusion Program, PAEC, P.O. Box 3329, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Low intensity dust ion-acoustic shock waves due to dust charge fluctuation in a nonextensive dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect

The properties of low intensity dust ion acoustic shock waves are studied in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive electrons. Owing to the departure from the Maxwellian electron distribution to a nonextensive one, the modified electrostatic charging of a spherical dust particle in plasma with ion streaming speed is considered. Based on the weakly nonlinear analysis, a new relationship between the low intensity localized disturbances and nonextensive electrons is derived. It is found that both strength and steepness of shock structures arise as the electrons evolve far from their thermodynamic equilibrium in such plasma with parameter ranges corresponding to Saturn's rings. It is also shown that the ion temperature and population of electrons reduce the possibility of the formation of the shock profile.

Alinejad, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahmansory, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak 38156-8-8349 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electrostatic Transport and Manipulation of Lunar Soil and Dust  

SciTech Connect

Transport and manipulation technologies of lunar soil and dust are under development utilizing the electrostatic force. Transport of particles is realized by an electrostatic conveyer consisting of parallel electrodes. Four-phase traveling electrostatic wave was applied to the electrodes to transport particles upon the conveyer and it was demonstrated that particles were efficiently transported under conditions of low frequency, high voltage, and the application of rectangular wave. Not only linear but also curved and closed transport was demonstrated. Numerical investigation was carried out with a three-dimensional hard-sphere model of the Distinct Element Method to clarify the mechanism of the transport and to predict performances in the lunar environment. This technology is expected to be utilized not only for the transport of bulk soil but also for the cleaning of a solar panel and an optical lens. Another technology is an electrostatic manipulation system to manipulate single particle. A manipulator consisted of two parallel pin electrodes. When voltage was applied between the electrodes, electrophoresis force generated in non-uniform electrostatic field was applied to the particle near the tip of the electrode. The particle was captured by the application of the voltage and released from the manipulator by turning off the voltage. It was possible to manipulate not only insulative but also conductive particles. Three-dimensional electrostatic field calculation was conducted to calculate the electrophoresis force and the Coulomb force.

Kawamoto, Hiroyuki [Department of Applied Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, Waseda University 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

SIMS ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERPLANETARY DUST FROM SPACE-EXPOSED AEROGEL. F. J. Stadermann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMS ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF INTERPLANETARY DUST FROM SPACE-EXPOSED AEROGEL. F. J. Stadermann 1: Aerogel is the medium of choice for the intact capture of small particles in space, because it is capable materials [1, 2]. After space-exposed aerogel is returned to the laboratory, the first step of analysis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Infrared emission from interplanetary dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard models of the interplanetary dust emission fail to account satisfactorily for IR observations. A new model of the dust, based on very simple assumptions on the grain structure (spherical and homogeneous) and chemical composition (astronomical silicates, graphite, blackbodies) is developed. Updated values of the refractive indexes have been included in the analysis. The predictions of the model (absolute values of the fluxes, spectral shape, elongation dependence of the emission) have then been compared with all the available IR observations performed by the ARGO (balloon-borne experiment by University of Rome), AFGL and Zodiacal Infrared Project (ZIP) (rocket experiments by Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Bedford, Mass.), and IRAS satellite. Good agreement is found when homogeneous data sets from single experiments (e.g., ZIP and ARGO) are considered separately. 19 references.

Temi, P.; De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.; Salama, A.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evidence for dust emission in the Warm Ionised Medium using WHAM data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the WHAM H_alpha survey and Leiden/Dwingeloo HI data to decompose the Far-infrared emission (from 100 to 1000 micron) at high Galactic latitude into components associated with the Warm Ionised Medium (WIM) and the Warm Neutral Medium (WNM). This decomposition is possible for the first time thanks to preliminary WHAM data that cover a significant fraction of the sky (about 10%). We confirm the first detection of dust emission from the WIM (Lagache et al. 1999) and show that the WIM dust temperature and emissivity are very similar to those in the WNM. The analysis suggests moreover that about 25% of the far-IR dust emission at high galactic latitude is uncorrelated with the HI gas. The decomposition again reveals a Cosmic Far-Infrared Background (CFIRB) which is determined for the first time from 100 to 1000 micron using two independant gas tracers.

Lagache, G; Reynolds, R J; Tufte, S L

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Evidence for dust emission in the Warm Ionised Medium using WHAM data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the WHAM H_alpha survey and Leiden/Dwingeloo HI data to decompose the Far-infrared emission (from 100 to 1000 micron) at high Galactic latitude into components associated with the Warm Ionised Medium (WIM) and the Warm Neutral Medium (WNM). This decomposition is possible for the first time thanks to preliminary WHAM data that cover a significant fraction of the sky (about 10%). We confirm the first detection of dust emission from the WIM (Lagache et al. 1999) and show that the WIM dust temperature and emissivity are very similar to those in the WNM. The analysis suggests moreover that about 25% of the far-IR dust emission at high galactic latitude is uncorrelated with the HI gas. The decomposition again reveals a Cosmic Far-Infrared Background (CFIRB) which is determined for the first time from 100 to 1000 micron using two independant gas tracers.

G. Lagache; L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds; S. L. Tufte

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

Use of Laboratory Drag Measurements in Evaluating Hot-Gas Filtration of Char from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial objective of this study was to better understand the reasons for the substantial increase in filter DP that was observed after the gasifier recycle loop modifications. Beyond this specific objective, a secondary goal was to develop a meaningful method of evaluating the effect of particle size and other particle properties on dustcake drag and filter DP. As mentioned earlier, the effect of particle size on dustcake drag and filter DP can be a very important consideration in the selection and specification of a precleaner cyclone for use upstream of the hot-gas filter. Installing a cyclone ahead of a hot-gas filter will reduce the transient areal loading of dust to the filter, but the beneficial effect of the reduced areal loading may be offset by an increase in drag associated with a finer particle-size distribution. The overall goal of this study was to better understand these tradeoffs and to ultimately develop a procedure that would be useful in analyzing the performance of hot-gas filters and in sizing new hot-gas filters. In addition to the obvious effects of a cyclone on dust loading and particle size, other indirect effects on particulate properties and flow resistance may occur when the cyclone is incorporated into the gasifier recycle loop as was the case at the PSDF. To better understand the importance of these other effects, this study sought to separate the particle-size effect from these other effects by measuring the drag of size-fractionated char samples collected before and after the recycle loop modifications.

Dahlin, R.S.; Landham, E.C.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

Williams, Jeremiah D. [Physics Department, Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio 45504 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles  

SciTech Connect

A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Observations of Magellanic Cloud Planetary Nebulae: the nature of dust in low metallicity circumstellar ejecta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present 5 - 40 micron spectroscopy of 41 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds, observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra show the presence of a combination of nebular emission lines and solid-state features from dust, superimposed on the thermal IR continuum. By analyzing the 25 LMC and 16 SMC PNe in our sample we found that the IR spectra of 14 LMC and 4 SMC PNe are dominated by nebular emission lines, while the other spectra show solid-state features. We observed that the solid-state features are compatible with carbon-rich dust grains (SiC, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), etc.) in most cases, except in three PNe showing oxygen-rich dust features. The frequency of carbonaceous dust features is generally higher in LMC than in SMC PNe. The spectral analysis allowed the correlations of the dust characteristics with the gas composition and morphology, and the properties of the central stars. We found that: 1) all PNe with carbonaceous dust features have C/O>1, none of these being bipolar or otherwise highly asymmetric; 2) all PNe with oxygen-rich dust features have C/Oproduction efficiency depends on metallicity, with low metallicity environments not favoring dust production.

L. Stanghellini; P. Garcia-Lario; D. A. Garcia-Hernandez; J. V. Perea-Calderon; J. E. Davies; A. Manchado; E. Villaver; R. A. Shaw

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Study of the Composition of Carryover Particles in Kraft Recovery Boilers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carryover particles are partially/completely burned black liquor particles entrained in the flue gas in kraft recovery boilers. Understanding how carryover particles form and deposit on… (more)

Khalaj-Zadeh, Asghar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Dust negative ion acoustic shock waves considering dust size distribution effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-ion dusty plasma containing hot isothermal electrons, ions (light positive ions and heavy negative ions), and extremely and negatively charged dust grains is studied in the present paper. The dust negative ion acoustic shock waves have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. How the dust size distribution affects the height and the thickness of the nonlinear shock wave is studied. It is noted that the different dust size distribution has different shock wave form and different moving speed.

Ma Yirong; Wang Canglong; Zhang Jianrong; Sun Jianan; Duan Wenshan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070, China and Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yang Lei [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) and Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars III. Dust production at supersolar metallicities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the formalism presented in our recent calculations of dust ejecta from the Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) phase, to the case of super-solar metallicity stars. The TP-AGB evolutionary models are computed with the COLIBRI code. We adopt our preferred scheme for dust growth. For M-giants, we neglect chemisputtering by H$_2$ molecules and, for C-stars we assume a homogeneous growth scheme which is primarily controlled by the carbon over oxygen excess. At super-solar metallicities, dust forms more efficiently and silicates tend to condense significantly closer to the photosphere (r~1.5 R$_*$) - and thus at higher temperatures and densities - than at solar and sub-solar metallicities (r~2-3 R$_*$). In such conditions, the hypothesis of thermal decoupling between gas and dust becomes questionable, while dust heating due to collisions plays an important role. The heating mechanism delays dust condensation to slightly outer regions in the circumstellar envelope. We find that the same mech...

Nanni, Ambra; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Model for Long-Range Transport of Desert Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Eulerian model for dust transport in the atmosphere is designed, and a new parameterization scheme for dust uptake is developed. The model results are quantitatively compared with satellite observations for an intense dust transport event that ...

Slobodan Ni?kovi?; Srdjan Dobri?i?

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Dust-acoustic filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal motion effect of charged particles in the filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma in the dust-acoustic frequency region is investigated by using the Lorentz transformed conductivity of the dusty plasma components and the total dielectric permittivity tensor of the dusty plasma in the laboratory frame. Obtaining the dispersion relation for dust-acoustic waves and considering the filamentation instability, the establishment time of the filamentation structure and the instability development threshold are derived. Moreover, it is shown that the current layer divides into separate current filaments.

Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Haghtalab, T. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand, 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran, 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Features of coal dust dynamics at action of differently oriented forces in granular filtering medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of the coal dust particles transportation and structurization in the experimental horizontal model of air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules as in the iodine air filter at the nuclear power plant is researched. In the investigated case the vector of carrying away force of air flow and the vector of gravitation force are mutually perpendicular, and the scattering of the dust particles on the granules occurs in the normal directions. It is found that the phenomenon of non controlled spontaneous sharp increase of aerodynamic resistance in the iodine air filter under the big integral volumes of filtered air and the big masses of introduced coal dust particles is not observed at the described experimental conditions in distinction from the case of the parallel orientation of this forces as in the vertical iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant. The quantitative measurements of the main parameters of the process of the dust masses transportation and structurization are made on a developed experimental model of the iodine air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules.

I. M. Neklyudov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin; O. P. Ledenyov

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Features of coal dust dynamics at action of differently oriented forces in granular filtering medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of the coal dust particles transportation and structurization in the experimental horizontal model of air filter with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules as in the iodine air filter at the nuclear power plant is researched. In the investigated case the vector of carrying away force of air flow and the vector of gravitation force are mutually perpendicular, and the scattering of the dust particles on the granules occurs in the normal directions. It is found that the phenomenon of non controlled spontaneous sharp increase of aerodynamic resistance in the iodine air filter under the big integral volumes of filtered air and the big masses of introduced coal dust particles is not observed at the described experimental conditions in distinction from the case of the parallel orientation of this forces as in the vertical iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant. The quantitative measurements of the main parameters of the process of the dust masses transportation and structurization are made on a ...

Neklyudov, I M; Poltinin, P Ya; Ledenyov, O P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

SPITZER CHARACTERIZATION OF DUST IN THE IONIZED MEDIUM OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD  

SciTech Connect

A systematic investigation of dust emission associated with ionized gas has so far been performed only in our Galaxy and for wavelengths longer than 60 {mu}m. Newly available Spitzer data now offer the opportunity to carry out a similar analysis in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). By cross-correlating Spitzer Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) data with the Australia Telescope Compact Array/Parkes H I 21 cm data, the NANTEN {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) data, and both the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas H{alpha} and the Parkes 6 cm data, we investigate the physical properties of dust associated with the different phases of the gas (atomic, molecular, and ionized). In particular, we study the presence and nature of dust from 3.6 to 160 {mu}m and for various regimes of ionized gas, spanning emission measures from {approx}1 pc cm{sup -6} (diffuse component) to {approx}10{sup 3}pc cm{sup -6} (H II regions). Using a dust emission model and testing our results with several radiation field spectra, we show that dust in ionized gas is warmer than dust associated with other phases (atomic and molecular). We also find a decrease of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) relative abundance with respect to big grains, as well as an increase of the near-infrared (NIR) continuum. These three results (i.e., warmer temperature, decrease of PAH abundance, and increase of the NIR continuum) are found consistently for all regimes of ionized gas. On the contrary, the molecular phase appears to provide favorable conditions for the survival of PAHs. Furthermore, the very small grain relative abundance tends to increase in the ionized phase, especially in bright H II regions. Last but not least, our analysis shows that the emissivity of dust associated with ionized gas is lower in the LMC than in our Galaxy and that this difference is not accounted for by the lower metallicity of the LMC.

Paradis, Deborah; Paladini, Roberta; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lagache, Guilaine [Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, 91405 Orsay (France); Kawamura, Akiko; Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Onishi, Toshikazu [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Observing Cold Dust with Herschel / SPIRE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major component of the emission of many galaxies is in the Far Infrared and the Sub?mmillimeter. UV photons from stars are absorbed by dust and re?emitted at longer wavelengths. Fairly cold dust was found in large spirals by the Infrared Space Observatory and the Spitzer Observatory but their longest wavelength filters were centered at 200 and 160 microns respectively

Bernhard Schulz; The SPIRE Consortium

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Heavy metals hazardous components of Eaf dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is a waste generated in the EAF during the steel production process. Among different wastes, EAF dust represents one of the most hazardous, since it contains heavy metals such as Zn, Fe, Cr, Cd and Pb. The goal of the ... Keywords: electric arc furnace (EAF), furnace additives, hazard components, heavy metals, scrap composition, x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

Cristiana-Zizi Rizescu; Zorica Bacinschi; Elena Valentina Stoian; Aurora Poinescu; Dan Nicolae Ungureanu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

219

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

220

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Dust removal in radio-frequency plasmas by a traveling potential modulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dust contamination in plasma deposition processes plays a crucial role in the quality and the yield of the products. To improve the quality and the yield of plasma processing, a favorable way is to remove the dust particles actively from the plasma reactors.Our recent experiments in the striped electrode device show that a traveling plasma modulation allows for a systematic particle removal independent of the reactor size. Besides the rf powered electrode, the striped electrode device includes a segmented electrode that consists of 100 electrically insulated narrow stripes. A traveling potential profile is produced by the modulation of the voltage signals applied on the stripes. The dust particles are trapped in the potential wells and transported with the traveling of the potential profile.The particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation on the potential above the segmented electrode indicates that the traveling potential profile can be realized either by applying low-frequency (0.1-10 Hz) voltage signals with a fixed phase shift between adjacent stripes or high-frequency (10 kHz a circumflex AS 100 MHz) signals with the amplitudes modulated by a low-frequency envelope. The transportation of the dust particles is simulated with a two-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) code with the potential profile obtained from the PIC simulation. The MD results reproduce the experimental observations successfully.This technology allows for an active removal of the contaminating particles in processing plasmas and it is independent of the reactor size. The removal velocity is controllable by adjusting the parameters for the modulation.

Li Yangfang; Jiang Ke; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E. [Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

Brownian Motion of Stars, Dust, and Invisible Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treating the motion of a dust particle suspended in a liquid as a random walk, Einstein in 1905 derived an equation describing the diffusion of the particle's probability distribution in configuration space. Fokker and Planck extended this work to describe the velocity distribution of the particles. Their equation and its solutions have been applied to many problems in nature starting with the motion of Brownian particles in a liquid. Chandrasekhar derived the Fokker-Planck equation for stars and showed that long-range gravitational encounters provide a drag force, dynamical friction, which is important in the evolution of star clusters and the formation of galaxies. In certain circumstances, Fokker-Planck evolution also describes the evolution of dark (invisible) matter in the universe. In the early universe, the thermal decoupling of weakly interacting massive particles from the plasma of relativistic leptons and photons is governed by Fokker-Planck evolution. The resulting dissipation imprints a minimum length scale for cosmic density fluctuations. Still later, these density fluctuations produce stochastic gravitational forces on the dark matter as it begins to cluster under gravity. The latter example provides an exact derivation of the Fokker-Planck equation without the usual assumption of Markovian dynamics.

Edmund Bertschinger

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foam is displacing wet suppression as the method of choice for controlling fugitive emissions from coal. Coal treated by wet suppression consumes through moisture addition, a heat energy equivalent of 1 ton out of every 500 tons fired. The application of foam requires less than 10% of the moisture usually required for wet suppression. In addition, foam is a much more effective dust suppressant, especially on respirable dust (particle with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns). To achieve maximum benefit from foam dust control, efficient on-site production of dry, stable foam is required. This paper discusses the basics of foam production and the many variables affecting foam expansion ratios. Successful applications of foam are also described.

Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Predicting particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas-side of finned tube heat- exchangers. Journal of Heatsurface interactions in heat exchanger fouling. Journal ofParticle Deposition on Heat Exchangers Epstein, N. , 1988.

Siegel, J A; Nazaroff, William W

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Anisotropic collective flow of a Lorentz gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical results for the anisotropic collective flow of a Lorentz gas of massless particles scattering on fixed centres are presented.

Nicolas Borghini; Clement Gombeaud

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Atlantic Richfield Company Black Thunder mine haul road dust study. [Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An examination of the effectiveness of various haul road dust control measures was performed at ARCO's Black Thunder Mine near Wright, Wyoming by evaluating both visible observations and quantitative measurements of particle concentrations. In order to evaluate dust control effectiveness both a 300 foot (91.5 meter) and 175 foot (53.4 meter) section of the main coal haul road was selected for testing. The test sections were separated by a 200 foot (61 meter) buffer zone. Each test section was relatively straight and away from interferences from other mine sources. The five haul road treatment test sequences evaluated for control measure effectiveness were: an untreated road segment; water treatment two times per hour; water treatment four times per hour; previously chemically treated segment of haul road (ARCO 2400 dust suppressant); and testing after application of Coherex (10% dilution). By comparing uncontrolled situations with various controlled situations, an estimate of the control efficiency of the dust control measures was determined. Based upon the results of the study a fugitive dust control scheme was selected considering control effectiveness, economics and operational efficiency.

Maxwell, D.R.; Hormel, T.R.; Ives, J.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model  

SciTech Connect

The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Laboratory Measurements and Model Sensitivity Studies of Dust Deposition Ice Nucleation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (-25, -30 and -35 C), and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (-30 and -35 C). These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH{sub ice}) required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF) representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RH{sub ice}. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from {approx}18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size). Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times) to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within {+-}2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Dust Acoustic Shock Waves in Adiabatic Hot Dusty Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is known that to have a monotonic or oscillatory shock wave a source of dissipation is needed. In this study, we considered the dust charge variation as a source of dissipation. By using the reductive perturbation technique, the nonlinear Burgers equation is derived and the shock-like solution is determined. The effects of dust temperature on different characteristics of dust acoustic shock wave are discussed. It is found out that dust thickness is not affected by dust temperature while for every dusty plasma systems there is dust critical temperature T{sub dc}, for which the dust acoustic shock height will be maximum.

Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Particle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

Moosmuller, Hans (Reno, NV); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Reno, NV); Arnott, W. Patrick (Reno, NV)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

CAN DUST EMISSION BE USED TO ESTIMATE THE MASS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN GALAXIES-A PILOT PROJECT WITH THE HERSCHEL REFERENCE SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

The standard method for estimating the mass of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a galaxy is to use the 21 cm line to trace the atomic gas and the CO 1-0 line to trace the molecular gas. In this paper, we investigate the alternative technique of using the continuum dust emission to estimate the mass of gas in all phases of the ISM. Using Herschel observations of 10 galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, we show that the emission detected by Herschel is mostly from dust that has a temperature and emissivity index similar to that of dust in the local ISM in our galaxy, with the temperature generally increasing toward the center of each galaxy. We calibrate the dust method using the CO and 21 cm observations to provide an independent estimate of the mass of hydrogen in each galaxy, solving the problem of the uncertain ''X-factor'' for the CO observations by minimizing the dispersion in the ratio of the masses estimated using the two methods. With the calibration for the dust method and the estimate of the X-factor produced in this way, the dispersion in the ratio of the two gas masses is 25%. The calibration we obtain for the dust method is similar to those obtained from Herschel observations of M31 and from Planck observations of the Milky Way. We discuss the practical problems in using this method.

Eales, Stephen; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Auld, Robbie; Davies, Jon; Gear, Walter; Gomez, Haley [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse; Gentile, Gianfranco; Fritz, Jacopo [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, George J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bianchi, Simone [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Boselli, Alessandro; Ciesla, Laure [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseilles, UMR6110 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-1338 Marseilles (France); Clements, David [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Lab, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Cortese, Luca [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2 D-85748, Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Galametz, Maud [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Hughes, Tom [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Madden, Suzanne [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d'Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); and others

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Method and apparatus for cutting and abrading with sublimable particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas delivery system provides a first gas as a liquid under extreme pressure and as a gas under intermediate pressure. Another gas delivery system provides a second gas under moderate pressure. The second gas is selected to solidify at a temperature at or above the temperature of the liquefied gas. A nozzle assembly connected to the gas delivery systems produces a stream containing a liquid component, a solid component, and a gas component. The liquid component of the stream consists of a high velocity jet of the liquefied first gas. The high velocity jet is surrounded by a particle sheath that consists of solid particles of the second gas which solidifies in the nozzle upon contact with the liquefied gas of the high velocity jet. The gas component of the stream is a high velocity flow of the first gas that encircles the particle sheath, forming an outer jacket. 6 figs.

Bingham, D.N.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Dust Lofting and Ingestion by Supercell Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research pertaining to aerosol impacts on cloud microphysics has shown a need for understanding mineral dust entrainment into moist convection. The goal of this study is to examine the pathways in which nonmicrophysically active mineral ...

Robert B. Seigel; Susan C. van den Heever

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Dust Intrusion Events into the Mediterranean Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study seven dust intrusion events were identified and analyzed in the central and eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea beginning August 1988 and ending September 1989. In order to locate their sources, characterize their mode, and ...

U. Dayan; J. Heffter; J. Miller; G. Gutman

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Charging of insulating and conducting dust grains by flowing plasma and photoemission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The charging of conducting or alternatively insulating dust grains in a supersonic plasma flow with a directed photon flux is studied by the particle-in-cell method. The electron emission modifies the surface charge distribution on a grain and in the surrounding plasma. The charge and potential distributions on and around a dust grain are studied for different photon fluxes and different angles of the incident unidirectional photons with respect to the plasma flow velocity vector. Continuous and pulsed radiations are considered. We show that photoemission allows controlling the charge on conducting grains, and discuss the charging of stationary and spinning insulating grains. Interactions between positively charged grains can be stronger than for negatively charged grains. The simulations are carried out in two spatial dimensions, treating ions and electrons as individual particles.

Miloch, W J; Pecseli, H L; Trulsen, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 ºC and 2.0 kPa O2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil™ particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ~ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure – possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O2. This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ~ 0.03 – 0.04) of the flakes.

J.W. Davis; B.W.N. Fitzpatrick; J.P. Sharpe; A.A. Haasz

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Estimating Environmental Exposures to Indoor Contaminants using Residential-Dust Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

congeners measured in residential-dust samples from selectedcongeners measured in residential-dust samples from selecteda)pyrene measured in residential-dust samples from selected

Whitehead, Todd Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VII. THE LOW-VELOCITY COLLISION BEHAVIOR OF LARGE DUST AGGLOMERATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed micro-gravity collision experiments in our laboratory drop tower using 5 cm sized dust agglomerates with volume filling factors of 0.3 and 0.4, respectively. This work is an extension of our previous experiments reported in Beitz et al. to aggregates of more than one order of magnitude higher masses. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized silica particles and were macroscopically homogeneous. We measured the coefficient of restitution for collision velocities ranging from 1 cm s{sup -1} to 0.5 m s{sup -1}, and determined the fragmentation velocity. For low velocities, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing impact velocity, in contrast to findings by Beitz et al. At higher velocities, the value of the coefficient of restitution becomes constant, before the aggregates break at the onset of fragmentation. We interpret the qualitative change in the coefficient of restitution as the transition from a solid-body-dominated to a granular-medium-dominated behavior. We complement our experiments by molecular-dynamics simulations of porous aggregates and obtain a reasonable match to the experimental data. We discuss the importance of our experiments for protoplanetary disks, debris disks, and planetary rings. This work is an extension to the previous work of our group and gives new insight into the velocity dependency of the coefficient of restitution due to improved measurements, better statistics, and a theoretical approach.

Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen [Institut fuer Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik, University of Braunschweig Mendelssohnstr. 3, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm, E-mail: r.schraepler@tu-bs.de [Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, University of Tuebingen Auf der Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Particle-Surface-Area-Based Parameterization of Immersion Freezing on Desert Dust Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In climate and weather models, the quantitative description of aerosol and cloud processes relies on simplified assumptions. This contributes major uncertainties to the prediction of global and regional climate change. Therefore, models need good ...

Monika Niemand; Ottmar Möhler; Bernhard Vogel; Heike Vogel; Corinna Hoose; Paul Connolly; Holger Klein; Heinz Bingemer; Paul DeMott; Julian Skrotzki; Thomas Leisner

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dust Grain-Size Distributions From MRN to MEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employing the Maximum Entropy Method algorithm, we fit interstellar extinction measurements which span the wavelength range 0.125-3 micron. We present a uniform set of MEM model fits, all using the same grain materials, optical constants and abundance constraints. In addition, we are taking advantage of improved UV and IR data and better estimates of the gas-to-dust ratio. The model fits cover the entire range of extinction properties that have been seen in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. The grain models employed for this presentation are the simplistic homogeneous spheres models (i.e., Mathis, Rumpl, & Nordsieck 1977) with two (graphite, silicate) or three (graphite, silicate, amorphous carbon) components. Though such usage is only a first step, the results do provide interesting insight into the use of grain size as a diagnostic of dust environment. We find that the SMC Bar extinction curve cannot be fit using carbon grains alone. This is a challenge to the recent observational result indicating little silicon depletion in the SMC.

Geoffrey C. Clayton; Michael J. Wolff; Ulysses J. Sofia; K. D. Gordon; K. A. Misselt

2003-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Harrison transformation of hyperelliptic solutions and charged dust disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a Harrison transformation on solutions to the stationary axisymmetric Einstein equations to generate solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations. The case of hyperelliptic solutions to the Ernst equation is studied in detail. Analytic expressions for the metric and the multipole moments are obtained. As an example we consider the transformation of a family of counter-rotating dust disks. The resulting solutions can be interpreted as disks with currents and matter with a purely azimuthal pressure or as two streams of freely moving charged particles. We discuss interesting limiting cases as the extreme limit where the charge becomes identical to the mass, and the ultrarelativistic limit where the central redshift diverges.

C. Klein

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hot Coal for Christmas: Dust Formation in the Swept-Up Shell Around The Peculiar Type Ib Supernova 2006jc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present evidence for the formation of dust grains in an unusual Type Ib SN based on late-time spectra of SN 2006jc. The progenitor suffered a giant outburst qualitatively similar to those seen in LBVs just 2 years prior to the SN, and we speculate that the dust formation we observe is an indirect consequence of that event. The key evidence for dust formation seen in our optical spectra is (1) the appearance of a strong continuum emission source at red wavelengths, and (2) fading of the redshifted sides of narrow HeI emission lines. These two observed characteristics provide the strongest case yet for dust formation in any Type Ib/c SN. Both developments occurred simultaneously between 51 and 75 days after peak brightness, which is quick compared to other dusty SNe. The high temperature of the dust implies carbon and not silicates, and we describe how infrared photometry may test this conjecture. Geometric considerations indicate dust formation occurring in the dense gas swept-up by the forward shock, and n...

Smith, Nathan; Filippenko, Alexei V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Particle dispersing system and method for testing semiconductor manufacturing equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system and method prepare a gas stream comprising particles at a known concentration using a particle disperser for moving particles from a reservoir of particles into a stream of flowing carrier gas. The electrostatic charges on the particles entrained in the carrier gas are then neutralized or otherwise altered, and the resulting particle-laden gas stream is then diluted to provide an acceptable particle concentration. The diluted gas stream is then split into a calibration stream and the desired output stream. The particles in the calibration stream are detected to provide an indication of the actual size distribution and concentration of particles in the output stream that is supplied to a process chamber being analyzed. Particles flowing out of the process chamber within a vacuum pumping system are detected, and the output particle size distribution and concentration are compared with the particle size distribution and concentration of the calibration stream in order to determine the particle transport characteristics of a process chamber, or to determine the number of particles lodged in the process chamber as a function of manufacturing process parameters such as pressure, flowrate, temperature, process chamber geometry, particle size, particle charge, and gas composition.

Chandrachood, Madhavi (Sunnyvale, CA); Ghanayem, Steve G. (Sunnyvale, CA); Cantwell, Nancy (Milpitas, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Geller, Anthony S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Particle Lifetimes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reviewing Particle Lifetimes Reviewing Particle Lifetimes The lifetimes of elementary particles are statistical in nature. In a given sample, one particle might decay immediately, another in 1 nanosecond, yet another after 10 milliseconds, and still another in 50 years. What we call the lifetime is the time it takes for a sample to decay so 1/e (~30%) of the sample is left; after 2 lifetimes, 1/e2 of the sample is left, and so on. Take, for example, a sample of cosmic ray muons produced in the upper atmosphere. These muons, when observed at (relative) rest in the laboratory, have a mean lifetime T. Now, since particle decay is statistical in nature, the number of undecayed particles after a given time is a negative exponential function: N(t) = No e-t/T where N(t) is the number of muons at time t, No is the initial number of

247

PARTICLE ACCELERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator for simultaneous acceleration of two particle beams in opposite directions is described. (T.R.H.)

Ohkawa, T.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Impact of Transport Schemes on Modeled Dust Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensitivity study is performed with the CHIMERE-DUST chemistry transport model in order to evaluate the modeled mineral dust spread due to the horizontal transport scheme accuracy. Three different schemes are implemented in the model: the ...

Maria Raffaella Vuolo; Laurent Menut; Hélène Chepfer

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Historical Records of Asian Dust Events (Hwangsa) in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observation of dust events in Korea must have been important through its long history because of its geographical and meteorological setting. Descriptions about dust events were well documented in historical archives, such as Samguk sagi (57 ...

Youngsin Chun; Hi-Ku Cho; Hyo-Sang Chung; Meehye Lee

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Analysis of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for free-surface flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a simple and attractive meshless Lagrangian particle method with applications in many fields such as astrophysics, hydrodynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, gas explosions, and granular ...

Kiara, Areti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dissipative particle dynamics with attractive and repulsive particle-particle interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In molecular dynamics simulations, a combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions allows the behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and multiphase systems to be simulated. We demonstrate that dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations with similar pairwise particle-particle interactions can also be used to simulate the dynamics of multiphase fluids. In these simulations, the positive, short-range, repulsive part of the interaction potentials were represented by polynomial spline functions such as those used as smoothing functions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and the negative long-range part of the interaction has the same form but a different range and amplitude. If a single spline function corresponding to a purely repulsive interaction is used, the DPD fluid is a gas, and we show that the Poiseuille flow of this gas can be described accurately by the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers. In a two-component system in which the purely repulsive interactions between different components are substantially larger than the purely repulsive intracomponent interactions, separation into two gas phases occurs, in agreement with results obtained using DPD simulations with standard repulsive particle-particle interactions. Finally, we show that a combination of short-range repulsive interactions and long-range attractive interactions can be used to simulate the behavior of liquid drops surrounded by a gas. Similar models can be used to simulate a wide range of processes such as multiphase fluid flow through fractures and porous media with complex geometries and wetting behaviors.

Paul Meakin; Moubin Liu; Hai Huang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Pseudopotentials of the particles interactions in complex plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the effective interaction potentials in a complex dusty plasma. The interaction of electrons with atoms and the interaction between dusty particles are studied by the method of the dielectric response function. In the effective interaction, potential between electron and atom the quantum effects of diffraction were taken into account. On the curve of the interaction potential between dust particles under certain conditions the oscillations can be observed.

Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Muratov, M. M. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, Tole bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Infrared Extinction by Aggregates of SiC Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle shape and aggregation have a strong influence on the spectral profiles of infrared phonon bands of solid dust grains. In this paper, we use a discrete dipole approximation, a cluster-of-spheres code following the Gerardy-Ausloos approach and a T-matrix method for calculating IR extinction spectra of aggregates of spherical silicon carbide (SiC) particles. We compare the results obtained with the three different methods and discuss differences in the band profiles.

Anja C. Andersen; Harald Mutschke; Thomas Posch

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

254

Identification of Arsenic Species in Coal Ash Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of the chemical species and compounds of arsenic in individual coal fly ash particles will help provide a scientifically sound basis for assessing health risks from inhalation of these particles. This report presents the results of an analytical chemistry study of coal-combustion ash, with some work also completed on oil-combustion ash and copper smelter dust collected from several sources in the United States and Europe. Results showed that most arsenic is present on the surface of coal a...

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

In-depth survey report of silica flour dust during packing, transfer, and shipping at the Central Silica Company, Glass Rock Plant, Glass Rock, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A visit was made to the Central Silica Company, Glass Rock, Ohio to evaluate methods used to control employee exposure to silica dust. The control methods at this company included careful handling and transfer of damp materials, exhaust ventilation, good housekeeping procedures, and the use of respiratory protection. Evaluations were made of the packing area, transfer point, inside loading trucks, and ambient air at sections of the flour building. Control systems included a good exhaust-ventilation system and four ventilation hoods. Evaluations were made of samples collected by an MSA gravimeter dust sampler, the Del High volume electrostatic precipitation, and bulk and rafter samples. Dust control methods appeared to be effective due to the existence of good engineering controls, good work practices, and an effective respiratory protection program. Additional control measures included the handling of the ore as a damp material, thus reducing the generation of dust particles. Outside dust sources were being reduced. Most of the product was shipped in bulk. Plastic wrapping was used around pallet loads to reduce bag breakage and dust dispersion. A filtered air system controlled low dust levels in the Pebble Mill control room. Enclosed screens operated under negative pressure separated fine from coarse product at the process building.

Caplan, P.E.; Reed, L.D.; Amendola, A.A.; Cooper, T.C.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

257

Dust Mitigation Methods for Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants generate coal combustion products (CCPs) requiring management for storage and disposal. These products are often stored in facilities such as landfills or placed in temporary storage pads for short or long durations. At these facilities, there is a need to address dust mitigation concerns in order to comply with environmental permits, ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Model for Saharan Dust Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the source strength and the deposition rate of the dust emerging from the Sahara are assessed. For this purpose a multichannel sunphotometer has been developed and a turbidity network covering 11 stations has been set up in the ...

Guillaume A. d'Almeida

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Radiative Heating Rates for Saharan Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined longwave and shortwave radiative transfer model was used to determine effects of Saharan dust on the radiative fluxes and heating/cooling rates in the atmosphere. Cases are treated for cloud-free and overcast conditions over the ocean ...

Toby N. Carlson; Stanley G. Benjamin

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Arbitrary amplitude dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized suprathermal dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear and nonlinear dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) wave propagating obliquely with respect to an external magnetic field is studied in a magnetized complex plasma which consists of a cold ion fluid, superthermal electrons, and static dust particles. The propagation properties of two possible modes (in the linear regime) are investigated. It is found that the electron suprathermality and the electron population decrease the phase velocities of both modes, while obliqueness leads to increase of separation between two modes. An energy-like equation derived to describe the nonlinear evolution of DIA solitary waves. The influences of electron suprathermality, obliqueness, and electron population on the existence domain of solitary waves and the soliton characteristics are examined. It is shown that the existence domain of the DIA soliton and its profile are significantly depending on the deviation of electrons from thermodynamic equilibrium, electrons population, and obliqueness. It is also found that the suprathermal plasma supports the DIA solitons with larger amplitude.

Shahmansouri, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Arak University, Arak 38156-8-8349 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alinejad, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167, Iran and Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Using Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Nuclear Dust Morphology to Rule Out Bars Fueling Seyfert Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If AGN are powered by the accretion of matter onto massive black holes, how does the gas in the host galaxy lose the required angular momentum to approach the black hole? Gas easily transfers angular momentum to stars in strong bars, making them likely candidates. Although ground-based searches for bars in active galaxies using both optical and near infrared surface brightness have not found any excess of bars relative to quiescent galaxies, the searches have not been able to rule out small-scale nuclear bars. To look for these nuclear bars we use HST WFPC2-NICMOS color maps to search for the straight dust lane signature of strong bars. Of the twelve Seyfert galaxies in our sample, only three have dust lanes consistent with a strong nuclear bar. Therefore, strong nuclear bars cannot be the primary fueling mechanism for Seyfert nuclei. We do find that a majority of the galaxies show an spiral morphology in their dust lanes. These spiral arms may be a possible fueling mechanism.

Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS VEHICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fueled truck fleet of more than 100 refuse hauling vehicles and plans to add more will include exhaust from on-road vehicles and from materials handling equipment, dust from refuse renewable natural gas. CR&R plans to add 100 CNG/LNG vehicles to its fleet over the next

264

3/14/08 5:42 PMIEEE Spectrum: New Sensor Shows Electric Nature of Dust Devils Page 1 of 3http://spectrum.ieee.org/mar08/6030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that makes it into the atmosphere. Dust is part of the family of aerosols-- suspended particles or molecules in the air--which includes water vapor and soot from coal combustion. Aerosols absorb or reflect radiation and the negative charges carried by wind-blown particles colliding with the sensor. Though it remains unclear just

Michigan, University of

265

The Particle Adventure | Particle decays and annihiliations ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

virtual particles. Virtual particles do not violate the conservation of energy. The kinetic energy plus mass of the initial decaying particle and the final decay products is...

266

The Particle Adventure | Accelerators and Particle Detectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waves and particles The world's meterstick Mass and energy Energy-mass conversion Accelerators How to obtain particles to accelerate Accelerating particles Accelerating...

267

Online Particle Physics Information - Particles & Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particles & Properties Data Review of Particle Physics (RPP) A biennial comprehensive review summarizing much of the known data about the field of particle physics produced by the...

268

Review of Particle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . .ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . . . 12.

Nakamura, Kenzo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION  

SciTech Connect

The agglomeration of ultrafine-size coal particles in an aqueous suspension by means of microscopic gas bubbles was demonstrated in numerous experiments with a scale model mixing system. Coal samples from both the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam and the Upper Freeport Seam were used for these experiments. A small amount of i-octane was added to facilitate the process. Microscopic gas bubbles were generated by saturating the water used for suspending coal particles with gas under pressure and then reducing the pressure. Microagglomerates were produced which appeared to consist of gas bubbles encapsulated in coal particles. Since dilute particle suspensions were employed, it was possible to monitor the progress of agglomeration by observing changes in turbidity. By such means it became apparent that the rate of agglomeration depends on the concentration of microscopic gas bubbles and to a lesser extent on the concentration of i-octane. Similar results were obtained with both Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Upper Freeport coal.

MEIYU SHEN; ROYCE ABBOTT; T.D. WHEELOCK

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Dust ion-acoustic shock waves in charge varying dusty plasmas with electrons having vortexlike velocity distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to investigate the properties of dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with vortexlike electron distribution. We use the ionization model, hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a trapped electron charging current derived from the well-known orbit limited motion theory. A new modified Burger equation is derived. Besides nonlinear trapping, this equation involves two kinds of dissipation (the anomalous one inherent to nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and the one due to the particle loss and ionization). These two kinds of dissipation can act concurrently. The traveling wave solution has been acquired by employing the modified extended tanh-function method. The shocklike solution is numerically analyzed based on the typical numerical data from laboratory dusty plasma devices. It is found that ion temperature, trapped particles, and weak dissipations significantly modify the shock structures.

Alinejad, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha, P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha 55177-36698 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tribeche, M. [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Science-Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers (Algeria)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mercury sorbent delivery system for flue gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presents a device for the removal of elemental mercury from flue gas streams utilizing a layer of activated carbon particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag for use in a flue gas scrubbing system.

Klunder; ,Edgar B. (Bethel Park, PA)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

272

Elementary Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elementary Particles Elementary Particles Elementary Particles Detectors Accelerators Visit World Labs For Children - for younger people Electric Forces & Fields For Children The Electric Force For Children Electric Force Fields For Children Charges and Fields For Children Vibrating Charges and Electromagnetic Waves Electrons For Older People The Discovery of the Electron Traveling Waves For Older People Waves and Wave-Like Motion For Children Catch the Wave For Children Vibrating Charges and Electromagnetic Waves For Children Electromagnetic Waves Standing Waves For Older People Physics 128 Lecture Standing Waves For Older People Resonance in Strings and Springs For Older People Standing Wave - 1st Harmonic For Older People Standing Wave - 2nd Harmonic Atom For Older People Bohr Atom

273

Trillion Particles,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trillion Trillion Particles, 120,000 cores, and 350 TBs: Lessons Learned from a Hero I/O Run on Hopper Surendra Byna ∗ , Andrew Uselton ∗ , Prabhat ∗ , David Knaak † , and Yun (Helen) He ∗ ∗ Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA. Email: {sbyna, acuselton, prabhat, yhe}@lbl.gov † Cray Inc., USA. Email: knaak@cray.com Abstract-Modern petascale applications can present a variety of configuration, runtime, and data management challenges when run at scale. In this paper, we describe our experiences in running VPIC, a large-scale plasma physics simulation, on the NERSC production Cray XE6 system Hopper. The simulation ran on 120,000 cores using ∼80% of computing resources, 90% of the available memory on each node and 50% of the Lustre scratch file system. Over two trillion particles were simulated for 23,000 timesteps, and 10 one-trillion particle dumps, each ranging between

274

Carbon particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

PARTICLE ACCELERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

Teng, L.C.

1960-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

Observation of the spatial growth of self-excited dust-density waves  

SciTech Connect

The growth of a naturally occurring dust-density wave (DDW) is experimentally observed using high-speed imaging. This low frequency wave ({approx}25 Hz) grows in amplitude as it propagates downward through a dusty plasma. The wave's linear growth rate -k{sub i} is measured using a phase-sensitive analysis method. For the conditions studied here, the growth rate increases as gas pressure decreases. At a critical gas pressure, which is observed, a balance between an ion-flow instability and dissipation by neutral gas drag determines a threshold for wave propagation. A linear dispersion relation is derived, taking into account the effects of strong-coupling, to compare to the experiment.

Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves  

SciTech Connect

The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Crescent Model School Shadman, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Spatial distribution of the interplanetary dust deduced by infrared observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IR observations of the interplanetary dust performed by the ZIP rocket experiment are analyzed, focusing on the effect of experimental errors on the inversion procedure previously used to obtain the spatial distribution of the dust. Numerical simulation shows that the experimental errors are too large to reveal deviations of the dust density from a simple power-law radial distribution. The accuracy which would be required in future experiments is estimated. 9 refs.

De Bernardis, P.; Feminella, F.; Moreno, G. (Roma I Universita, Rome (Italy))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Dust acoustic shock waves in two temperatures charged dusty grains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reductive perturbation method has been used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation and modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger for dust acoustic shock waves in a homogeneous unmagnetized plasma having electrons, singly charged ions, hot and cold dust species with Boltzmann distributions for electrons and ions in the presence of the cold (hot) dust viscosity coefficients. The behavior of the shock waves in the dusty plasma has been investigated.

El-Shewy, E. K. [Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Science and Arts College in Al-Rass, Physics Department, Qassim University, Al-Rass Province (Saudi Arabia); Abdelwahed, H. G. [Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department, Alkharj University, Al-kharj (Saudi Arabia); Elmessary, M. A. [Engineering Mathematics and Physics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Recovering Zinc and Lead from Electric Arc Furnace Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Non-member price: 25.00. TMS Student Member price: 10.00. Product In Stock. Description Increasing amounts of electric arc furnace dust ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Dust-induced instability in a rotating plasma  

SciTech Connect

The effect of immobile dust on stability of a magnetized rotating plasma is analyzed. In the presence of dust, a term containing an electric field appears in the one-fluid equation of plasma motion. This electric field leads to an instability of the magnetized rotating plasma called the dust-induced rotational instability (DRI). The DRI is related to the charge imbalance between plasma ions and electrons introduced by the presence of charged dust. In contrast to the well-known magnetorotational instability requiring the decreasing radial profile of the plasma rotation frequency, the DRI can appear for an increasing rotation frequency profile.

Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Lominadze, J. G.; Tsypin, V. S.; Churikov, A. P.; Erokhin, N. N.; Galvao, R. M. O. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, N.S.W. 2006 (Australia); Kharadze Abastumani National Astrophysical Observatory, 2a, Kazbegi Ave., Tbilisi 0160 (Georgia); Brazilian Center for Physics Research, Rua Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Syzran Branch of Samara Technical University, 45, Sovetskaya Str., Syzran, Samara Region 446001 (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, Brazil and Brazilian Center for Physics Research, Rua Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

ESP Dust Recovery Process Test Works, Plant Trial, Commissioning ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the volatile arsenic will report to Isasmelt Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) or Waste Heat Boiler dusts where it will form a re-circulating load within the ...

283

Dust in the Indoor Environment: Physical and Chemical Changes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hottinger said: "Settled dust on hot surfaces above 70 degrees Celsius results in distillation products having irritating effect on mucous membranes, fairly equal to the effect...

284

MULTIBAND OPTICAL OBSERVATION OF THE P/2010 A2 DUST TAIL  

SciTech Connect

An inner main-belt asteroid, P/2010 A2, was discovered on 2010 January 6. Based on its orbital elements, it is considered that the asteroid belongs to the Flora collisional family, where S-type asteroids are common, while showing a comet-like dust tail. Although analysis of images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and Rosetta spacecraft suggested that the dust tail resulted from a recent head-on collision between asteroids, an alternative idea of ice sublimation was suggested based on the morphological fitting of ground-based images. Here, we report a multiband observation of P/2010 A2 made on 2010 January with a 105 cm telescope at the Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory. Three broadband filters, g', R{sub c} , and I{sub c} , were employed for the observation. The unique multiband data reveal that the reflectance spectrum of the P/2010 A2 dust tail resembles that of an Sq-type asteroid or that of ordinary chondrites rather than that of an S-type asteroid. Due to the large error of the measurement, the reflectance spectrum also resembles the spectra of C-type asteroids, even though C-type asteroids are uncommon in the Flora family. The reflectances relative to the g' band (470 nm) are 1.096 {+-} 0.046 at the R{sub c} band (650 nm) and 1.131 {+-} 0.061 at the I{sub c} band (800 nm). We hypothesize that the parent body of P/2010 A2 was originally S-type but was then shattered upon collision into scattering fresh chondritic particles from the interior, thus forming the dust tail.

Kim, Junhan [303-201, Mokdong Apartment, Mok-5-dong, Yangcheon-gu, Seoul 158-753 (Korea, Republic of); Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Silim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hanayama, Hidekazu [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao; Usui, Fumihiko; Sarugaku, Yuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Kenshi [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asaguchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Watanabe, Jun-ichi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi, E-mail: ishiguro@astro.snu.ac.kr [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hazardous Gas Production by Alpha Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused on the production of hazardous gases in the radiolysis of solid organic matrices, such as polymers and resins, that may be associated with transuranic waste material. Self-radiolysis of radioactive waste is a serious environmental problem because it can lead to a change in the composition of the materials in storage containers and possibly jeopardize their integrity. Experimental determination of gaseous yields is of immediate practical importance in the engineering and maintenance of containers for waste materials. Fundamental knowledge on the radiation chemical processes occurring in these systems allows one to predict outcomes in materials or mixtures not specifically examined, which is a great aid in the management of the variety of waste materials currently overseen by Environmental Management.

Jay A. LaVerne, Principal Investigator

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

286

Direct Characterization of Airborne Particles Associated with Arsenic-rich Mine Tailings: Particle Size Mineralogy and Texture  

SciTech Connect

Windblown and vehicle-raised dust from unvegetated mine tailings can be a human health risk. Airborne particles from As-rich abandoned Au mine tailings from Nova Scotia, Canada have been characterized in terms of particle size, As concentration, As oxidation state, mineral species and texture. Samples were collected in seven aerodynamically fractionated size ranges (0.5-16 {micro}m) using a cascade impactor deployed at three tailings fields. All three sites are used for recreational activities and off-road vehicles were racing on the tailings at two mines during sample collection. Total concentrations of As in the <8 {micro}m fraction varied from 65 to 1040 ng/m{sup 3} of air as measured by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The same samples were analysed by synchrotron-based microfocused X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy ({micro}XANES) and X-ray diffraction ({micro}XRD) and found to contain multiple As-bearing mineral species, including Fe-As weathering products. The As species present in the dust were similar to those observed in the near-surface tailings. The action of vehicles on the tailings surface may disaggregate material cemented with Fe arsenate and contribute additional fine-grained As-rich particles to airborne dust. Results from this study can be used to help assess the potential human health risks associated with exposure to airborne particles from mine tailings.

M Corriveau; H Jamieson; M Parsons; J Campbell; A Lanzirotti

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Episodic Dust Events of Utah’s Wasatch Front and Adjoining Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Episodic dust events cause hazardous air quality along Utah’s Wasatch Front and dust loading of the snowpack in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This paper presents a climatology of episodic dust events of the Wasatch Front and adjoining region ...

W. James Steenburgh; Jeffrey D. Massey; Thomas H. Painter

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

THE DUST BUDGET OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: ARE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS THE PRIMARY DUST SOURCE AT LOW METALLICITY?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We estimate the total dust input from the cool evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using the 8 {mu}m excess emission as a proxy for the dust-production rate (DPR). We find that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars produce (8.6-9.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} of dust, depending on the fraction of far-infrared sources that belong to the evolved star population (with 10%-50% uncertainty in individual DPRs). RSGs contribute the least (budget, this suggests that dust must grow in the ISM or be formed by another unknown mechanism.

Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sargent, B. A. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Srinivasan, S. [UPMC-CNRS UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Riebel, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); McDonald, I. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Van Loon, J. Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Clayton, G. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Sloan, G. C., E-mail: mboyer@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

AN INTERMEDIATE LUMINOSITY TRANSIENT IN NGC 300: THE ERUPTION OF A DUST-ENSHROUDED MASSIVE STAR  

SciTech Connect

We present multi-epoch high-resolution optical spectroscopy, UV/radio/X-ray imaging, and archival Hubble and Spitzer observations of an intermediate luminosity optical transient recently discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC 300. We find that the transient (NGC 300 OT2008-1) has a peak absolute magnitude of M{sub bol} {approx} -11.8 mag, intermediate between novae and supernovae, and similar to the recent events M85 OT2006-1 and SN 2008S. Our high-resolution spectra, the first for this event, are dominated by intermediate velocity ({approx}200-1000 km s{sup -1}) hydrogen Balmer lines and Ca II emission and absorption lines that point to a complex circumstellar environment, reminiscent of the yellow hypergiant IRC+10420. In particular, we detect asymmetric Ca II H and K absorption with a broad red wing extending to {approx}10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}, indicative of gas inflow at high velocity (possibly the wind of a massive binary companion). The low luminosity, intermediate velocities, and overall similarity to a known eruptive star indicate that the event did not result in a complete disruption of the progenitor. We identify the progenitor in archival Spitzer observations, with deep upper limits from Hubble data. The spectral energy distribution points to a dust-enshrouded star with a luminosity of about 6 x 10{sup 4} L{sub sun}, indicative of a {approx}10-20 M{sub sun} progenitor (or binary system). This conclusion is in good agreement with our interpretation of the outburst and circumstellar properties. The lack of significant extinction in the transient spectrum indicates that the dust surrounding the progenitor was cleared by the outburst. We thus predict that the progenitor should be eventually visible with Hubble if the transient event marks an evolutionary transition to a dust-free state, or with Spitzer if the event marks a cyclical process of dust formation.

Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Foley, R. J.; Dupree, A. K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chevalier, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Fransson, C. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Leonard, D. C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, PA-210, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Debes, J. H. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Tremonti, C. A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ivans, I. I.; Thompson, I. B. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Simmerer, J. [Lund Observatory, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

SPITZER AND HERSCHEL MULTIWAVELENGTH CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DUST CONTENT OF EVOLVED H II REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

We have analyzed a uniform sample of 16 evolved H II regions located in a 2 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign Galactic field centered at (l,b) = (30 Degree-Sign , 0 Degree-Sign ) and observed as part of the Herschel Hi-GAL survey. The evolutionary stage of these H II regions was established using ancillary radio-continuum data. By combining Hi-GAL PACS (70 {mu}m, 160 {mu}m) and SPIRE (250 {mu}m, 350 {mu}m, and 500 {mu}m) measurements with MIPSGAL 24 {mu}m data, we built spectral energy distributions of the sources and showed that a two-component gray-body model is a good representation of the data. In particular, wavelengths >70 {mu}m appear to trace a cold dust component, for which we estimated an equilibrium temperature of the big grains (BGs) in the range 20-30 K, while for {lambda} < 70 {mu}m, the data indicate the presence of a warm dust component at temperatures of the order of 50-90 K. This analysis also revealed that dust is present in the interior of H II regions, although likely not in a large amount. In addition, the data seem to corroborate the hypothesis that the main mechanism responsible for the (partial) depletion of dust in H II regions is radiation-pressure-driven drift. In this framework, we speculated that the 24 {mu}m emission that spatially correlates with ionized gas might be associated with either very small grain or BG replenishment, as recently proposed for the case of wind-blown bubbles. Finally, we found that evolved H II regions are characterized by distinctive far-IR and submillimeter colors, which can be used as diagnostics for their identification in unresolved Galactic and extragalactic regions.

Paladini, R. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200, East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Umana, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Veneziani, M.; Noriega-Crespo, A. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200, East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Piacentini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Pinheiro Goncalves, D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto 50 George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Paradis, D.; Bernard, J.-P. [Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Tibbs, C. T. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200, East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Natoli, P., E-mail: paladini@ipac.caltech.edu [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Ferrara, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The gas temperature in flaring disks around pre-main sequence stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is presented which calculates the gas temperature and chemistry in the surface layers of flaring circumstellar disks using a code developed for photon-dominated regions. Special attention is given to the influence of dust settling. It is found that the gas temperature exceeds the dust temperature by up to several hundreds of Kelvins in the part of the disk that is optically thin to ultraviolet radiation, indicating that the common assumption that Tgas=Tdust is not valid throughout the disk. In the optically thick part, gas and dust are strongly coupled and the gas temperature equals the dust temperature. Dust settling has little effect on the chemistry in the disk, but increases the amount of hot gas deeper in the disk. The effects of the higher gas temperature on several emission lines arising in the surface layer are examined. The higher gas temperatures increase the intensities of molecular and fine-structure lines by up to an order of magnitude, and can also have an important effect on the line shapes.

B. Jonkheid; F. G. A. Faas; G. -J. van Zadelhoff; E. F. van Dishoeck

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Particle swarm optimization with opposite particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The particle swarm optimization algorithm is a kind of intelligent optimization algorithm. This algorithm is prone to be fettered by the local optimization solution when the particle's velocity is small. This paper presents a novel particle swarm ...

Rujing Wang; Xiaoming Zhang

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stable Does not decay. A particle is stable if there exist no processes in which a particle disappears and in its place different particles appear...

294

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Event What occurs when two particles collide or a single particle decays. Particle theories predict the probabilities of various possible events occurring when many similar...

295

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge A quantum number carried by a particle. Determines whether the particle can participate in an interaction process. A particle with electric charge has electrical...

296

Two-Component Dust in Spherically Symmetric Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two components of spherically symmetric, inhomogeneous dust penetrating each other are introduced as a generalization of the well-known Tolman-Bondi dust solution. The field equations of this model are formulated and general properties are discussed. inhomogeneous Special solutions with additional symmetries - an extra Killing- or homothetic vector - and their matching to the corresponding Tolman-Bondi solution are investigated.

Haager, G

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Two-Component Dust in Spherically Symmetric Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two components of spherically symmetric, inhomogeneous dust penetrating each other are introduced as a generalization of the well-known Tolman-Bondi dust solution. The field equations of this model are formulated and general properties are discussed. inhomogeneous Special solutions with additional symmetries - an extra Killing- or homothetic vector - and their matching to the corresponding Tolman-Bondi solution are investigated.

Gernot Haager

1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

298

Dust en-route to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spacecraft investigations during the last ten years have vastly improved our knowledge about dust in the Jovian system. All Galilean satellites, and probably all smaller satellites as well, are sources of dust in the Jovian system. In-situ measurements with the dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have for the first time demonstrated the electromagnetic interaction of charged dust grains with the interplanetary magnetic field and with a planetary magnetosphere. Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a giant mass-velocity spectrometer for charged 10-nanometer dust grains. These dust grains are released from Jupiter's moon Io with typical rate of 1 kg s^1. The dust streams probe the plasma conditions in the Io plasma torus and can be used as a potential monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity. The other Galilean satellites are surrounded by tenuous impact-generated clouds of mostly sub-micrometer ejecta grains. Galileo measurements have demonstrated that impact-ejecta derived from hypervelocity impacts onto satellites are the major -- if not the only -- constituent of dusty planetary rings. We review the in-situ dust measurements at Jupiter and give an update of most recent results.

Harald Krueger; Eberhard Gruen

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

299

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Moore, Keith

300

Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a method by which microseismic events can be discriminated/detected that correspond to only the portion of the hydraulic fracture that contains the proppant material and can be expected to be conductive to the flow of oil and gas. July 3, 2013 Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Figure 1: A graph of ionic conductivity as a function of temperature for the anti-perovskite Li3OCl. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing Applications: Oil and gas production Geophysical exploration Benefits: Tracks the disposition of material in a hydraulic fracturing

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301

Structural properties of dusty plasma in direct current and radio frequency gas discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents radial distribution functions of dust particles obtained experimentally in dc and rf discharges. Pressure and interaction energy of dusty particles were calculated on the basis of these functions. The Langevin dynamics computer simulation for each experiment was performed. The comparisons with computer simulations are made.

Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Jumabekov, A. N.; Dosbolayev, M. K. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, Tole bi 96a, Almaty, 050012 (Kazakhstan)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

The ecology of dust: local- to global-scale perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Emission and redistribution of dust due to wind erosion in drylands drives major biogeochemical dynamics and provides important aeolian environmental connectivity at scales from individual plants up to the global scale. Yet, perhaps because most relevant research on aeolian processes has been presented in a geosciences rather than ecological context, most ecological studies do not explicitly consider dust-driven processes. To bridge this disciplinary gap, we provide a general overview of the ecological importance of dust, examine complex interactions between wind erosion and ecosystem dynamics from the plant-interspace scale to regional and global scales, and highlight specific examples of how disturbance affects these interactions and their consequences. Changes in climate and intensification of land use will both likely lead to increased dust production. To address these challenges, environmental scientists, land managers and policy makers need to more explicitly consider dust in resource management decisions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Jason P [UA; Belnap, Jayne [NON LANL; Breshears, David D [UA; Neff, Jason [CU; Okin, Gregory S [UCLA; Painter, Thomas H [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Ravi, Sujith [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Reheis, Marith C [UCLA; Reynolds, Richard L [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Beam-Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

304

THE MILKY WAY TOMOGRAPHY WITH SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. IV. DISSECTING DUST  

SciTech Connect

We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry of 73 million stars to simultaneously constrain best-fit main-sequence stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) and amount of dust extinction along the line of sight toward each star. Using a subsample of 23 million stars with Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry, whose addition enables more robust results, we show that SDSS photometry alone is sufficient to break degeneracies between intrinsic stellar color and dust amount when the shape of extinction curve is fixed. When using both SDSS and 2MASS photometry, the ratio of the total to selective absorption, R{sub V} , can be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 for most stars in high-extinction regions. These fits enable detailed studies of the dust properties and its spatial distribution, and of the stellar spatial distribution at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 30 Degree-Sign ). Our results are in good agreement with the extinction normalization given by the Schlegel et al. (SFD) dust maps at high northern Galactic latitudes, but indicate that the SFD extinction map appears to be consistently overestimated by about 20% in the southern sky, in agreement with recent study by Schlafly et al. The constraints on the shape of the dust extinction curve across the SDSS and 2MASS bandpasses disfavor the reddening law of O'Donnell, but support the models by Fitzpatrick and Cardelli et al. For the latter, we find a ratio of the total to selective absorption to be R{sub V} = 3.0 {+-} 0.1(random){+-}0.1 (systematic) over most of the high-latitude sky. At low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 5 Degree-Sign ), we demonstrate that the SFD map cannot be reliably used to correct for extinction because most stars are embedded in dust, rather than behind it, as is the case at high Galactic latitudes. We analyze three-dimensional maps of the best-fit R{sub V} and find that R{sub V} = 3.1 cannot be ruled out in any of the 10 SEGUE stripes at a precision level of {approx}0.1-0.2. Our best estimate for the intrinsic scatter of R{sub V} in the regions probed by SEGUE stripes is {approx}0.2. We introduce a method for efficient selection of candidate red giant stars in the disk, dubbed 'dusty parallax relation', which utilizes a correlation between distance and the extinction along the line of sight. We make these best-fit parameters, as well as all the input SDSS and 2MASS data, publicly available in a user-friendly format. These data can be used for studies of stellar number density distribution, the distribution of dust properties, for selecting sources whose SED differs from SEDs for high-latitude main-sequence stars, and for estimating distances to dust clouds and, in turn, to molecular gas clouds.

Berry, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brooks, Keira J.; Gibson, Robert R.; Jones, Lynne; Yoachim, Peter; Krughoff, Simon; Connolly, Andrew J.; Loebman, Sarah [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Juric, Mario [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bellovary, Jillian [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vrbanec, Dijana [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kimball, Amy [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Bond, Nicholas A. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Schlegel, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS 50R5032, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Enhanced production of HD and D_2 molecules on small dust grains in diffuse clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by recent observations of deuterated molecules in the interstellar medium, we examine the production of HD and D$_2$ molecules on dust grain surfaces. A mechanism for the enhanced production of these deuterated molecules is studied. This mechanism applies on grain surfaces on which D atoms stick more strongly than H atoms, under conditions of low flux and within a suitable range of temperatures. It is shown that under these conditions the production rates of HD and D$_2$ are greatly enhanced (vs. the H$_2$ production rate) compared with the expected rates based on the adsorption of gas-phase atomic abundances of D and H. The enhancement in the formation rate of HD is comparable with the enhancement due to gas-phase ion-molecule reactions in diffuse clouds.

Azi Lipshtat; Ofer Biham; Eric Herbst

2003-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

THE ORIGIN OF DUST IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: PROBING THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF GALAXIES BY THEIR DUST CONTENT  

SciTech Connect

Two distinct scenarios for the origin of the {approx}4 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} of dust observed in the high-redshift (z = 6.4) quasar J1148+5251 have been proposed. The first assumes that this galaxy is much younger than the age of the universe at that epoch so that only supernovae (SNe) could have produced this dust. The second scenario assumes a significantly older galactic age, so that the dust could have formed in lower-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Presenting new integral solutions for the chemical evolution of metals and dust in galaxies, we offer a critical evaluation of these two scenarios and observational consequences that can discriminate between the two. We show that AGB stars can produce the inferred mass of dust in this object, however, the final mass of surviving dust depends on the galaxy's star formation history (SFH). In general, SNe cannot produce the observed amount of dust unless the average SN event creates over {approx}2 M{sub sun} of dust in its ejecta. However, special SFHs can be constructed in which SNe can produce the inferred dust mass with a reasonable average dust yield of {approx}0.15 M{sub sun}. The two scenarios propose different origins for the galaxy's spectral energy distribution, different star formation efficiencies and stellar masses, and consequently different comoving number densities of J1148+5251-type hyperluminous infrared (IR) objects. The detection of diagnostic mid-IR fine structure lines and more complete surveys determining the comoving number density of these objects can discriminate between the two scenarios.

Dwek, Eli [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cherchneff, Isabelle, E-mail: eli.dwek@nasa.gov, E-mail: isabelle.cherchneff@unibas.ch [Department Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

FROM PLANETESIMALS TO DUST: LOW-GRAVITY EXPERIMENTS ON RECYCLING SOLIDS AT THE INNER EDGES OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS  

SciTech Connect

Transporting solids of different sizes is an essential process in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and planet formation. Large solids are supposed to drift inward; high-temperature minerals found in comets are assumed to have been transported outward. From low-gravity experiments on parabolic flights, we studied the light-induced erosion of dusty bodies caused by a solid-state greenhouse effect and photophoresis within a dust bed's upper layers. The gravity levels studied were 0.16g, 0.38g, 1g, and 1.7g. The light flux during the experiments was 12 {+-} 2 kW m{sup -2} and the ambient pressure was 6 {+-} 0.9 mbar. Light-induced erosion is strongly gravity dependent, which is in agreement with a developed model. In particular for small dusty bodies ((sub)-planetesimals), efficient erosion is possible at the optically thin inner edges of protoplanetary disks. Light-induced erosion prevents significant parts of a larger body from moving too close to the host star and being subsequently accreted. The small dust produced continues to be subject to photophoresis and is partially transported upward and outward over the surface of the disk; the resulting small dust particles are observed over the disk's lifetime. The fraction of eroded dust participates in subsequent cycles of growth during planetesimal formation. Another fraction of dust might be collected by a body of planetary size if this body is already present close to the disk edge. Either way, light-induced erosion is an efficient recycling process in protoplanetary disks.

De Beule, Caroline; Kelling, Thorben; Wurm, Gerhard; Teiser, Jens; Jankowski, Tim, E-mail: caroline.de-beule@uni-due.de [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Lotharstrasse 1, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany)] [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Lotharstrasse 1, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Simple Cosmological Model with Relativistic Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct simple and useful approximation for the relativistic gas of massive particles. The equation of state is given by an elementary function and admits analytic solution of the Friedmann equation, including more complex cases when the relativistic gas of massive particles is considered together with radiation or with dominating cosmological constant. The model of relativistic gas may be interesting for the description of primordial Universe, especially as a candidate for the role of a Dark Matter.

Guilherme de Berredo-Peixoto; Ilya L. Shapiro; Flavia Sobreira

2004-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Gas stream cleaning system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil mist and solid particle laden gas from an oil shale retorting operation is initially treated with a temperature controlled oil spray and then by a coalescer to reduce the quantity of oil mist and remove most of the solid particle content of the gas stream and then finally treated by an electrostatic precipitator to essentially remove the oil mist remaining in the gas.

Kunchal, S. Kumar (300 Enterprise Bldg., Grand Junction, CO 81501); Erck, Louis J. (Anvil Points, Rifle, CO 81650); Harris, Harry A. (No. 25 Anvil Points, Rifle, CO 81650)

1979-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

Packaged air cleaning systems tame desert dust storms in Oman  

SciTech Connect

Vast storms created when cold, northwesterly air masses slam into hot, southwesterly monsoons, moving lethargically over the Sudan and Red Sea, generate swift downdrafts that strike the ground and deflect forward in a powerful, swirling air stream up to 500 km long. As the wind moves along the ground, it churns up particles ranging in size from 80 to 2000 micrometers. This churning also kicks up particles in the 0.1 to 80 micrometer range, and these may rise to heights of 500 m or more, the smaller of which remain suspended for hours. These conditions made it imperative to protect the blades and internal mechanisms of the gas turbines in use at Yibal, Sultanate of Oman. Each of the gas turbines is equipped with a packaged intake air cleaning system. Because no single air filter has been designed to handle effectively the extremely high concentrations of particulates encountered during storms, the AAF air filters are multistage filtration systems. These systems are discussed.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A new method to generate dust with astrophysical properties  

SciTech Connect

In interstellar and interplanetary space, the size distribution and composition of dust grains play an important role. For example, dust grains determine optical and ultraviolet extinction levels in astronomical observations, dominate the cooling rate of our Galaxy, and sets the thermal balance and radiative cooling rates in molecular clouds, which are the birth place of stars. Dust grains are also a source of damage and failure to space hardware and thus present a hazard to space flight. To model the size distribution and composition of dust grains, and their effect in the above scenarios, it is vital to understand the mechanism of dust-shock interaction. We demonstrate a new experiment which employs a laser to subject dust grains to pressure spikes similar to those of colliding astrophysical dust, and which accelerates the grains to astrophysical velocities. The new method generates much larger data sets than earlier methods; we show how large quantities (thousands) of grains are accelerated at once, rather than accelerating individual grains, as is the case of earlier methods using electric fields.

Hansen, J F; van Breugel, W; Bringa, E M; Graham, G A; Remington, B A; Taylor, E A; Tielens, A G

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy conditions, traversable wormholes and dust shells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Firstly, we review the pointwise and averaged energy conditions, the quantum inequality and the notion of the ``volume integral quantifier'', which provides a measure of the ``total amount'' of energy condition violating matter. Secondly, we present a specific metric of a spherically symmetric traversable wormhole in the presence of a generic cosmological constant, verifying that the null and the averaged null energy conditions are violated, as was to be expected. Thirdly, a pressureless dust shell is constructed around the interior wormhole spacetime by matching the latter geometry to a unique vacuum exterior solution. In order to further minimize the usage of exotic matter, we then find regions where the surface energy density is positive, thereby satisfying all of the energy conditions at the junction surface. An equation governing the behavior of the radial pressure across the junction surface is also deduced. Lastly, taking advantage of the construction, specific dimensions of the wormhole, namely, the t...

Lobo, F S N

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Particle pressures in fluidized beds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction), they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, the authors inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds; the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined) and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Particle Pressures in Fluidized Beds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction): they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, we inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined)and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill is provided for comminuting solid ticles. The mill includes a housing enclosing a porous fluidizing gas diffuser plate, a baffled rotor and stator, a hollow drive shaft with lateral vents, and baffled gas exhaust exit ports. In operation, fluidizing gas is forced through the mill, fluidizing the raw material and milling media. The rotating rotor, stator and milling media comminute the raw material to be ground. Small entrained particles may be carried from the mill by the gas through the exit ports when the particles reach a very fine size.

Sadler, III, Leon Y. (Tuscaloosa, AL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

High temperature nuclear gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

Significance of gas turbine cycle, process of the development of gas turbines, cycle and efficiency of high-temperature gas turbines, history of gas turbine plants and application of nuclear gas turbines are described. The gas turbines are directly operated by the heat from nuclear plants. The gas turbines are classified into two types, namely open cycle and closed cycle types from the point of thermal cycle, and into two types of internal combustion and external combustion from the point of heating method. The hightemperature gas turbines are tbe type of internal combustion closed cycle. Principle of the gas turbines of closed cycle and open cycle types is based on Brayton, Sirling, and Ericsson cycles. Etficiency of the turbines is decided only by pressure ratio, and is independent of gas temperature. An example of the turbine cycle for the nuclear plant Gestacht II is explained. The thermal efficiency of that plant attains 37%. Over the gas temperature of about 750 deg C, the thermal efficiency of the gas turbine cycle is better than that of steam turbine cycle. As the nuclear fuel, coated particle fuel is used, and this can attain higher temperature of core outlet gas. Direct coupling of the nuclear power plants and the high temperature gas turbines has possibility of the higher thermal efficiency. (JA)

Kurosawa, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Air Key Points: * Air quality risks from shale oil and gas development are generally the result of: (1) dust and engine exhaust from increased truck traffic; (2) emissions from diesel-powered pumps used to power equipment; (3) intentional flaring or venting of gas for operational reasons; and, (4) unintentional emissions of pollutants from faulty equipment or impoundments. 1 * Natural gas is efficient and clean compared to other fossil fuels, emitting less nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide than coal and oil, no mercury and very few particulates. However, the drilling

318

Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems Speaker(s): Allen Robinson Date: November 11, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Combustion systems such as motor vehicles and power plants are major sources of fine particulate matter. This talk describes some of the changes in fine particle emissions that occur as exhaust from combustion systems mix with background air. This mixing cools and dilutes the exhaust which influences gas-particle partitioning of semi-volatile species, the aerosol size distribution, and the fine particle mass. Dilution sampling is used to characterize fine particle emissions from combustion systems because it simulates the rapid cooling and dilution that occur as exhaust mixes with the atmosphere. Results from dilution sampler

319

Reducing dust emissions at OAO Alchevskkoks coke battery 10A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coke battery 10A with rammed batch is under construction at OAO Alchevskkoks. The design documentation developed by Giprokoks includes measures for reducing dust emissions to the atmosphere. Aspiration systems with dry dust trapping are employed in the new components of coke battery 10A and in the existing coke-sorting equipment. Two-stage purification of dusty air in cyclones and bag filters is employed for the coke-sorting equipment. This system considerably reduces coke-dust emissions to the atmosphere.

T.F. Trembach; E.N. Lanina [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Theoretical Study of the Wet Removal of Atmospheric Pollutants. Part II: The Uptake and Redistribution Of (NH4)2SO4 Particles and SO2 Gas Simultaneously Scavenged by Growing Cloud Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical model has been formulated which allows the processes which control the wet deposition of atmospheric aerosol particles and pollutant gases to be included in cloud dynamic models. The cloud considered in the model was allowed to grow ...

A. I. Flossmann; H. R. Pruppacher; J. H. Topalian

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electromagnetic radiation, motion of a particle and energy-mass relation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equation of motion of an uncharged arbitrarily shaped dust particle under the effects of (stellar) electromagnetic radiation and thermal emission is derived. The resulting relativistically covariant equation of motion is expressed in terms of standard optical parameters. Relations between energy and mass of the incoming and outgoing radiation are obtained, together with relations between radiation energy and mass of the particle. The role of the diffraction nicely fits the relativistic formulation of the momentum of the outgoing radiation. The inequality 0 radiation pressure, integrated over stellar spectrum). The condition for the P-R effect is $\\vec{p}'_{o}$ = (1 - $\\bar{Q}'_{pr, 1} / \\bar{Q}'_{ext}$) $\\vec{p}'_{i}$, where $\\vec{p}'_{i}$ and $\\vec{p}'_{o}$ are incoming and outgoing radiation momenta (per unit time) measured in the proper frame of reference of the particle. The case of "perfectly absorbing spherical dust particle", within geometrical optics approximation, corresponds to the condition $\\vec{p}'_{o}$ = 0.5 $\\vec{p}'_{i}$. As for arbitrarily shaped dust particle, the condition 0 radiation pressure components. The condition can add a new information to the results obtained from observations, measurements and numerical calculations of the optical properties of the particle.

J. Klacka

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Iron Speciation and Mixing in Single Aerosol Particles from the Asian Continental Outflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioavailable iron from atmospheric aerosol is an essential nutrient that can control oceanic productivity, thereby impacting the global carbon budget and climate. Particles collected on Okinawa Island during an atmospheric pollution transport event from China were analyzed using complementary single particle techniques to determine the iron source and speciation. Comparing the spatial distribution of iron within ambient particles and standard Asian mineral dust, it was determined that field-collected atmospheric Fe-containing particles have numerous sources, including anthropogenic sources such as coal combustion. Fe-containing particles were found to be internally mixed with secondary species such as sulfate, soot, and organic carbon. The mass weighted average Fe(II) fraction (defined as Fe(II)/[Fe(II)+Fe(III)]) was determined to be 0.33 {+-} 0.08. Within the experimental uncertainty, this value lies close to the range of 0.26-0.30 determined for representative Asian mineral dust. Previous studies have indicated that the solubility of iron from combustion is much higher than that from mineral dust. Therefore, chemical and/or physical differences other than oxidation state may help explain the higher solubility of iron in atmospheric particles.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Furutani, Hiroshi; Rodel, Tobias; Henn, Tobias R.; Sprau, Peter; Laskin, Alexander; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Gilles, Marry K.

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Recycling EAF Dust with CONTOP Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... The heat transferred to the cyclone cooling system and the off-gas boiler produces steam from which power is generated in a turbine. VAI has ...

324

An experimental study of deflagration to detonation transition supported by dust layers  

SciTech Connect

The roles which dust layers play in severe dust explosions were investigated in a 70-m-long and 30-cm-diameter horizontal Flame Acceleration Tube (FAT) with one end closed and the other end open to the atmosphere. A variety of dusts such as corn dust, cornstarch, Mira Gel starch, wheat dust, and wood flour were layered on the bottom half of the FAT. Flame and detonation propagation parameters were closely monitored at different locations along the FAT. The study demonstrated that the moisture content of the dust, the exposed area of the dust layers to the convective flow, and the physical characteristics of the dust are the factors that most determine the severity of layered dust explosions, indicating that prelayered dust combustion is dominated by the dust/air mixing process. While the dust explosion rate constant K{sub st} can be used to characterize dust explosibility in predispersed dust in constant volume enclosures, it does not appear to characterize the behavior of layered dust explosions. Qualitative measurements of the variation of dust concentration during a layered dust explosion were obtained. The measurements indicated that the dust concentration at the time of flame arrival is highly nonuniform. The maximum pressure rise (P{sub max} {minus} P{sub 0}) within the FAT during a layered dust explosion was found to vary linearly with the flame velocity V{sub f} when V{sub f} is subsonic. As V{sub f} reaches supersonic values the maximum pressure increase was found to vary with the V{sub f}{sup 2}, the square of the flame velocity. This result was found to be independent of dust type and concentration.

Li, Y.C.; Kauffman, C.W.; Sichel, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 5 - Fugitive Dust (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations aim to prevent the release of fugitive dust by forbidding

326

Thermal Impact of Saharan Dust over Land. Part I: Simnulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations are carded out to verify a mesoscale model in order to perform sensitivity tests of satellite response to atmospheric dust content. The model chosen is the mesoscale model of Colorado State University with a modified radiation ...

Guy Cautenet; Michel Legrand; Sylvie Cautenet; Bernard Bonnel; Gérard Brogniez

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A Case Study of Mobilization and Transport of Saharan Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical models of the atmosphere and aerosols are used to investigate mobilization and transport of Saharan dust over West Africa and the tropical Atlantic Ocean for 23–28 August 1974. We have found that mobilization during this period was ...

Douglas L. Westphal; Owen B. Toon; Toby N. Carlson

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Aerobiology and the global transport of desert dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

misconception that all microorganisms in dust clouds are killed by solar UV-radiation, lack of nutrients and desiccation during their multi-day journey. In fact, some genera of bacteria (e.g. Bacillus) and most fungi

Ahmad, Sajjad

329

Metal Dusting [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Metal Dusting Bookmark and Share R&D 100 AWARD The "Materials resistant...

330

Saharan Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing Measured from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses data collected from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments to determine Saharan dust broadband shortwave aerosol radiative forcing over ...

F. Li; A. M. Vogelmann; V. Ramanathan

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Morphological investigations of fibrogenic action of Estonian oil shale dust  

SciTech Connect

A review of morphological investigations carried out to clarify the pathogenicity of industrial dust produced in the mining and processing of Estonian oil shale is given. Histological examination of lungs of workers in the oil shale industry taken at necropsies showed that the inhalation of oil shale dust over a long period (more than 20 years) may cause the development of occupational pneumoconiotic changes in oil shale miners. The pneumoconiotic process develops slowly and is characterized by changes typical of the interstitial form of pneumoconiotic fibrosis in the lungs. Emphysematous changes and chronic bronchitis also occur. The average chemical content of oil shale as well as of samples of oil shale dust generated during mining and sorting procedures is given. The results of experiments in white rats are presented; these studies also indicate a mild fibrogenic action of Estonian oil shale dust.

Kung, V.A.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Dust Accumulation Biases in PIRATA Shortwave Radiation Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term and direct measurements of surface shortwave radiation (SWR) have been recorded by the Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA) since 1997. Previous studies have shown that African dust, transported westward ...

Gregory R. Foltz; Amato T. Evan; H. Paul Freitag; Sonya Brown; Michael J. McPhaden

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Next Century Challenges: Mobile Networking for "Smart Dust"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next Century Challenges: Mobile Networking for "Smart Dust" J. M. Kahn, R. H. Katz (ACM Fellow), K be small enough to remain suspended in air, buoyed by air currents, sensing and communicating for hours

Kahn, Joseph M.

334

Magnetorotational instability in plasmas with mobile dust grains  

SciTech Connect

The magnetorotational instability of dusty plasmas is investigated using the multi-fluid model and the general dispersion relation is derived based on local approximation. The dust grains are found to play an important role in the dispersion relation in the low-frequency mode and exhibit destabilizing effects on the plasma. Both the instability criterion and growth rate are affected significantly by the dust and when the dust is heavy enough to be unperturbed, the reduced dispersion relations are obtained. The instability criteria show that the dust grains have stabilizing effects on the instability when the rotation frequency decreases outwards and conversely lead to destabilizing effects when the rotation frequency increases outwards. The results are relevant to accession and protoplanetary disks.

Ren Haijun [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Cao Jintao [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li Ding [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

A SPITZER SURVEY FOR DUST IN TYPE IIn SUPERNOVAE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations suggest that Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) may exhibit late-time (>100 days) infrared (IR) emission from warm dust more than other types of core-collapse SNe. Mid-IR observations, which span the peak of the thermal spectral energy distribution, provide useful constraints on the properties of the dust and, ultimately, the circumstellar environment, explosion mechanism, and progenitor system. Due to the low SN IIn rate (<10% of all core-collapse SNe), few IR observations exist for this subclass. The handful of isolated studies, however, show late-time IR emission from warm dust that, in some cases, extends for five or six years post-discovery. While previous Spitzer/IRAC surveys have searched for dust in SNe, none have targeted the Type IIn subclass. This paper presents results from a warm Spitzer/IRAC survey of the positions of all 68 known SNe IIn within a distance of 250 Mpc between 1999 and 2008 that have remained unobserved by Spitzer more than 100 days post-discovery. The detection of late-time emission from 10 targets ({approx}15%) nearly doubles the database of existing mid-IR observations of SNe IIn. Although optical spectra show evidence for new dust formation in some cases, the data show that in most cases the likely origin of the mid-IR emission is pre-existing dust, which is continuously heated by optical emission generated by ongoing circumstellar interaction between the forward shock and circumstellar medium. Furthermore, an emerging trend suggests that these SNe decline at {approx}1000-2000 days post-discovery once the forward shock overruns the dust shell. The mass-loss rates associated with these dust shells are consistent with luminous blue variable progenitors.

Fox, Ori D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Chevalier, Roger A.; Skrutskie, Michael F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Soderberg, Alicia M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Nathan; Steele, Thea N., E-mail: ori.d.fox@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Method for producing ceramic particles and agglomerates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating spherical and irregularly shaped dense particles of ceramic oxides having a controlled particle size and particle size distribution. An aerosol containing precursor particles of oxide ceramics is directed into a plasma. As the particles flow through the hot zone of the plasma, they melt, collide, and join to form larger particles. If these larger particles remain in the hot zone, they continue melting and acquire a spherical shape that is retained after they exit the hot zone, cool down, and solidify. If they exit the hot zone before melting completely, their irregular shape persists and agglomerates are produced. The size and size distribution of the dense product particles can be controlled by adjusting several parameters, the most important in the case of powder precursors appears to be the density of powder in the aerosol stream that enters the plasma hot zone. This suggests that particle collision rate is responsible for determining ultimate size of the resulting sphere or agglomerate. Other parameters, particularly the gas flow rates and the microwave power, are also adjusted to control the particle size distribution.

Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Gleiman, Seth S. (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Particle Adventure | Particle decays and annihiliations ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

alphabet: (alpha), (beta), and (gamma). Alpha particles are helium nuclei (2 p, 2 n): Beta particles are speedy electrons: Gamma radiation is a high-energy photon: These three...

338

Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal dusting corrosion has been a serious problem in the petroleum and petrochemical industries, such as reforming and syngas production systems. This form of deterioration has led to worldwide material loss for 50 years. For the past three years, we have studied the mechanism of metal dusting for Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present a correlation between the weight loss and depth of pits that form in Ni-base alloys. Nickel-base alloys were also tested at 1 and 14.8 atm (210 psi), in a high carbon activity environment. Higher system pressure was found to accelerate corrosion in most Ni-base alloys. To reduce testing time, a pre-pitting method was developed. Mechanical scratches on the alloy surface led to fast metal dusting corrosion. We have also developed preliminary data on the performance of weldments of several Ni-base alloys in a metal dusting environment. Finally, Alloy 800 tubes and plates used in a reformer plant were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and Raman spectroscopy. The oxide scale on the surface of the Alloy 800 primarily consists of Fe{sub 1+x}Cr{sub 2-X}O{sub 4} spinel phase with high Fe content. Carbon can diffuse through this oxide scale. It was discovered that the growth of metal dusting pits could be stopped by means of a slightly oxidized alloy surface. This leads to a new way to solve metal dusting problem.

Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenges are Associated with Challenges are Associated with Shale Gas Production? Developing any energy resource - whether conventional or non-conventional like shale - carries with it the possibility and risk of environmental, public health, and safety issues. Some of the challenges related to shale gas production and hydraulic fracturing include: * Increased consumption of fresh water (volume and sources); * Induced seismicity (earthquakes) from shale flowback water disposal;Chemical disclosure of fracture fluid additives; * Potential ground and surface water contamination; * Air quality impacts; * Local impacts, such as the volume of truck traffic, noise, dust and land disturbance.

340

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes for the purification of natural gas .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mixed matrix nanocomposite membranes composed of a crosslinkable polyimide matrix and high-silica molecular sieve particles were developed for purifying natural gas. It was shown that… (more)

Ward, Jason Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boson A particle that has integer intrinsic angular momentum (spin) measured in units of h-bar (spin 0, 1, 2, ...). All particles are either fermions or bosons. The particles...

343

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rest Mass The rest mass (m) of a particle is the mass defined by the energy of the isolated (free) particle at rest, divided by the speed of light squared. When particle physicists...

344

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decay A process in which a particle disappears and in its place different particles appear. The sum of the masses of the produced particles is always less than the mass of the...

345

The Particle Adventure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is this particle really the Higgs... Is this particle really the Higgs Boson? Does it swim and quack like a duck? While decays of this kind had been observed for the new particle...

346

Energy conditions, traversable wormholes and dust shells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Firstly, we review the pointwise and averaged energy conditions, the quantum inequality and the notion of the ``volume integral quantifier'', which provides a measure of the ``total amount'' of energy condition violating matter. Secondly, we present a specific metric of a spherically symmetric traversable wormhole in the presence of a generic cosmological constant, verifying that the null and the averaged null energy conditions are violated, as was to be expected. Thirdly, a pressureless dust shell is constructed around the interior wormhole spacetime by matching the latter geometry to a unique vacuum exterior solution. In order to further minimize the usage of exotic matter, we then find regions where the surface energy density is positive, thereby satisfying all of the energy conditions at the junction surface. An equation governing the behavior of the radial pressure across the junction surface is also deduced. Lastly, taking advantage of the construction, specific dimensions of the wormhole, namely, the throat radius and the junction interface radius, and estimates of the total traversal time and maximum velocity of an observer journeying through the wormhole, are also found by imposing the traversability conditions.

Francisco S. N. Lobo

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

Particle size distribution instrument. Topical report 13  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of an instrument to measure the concentration of particles in gas is described in this report. An in situ instrument was designed and constructed which sizes individual particles and counts the number of occurrences for several size classes. Although this instrument was designed to detect the size distribution of slag and seed particles generated at an experimental coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power facility, it can be used as a nonintrusive diagnostic tool for other hostile industrial processes involving the formation and growth of particulates. Two of the techniques developed are extensions of the widely used crossed beam velocimeter, providing simultaneous measurement of the size distribution and velocity of articles.

Okhuysen, W.; Gassaway, J.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate Nuclear and Particle Physics (NPP) at BNL comprises the Collider-Accelerator Department (including the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory,...

349

Glossary Term - Beta Particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decay Previous Term (Beta Decay) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Bohr Radius) Bohr Radius Beta Particle Beta particles are either electrons or positrons ejected from the nucleus....

350

Glossary Term - Alpha Particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decay Previous Term (Alpha Decay) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Atomic Number) Atomic Number Alpha Particle alphaparticle.gif Produced during alpha decay, an alpha particle is a...

351

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virtual Particle A particle that exists only for an extremely brief instant in an intermediary process. Then the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle allows an apparent violation of...

352

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annihilation A process in which a particle meets its corresponding antiparticle and both disappear. The energy appears in some other form, perhaps as a different particle and its...

353

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chamber The outer layers of a particle detector capable of registering tracks of charged particles. Except for the chargeless neutrinos, only muons reach this layer from the...

354

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hadron A particle made of strongly-interacting constituents (quarks andor gluons). These include the meson and baryons. Such particles participate in residual strong interactions...

355

Particle Physics Booklet 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

212 25. Accelerator physics of colliders ? 26. High-energythe full Review. PARTICLE PHYSICS BOOKLET TABLE OF CONTENTSrev. ) Summary Tables of Particle Physics Gauge and Higgs

et al., C. Amsler

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Small Particles, Big Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Particles, Big Impact Small Particles, Big Impact Small-scale effects of Aerosols Add up Over Time August 24, 2011 | Tags: Climate Research, Earth Sciences, Environmental...

357

Investigation of the sheath formation in a dusty plasma containing energetic electrons and nano-size dust grains  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulations of the stationary multi-fluid equations are used to study the structure of a dusty plasma sheath in the presence of a beam of energetic electrons. It is found that even a small number of energetic electrons can strongly modify the sheath parameters, specially the sheath thickness. Depending on the magnitude of the beam flux, two different regimes of sheath thickness can be recognized; At small beam fluxes, the sheath is in the regime of thin sheath and its thickness grows linearly with the beam flux. As the beam flux increases, at a certain beam energy or beam number density, the sheath demonstrates a sharp transition to the regime of thick sheath where the width is almost three times larger. The beam parameters corresponding to the transition between the two regimes depend on the parameters of the background plasma. The beam transition energy increases with the electron temperature and dust number density while decreases with the dust radius. On the other hand, the beam transition number density is a non-monotonic function of the background plasma number density. The localization of dust particles above the substrate is intensified by the increase in the beam number density.

Foroutan, G.; Akhoundi, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Nanostructure Material Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Can gas in young debris disks be constrained by their radial brightness profiles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disks around young stars are known to evolve from optically thick, gas-dominated protoplanetary disks to optically thin, almost gas-free debris disks. It is thought that the primordial gas is largely removed at ages of ~10 Myr, but it is difficult to discern the true gas densities from gas observations. This suggests using observations of dust: it has been argued that gas, if present with higher densities, would lead to flatter radial profiles of the dust density and surface brightness than those actually observed. However, here we show that these profiles are surprisingly insensitive to variation of the parameters of a central star, location of the dust-producing planetesimal belt, dustiness of the disk and - most importantly - the parameters of the ambient gas. This result holds for a wide range of gas densities (three orders of magnitude), for different radial distributions of the gas temperature, and different gas compositions. The brightness profile slopes of -3...-4 we find are the same that were theore...

Krivov, Alexander V; Brandeker, Alexis; Thébault, Philippe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Formulation of Non-steady-state Dust Formation Process in Astrophysical Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-steady-state formation of small clusters and the growth of grains accompanied by chemical reactions are formulated under the consideration that the collision of key gas species (key molecule) controls the kinetics of dust formation process. The formula allows us to evaluate the size distribution and condensation efficiency of dust formed in astrophysical environments. We apply the formulation to the formation of C and MgSiO3 grains in the ejecta of supernovae, as an example, to investigate how the non-steady effect influences the formation process, condensation efficiency f_{con}, and average radius a_{ave} of newly formed grains in comparison with the results calculated with the steady-state nucleation rate. We show that the steady-state nucleation rate is a good approximation if the collision timescale of key molecule tau_{coll} is much smaller than the timescale tau_{sat} with which the supersaturation ratio increases; otherwise the effect of the non-steady state becomes remarkable, leading to a lo...

Nozawa, Takaya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Physics Out Loud - Particle Resonance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Accelerator Previous Video (Particle Accelerator) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Photomultiplier Tube) Photomultiplier Tube Particle Resonance How is a particle...

362

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a wide variety of laboratory analyses during the past quarter. As with most of the work we performed during the previous quarter, our recent efforts were primarily directed toward the determination of the effects of adsorbed water on the cohesivity and tensile strength of powders. We also continued our analyses of dust cake ashes that have had the soluble compounds leached from their particle surfaces by repeated washings with water. Our analyses of leached and unleached dust cake ashes continued to provide some interesting insights into effects that compounds adsorbed on surfaces of ash particles can have on bulk ash behavior. As suggested by our literature review, our data indicate that water adsorption depends on particle morphology and on surface chemistry. Our measurements of tensile strength show, that for many of the samples we have analyzed a relative minimum in tensile strength exists for samples conditioned and tested at about 30% relative humidity. In our examinations of the effects of water conditioning on sample cohesivity, we determined that in the absence of absorption of water into the interior of the particles, cohesivity usually increases sharply when environments having relative humidities above 75% are used to condition and test the samples. Plans are under way to condition selected samples with (NH[sub 4])[sub 2]SO[sub 4], NH[sub 4]HSO[sub 4], CaCl[sub 2], organosiloxane, and SO[sub 3]. Pending approval, we will begin these conditioning experiments, and subsequent analyses of the conditioned samples.

Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

On the Flux of Extra-Solar Dust in Earth's Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micron size extrasolar dust particles have been convincingly detected by satellites. Larger extrasolar meteoroids (5-35 microns) have most likely been detected by ground based radar at Arecibo and New Zealand. We present estimates of the minimum detectable particle sizes and collecting areas for both radar systems. We show that particles larger than about 10 microns can propagate for tens of parsecs through the interstellar medium, opening up the possibility that ground based radar systems can detect AGB stars, young stellar objects such as T Tauri stars, and debris disks around Vega-like stars. We provide analytical and numerical estimates of the ejection velocity in the case of a debris disk interacting with a Jupiter mass planet. We provide rough estimates of the flux of large micrometeoroids from all three classes of sources. Current radar systems are unlikely to detect significant numbers of meteors from debris disks such as Beta Pictoris. However, we suggest improvements to radar systems that should allow for the detection of multiple examples of all three classes.

Norman Murray; Joe Weingartner; Paul Capobianco

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

First-principles investigations of Ni3Al(111) and NiAl(110) surfaces at metal dusting conditions  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the structure and surface composition of the {gamma}{prime}-Ni{sub 3}Al(111) and {beta}-NiAl(110) alloy surfaces at conditions relevant for metal dusting corrosion related to catalytic steam reforming of natural gas. In regular service as protective coatings, nickel-aluminum alloys are protected by an oxide scale, but in case of oxide scale spallation, the alloy surface may be directly exposed to the reactive gas environment and vulnerable to metal dusting. By means of density functional theory and thermochemical calculations for both the Ni{sub 3}Al and NiAl surfaces, the conditions under which CO and OH adsorption is to be expected and under which it is inhibited, are mapped out. Because CO and OH are regarded as precursors for nucleating graphite or oxide on the surfaces, phase diagrams for the surfaces provide a simple description of their stability. Specifically, this study shows how the CO and OH coverages depend on the steam to carbon ratio (S/C) in the gas and thereby provide a ranking of the carbon limits on the different surface phases.

Saadi, Souheil

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group Kelvin Building, University indices (silica aerogel for low momentum tracks, gaseous C 4 F 10 for intermediate momentum and CF 4 gas

Glasgow, University of

366

Investigation of the optical and cloud forming properties of pollution, biomass burning, and mineral dust aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation describes the use of measured aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopic growth to examine the physical and chemical properties of several particle classes. The primary objective of this work was to investigate the optical and cloud forming properties of a range of ambient aerosol types measured in a number of different locations. The tool used for most of these analyses is a differential mobility analyzer / tandem differential mobility analyzer (DMA / TDMA) system developed in our research group. To collect the data described in two of the chapters of this dissertation, an aircraft-based version of the DMA / TDMA was deployed to Japan and California. The data described in two other chapters were conveniently collected during a period when the aerosol of interest came to us. The unique aspect of this analysis is the use of these data to isolate the size distributions of distinct aerosol types in order to quantify their optical and cloud forming properties. I used collected data during the Asian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) to examine the composition and homogeneity of a complex aerosol generated in the deserts and urban regions of China and other Asian countries. An aircraft-based TDMA was used for the first time during this campaign to examine the size-resolved hygroscopic properties of the aerosol. The Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM-2003) study was designed both to evaluate the degree to which models can predict the long-range transport of Asian dust, and to examine the physical and optical properties of that aged dust upon reaching the California coast. Aerosol size distributions and hygroscopic growth were measured in College Station, Texas to investigate the cloud nucleating and optical properties of a biomass burning aerosol generated from fires on the Yucatan Peninsula. Measured aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopicity and volatility were used to infer critical supersaturation distributions of the distinct particle types that were observed during this period. The predicted cloud condensation nuclei concentrations were used in a cloud model to determine the impact of the different aerosol types on the expected cloud droplet concentration. RH-dependent aerosol extinction coefficients were also calculated.

Lee, Yong Seob

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Spitzer search for cold dust within globular clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globular cluster stars evolving off the main sequence are known to lose mass, and it is expected that some of the lost material should remain within the cluster as an intracluster medium (ICM). Most attempts to detect such an ICM have been unsuccessful. The Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on the Spitzer Space Telescope was used to observe eight Galactic globular clusters in an attempt to detect the thermal emission from ICM dust. Most clusters do not have significant detections at 70 microns; one cluster, NGC 6341, has tentative evidence for the presence of dust, but 90 micron observations do not confirm the detection. Individual 70 micron point sources which appear in several of the cluster images are likely to be background galaxies. The inferred dust mass and upper limits are solar masses, well below expectations for cluster dust production from mass loss in red and asymptotic giant branch stars. This implies that either globular cluster dust production is less efficient, or that ICM rem...

Barmby, P; Woodward, C E; Gehrz, R D; van Loon, J Th; Fazio, G G; Marengo, M; Polomski, E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Particle Bed Reactor scaling relationships  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scaling relationships for Particle Bed Reactors (PBRs) are discussed. The particular applications are short duration systems, i.e., for propulsion or burst power. Particle Bed Reactors can use a wide selection of different moderators and reflectors and be designed for such a wide range of power and bed power densities. Additional design considerations include the effect of varying the number of fuel elements, outlet Mach number in hot gas channel, etc. All of these variables and options result in a wide range of reactor weights and performance. Extremely light weight reactors (approximately 1 kg/MW) are possible with the appropriate choice of moderator/reflector and power density. Such systems are very attractive for propulsion systems where parasitic weight has to be minimized.

Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F.L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Dispersion relations of externally and thermally excited dust lattice modes in 2D complex plasma crystals  

SciTech Connect

The dispersion relations of the externally and thermally (naturally) excited dust lattice modes (both longitudinal and transverse) in two-dimensional Debye-Yukawa complex plasma crystals are investigated. The dispersion relations are calculated numerically by taking the neutral gas damping effects into account and the numerical results are in agreement with the experimental data given by Nunomura et al.[Phys. Rev. E 65, 066402 (2002)]. It is found that for the mode excited by an external disturbance with a real frequency, the dispersion properties are changed at a critical frequency near where the group velocity of the mode goes to zero. Therefore, the high frequency branch with negative dispersion cannot be reached. In contrast, for the thermally excited mode, the dispersion curve can extend all the way to the negative dispersion region, while a 'cut-off' wave number exists at the long wavelength end of the dispersion in the transverse mode.

Yang Xuefeng; Cui Jian; Zhang Yuan [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Yue [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cooling flows, central galaxy--cluster alignments, X-ray absorption and dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis of pointed ROSAT PSPC observations of five of the most luminous, intermediate redshift ($0.1 cooling flows. The alignment between CCGs and their host clusters has been investigated. For those clusters with cooling flows, the position angles of the X-ray emission from the clusters and the optical emission from the CCGs agrees within 5 degrees. For the one probable non-cooling flow cluster in the sample, Abell 2208, the alignment is significantly poorer. We examine the evidence for intrinsic X-ray absorption in the clusters. The X-ray spectra for Abell 1068 and Abell 1664 show that the cooling flows in these clusters are intrinsically absorbed by equivalent hydrogen column densities $\\geq 10^{21} atom cm$^{-2}$. The optical spectra of the CCGs in these clusters exhibit substantial intrinsic reddening, at levels consistent with the X-ray absorption results if standard dust to gas ratios are assumed.

S. W. Allen; A. C. Fabian; A. C. Edge; H. Bohringer; D. A. White

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

Smoke and Dust Particles of Meteoric Origin in the Mesosphere and Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A height profile of ablated mass from meteors is calculated, assuming an incoming mass of 10?16 g cm?2 s?1 (44 metric tons per day) and the velocity distribution of Southworth and Sekanina, which has a mean of 14.5 km s?1. The profile peaks at 84 ...

Donald M. Hunten; Richard P. Turco; Owen B. Toon

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Heterogeneous chemistry of atmospheric mineral dust particles and their resulting cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice nucleation in ice and mixed- phase clouds are: 1. WhatWhat is the phase, hygroscopicity, and warm and ice cloudmixed phase clouds, while cirrus clouds are composed of ice

Sullivan, Ryan Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Particle Adventure | Particle decays and annihiliations ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

like everyday objects and have momentum, but they also have wave properties. Quantum mechanics, the mathematical basis for our theories about particles, explains the behavior of...

374

The Particle Adventure | Particle decays and annihiliations ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle decays and annihiliations - Electron positron annhiliation When an electron and positron (antielectron) collide at high energy, they can annihilate to produce charm...

375

Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode  

SciTech Connect

The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

Jiang Ke; Li Yangfang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Protection of lithographic components from particle contamination  

SciTech Connect

A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Lafayette, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Infrared Emission from Interstellar Dust. III. The Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The infrared (IR) emission from interstellar dust in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is modelled using a mixture of amorphous silicate and carbonaceous grains, including a population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. (1) It is shown that this dust model is able to reproduce the spectral energy distribution from near-IR to far-IR for the entire SMC Bar region, provided the PAH abundance in the SMC Bar region is very low. (2) The IR spectrum of the SMCB1#1 molecular cloud can also be reproduced by our dust model provided the PAH abundance is increased relative to the overall SMC Bar. The PAHs in SMCB1#1 incorporate ~3% of the SMC C abundance, compared to environmental conditions. Other possibilities such as super-hydrogenation of PAHs and softening of the starlight spectrum are also discussed.

Aigen Li; B. T. Draine

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Lithium Wall Conditioning And Surface Dust Detection On NSTX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium evaporation onto NSTX plasma facing components (PFC) has resulted in improved energy confinement, and reductions in the number and amplitude of edge-localized modes (ELMs) up to the point of complete ELM suppression. The associated PFC surface chemistry has been investigated with a novel plasma material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface analysis station. Analysis has demonstrated that binding of D atoms to the polycrystalline graphite material of the PFCs is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular deuterium atoms become weakly bonded near lithium atoms themselves bound to either oxygen or the carbon from the underlying material. Surface dust inside NSTX has been detected in real-time using a highly sensitive electrostatic dust detector. In a separate experiment, electrostatic removal of dust via three concentric spiral-shaped electrodes covered by a dielectric and driven by a high voltage 3-phase waveform was evaluated for potential application to fusion reactors

Skinner, C H; Bell, M G; Friesen, F.Q.L.; Heim, B; Jaworski, M A; Kugel, H; Maingi, R; Rais, B

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

Phenomena of spin rotation and oscillation of particles (atoms, molecules) containing in a trap blowing on by wind of high energy particles in storage ring - new method of measuring of spin-dependent part of zero-angle coherent scattering amplitude  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New experiment arrangement to study spin rotation and oscillation of particles of gas target through which beam of high energy particles passes is discussed. Such experiment arrangement make it realizable for storage ring and allows to study zero-angle scattering amplitude at highest possible energies. Life-time of particle beam in storage ring can reach several hours and even days. Life-time of particle in gas target (gas trap) is long too. Particles circulate in storage ring with frequency $\

Vladimir Baryshevsky

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

380

Westinghouse Advanced Particle Filter System  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) are being developed and demonstrated for commercial, power generation application. Hot gas particulate filters are key components for the successful implementation of IGCC and PFBC in power generation gas turbine cycles. The objective of this work is to develop and qualify through analysis and testing a practical hot gas ceramic barrier filter system that meets the performance and operational requirements of PFBC and IGCC systems. This paper reports on the development and status of testing of the Westinghouse Advanced Hot Gas Particle Filter (W-APF) including: W-APF integrated operation with the American Electric Power, 70 MW PFBC clean coal facility--approximately 6000 test hours completed; approximately 2500 hours of testing at the Hans Ahlstrom 10 MW PCFB facility located in Karhula, Finland; over 700 hours of operation at the Foster Wheeler 2 MW 2nd generation PFBC facility located in Livingston, New Jersey; status of Westinghouse HGF supply for the DOE Southern Company Services Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama; the status of the Westinghouse development and testing of HGF`s for Biomass Power Generation; and the status of the design and supply of the HGF unit for the 95 MW Pinon Pine IGCC Clean Coal Demonstration.

Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Sanjana, Z.N.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Dust Tracking Using Composite Visible/IR Images: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible and infrared (IR) images from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer are composited to improve the depiction of airborne dust over coastlines. On IR images, wind-raised dust ...

Thomas F. Lee

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Integrated impact analysis of yellow-dust storms : a regional case study in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dust storm is a meteorological event that is caused by strong winds and proceeds from arid and semi-arid regions, transporting a thick cloud of fine sediments. In China, the sediments of dust storms mainly come from ...

Ai, Ning, 1978-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Multidecadal Covariability of North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature, African Dust, Sahel Rainfall, and Atlantic Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most studies of African dust and North Atlantic climate have been limited to the short time period since the satellite era (1980 onward), precluding the examination of their relationship on longer time scales. Here a new dust dataset with the ...

Chunzai Wang; Shenfu Dong; Amato T. Evan; Gregory R. Foltz; Sang-Ki Lee

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Radiative Effects of Airborne Dust on Regional Energy Budgets at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of dust on the radiative energy budget at the top of the atmosphere were investigated using model calculations and measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Estimates of the dust optical depth were made from ...

Steven A. Ackerman; Hyosang Chung

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Particle Physics Education Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

쭺-¶ 쭺-¶ Particle Physics Education Sites ¡]¥H¤U¬°¥~¤åºô¯¸¡^ quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites - Physics Alliance - Accelerators at National Laboratories icon Particle Physics Education and Information sites: top Introduction: The Particle Adventure - an interactive tour of particle physics for everyone: the basics of theory and experiment. Virtual Visitor Center of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Guided Tour of Fermilab, - overviews of several aspects of Particle Physics. Also check out Particle Physics concepts. Probing Particles - a comprehensive and straight-forward introduction to particle physics. Big Bang Science - approaches particle physics starting from the theoretical origin of the universe.

386

Laser particle sorter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

389

Thermodynamics of resonances and blurred particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exact and approximate expressions for thermodynamic characteristics of heated matter, which consists of particles with finite mass-widths, are constructed. They are expressed in terms of Fermi/Bose distributions and spectral functions, rather than in terms of more complicated combinations between real and imaginary parts of the self-energies of different particle species. Therefore thermodynamically consistent approximate treatment of systems of particles with finite mass-widths can be performed, provided spectral functions of particle species are known. Approximation of the free resonance gas at low densities is studied. Simple ansatz for the energy dependence of the spectral function is suggested that allows to fulfill thermodynamical consistency conditions. On examples it is shown that a simple description of dense systems of interacting particle species can be constructed, provided some species can be treated in the quasiparticle approximation and others as particles with widths. The interaction affects quasiparticle contributions, whereas particles with widths can be treated as free. Example is considered of a hot gas of heavy fermions strongly interacting with light bosons, both species with zero chemical potentials. The density of blurred fermions is dramatically increased for high temperatures compared to the standard Boltzmann value. The system consists of boson quasiparticles (with effective masses) interacting with fermion -- antifermion blurs. In thermodynamical values interaction terms partially compensate each other. Thereby, in case of a very strong coupling between species thermodynamical quantities of the system, like the energy, pressure and entropy, prove to be such as for the quasi-ideal gas mixture of quasi-free fermion blurs and quasi-free bosons.

D. N. Voskresensky

2008-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

February 20, 1991 Thermalization of high Energy Particles in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revised February 20, 1991 Thermalization of high Energy Particles in a Cold Gas K.T. Waldeer and H to be answered are as to the thermalization time, the temporal evolution of the energy spectra of the gas T . We ask for the thermalization time and the temporal evolution of the energy spectra. We

Waldeer, Thomas

392

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group Kelvin Building, University­taking conditions are described. An analysis of the detector performance, using silica aerogel, air and C 4 F 10 gas tag of B mesons using kaons. The RICH­1 detector [1--3] combines gas and aerogel radiators to provide

Glasgow, University of

393

The Diurnal and Seasonal Cycles of Wind-Borne Dust over Africa North of the Equator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a study of the diurnal and seasonal cycles of dust over North Africa, using surface visibility as an indicator of dust. The diurnal cycle shows a reduction of visibility during the daytime hours in the areas where dust is ...

G. N’Tchayi Mbourou; J. J. Bertrand; S. E. Nicholson

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

COAMPS Real-Time Dust Storm Forecasting during Operation Iraqi Freedom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dust storms are a significant weather phenomenon in the Iraq region in winter and spring. Real-time dust forecasting using the U.S. Navy’s Coupled Ocean–Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) with an in-line dust aerosol model was ...

Ming Liu; Douglas L. Westphal; Annette L. Walker; Teddy R. Holt; Kim A. Richardson; Steven D. Miller

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Particle-jet interactions in an MHD second stage combustor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Argonne two-phase combustion flow computer code is used to simulate reacting flows to aid in the development of an advanced combustor for magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two- dimensional, steady state, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for multiple gas species and particles. The combustion code includes turbulence, integral combustion, and particle evaporation submodels. A recently developed integral combustion submodel makes calculations more efficient and more stable while still preserving the major physical effects of the complex combustion processes. The combustor under investigation is a magnetohydrodynamic second stage combustor in which opposed jets of oxidizer are injected into a confined cross-stream of hot coal gas flow following a first stage swirl combustor. The simulation is intended to enhance the understanding the of seed particle evaporation in the combustor and evaluate the effects of combustor operating conditions on seed particle evaporation and vapor dispersion, which directly affect overall magnetohydrodynamic power generation. Computation results show that oxidizer jet angle and particle size may greatly affect particle evaporation and vapor dispersion. At a jet angle about 130 degrees, particle evaporation rate is the highest because of the highest average gas temperature. As particle size increases beyond 10 microns in diameter, the effects of particle size on wall deposition rate, evaporation delay, and downstream seed vapor dispersion become more pronounced. 16 refs., 10 figs.

Lottes, S.A.; Chang, S.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Particle-jet interactions in an MHD second stage combustor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Argonne two-phase combustion flow computer code is used to simulate reacting flows to aid in the development of an advanced combustor for magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two- dimensional, steady state, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for multiple gas species and particles. The combustion code includes turbulence, integral combustion, and particle evaporation submodels. A recently developed integral combustion submodel makes calculations more efficient and more stable while still preserving the major physical effects of the complex combustion processes. The combustor under investigation is a magnetohydrodynamic second stage combustor in which opposed jets of oxidizer are injected into a confined cross-stream of hot coal gas flow following a first stage swirl combustor. The simulation is intended to enhance the understanding the of seed particle evaporation in the combustor and evaluate the effects of combustor operating conditions on seed particle evaporation and vapor dispersion, which directly affect overall magnetohydrodynamic power generation. Computation results show that oxidizer jet angle and particle size may greatly affect particle evaporation and vapor dispersion. At a jet angle about 130 degrees, particle evaporation rate is the highest because of the highest average gas temperature. As particle size increases beyond 10 microns in diameter, the effects of particle size on wall deposition rate, evaporation delay, and downstream seed vapor dispersion become more pronounced. 16 refs., 10 figs.

Lottes, S.A.; Chang, S.L.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Existence domains of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the traditional Sagdeev pseudopotential approach, the existence of large amplitude solitons is investigated for a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons. The lower and upper soliton Mach number limitations are determined as a function of various parameters and physical reasons are provided as to why these Mach number limits occur. Some regions in parameter space have been identified where only negative or positive solitons occur, whereas, other regions support the coexistence of both positive and negative potential solitons.

Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Large amplitude dust-acoustic double layers in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of large amplitude double layers in a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons is investigated using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. Both positive potential and negative potential double layers are found to be supported by the model. The variation of the maximum amplitudes of the double layers and corresponding Mach numbers are examined as a function of various plasma parameters. In particular, we investigate to what extent ion non-thermal effects are required for positive potential double layers to occur.

Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

HD and H2 formation in low-metallicity dusty gas clouds at high reshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context: The HD and H2 molecules play important roles in the cooling of primordial and very metal-poor gas at high redshift. Aims: Grain surface and gas phase formation of HD and H2 is investigated to assess the importance of trace amounts of dust, 10^{-5}-10^{-3} Zo, in the production of HD and H2. Methods: We consider carbonaceous and silicate grains and include both physisorption and chemisorption, tunneling, and realistic grain surface barriers. We find, for a collapsing gas cloud environment with coupled chemical and thermal balance, that dust abundances as small as 10^{-5} solar lead to a strong boost in the H2 formation rate due to surface reactions. As a result of this enhancement in H2, HD is formed more efficiently in the gas phase through the D+ +H2 reaction. Direct formation of HD on dust grains cannot compete well with this gas phase process for dust temperatures below 150 K. We also derive up-to-date analytic fitting formulae for the grain surface formation of H2 and HD, including the different ...

Cazaux, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

402

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

403

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

404

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

405

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

406

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

407

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

408

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

409

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

410

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermion Any particle that has odd-half-integer (12, 32, ...) intrinsic angular momentum (spin), measured in units of h-bar. All particles are either fermions or bosons. Fermions...

411

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interaction A process in which a particle decays or it responds to a force due to the presence of another particle (as in a collision). The four fundamental interactions are...

412

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pauli Exclusion Principle The principle that no two particles in the same quantum state may exist in the same place at the same time. Particles that obey this principle are called...

413

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle A particle with no internal substructure. In the Standard Model the quarks, leptons, photons, gluons, W+ and W- bosons, and the Z bosons are fundamental. All other objects...

414

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antiparticle For most particle types (and every fermion type) there is another particle type that has exactly the same mass but the opposite value of all other charges (quantum...

415

SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON ~m Small Particle Heat Exchangers Arion J. Hunt June 1978d. LBL 7841 Small Particle Heat Exchangers by Arlon J. Huntgenerally to non-solar heat exchangers. These may be of the

Hunt, A.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Particle Adventure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boson - 2 Finding the Mass of the Higgs Boson - Part 2 Adding up the masses of the particles from the Higgs decay doesn't work, because these particles have enormous kinetic energy...

417

An observational Study of the “Interstate 5” Dust Storm Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 29 November 1991 a series of collisions involving 164 vehicles occurred on Interstate 5 in the San Joaquin Valley in California in a dust storm that reduced the visibility to near zero. The accompanying high surface winds are hypothesized to ...

Patricia M. Pauley; Nancy L. Baker; Edward H. Barker

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF DUST ABUNDANCES ACROSS THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD  

SciTech Connect

Using the data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) legacy survey, we have studied the variations of the dust composition and abundance across the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Such variations are expected, as the explosive events which have lead to the formation of the many H I shells observed should have affected the dust properties. Using a model and comparing with a reference spectral energy distribution from our Galaxy, we deduce the relative abundance variations of small dust grains across the LMC. We examined the infrared color ratios as well as the relative abundances of very small grains (VSGs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) relative to the big grain abundance. Results show that each dust component could have different origins or evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). The VSG abundance traces the star formation activity and could result from shattering of larger grains, whereas the PAH abundance increases around molecular clouds as well as in the stellar bar, where they could have been injected into the ISM during mass loss from old stars.

Paradis, Deborah; Reach, William T. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, CESR, 9 av. du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Chad W.; Gordon, Karl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hora, Joseph L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-65, Cambridge, MA, 02138-1516 (United States); Indebetouw, Remy [7 National Radio Astronomy Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903-0818 (United States); Kawamura, Akiko [Nagoya University, Department of Astrophysics, Chikusa-Ku, Nagoya, 464-01 (Japan); Meade, Marilyn [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Vijh, Uma P. [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Volk, Kevin [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. Aohuku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Dust and the ultraviolet energy distribution of quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ultraviolet energy distribution of quasars shows a sharp steepening of the continuum shortward of 1000 A (rest-frame). We describe how we came to consider the possibility that this continuum break might be the result of absorption by carbon crystallite dust grains.

Luc Binette; Christophe Morisset; Sinhue Haro-Corzo

2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Simulation of Transport and Removal Processes of the Saharan Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A planetary boundary layer (PBL) model has been modified to include a Saharan air layer containing the bulk of Saharan dust. The Saharan air layer is recognized as a deep mixed layer which extends up to 4–6 km during hot summer months and is ...

In-Young Lee

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dust particles gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

422

Doppler Radar Observations of Dust Devils in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of a dust-devil dataset collected in northwest Texas are presented. The data were collected just above the ground at close range with a mobile, W-band (3-mm wavelength) Doppler radar having an azimuthal (radial) resolution of 3–5 m (30 m)...

Howard B. Bluestein; Christopher C. Weiss; Andrew L. Pazmany

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron A type of circular accelerator in which the particles travel in synchronized bunches at fixed radius...

424

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois (near Chicago). Named for particle physics pioneer Enrico Fermi...

425

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERN CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics) is the major European international accelerator laboratory located near Geneva, Switzerland...

426

The Particle Adventure | Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracking The reconstruction of a "track" left in a detector by the passage of a particle through the...

427

The Particle Adventure | How do we experiment with tiny particles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators and particle detectors - How do we experiment with tiny particles? - How to obtain particles to accelerate Electrons: Heating a metal causes electrons to be ejected. A...

428

The Particle Adventure | How do we experiment with tiny particles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators and particle detectors - How do we experiment with tiny particles? - Detector shapes Physicists are curious about the events that occur during and after a particle's...

429

Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Measurements in a Residence Title Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Measurements in a Residence Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., and Federico Noris Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Particulate matter (PM) is a contaminant of concern in many indoor environments, including residential and commercial buildings. Health guidelines for exposure to particles are in units of mass concentrations. Relative to time-integrated mass measurements collected on filters, real-time particle counters are less time-consuming to operate. Studies found reasonable correlation between these two measurement techniques, but agreement may vary in different sampling environments, and depends on the instruments used. We performed a side-by-side comparison of particle counts and mass concentrations estimated by three types of real-time instruments: MetOne BT-637 optical particle counter (OPC), TSI DustTrak aerosol monitor, and TSI aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer. In addition to these real-time instruments, time-integrated particle mass was also collected using PM2.5 and PM10 Personal Environmental Monitors (PEMs) manufactured by SKC. Sampling was conducted for two consecutive days in an occupied single-family house in Berkeley, California. Concentration profiles had similar trends, with DustTraks reporting higher particle mass concentrations, partially explained by the density value assumed in the calibration. We made assumptions for particle size and density to calculate the PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations for the MetOne and APS, and compared with the filter-based measurements. Despite uncertainties and assumptions, there was generally good agreement for the different methods.

430

Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Zboray, James A. (Irvine, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Research on Very High Temperature Gas Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very high temperature gas reactors are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated advanced reactors that show potential for generating low-cost electricity via gas turbines or cogeneration with process-heat applications. This investigation addresses the development status of advanced coatings for nuclear-fuel particles and high-temperature structural materials and evaluates whether these developments are likely to lead to economically competitive applications of the very high temperature gas reactor concept.

1991-08-08T23:59:59.000Z