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Sample records for dupont danisco cellulosic

  1. DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsAreafor Geothermal Resources Rules - IdahoDruidApollo

  2. DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise Plenary I: Progress in Advanced...

  3. DuPont's Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DuPont's Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for the Advanced Biofuels Industry DuPont's Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for the Advanced Biofuels...

  4. DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Plenary I: Progress in Advanced Biofuels DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise William Provine, Director–Science and Technology External Affairs, DuPont

  5. Novel Biomass Conversion Process Results in Commercial Joint Venture; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    Fact sheet describing DuPont/NREL cooperative research and development agreement that resulted in biomass-to-ethanol conversion process used as a basis for DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, LLC and cellulosic ethanol demonstration plant.

  6. DuPont Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery Opening | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeCommunication &20081-929-200499Actof20142007ofDepartmentDraftLandDraftDryingDuPont

  7. Three Essays on Bioenergy Production in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wlodarz, Marta

    2013-12-02

    . ............................................................................. 20 8. Projected ethanol price and cost of satisfying cellulosic mandate per gallon (Annual Energy Outlook gasoline price projection is for Free On Board (F.O.B.) rack gasoline price... ethanol more cost-effective. Furthermore, several companies (e.g. BP, Coskata, DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, Range Fuels, Poet) have been considering cellulosic ethanol production (EPA 2009). , So far, none of them has achieved lignocellulosic...

  8. DuPont Parlin Energy Conservation Team 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derer, R.; Pollock, M.; Mumink, B.; Guidry, V.; Kersch, J.

    2015-01-01

    Conservation Mike Pollock DuPont Engineering Energy Operations Consultant IETC – 2015 New Orleans, LA ESL-IE-15-06-03 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 2? Central NJ location... conservation efforts have been assertive Site Overview 2 ESL-IE-15-06-03 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 3Context of Efforts ? Business functions under constant pressure to reduce costs...

  9. DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delaware-based DuPont is working to develop ultra-thin moisture protective films for photovoltaic panels — so thin they’re about 1,000 times thinner than a human hair.

  10. DuPont Approach to Energy Management: A System Wide Approach to Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    : C&S Unit Improvement DuPont Canada 27.5% DuPont Europe 19.6% DuPont Mexico 15.1% DuPont United States 8.4% The balance of this paper describes the DuPont Company-wide approach that has been used to facilitate these improvements in energy... and leveraging of energy "best practices", recognizing individuals and groups for energy savings, publishing a company wide energy newsletter, maintaining a website on the company intranet, performing engineering studies, conducting intemal and external...

  11. Energy Secretary Chu to Tour DuPont Clean Energy Innovation Facilities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    energy research and development facilities, including innovative work on advanced biofuels. Secretary Chu will highlight how companies like DuPont are helping the United States...

  12. DuPont's Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us|ofElizabeth Sherwood-RandallAdvanced Biofuels

  13. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  14. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  15. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  16. Cellulose in Cyanobacteria. Origin of Vascular Plant Cellulose Synthase?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown Jr., R. Malcolm

    Cellulose in Cyanobacteria. Origin of Vascular Plant Cellulose Synthase? David R. Nobles, Dwight K of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 Although cellulose biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria has been suggested previously, we present the first conclusive evidence, to our knowledge, of the presence of cellulose

  17. DuPont Displays Develops Low-Cost Method of Printing OLED Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DuPont Displays Inc. (DDI) has developed a novel way of printing color-tunable OLED lighting panels that keeps manufacturing costs low. The method involves processing the organic layers from solution, with most of the process steps taking place under atmospheric conditions rather than in a high vacuum. Industry-standard slot-coating methods are used in conjunction with nozzle printing—in which the solutions of organic materials are continuously jetted through an array of nozzles moving at high speed—allowing the light-emitting materials to be spatially patterned.

  18. Outgassing rate of Reemay Spunbonded Polyester and DuPont Double Aluminized Mylar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.J.; Pate, D.; Welch, K.M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents the outgassing rates of two commercially available multi-layer insulation (MLI) materials commonly used in cryogenic applications. Both Reemay Spunbonded Polyester and DuPont Double Aluminized Mylar (DAM) were studied for outgassing species and respective rates, and the total amount of outgassed material. Measurements were made using a Fixed Aperture Technique. A sample was pumped on through an aperture of known size with a turbomolecular pump. Pressure vs. time was plotted for both Reemay and DAM, as well as the baseline system, and data conveniently extrapolated to {approx}1,000 hrs. A quadrupole residual gas analyzer was used to measure the outgassing species.

  19. Manhattan Project: DuPont and Hanford, Hanford Engineer Works, 1942

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy ofArticle)SciTechNorris Bradbury, RobertThe president of DuPont,

  20. Advanced Cellulosic Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cellulosic Biofuels Advanced Cellulosic Biofuels Breakout Session 2-B: NewEmerging Pathways Advanced Cellulosic Biofuels Dr. Robert Graham, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman,...

  1. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

    1983-05-13

    A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  2. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric A. (Brookline, MA); Demain, Arnold L. (Wellesley, MA); Madia, Ashwin (Decatur, IL)

    1985-09-10

    A method of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of a reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  3. Cellulose-Bound Magnesium Diboride Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    Cellulose-Bound Magnesium Diboride Superconductivity Y.L. Lin and M.O. Pekguleryuz Department a cellulose based polymer. Cellulose tends to react only very weekly and is very robust, hence constitutes

  4. Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2010, Verenium...

  5. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  6. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  7. Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

    2012-05-01

    This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

  8. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Myles A. (Falmouth, MA); Morris, Robert S. (Fairhaven, MA)

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

  9. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, M.A.; Morris, R.S.

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorption agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure. 3 figs.

  10. Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fed. Sci. Tech. Inform., AD 1968, AD-676351, 44 pp. 194. Kwang-Shaun Huang, Kee-Chuan Pan and Chao-Nan Perng, "Pyrolysis of Cellulose. I. Effect of Diamrnonium Phos- phate...

  11. Identification of a cellulose synthase-associated protein required for cellulose biosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskin, Tobias

    Identification of a cellulose synthase-associated protein required for cellulose biosynthesis Ying, Stanford, CA 94305 Contributed by Chris R. Somerville, May 24, 2010 (sent for review May 8, 2010) Cellulose with cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms involved in primary plant cell wall synthesis. CSI1 encodes a 2,150-amino

  12. Cellulose degradation system of Cytophaga hutchinsonii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chao-Kuo

    2012-11-30

    In this project, Cytophaga hutchinsonii, an aerobic gliding bacterium with cellulose-degrading ability, was studied, since its cellulase system was unknown and might be very different from those of other cellulose-degrading ...

  13. Compositions for saccharification of cellulosic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBrayer, Brett; Shaghasi, Tarana; Vlasenko, Elena

    2013-11-12

    The present invention relates to enzyme compositions for high temperature saccharification of cellulosic material and to uses thereof.

  14. Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough Lebanon, NH - May 7, 2009 bioprocessing, or CBP, a low-cost processing strategy for production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass. CBP much, much closer to billions of gallons of low cost cellulosic biofuels," said Michigan State

  15. Bioenergy Impacts Â… Cellulosic Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make Fuels andfor its cellulosic ethanol

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Comparison of changes in cellulose ultrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER Comparison of changes in cellulose ultrastructure during different pretreatments commonly cited factor that con- tributes to the recalcitrance of biomass is cellulose crystallinity crystallinity, crystalline allomorph distribu- tion, and cellulose ultrastructure. The observed changes

  17. Extraction of -cellulose from mummified wood for stable isotopic analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gedalof, Ze'ev

    Extraction of -cellulose from mummified wood for stable isotopic analysis Benjamin A. Hook a cellulose can provide valuable paleocli- matic information at annual and subannual resolution, from time the trees grew. In the mummified wood, polysaccharides (hemicellulose, -cellulose) are frequently

  18. Facilitated Transport of Small Carbohydrates through Plasticized Cellulose Triacetate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Facilitated Transport of Small Carbohydrates through Plasticized Cellulose Triacetate Membranes.7,8 This report describes plasticized cellulose triacetate mem- branes that incorporate a large involved plasticized films that are homogeneous mixtures of cellulose triacetate (CTA), plasticizer (e

  19. Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics...

  20. Cellulose, Chitosan, and Keratin Composite Materials. Controlled Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Cellulose, Chitosan, and Keratin Composite Materials. Controlled Drug Release Chieu D. Tran 53201, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: A method was developed in which cellulose (CEL

  1. Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic Biofuel Plant Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic Biofuel Plant October 17, 2014 -...

  2. Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Opening Plenary Session: Celebrating Successes-The...

  3. Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

    2012-04-03

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

  4. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cellulose requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking...

  5. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improved methods for breaking down cellulose nanofibers are central to cost-effective biofuel production. June 19, 2013 An enzyme (shown in blue) pulls out individual cellulose...

  6. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

    1983-01-01

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

  7. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

    1983-07-26

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

  8. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  9. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    BSA Treatment to Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose in Lignin Containing Substrates Bin Yang cellulose and solids containing 56% cellulose and 28% lignin from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover. Little BSA was adsorbed on Avicel cellulose, while pretreated corn stover solids adsorbed

  11. Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, B.M.

    1986-12-23

    A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

  12. Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Bruce M. (Bend, OR)

    1986-01-01

    A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

  13. Quantifying Contaminant Mass for the Feasibility Study of the DuPont Chambers Works FUSRAP Site - 13510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Carl; Rahman, Mahmudur; Johnson, Ann; Owe, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) - Philadelphia District is conducting an environmental restoration at the DuPont Chambers Works in Deepwater, New Jersey under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Discrete locations are contaminated with natural uranium, thorium-230 and radium-226. The USACE is proposing a preferred remedial alternative consisting of excavation and offsite disposal to address soil contamination followed by monitored natural attenuation to address residual groundwater contamination. Methods were developed to quantify the error associated with contaminant volume estimates and use mass balance calculations of the uranium plume to estimate the removal efficiency of the proposed alternative. During the remedial investigation, the USACE collected approximately 500 soil samples at various depths. As the first step of contaminant mass estimation, soil analytical data was segmented into several depth intervals. Second, using contouring software, analytical data for each depth interval was contoured to determine lateral extent of contamination. Six different contouring algorithms were used to generate alternative interpretations of the lateral extent of the soil contamination. Finally, geographical information system software was used to produce a three dimensional model in order to present both lateral and vertical extent of the soil contamination and to estimate the volume of impacted soil for each depth interval. The average soil volume from all six contouring methods was used to determine the estimated volume of impacted soil. This method also allowed an estimate of a standard deviation of the waste volume estimate. It was determined that the margin of error for the method was plus or minus 17% of the waste volume, which is within the acceptable construction contingency for cost estimation. USACE collected approximately 190 groundwater samples from 40 monitor wells. It is expected that excavation and disposal of contaminated soil will remove the contaminant source zone and significantly reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater. To test this assumption, a mass balance evaluation was performed to estimate the amount of dissolved uranium that would remain in the groundwater after completion of soil excavation. As part of this evaluation, average groundwater concentrations for the pre-excavation and post-excavation aquifer plume area were calculated to determine the percentage of plume removed during excavation activities. In addition, the volume of the plume removed during excavation dewatering was estimated. The results of the evaluation show that approximately 98% of the aqueous uranium would be removed during the excavation phase. The USACE expects that residual levels of contamination will remain in groundwater after excavation of soil but at levels well suited for the selection of excavation combined with monitored natural attenuation as a preferred alternative. (authors)

  14. Synthetic biology approach to cellulose degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhundi, Sahreena Saleem

    2012-06-22

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on earth, is composed of ? – 1,4 – linked glucose units, which in turn form a highly ordered crystalline structure that is insoluble and recalcitrant to degradation. It is the ...

  15. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh -hui; Lai, Hsin -Chih

    2015-03-19

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of ?-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To addressmore »this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the assembly of crystalline cellulose.« less

  16. Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material Erin Baker Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty; Environmental policy 2 #12;1 Introduction This paper contains supplementary material for "Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement

  17. 14. CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF LAKE SEDIMENT CELLULOSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    14. CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF LAKE SEDIMENT CELLULOSE: METHODS AND APPLICATIONS BRENT B and Environmental Sciences Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT USA 06459 Keywords: cellulose, lake sediment, oxygen of lake sediment cellulose is a recently developed paleolimnological approach that is gaining increasing

  18. Introduction The orientation of the elementary cellulose fibrils rein-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.

    Introduction The orientation of the elementary cellulose fibrils rein- forcing the wood cell wall by the tilt angle of the cellulose fibrils with re- spect to the longitudinal cell axis (microfibril angle of elementary cellulose in longitudinal tracheids outside and inside of so-called crossfields, the latter formed

  19. Network Structure of Cellulose Ethers Used in Pharmaceutical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peppas, Nicholas A.

    Network Structure of Cellulose Ethers Used in Pharmaceutical Applications during Swelling cellulose ethers that differ in their type and degree of substitution and to elucidate the network structure hydrogels of cellulose derivatives, such as the polymer volume frac- tion in the swollen state, 2,S

  20. Unconventional Relationshipsfor Hemicellulose Hydrolysis and Subsequent Cellulose Digestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Chapter 6 Unconventional Relationshipsfor Hemicellulose Hydrolysis and Subsequent Cellulose, and Charles £. Wyman Thayer School of Engineering, DartmouthCollege, Hanover, NH 03755 Cellulosic biomass can and subsequently by enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual cellulose, and these sugars can be used to produce fuels

  1. "Nematic Ordered Cellulose": A Concept of Glucan Chain Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown Jr., R. Malcolm

    "Nematic Ordered Cellulose": A Concept of Glucan Chain Association Tetsuo Kondo, Eiji Togawa, Number 4, Pages 1324-1330 #12;1324 Biomacromolecules 2001, 2, 1324-1330 "Nematic Ordered Cellulose at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 Received August 15, 2001 Native cellulose consists of a set of parallel

  2. Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ARTICLE Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion Rajeev Kumar derived pseudo-lignin on cellulose conversion at the moderate to low enzyme loadings necessary for favorable economics, dilute acid pretreatment of Avicel cellulose alone and mixed with beechwood xylan

  3. Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

  4. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, J.

    1998-12-01

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

  5. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered.

  6. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Ashtead, GB)

    2011-11-22

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  7. SANS Study of Cellulose Extracted from Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL; McGaughey, Joseph [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    AbstractLignocellulosic biomass, an abundant renewable natural resource, has the potential to play a major role in generation of renewable biofuels through its conversion to bio-ethanol. Unfortunately, it is a complex biological composite material that shows significant recalcitrance making it a cost-ineffective feedstock for bioethanol production. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to probe the multi-scale structure of cellulosic materials. Cellulose was extracted from milled native switchgrass and switchgrass that had undergone the dilute acid pretreatment method to disrupt the lignocellulose structure. The high-Q structural feature (Q > 0.07 -1) can be assigned to cellulose fibrils based on comparison with the switchgrass purified by solvent extraction of native and dilute acid pretreated and a commercial preparation of microcrystalline cellulose. Dilute acid pretreatment results in an increase in the smallest structural size, a decrease in the interconnectivity of the fibrils; and no change in the smooth domain boundaries at length scales larger than 1000 .

  8. Cellulose Graft Copolymers for Potential Adhesive Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, Ramani

    Chapter 24 Cellulose Graft Copolymers for Potential Adhesive Applications Bonding of Plastics interfacial adhesion between the wood and polystyrene components because of their inherent incompatibility, Corvallis, OR 97331 0097-6156/89/0385-0337$06.00/0 Q 1989 American Chemical Society #12;338 ADHESIVES FROM

  9. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  10. The effect of deuteration on the structure of bacterial cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bali, Garima [Georgia Institute of Technology; Foston, Marcus [Georgia Institute of Technology; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL; He, Junhong [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo generated deuterated bacterial cellulose, cultivated from 100% deuterated glycerol in D2O medium, was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid dissolution and 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A solution NMR method of the dissolved cellulose was used to determine that this bacterial cellulose had 85 % deuterium incorporation. Acetylation and 1H and 2H NMR of deuterated bacterial cellulose indicated near equal deuteration at all sites of the glucopyranosyl ring except C-6 which was partly deuterated. Despite the high level of deuterium incorporation there were no significant differences in the molecular and morphological properties were observed for the deuterated and protio bacterial cellulose samples. The highly deuterated bacterial cellulose presented here can be used as a model substrate for studying cellulose biopolymer properties via future small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies.

  11. Industrial hygiene walk-through survey report of E. I. Dupont de Nemours and Company, Inc. , Chocolate Bayou Plant, Alvin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajen, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    A walkthrough survey of EI duPont deNemours and Company, Incorporated, Alvin, Texas was conducted in November, 1984. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the 1,3-butadiene monomer manufacturing process and the potential for exposure. The facility manufactured a crude product stream containing 1,3-butadiene as a coproduct of its ethylene process. The crude was refined to a 99.5% 1,3-butadiene product. The refining process occurred in a closed system, tightly maintained for economic, fire, and health-hazard reasons. The product was transferred by way of a pipeline to storage spheres for later transport off site. The facility used an open-loop cylinder (bomb) technique for quality control sampling. All pumps were equipped with single mechanical seals, which were in the process of being replaced by tandem seals. Since 1962, the facility had experienced process changes and three changes of ownership. Because of these changes, records from previous owners of industrial hygiene monitoring were not available. Job titles identified as having potential exposure were processors, wage employee supervisors, production engineers, and laboratory technicians. The author concludes that a closed-loop manual quality-control sampling system should be installed to reduce exposure from this source.

  12. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  13. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN) [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  14. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  15. Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) Data reflects projected air emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX), ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur oxide (SOX),...

  16. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01

    What is Holding Back Cellulosic Ethanol? • Capital costs arehigh • The cost of capital is high – particularly for newCost Elements Biomass Feedstock Feed Handling Capital

  17. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "The production of cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol is a significant part of America's energy future. This new facility, one of six commercial scale biorefineries to be...

  18. An Environmental and Policy Evaluation of Cellulosic Ethanol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurtado, Lisa Diane

    2012-07-16

    of energy crops. A new policy is proposed to support the sustainable, environmentally responsible development of cellulosic ethanol in the US....

  19. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compositions and methods relating to...

  20. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01

    Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale SustainableHydrogen Batteries Nuclear By Lee Lynd, Dartmouth Ethanol •Ethanol, ethyl alcohol, fermentation ethanol, or just “

  1. Appendix D: 2012 Cellulosic Ethanol Success, Bioenergy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    produce cellulosic ethanol at commercial-scale costs that are competitive with gasoline production at 110barrel of crude oil. Many industry partners are also demonstrating...

  2. Structural reorganization in films of cellulose derivatives in the presence of colloidal particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Pulak

    Structural reorganization in films of cellulose derivatives in the presence of colloidal particles of two ethers of cellulose, hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), with dispersed-ray reflectivity; Cellulose derivatives; Silica particles 1. Introduction In recent years, macromolecular

  3. Cellulose Binding Protein from the Parasitic Nematode Heterodera schachtii Interacts with Arabidopsis Pectin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussey, Richard S.

    Cellulose Binding Protein from the Parasitic Nematode Heterodera schachtii Interacts Heterodera glycines also produces a cellulose binding protein (Hg CBP) secretory protein. To determine

  4. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    EthanolOf Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol I Charles R. WilkeCELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of U.S.

  5. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  6. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  7. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Shimshon, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (North Gallilea, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  10. What is (and is not) vital to advancing cellulosic ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    What is (and is not) vital to advancing cellulosic ethanol Charles E. Wyman Chemical of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92506, USA Ethanol made biologically from cellulosic ethanol; however, government policies are needed to overcome the per- ceived risk of first applications

  11. Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) have attracted much attention over the past several years due to their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) have attracted much attention over the past several years due- hydroxybutyrate-hydroxyvalerate). Cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared from microcrystilline cellulose (MCC) using) threads with the addition of cellulose nanowhiskers. PHBV-CNW fibers were prepared by wet spinning

  12. Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on Cellulose Hydrolysis, and Underlying Mechanisms Hongjia Li,1,2,4 Yunqiao Pu,3,4 Rajeev Kumar,1,2,4 Arthur J to form droplets that deposit on the cellulose surface and retard enzymatic digestion of cellulose

  13. Surface plasmon resonance imaging of the enzymatic degradation of cellulose microfibrils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging of the enzymatic degradation of cellulose microfibrils Scott G with cellulose microfibrils using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging. The cellulose microfibrils, obtained of the enzymes onto both the cellulose microfibrils and the bare surface, and the subsequent degradation

  14. NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

  15. Slow dynamics in a model of the cellulose network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Manyuhina; A. Fasolino; M. I. Katsnelson

    2007-06-07

    We present numerical simulations of a model of cellulose consisting of long stiff rods, representing cellulose microfibrils, connected by stretchable crosslinks, representing xyloglucan molecules, hydrogen bonded to the microfibrils. Within a broad range of temperature the competing interactions in the resulting network give rise to a slow glassy dynamics. In particular, the structural relaxation described by orientational correlation functions shows a logarithmic time dependence. The glassy dynamics is found to be due to the frustration introduced by the network of xyloglucan molecules. Weakening of interactions between rod and xyloglucan molecules results in a more marked reorientation of cellulose microfibrils, suggesting a possible mechanism to modify the dynamics of the plant cell wall.

  16. The Role of Cellulosic Ethanol in Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Neilson, Jr.

    2007-10-01

    Petroleum provides essentially all of the energy used today in the transportation sector. To reduce this dependence on fossil energy, other fuels are beginning to be used, notably ethanol and biodiesel. Almost all fuel ethanol is produced by the conversion of corn grain to starch with subsequent fermentation to ethanol. In 2006, almost 5 billion gallons of fuel ethanol were produced, which used 17% of domestic corn production. The DOE has a goal to displace 30% of motor gasoline demand or 60 billion gallons per year by 2030. To achieve this goal, production of ethanol from lignocellulosic sources (e.g., agricultural residues, forest residues, and dedicated energy crops) is needed. This paper will describe the production of cellulosic ethanol as well as the issues and benefits associated with its production.

  17. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year. Funding for these projects is also an integral part of the President's Biofuels Initiative that will lead to the wide-scale use of...

  18. Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jessica J

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

  19. The structure and mechanics of nanofibrillar cellulose foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zubaidah Mohammed

    Crystalline nanofibrillar cellulose has remarkable mechanical properties: a Young's modulus of about 130 GPa and a tensile strength in the range of 750–1000 MPa. Recently, there has been increasing interest in exploiting ...

  20. Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haward, Simon J.

    In this study, we characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIAc). In steady shear flow, the semidilute solutions ...

  1. Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    28,000 vehicles off the road. The cellulosic ethanol produced at the Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas (ABBK) facility, located about 90 miles southwest of Dodge City, Kansas,...

  2. DuPont Energy Innovations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    21 1 6 2 9 9 U. S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2007 (Quadrillion BTU) Source by Energy Type, Indexed to 1970 INDEXEDPRICE Source: Energy Information Administration, website data #12 energy flat with 1990 levels. Progress: · Consumption down 7 percent overall as compared to 1990. · Since

  3. Molecular Orientation in Dry and Hydrated Cellulose Fibers: A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Molecular Orientation in Dry and Hydrated Cellulose Fibers: A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering the molecular alignment in dry and hydrated cellulose fibers. Two types of cellulose were investigated: natural cellulose I in cotton fibers and regenerated cellulose II in rayon fibers. On the basis of the orientation

  4. Development of sustainable harvest strategies for cellulose-based biofuels: The effect of intensity and season of harvest on cellulosic feedstock and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of sustainable harvest strategies for cellulose-based biofuels: The effect of intensity Station. #12;v Abstract Development of sustainable harvest strategies for cellulose-based biofuels nesting and cellulosic biofuel production. The objectives of this project were to- (1) determine

  5. Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

  6. Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by an engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima; Tsai, Shen-Long; Madan, Bhawna; DaSilva, Nancy A; Chen, Wilfred

    2011-01-01

    Cellulase, clostridia, and ethanol. Microbiol Mol Biol RevNext- generation cellulosic ethanol technologies and theirProduction of cellulosic ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  7. Optimization and Simulation for Designing the Supply Chain of the Cellulosic Biofuel Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Heungjo

    2012-02-14

    The purpose of this dissertation is to provide an effective approach to design the supply chain (SC) of the cellulosic biofuel industry in order that it will support and accelerate the successful commercialization of the cellulosic biofuel industry...

  8. UNIVERSIT DU QUBEC MONTRAL VALIDATION DU SIGNAL 8\\80 DANS LA CELLULOSE DE BRYOPHYTES DE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL VALIDATION DU SIGNAL 8\\80 DANS LA CELLULOSE DE BRYOPHYTES DE'Université d'Ottawa pour les analyses isotopiques de la cellulose. Un grand merci aux assistants de terrain et

  9. Interactions between MUR10/CesA7-Dependent Secondary Cellulose Biosynthesis and Primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Markus

    Interactions between MUR10/CesA7-Dependent Secondary Cellulose Biosynthesis and Primary Cell Wall is identical with the CesA7 gene, which encodes a cellulose catalytic subunit previously thought

  10. Review: Continuous hydrolysis and fermentation for cellulosic ethanol production Simone Brethauer, Charles E. Wyman *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Review: Continuous hydrolysis and fermentation for cellulosic ethanol production Simone Brethauer for these benefits to be realized. Continuous hydrolysis and fermentation processes offer important potential advantages in reducing costs, but little has been done on continuous processing of cellulosic biomass

  11. Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement and Jeffrey Keisler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement Erin Baker and Jeffrey Keisler funding and the likelihood of achieving advances in cellulosic biofuel technologies. While in collecting more information on this technology. Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty

  12. ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol...

  13. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. We discovered that C. papyrosolvens produces a multiprotein, multicom

  14. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system.

  15. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1997-06-10

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

  16. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1996-04-16

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

  17. Enzymatically based cellulosic ethanol production technology was selected as a key area for biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Enzymatically based cellulosic ethanol production technology was selected as a key area for biomass crisis' of the 1970s. Although biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals through classical mutagenesis and strain Biofuels (2011) 2(4), 421­450 Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass

  18. Primary Radiation Defect Production in Polyethylene and Cellulose Jussi Polvi,* Petri Luukkonen, and Kai Nordlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Primary Radiation Defect Production in Polyethylene and Cellulose Jussi Polvi,* Petri Luukkonen in polyethylene and cellulose were examined using molecular dynamics simulations. The governing reactions in both. Crystalline cellulose was found to be more resistant to radiation damage than crystalline polyethylene

  19. Consequences of a Rapid Cellulose Extraction Technique for Oxygen Isotope and Radiocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    Consequences of a Rapid Cellulose Extraction Technique for Oxygen Isotope and Radiocarbon Analyses isotope analyses to investigate the purity of cellulose extracted from wood using a rapid processing and plant physiological processes has typically focused on the R-cellulose component of wood, necessitating

  20. Cellulose Biodegradation Models; An Example of Cooperative Interactions in Structured Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroshnikov, Alexey

    Cellulose Biodegradation Models; An Example of Cooperative Interactions in Structured Populations Pierre-Emmanuel Jabin Alexey Miroshnikov Robin Young Abstract We introduce various models for cellulose the structure of the cellulose chains and are allowed to depend on the phenotypical traits of the population

  1. Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2006-01-01

    Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 38­40 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose the thickness of the cellulose nitrate layer of the commonly used LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detector spectrometry will induce degradation of the cellulose nitrate. For this purpose, Fourier transform infrared

  2. Variation of Cellulose Microfibril Angles in Softwoods and Hardwoods--A Possible Strategy of Mechanical Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.

    Variation of Cellulose Microfibril Angles in Softwoods and Hardwoods-- A Possible Strategy beech). The tilt angle of the cellulose fibrils in the wood cell wall versus the longitudinal cell axis Words: cellulose; hardwood; microfibril angle; small-angle scattering; softwood; wood; X

  3. Changes in the Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rate of Avicel Cellulose With Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Changes in the Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rate of Avicel Cellulose With Conversion Bin Yang, Deidre M: 10.1002/bit.20942 Abstract: The slow down in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose with conversion has reaction of the nearly pure cellulose in Avicel was interrupted over the course of nearly complete

  4. Materials Chemistry and Physics 95 (2006) 307312 Chemical etching characteristics for cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2006-01-01

    Materials Chemistry and Physics 95 (2006) 307­312 Chemical etching characteristics for cellulose; received in revised form 31 May 2005; accepted 12 June 2005 Abstract Cellulose nitrate films (commercially was consistent with the expected range. © 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Cellulose nitrate

  5. Access of Cellulase to Cellulose and Lignin for Poplar Solids Produced by Leading Pretreatment Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Access of Cellulase to Cellulose and Lignin for Poplar Solids Produced by Leading Pretreatment. From this, Langmuir adsorption parameters, cellulose accessibility to cellulase, and the effectiveness (rsolids ¼ 56 mg/g solid). Lime pretreated sol- ids also had the highest cellulose accessibility

  6. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Coupled With Electricity Generation in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Coupled With Electricity Generation in a Microbial Fuel cells (MFCs) from a variety of biodegrad- able substrates, including cellulose. Particulate materials hydrolysis rates of the particles. Cellulases are used to achieve rapid conversion of cellulose to sugar

  7. light-Scattering and Size-Exclusion Chromatographic.' Characterization of Hydroxyethyl Cellulose Acetate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chi

    light-Scattering and Size-Exclusion Chromatographic.' Characterization of Hydroxyethyl Cellulose to investigate a set of moderately distributed hydroxyethyl cellulose acetate{~ECA) samples'in tetrahydrofuran- Cellulose constitutes a ubiquitous and r~newable ular weight~ndcm9l~cular weight distribution:"". natural

  8. Design of Superhydrophobic Paper/Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Enhanced Etching and Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breedveld, Victor

    Design of Superhydrophobic Paper/Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Enhanced Etching and Deposition established by selective etching of the amorphous domains in cellulose. Despite different fiber types of superhydrophobic paper or cellulose surfaces with specific adhesion properties are described. The significance

  9. Strong Cellulase Inhibition by Mannan Polysaccharides in Cellulose Conversion to Sugars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Strong Cellulase Inhibition by Mannan Polysaccharides in Cellulose Conversion to Sugars Rajeev and their enzymatically prepared hydrolyzates were discovered to be strongly inhibitory to fungal cellulase in cellulose; galactomannan; oligomers; xylan Introduction Lignocellulosic biomass comprised of three major compo- nents--cellulose

  10. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE9 Serves a Nonredundant Role in Secondary Cell Wall Synthesis in Arabidopsis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haughn, George

    CELLULOSE SYNTHASE9 Serves a Nonredundant Role in Secondary Cell Wall Synthesis in Arabidopsis­33076 Bordeaux, France (F.B., Y.L.-B.) Herein, we sought to explore the contribution of cellulose). Consistent with seed preferential expression of CELLULOSE SYNTHASE9 (CESA9), null mutations in CESA9 caused

  11. Hydrochloric Acid-Catalyzed Levulinic Acid Formation from Cellulose: Data and Kinetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Hydrochloric Acid-Catalyzed Levulinic Acid Formation from Cellulose: Data and Kinetic Model.com). In this study, the kinetics of the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH101 of conditions: 160­200 C, hydrochloric acid concentrations of 0.309­0.927 M (11.3­33.8 g/l), cellulose

  12. PII S0016-7037(02)00964-X Leaf cellulose D and 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PII S0016-7037(02)00964-X Leaf cellulose D and 18 O trends with elevation differ in direction among of stable isotopes in fossil leaf cellulose could be enhanced by adequate calibration. This potential from rodent middens. Trends in D and 18 O of leaf cellulose were examined for three species growing

  13. Screening fungi isolated from historic Discovery Hut on Ross Island, Antarctica for cellulose degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    Screening fungi isolated from historic Discovery Hut on Ross Island, Antarctica for cellulose isolated on selective media. Of these, 108 were screened for hydrolytic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose oxysporum and Geomyces sp. were shown to grow on a variety of synthetic cellulose substrates and to use

  14. Direct in Situ Observation of Synergism between Cellulolytic Enzymes during the Biodegradation of Crystalline Cellulose Fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    of Crystalline Cellulose Fibers Jingpeng Wang, Amanda Quirk, Jacek Lipkowski,*, John R. Dutcher, and Anthony JCel7A are exo-acting cellobiohydrolases processing cellulose fibers from the nonreducing and reducing ends, respectively. TrCel7B is an endoglucanase that hydro- lyzes amorphous cellulose within fibers

  15. Minimally invasive monitoring of cellulose degradation by desorption electrospray ionization and laser ablation electrospray ionization mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Minimally invasive monitoring of cellulose degradation by desorption electrospray ionization cellulose degradation products produced by accelerated aging in unsized cotton paper. Soluble extracts from and degradation rate of cellulose in aging paper has been of great concern in applications where the long term

  16. Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions Simon J. Haward,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vivek

    Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions Simon J. Haward,*, Vivek Sharma characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic of the semidilute cellulose solutions in a uniaxial extensional ow that mimics the dynamics encountered in the spin

  17. The Building Blocks of Cellulose: The Intrinsic Conformational Structures of Cellobiose, Its Epimer, Lactose,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    The Building Blocks of Cellulose: The Intrinsic Conformational Structures of Cellobiose, Its Epimer calculation has established the intrinsic three-dimensional structures of the cellulose disaccharide and, focusing on the critical 1,4-linkage at the nonreducing end of the growing cellulose polymer, its C-4

  18. Cellulose bait improves the effectiveness of Metarhizium anisopliae as a microbial control of termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    Cellulose bait improves the effectiveness of Metarhizium anisopliae as a microbial control containers treated with M. anisopliae at the concentration of P 1.5 Â 107 conidia/cm3 . Cellulose powder bait/g, respectively, in choice tests in which termites were provided with treated cellulose bait and untreated wood. Ó

  19. Identification of cellulose synthase(s) in higher plants: sequence analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown Jr., R. Malcolm

    Identification of cellulose synthase(s) in higher plants: sequence analysis of processive similarity to the amino acid sequence of cellulose synthase from Acetobacter xylinum. Using hydrophobic similarity to the A. xylinum cellulose synthase. These ESTs contain some of the conserved residues identified

  20. 20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stott, Lowell

    20th century seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asian montane forests from tree cellulose 18 O composition (18 O) of sub- annual tree cellulose samples of Pinus kesiya growing at 1,500 m elevation on Doi Chiang Dao in northern Thailand. The cellulose 18 O values exhibit a distinctive annual cycle

  1. Improved Performance of OLEDs on Cellulose/Epoxy Substrate Using Adenine as a Hole Injection Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    Improved Performance of OLEDs on Cellulose/Epoxy Substrate Using Adenine as a Hole Injection Layer structure with cellulose, gold, and the DNA nucleobase adenine. Gold films are used as semitransparent electrodes on plant-based cellulose substrates, providing flexible anodes that are highly conductive without

  2. Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

  3. Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, Raymond

    2012-11-06

    Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

  4. Acid softening and hydrolysis of cellulose. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The report describes the experimental and analytic work to develop a process to reduce the cost of producing ethanol from cellulose. Ethanol is a renewable liquid fuel with applications in transportation, including oxygenation of fuel to reduce carbon monoxide emissions. If produced from cellulose contained in New York State's abundant low-grade wood resources or waste paper, significant quantities of petroleum could be displaced while creating new economic opportunity. The focus of the project was evaluating acid softening and hydrolysis technology to make cellulose responsive to conversion to fermentable sugar, from which production of ethanol would then be conventional and economical. The procedure is competitive with other cellulose-to-ethanol approaches such as enzyme hydrolysis; however, overall economic feasibility is problematic. To produce ethanol at $1.00 per gallon, a cost that would be competitive with producing ethanol from corn, and at the same time earn a 15 percent return for the owners of the plant, one of the major coproducts, lignin, would have to sell for $0.21 to $0.24 per pound. Identification of a suitable lignin market, a rise in petroleum prices, or restricting fossil-based carbon dioxide emissions will affect the economic feasibility of this particular type of lignin.

  5. TOPICAL PAPER Potential Synergies and Challenges in Refining Cellulosic Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    TOPICAL PAPER Potential Synergies and Challenges in Refining Cellulosic Biomass to Fuels, Chemicals Hampshire 03755 Lignocellulosic biomass such as agricultural and forestry residues and dedicated crops that outweigh increased biomass transport costs for facilities processing less than about 10,000 dry tons per

  6. Cellulose 8: 91-97,200/. (i) 2001 Kluwer AcademIc Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown Jr., R. Malcolm

    91 Cellulose 8: 91-97,200/. (i) 2001 Kluwer AcademIc Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. Rotation of cellulose ribbons during degradation with fungal cellulase Andrew J. Bowling}, Yoshihiko Amano2; accepted 15 March 2001 Key words: bacterial cellulose, cellulose, cellulase, Celluclast, chira

  7. Pre-acclimation of a wastewater inoculum to cellulose in an aqueouscathode MEC improves power generation in aircathode MFCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pre-acclimation of a wastewater inoculum to cellulose in an aqueous­cathode MEC improves power Cellulose Electricity generation Hydrolysis Microaerophilic a b s t r a c t Cellulose has been used in two removals were 50­70% based on total cellulose removals of 60­80%. Decreasing the reactor volume from 26

  8. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Design and Fabrication of Cellulose-Based Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    of Cellulose-Based Nanomaterials a dual-speaker seminar featuring Tetsuo Kondo and Shingo Yokota, Department cellulose was his main subject. His research interest has extended to the supermolecular architecture of cellulose in native and artificial systems. He has employed wood cell wall cellulose to investigate beta

  9. Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose. The most common species for this purpose are pine, spruce and birch in the Nordic countries and eucalyptus and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Forest biomass and pulpwood in particular is the most important raw material for cellulose diverse novel processes for separating cellulose, hemi cellulose and lignin from biomass. Biorefineries

  10. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1994-09-20

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attrition mill and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system. 1 fig.

  11. Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Somerville, Chris [Director, Energy Biosciences Institute

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

  12. Structure and processing of fibrous cellulose: bacterial and ascidian material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandelwal, Mudrika

    2013-06-11

    synthase enzyme complex 2. Mini-sheets: Association of few to large number of glucan chains by hydrogen bonds and/or van der Waals forces as a single monolayer after extrusion from catalytic site within a TC subunit. 3. Mini-crystals: Association... , for example with carbon nanotubes [111]. Several groups have worked on obtaining bundles of oriented cellulose microfibrils. Effect of kinematic viscosity has been studied by varying the thickness of silicone oil layer in order to introduce orientation...

  13. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Motor Company sponsorship of the Chair in Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Riverside that enhances our research on cellulosic ethanol.Motor Company sponsorship of the Chair in Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Riverside that enhances our research on cellulosic ethanol.Motor Company for their sponsorship of the Chair in Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Riverside that enhances our cellulosic ethanol

  14. O of cellulose organic fraction combined with 18 O of calcite and 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    1 18 O of cellulose organic fraction combined with 18 O of calcite and 18 O of diatoms in lake in the past, while 18 O of cellulose organic fraction served as a proxy of 18 O of lake water. 18 O of diatoms sample: 13 C and 15 N of bulk organic fraction, 18 O of cellulose organic fraction, 18 O and 13 C

  15. Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A

    2013-10-01

    The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

  16. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    process streams. Handb. Bioethanol:395-415. 10. Ehrman T.solid waste used as bioethanol sources and its relatedof cellulosic biomass into bioethanol as an alternative

  17. The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yao; Stipanovic, Arthur J [SUNY-ESF; Winter, William T. [SUNY-ESF; Wilson, David B.; Kim, Young-Jun

    2007-12-01

    Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA "Roadmap" objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled "The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases" was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by "pure" enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH "pretreatment" provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

  18. Surface-Based Assays for Enzyme Adsorption and Activity on Model Cellulose Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Samuel Andrew

    2012-01-01

    into Ethanol. Appl Microbio Biotech 2005, 67, 19-25. (11)and Selection Strategies. Biotech Advances 2005, 24, 452-Pure Cellulosic Substrates. Biotech Bioeng 2008, 102, 1570-

  19. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    60,700 ETHANOL RECOVERY Dist. Column CondenserF2 Steam Exchanger Ethanol Absorber 10 ft. diameter. 38Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Progress Report, LBL-

  20. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    BIOCONVERSION TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL BERKELEY PROGRAM--JulyXylose Fermentation to Ethanol (a) (b) Fusarium oxysporum (OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of

  1. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    13 Javier Perez I II. ETHANOL FERMENTATION STUDIES A. B.Development Studies of Ethanol Production--------------- 19of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol." (June 1979) and (b)

  2. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  3. The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stipanovic, Arthur J

    2014-11-17

    Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA “Roadmap” objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled “The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases” was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by “pure” enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH “pretreatment” provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

  4. Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher Homes Jump to:OAS Cellulosic Ethanol

  5. Nanoindentation of Biodegradable Cellulose Diacetate-graft-Poly(L-lactide) Copolymers: Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    - degradable polymers, for example, aliphatic poly- esters and copoly(ester-carbonate)s, have been actively 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part B: Polym Phys 45: 1114­1121, 2007 Keywords: cellulose'' concepts, copolymerization and polymer blending of cellulose and its derivatives with synthetic bio

  6. Comparison of low-energy radiation effects in polyethylene and cellulose Jussi Polvi, Kai Nordlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Comparison of low-energy radiation effects in polyethylene and cellulose Jussi Polvi, Kai Nordlund, for a carbon atom in polyethylene chain, and for one of the carbon atoms in cellulose chain. Our analysis shows and on average slightly higher for the carbon atoms in the polyethylene chain than for the target carbon atom

  7. Hydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation and electrohydrogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;1. Introduction Biohydrogen production from cellulose has received consid- erable attentionHydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation form 27 May 2009 Accepted 28 May 2009 Available online 28 June 2009 Keywords: Biohydrogen Microbial

  8. Cellulosic Ethanol Technology on Track to Being Competitive With Other Transportation Fuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been driving down the cost of cellulosic ethanol and overcoming the technical challenges that surround it-major milestones toward the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012.

  9. Fabrication of "Roll-off" and "Sticky" Superhydrophobic Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breedveld, Victor

    Fabrication of "Roll-off" and "Sticky" Superhydrophobic Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Processing portions of the cellulose in an oxygen plasma and subsequently coating the etched surface with a thin as a precursor. Variation of plasma treatment yielded two types of superhydrophobicity : "roll-off" (contact

  10. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  11. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  12. Silicon cantilever functionalization for cellulose-specific chemical force imaging of switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ida [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL; Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    A method for direct functionalization of silicon and silicon nitride cantilevers with bifunctional silanes was tested with model surfaces to determine adhesive forces for different hydrogen-bonding chemistries. Application for biomass surface characterization was tested by mapping switchgrass and isolated switchgrass cellulose in topographic and force-volume mode using a cellulose-specific cantilever.

  13. Comparison of laboratory delignification methods, their selectivity, and impacts on physiochemical characteristics of cellulosic biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    characteristics of cellulosic biomass Rajeev Kumar a,b,d, , Fan Hu c,d , Christopher A. Hubbell c,d , Arthur J. " Various raw and pretreated biomass solids and pure cellulose were used. " Delignification selectivity, and information for less recalci- trant lignocellulosic feedstocks and pretreated biomass is scarce. Furthermore

  14. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are central to cost-effective biofuel production and the subject of new research from Los Alamos National and designer enzymes for biofuel production from cellulosic--or non-food--plant derived biomass. "Cellulose columns," says GLBRC's Shishir Chundawat. "The key to cheaper biofuel production is to unravel

  15. Cellulose and psyllium supplementation in 10 females: the effect on food intake and in vitro fermentation variables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Susan Renee

    1988-01-01

    chain fatty acids (SCFA). Subjects fed cellulose had a lower energy intake than when no fiber supplement was given (P&0. 01). When the subjects were fed cellulose and fermenting cellulose (FCFC), percent recovery of cellulose was 98 + 8. 6%. Percent... Fermentation of Dietary Fiber . . . 3 Effect on Fecal Bulk . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Effect on pH 9 Effect on Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Effect on Short Chain Fatty Acids 11 Effect of Fiber Supplementation on Food Intake...

  16. Molecular simulation of surface reorganization and wetting in crystalline cellulose I and II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Reinhard J; Ribitsch, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose is one of the most versatile substances in the world. Its immense variety of applications was in recent years complemented by interesting nanotechnological applications. The fabrication of complex cellulose-based materials asks for thorough understanding of the surface structure and its interactions with adsorbates. In this study we investigate several surface model systems of nanotechnological interest, which are obtained by reorganization of the cellulose-vacuum or cellulose-water interfaces of slabs of crystalline cellulose. To do this, we constructed supercells from crystallographic data, and then optimized the interface structures. From the bulk and surface systems we calculated structural properties such as unit cell parameters, dihedral conformation distributions, density profiles and hydrogen bonding. The results suggest that no overall geometrical restructuring occurs at the interface. However, the hydrogen bond network is strongly reconstructed, as is inferred from the dihedral conformatio...

  17. Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Synthesis of new cellulose ethers using metathesis reactions -Study of their properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenave, Charles

    , hydroxyle or amine functions. Their synthesis process generally needs a pre-treatment of the cellulose, hydroxyle or amine functions. Their synthesis process generally needs a pre-treatment of the cellulose of the hydroxyl of cellulose ethers, which are commercially available or described in the literature

  18. Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) ~ http://www.zoo.utoronto.ca/able Demystifying Hardy-Weinberg: Using Cellulose Acetate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demystifying Hardy-Weinberg: Using Cellulose Acetate Electrophoresis of the Lap Locus to Study Population From: Peroni, P. A. and D. E. McCauley. 1999. Demystifying Hardy-Weinberg: Using cellulose acetate proceedings volumes. #12;102 Cellulose Acetate Electrophoresis Contents Introduction

  19. Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of RSW2 Link the KORRIGAN Endo-1,4--Glucanase to Cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskin, Tobias

    Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of RSW2 Link the KORRIGAN Endo-1,4- -Glucanase to Cellulose Synthesis the KORRIGAN gene complements the cellulose-deficient rsw2-1 mutant of Arabidopsis. Three temperature. The shoots of rsw2-1 seedlings produce less cellulose and accumulate a short chain, readily extractable

  20. How cellulose-based leaf toughness and lamina density contribute to long leaf lifespans of shade-tolerant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitajima, Kaoru

    How cellulose-based leaf toughness and lamina density contribute to long leaf lifespans of shade-8137.2012.04203.x Key words: anti-herbivory defence, cellulose, herbivory, lamina density, leaf lifespan, leaf, a recently recognized indicator of material strength per unit mass, was linearly correlated with cellulose

  1. A Bayesian model for predicting local El Nin~o events using tree ring widths and cellulose d18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nippert, Jesse

    A Bayesian model for predicting local El Nin~o events using tree ring widths and cellulose d18 O composition (d18 O) of cellulose recorded in annual tree rings reflects the climate and precipitation history tree ring d18 O in a cellulose and annual ring width was negative during most years, reflecting amount

  2. A single-substrate model to interpret intra-annual stable isotope signals in tree-ring cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A single-substrate model to interpret intra-annual stable isotope signals in tree-ring cellulose J cellulose (d13 Ccellulose and d18 Ocellulose, respectively) reveal well-defined seasonal variations or oxygen isotope composition of whole wood (or cellulose extracted from wood) to temperature, relative

  3. Long-Term Stabilization of Foams and Emulsions with In-Situ Formed Microparticles from Hydrophobic Cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Cellulose Hartmut A. Wege, Sejong Kim, Vesselin N. Paunov, Qixin Zhong,*,§ and Orlin D. Velev*, Department a simple method to produce foams and emulsions of extraordinary stability by using hydrophobic cellulose microparticles, which are formed in situ by a liquid-liquid dispersion technique. The hydrophobic cellulose

  4. Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney

    2007-10-01

    The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35–50% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on various geographical factors and the types of systems used for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefi neries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that infl uence pioneer biorefi nery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial scenarios were postulated to develop a pioneer dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this pioneer design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply system improvements, and technology advancements to achieve government and private sector cost targets. Analysis of the pioneer supply system resulted in a delivered feedstock cost to the throat of the pretreatment reactor of $37.00 per dry tonne (2002 $). Pioneer supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefi neries using specifi c feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. As the industry develops and cost barriers are addressed, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefi neries located in different regions.

  5. Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

    2010-09-01

    Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data supplied by a recent report from the National Research Council (NRC). The thermochemical system analysis revealed that most of the system inefficiency is associated with the gasification process and subsequent tar reforming step. For the biochemical process, the steam generation from residue combustion, providing the requisite heating for the conventional pretreatment and alcohol distillation processes, was shown to dominate the exergy loss. An overall energy balance with different potential distillation energy requirements shows that as much as 30% of the biomass energy content may be available in the future as a feedstock for thermochemical production of liquid fuels.

  6. Recyclable organic solar cells on substrates comprising cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kippelen, Bernard; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Zhou, Yinhua; Moon, Robert; Youngblood, Jeffrey P.

    2015-12-01

    Recyclable organic solar cells are disclosed herein. Systems and methods are further disclosed for producing, improving performance, and for recycling the solar cells. In certain example embodiments, the recyclable organic solar cells disclosed herein include: a first electrode; a second electrode; a photoactive layer disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode; an interlayer comprising a Lewis basic oligomer or polymer disposed between the photoactive layer and at least a portion of the first electrode or the second electrode; and a substrate disposed adjacent to the first electrode or the second electrode. The interlayer reduces the work function associated with the first or second electrode. In certain example embodiments, the substrate comprises cellulose nanocrystals that can be recycled. In certain example embodiments, one or more of the first electrode, the photoactive layer, and the second electrode may be applied by a film transfer lamination method.

  7. Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

    2011-06-23

    At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

  8. DuPont Energy Breakout Initiative 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, W. F.

    2007-01-01

    and prioritize identified opportuni- ties and then assign resources to work on and complete Six Sigma or capital projects. ENERGY CENTER OF COMPETENCY Improvement in plant energy efficiency re- quires a dedicated team of individuals who are motivated to look... Opportunities Quantify Stake Determine Feasibility Prioritize Improvements Capital ProjectsSix Sigma Projects Appoint Plant Energy Team Eliminate Defects 181716151413121110987654321Month Compare Operations to Energy Efficiency Best Practices Website Energy...

  9. DuPont Apollo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsAreafor Geothermal Resources Rules - IdahoDruidApollo Jump

  10. DuPont Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDouble Oak, Texas:

  11. DuPont | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDouble Oak, Texas:DuPont Jump to:

  12. Dupont Fuel Cells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDouble Oak, Texas:DuPontDukeDunlap

  13. Comparison of cellulose consumption between Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes flavipes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) under laboratory conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Denise

    2007-09-17

    We are interested in determining the effects of subterranean termite soldier ratios on the overall cellulose consumption of Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes flavipes. In nature, Coptotermes formosanus is found in ...

  14. Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions Simon J. Haward1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of structured, complex fluids (paints, inks, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals) on the one hand, and to provide bonds that make it difficult to dissolve unmodified cellulose in common organic solvents, or in water

  15. EA-1705: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Mascoma Corporation, Kinross Charter Township, Michigan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The frontier Project consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a proprietary pretreatment and fermentation process.

  16. Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an exzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation.

  17. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris R. (Portola Valley, CA); Scheible, Wolf (Golm, DE)

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  18. The Disintegration Process in Microcrystalline Cellulose Based Tablets I.: Influence of Temperature, Porosity and Superdisintegrants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yassin, Samy; Goodwin, Daniel J.; Anderson, Andrew; Sibik, Juraj; Wilson, D. Ian; Gladden, Lynn F.; Zeitler, J. Axel

    2015-06-12

    Disintegration performance was measured by analysing both water ingress and tablet swelling of pure microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and in mixture with croscarmellose sodium using terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI). Tablets made from pure MCC...

  19. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  20. Absorption and transport properties of ultra-fine cellulose webs Gerardo Callegari a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    Electrospinning Cellulose Nanoweb Kozeny­Carman Washburn a b s t r a c t Characterization of transport or particles. In electrospinning (ES), a polymer solution or melt droplet formed at the opening of a thin

  1. A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleinser, Matthew A.

    2010-01-16

    Agricultural and forestry wastes for the use of creating cellulosic ethanol were inventoried for each county in Texas. A simple forecast was created for each of the agricultural wastes and then a multivariate empirical distribution was used...

  2. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of22 Mohammad Riaz ETHANOL FERMENTATION STUDIES II I. A. B.Hydrolyzates to Ethanol J2 Ren-Der Yang

  3. Experimental investigations of rheological properties of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and polyvinyl alcohol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fort, Ben Franklin

    1966-01-01

    EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF SODIUM CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULOSE AND POLYVINYL ALCOHOL A Thesis By BEN F. FORT, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AfkM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1966 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF SODIUM CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULOSE AND POLYVINYL ALCOHOL A Thesis By BEN F. FORT, JR. Approved...

  4. Evaluation of Exothermic Reactions from Bulk-Vitrification Melter Feeds Containing Cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Bos, Stanley J.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Berry, Pam

    2007-06-25

    PNNL has demonstrated that cellulose effectively reduces the amount of molten ionic salt during Bulk Vitrification of simulated Hanford Low Level Waste (LLW). To address concerns about the potential reactivity of cellulose-LLW, PNNL used thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, and accelerating rate calorimetry to determine in these preliminary studies that these mixtures will support a self-sustaining reaction if heated to 110°C at adiabatic conditions. Additional testing is recommended.

  5. Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, L.

    1994-12-06

    High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added in an excess amount needed. 3 figures.

  6. Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

    1994-01-01

    High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH).sub.2 is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH).sub.2 is added in an excess amount needed.

  7. Cellulose triacetate based novel optical sensor for uranium estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.M.; Pathak, P.N.; Pandey, A.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    A cellulose triacetate (CTA) based optode has been developed by immobilizing tricapryl-methyl ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) as the extractant and 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5- diethyl-aminophenol (Br-PADAP) as the chromophore. The optode changes color (from yellow to magenta) due to uranium uptake in bicarbonate medium ({approx}10{sup -4} M) at pH 7-8 in the presence of triethanolamine (TEA) buffer. The detection limit of the optode film (dimension: 3 cm x 1 cm) was determined to be {approx}0.3 {mu}g/mL for a 15 mL pure uranium sample at pH 7-8 (in TEA buffer). The effects of experimental parameters have been evaluated in terms of maximum uptake of U(VI), minimum response time, and reproducibility and stability of the Br-PADAP-U(VI ) complex formed in the optode matrix. The applicability of the optimized optode has been examined in the effluent samples obtained during magnesium diuranate precipitation step following the TBP purification cycle. (authors)

  8. ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This pilot-scale integrated biorefinery will produce 250,000 gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol when running at full operational status.

  9. A cell is not a pan of water: Problems with using [delta]D composition in wood cellulose to interpret climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, V.J.; Deniro, M.J. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States) Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States))

    1993-06-01

    If the isotopic composition of hydrogen in tree ring cellulose is related to that of water at the site of cellulose synthesis, then it records climatic information. Relationships between [delta]D tree ring cellulose and climate have been found, yet the mechanisms of hydrogen fractionation in the synthesis of wood cellulose were not examined. We grew avocadoes in water of controlled isotopic composition at different humidities until their stems became woody. Ambient humidity was consistently related to the isotopic composition of leaf water and leaf cellulose but not to wood cellulose. Both leaf and wood cellulose [delta]D values were higher than those of environmental water indicating that some of the hydrogen had been reallocated from stored post photosynthetic compounds. Effects of stored compounds on the isotopic composition of wood cellulose could significantly confound paleoclimatic reconstructions from this method.

  10. Cationic quaternization of cellulose with methacryloyloxy ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride via ATRP method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supeno [Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia and School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Daik, Rusli, E-mail: rusli@ukm.edu.my [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); El-Sheikh, Said M. [Nano-Structured Materials Division, Advanced Materials Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-09-03

    The synthesis of a cationic cellulose copolymer from cellulose macro-initiator (MCC-BiB) and quaternary compound monomer (METMA) via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was studied. By using dimethylformamide (DMF), the optimum condition for successful synthesis was at the mole ratio of MCC-BIB:Catalyst:METMA = 1:1:26. The highest copolymer recovery was 93.2 % for 6 h and at 40°C. The copolymer was insoluble in weak polar solvents such as THF and DMF but soluble in methanol and water. The chemistry of cellulose copolymer was confirmed by the FTIR and TGA in which the METMA monomer was used as a reference. The absence of CC bond in the CiB-g-METMA spectrum indicated that graft copolymerization occurred.

  11. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accepted 29 October 2010 Available online 4 November 2010 Keywords: Cascade biohydrogen productionIntegrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial s t r a c t Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen

  12. Sodium Chloride interaction with solvated and crystalline cellulose : sodium ion affects the tetramer and fibril in aqueous solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellesia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic salts are a natural component of biomass which have a significant effect on the product yields from a variety of biomass conversion processes. Understanding their effect on biomass at the microscopic level can help discover their mechanistic role. We present a study of the effect of aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) on the largest component of biomass, cellulose, focused on the thermodynamic and structural effect of a sodium ion on the cellulose tetramer, and fibril. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of a cellulose tetramer reveal a number of preferred cellulose-Na contacts and bridging positions. Large scale MD simulations on a model cellulose fibril find that Na+ perturbs the hydroxymethyl rotational state population and consequently disrupts the "native" hydrogen bonding network.

  13. Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-04-01

    Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

  14. Cellulose and cellobiose: adventures of a wandering organic chemist in theoretical chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluyut, John

    2012-04-03

    The energies arising from the rotation of free hydroxyl groups in the central glucose residue of a cellulose crystalline assembly, calculated using RHF, DFT, and FMO2/MP2 methods, will be presented. In addition, interactions of this central glucose residue with some of the surrounding residues (selected on the basis of the interaction strengths) are analyzed. The mechanism of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellobiose, which is the repeating unit of cellulose. Energies corresponding to the different steps of this mechanism calculated using RHF and DFT are compared with those previously reported using molecular dynamics calculations and with experimental data.

  15. Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

    1998-03-24

    A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

  16. Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Myers, Michele D. (Dacono, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

  17. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yongchao [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Tao [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL] [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL] [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress response to heavy carbon load and accumulation of metabolic products. These findings provide new perspectives to enhance the ability of cellulolytic bacteria to produce biofuels and biocommodities with high efficiency and at low cost directly from lignocellulosic biomass.

  18. Process Design of Wastewater Treatment for the NREL Cellulosic Ethanol Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinwinder, T.; Gill, E.; Gerhardt, M.

    2011-09-01

    This report describes a preliminary process design for treating the wastewater from NREL's cellulosic ethanol production process to quality levels required for recycle. In this report Brown and Caldwell report on three main tasks: 1) characterization of the effluent from NREL's ammonia-conditioned hydrolyzate fermentation process; 2) development of the wastewater treatment process design; and 3) development of a capital and operational cost estimate for the treatment concept option. This wastewater treatment design was incorporated into NREL's cellulosic ethanol process design update published in May 2011 (NREL/TP-5100-47764).

  19. Chapter 18: Understanding the Developing Cellulosic Biofuels Industry through Dynamic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newes, E.; Inman, D.; Bush, B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss a system dynamics model called the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the burgeoning cellulosic biofuels industry in the United States. The model has also recently been expanded to include advanced conversion technologies and biofuels (i.e., conversion pathways that yield biomass-based gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, and butanol), but we focus on cellulosic ethanol conversion pathways here. The BSM uses a system dynamics modeling approach (Bush et al., 2008) built on the STELLA software platform.

  20. Calcium Binding by the N-Terminal Cellulose-Binding Domain from Cellulomonas fimi -1,4-Glucanase CenC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    Calcium Binding by the N-Terminal Cellulose-Binding Domain from Cellulomonas fimi -1,4-Glucanase, 1998 ABSTRACT: The interaction of the N-terminal cellulose-binding domain, CBDN1, from Cellulomonas-state stability. Enzymes that degrade cellulose often contain one or more domains that mediate binding

  1. Influence of cellulose oxygen isotope variability in sub-fossil Sphagnum and plant macrofossil components on the reliability of paleoclimate records at the Mer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    Influence of cellulose oxygen isotope variability in sub-fossil Sphagnum and plant macrofossil Available online 15 November 2011 a b s t r a c t This study provides a new understanding of cellulose) is com- prised primarily of cellulose (15­50%), hemicellulose (10­40%), lig- nin (5­30%), proteins (2

  2. The Cellulose-binding Domains from Cellulomonas fimi bbb-1,4-Glucanase CenC Bind Nitroxide Spin-labeled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    The Cellulose-binding Domains from Cellulomonas fimi bbb-1,4-Glucanase CenC Bind Nitroxide Spin6T 1Z3, Canada The N-terminal cellulose-binding domains CBDN1 and CBDN2 from Cellulomonas ®mi cellulase CenC each adopt a jelly-roll b-sandwich struc- ture with a cleft into which amorphous cellulose

  3. List of Journal Publications T. Wu, M. Frydrych, K. O'Kelly, B. Chen*: Poly(glycerol sebacate urethane)-cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ojovan, Michael

    urethane)-cellulose nanocomposites with water-active shape-memory effects, Biomacromolecules. 2014, 15-adaptive and shape-memory behaviour of chitosan-modified cellulose whisker/elastomer composites in different p. Chen*: Mechanical behavior of transparent nanofibrillar cellulose-chitosan nanocomposite films in dry

  4. Binding Strength of Sodium Ions in Cellulose for Different Water Contents M. D. Deshpande,,| Ralph H. Scheicher,*,, Rajeev Ahuja,, and Ravindra Pandey*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Binding Strength of Sodium Ions in Cellulose for Different Water Contents M. D. Deshpande,,| Ralph ions (Na+ ) with cellulose is investigated from first principles for varying degrees of water content OH groups in cellulose which we categorize as two different types. In the absence of water, Na+ forms

  5. Method of increasing the rate of hydration of activated hydroethyl cellulose compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, R. F.; Hoover, L. D.

    1984-10-09

    A method of producing a well servicing fluid containing zinc bromide in which an activated hydroxyethyl cellulose is either admixed with a zinc bromide solution containing above about 30% by weight zinc bromide, or, in the alternative, is admixed with a non-zinc bromide containing solution to produce a viscosified solution which is then admixed with a zinc bromide containing solution.

  6. Production of Cellulase on Mixtures of Xylose and Cellulose in a Fed-Batch Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado 80401 Accepted forpublication May 79, 1989 Cellulase received attention for renewable production of fuels from cellulosics because of the high selectivity for enzyme production, provided the motivation for studying enzyme production on a mixture of xylose

  7. Author's personal copy Fabrication and properties of transparent polymethylmethacrylate/cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy consumption, easy pro- cessability, renewable nature, and recyclability, cellulose nano- crystals for significant reinforcement of polymers at low filler loading levels (Dubief et al., 1999; Duf- resne, 2003). Both natural and synthetic polymers were reported as matrix material. Natural polymers used include

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Cellulosilyticum lentocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David A [Cornell University; Suen, Garret [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Fox, Brian G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Angert, Esther R. [Cornell University; Currie, Cameron [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosilyticum lentocellum DSM 5427 is an anaerobic, endospore-forming member of the Firmicutes. We describe the complete genome sequence of this cellulose-degrading bacterium; originally isolated from estuarine sediment of a river that received both domestic and paper mill waste. Comparative genomics of cellulolytic clostridia will provide insight into factors that influence degradation rates.

  9. Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, J.

    1987-09-18

    A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. A reactor for high-temperature pyrolysis and oxygen isotopic analysis of cellulose via induction heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Michael N.

    A reactor for high-temperature pyrolysis and oxygen isotopic analysis of cellulose via induction and theory to recommend pyrolysis at temperatures above 14508C to minimize memory and fractionation effects of producing pyrolysis conditions for the analysis of oxygen and deuterium isotopic compositions of organic

  11. Nanoporous layered silicate AMH-3/cellulose acetate nanocomposite membranes for gas separations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Nanoporous layered silicate AMH-3/cellulose acetate nanocomposite membranes for gas separations Wun their promising characteristics in gas separation, defect-free zeolite membranes are presently difficult Exfoliation Interface CO2 separation a b s t r a c t Nanoporous layered silicate/polymer composite membranes

  12. Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from a , J. Magid b , B. Yang d , C.E. Wyman c a Forestry and Wood Products, Forest & Landscape, Faculty Received in revised form 8 November 2011 Accepted 9 December 2011 Available online xxx Keywords: Bioethanol

  13. Cost of Abating Greenhouse Gas Emissions with Cellulosic Ethanol Puneet Dwivedi,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    residues and different types of energy crops) that are expected to differ in their production costs and GHG Hudiburg,, Deepak Jaiswal, William Parton,§ Stephen Long,, Evan DeLucia,, and Madhu Khanna*,, Energy below the threshold of at least 60% for biofuels classified as cellulosic biofuels under the Renewable

  14. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, F., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT (Germany); Elsner, P., E-mail: peter.elsner@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT, Germany and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  15. Study of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose for Production of Fuel Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Study of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose for Production of Fuel Ethanol by the Simultaneous to ethanol, a promising alternative fuel, can be carried out efficiently and economically using-glucosidase, with the fermentative synthesis of ethanol. Because the enzymatic step determines the availability of glucose

  16. The Effect of Ethanol on Fuel Price Behavior and the Viability of Cellulosic Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    The Effect of Ethanol on Fuel Price Behavior and the Viability of Cellulosic Biofuels Jacob La's transport fuel in 2010 corn ethanol. #12;Biofuels in the US Biofuels have traditionally been used's transport sector energy from sugar cane. 9.4% of US's transport fuel in 2010 corn ethanol. In 2007, US

  17. Shaping Reactor Microbiomes to Produce the Fuel Precursor nButyrate from Pretreated Cellulosic Hydrolysates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    - butyrate production rate of 0.47 g COD l-1 d-1 in bioreactors that were fed with dilute-acid pretreatedShaping Reactor Microbiomes to Produce the Fuel Precursor nButyrate from Pretreated Cellulosic the production of carboxylic acids with open cultures of microbial consortia (reactor micro- biomes), we

  18. Relationship between wood elastic strain under bending and cellulose crystal strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Montero1* , Bruno Clair1 , Tancrède Alméras1 , Arie van der Lee2 , Joseph Gril1 1 Laboratoire de Mécanique-wall. In each layer, cellulose * Corresponding author: cedric.montero@univ-montp2.fr hal-00646489,version1-30Nov

  19. EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for the Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Highlands County, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue a Federal loan guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for a cellulosic ethanol facility in Highlands County, Florida. This EA is on hold.

  20. Method of increasing the rate of hydration of activated hydroxyethyl cellulose compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, R.F.; Hoover, L.D.

    1987-08-11

    This patent describes a method of producing a well servicing fluid wherein a first solution containing zing bromide is mixed with at least one second solution having dissolved therein a salt selected from the group consisting of calcium chloride, calcium bromide, and mixtures thereof, the improvement which comprises the following steps in the order indicated: (a) admixing a hydroxyethyl cellulose composition with the second solution to produce a viscosified solution and (b) thereafter admixing the viscosified solution with the first solution containing zinc bromide and having a density of at least 17.0 ppg to give the desired well servicing fluid having a density in the range from about 14.2 ppg to about 18.0 ppg, the hydroxyethyl cellulose being activated prior to admixture so as to substantially hydrate or solubilize in the second solution at ambient temperatures.

  1. Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

    2008-07-17

    California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

  2. Experimental study of the effect of sodium carbonate on the conversion of cellulose to oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Siu-Hung

    1981-01-01

    precipitated very fast, the mixture should be stirred up continuously until the slurry vas fed into the feed tank immediately after the reactor reached the desired preheated temperature. Once the feed vas fed, the feed tank was pressurized with nitrogen...) (Me mbe r) (He ber) (H d of Department- December 1981 ABSTHACT Experimental Study of the Effect of Sodium Carbonate on the Conversion of Cellulose to Oil. (December 19B1) Siu-Hunq Chu, B. A. , National Taiwan University Chairman of Advisory...

  3. Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

    2010-09-01

    Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus® conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus® conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

  4. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, John; Weatherwax, Sharlene; Ferrell, John

    2006-06-07

    The Biomass to Biofuels Workshop, held December 7–9, 2005, was convened by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science; and the Office of the Biomass Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The purpose was to define barriers and challenges to a rapid expansion of cellulosic-ethanol production and determine ways to speed solutions through concerted application of modern biology tools as part of a joint research agenda. Although the focus was ethanol, the science applies to additional fuels that include biodiesel and other bioproducts or coproducts having critical roles in any deployment scheme.

  5. Compositions for enhancing hydroysis of cellulosic material by cellulolytic enzyme compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising a GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and an organic compound comprising a carboxylic acid moiety, a lactone moiety, a phenolic moiety, a flavonoid moiety, or a combination thereof, wherein the combination of the GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and the organic compound enhances hydrolysis of a cellulosic material by a cellulolytic enzyme compared to the GH61 polypeptide alone or the organic compound alone. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  6. Rapid response of tree cellulose radiocarbon content to changes in atmospheric /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grootes, P.M.; Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H.; Leach, D.D.; Stuiver, M.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed radial profile for the /sup 14/C concentration in tree cellulose, covering growth rings for the years 1962-1964, was obtained for a Sitka spruce of the US Pacific Coast using accelerator mass spectrometry. The tree cellulose /sup 14/C closely follows atmospheric /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ concentrations, responding to changes with a delay of not more than a few weeks. The delay in response is mostly due to the addition of between 13 and 28% of biospheric CO/sub 2/ to the canopy-air CO/sub 2/ used by the tree for stem cellulose. Delayed incorporation and the use of stored photosynthate of the previous fall appear less important. 63 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Manuscript accepted for publication in Sexual Plant Reproduction Morphogenesis of complex plant cell shapes: the mechanical role of crystalline cellulose in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    not the main stress-bearing component against turgor pressure induced tensile stress in circumferential.geitmann@umontreal.ca Abstract Cellulose is the principal component of the load-bearing system in primary plant cell walls of cellulose in the cell wall is untypically low. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the load-bearing

  8. Develop and Demonstrate the Cellulose to Ethanol Process: Executive Summary of the Final Technical Report, 17 September 1980 - 17 March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emert, George H.; Becker, Dana K.; Bevernitz, Kurt J.; Gracheck, Stephen J.; Kienholz, Eldon W.; Rivers, Dougals B.; Zoldak, Bernadette R.; Woodford, Lindley C.

    1982-01-01

    The Biomass Research Center at the University of Arkansas was contracted by the Solar Energy Research Institute to 'Develop and Demonstrate the Cellulose to Ethanol Process.' The purpose of the contract was to accelerate site selection, site specific engineering, and research and development leading to the determination of the feasibility of economically operating a cellulose to ethanol commercial scale plant.

  9. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  10. Vertical Integration of Biomass Saccharification of Enzymes for Sustainable Cellulosic Biofuel Production in a Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj Kumar, PhD

    2011-05-09

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  11. Integrated cellulosic enzymes hydrolysis and fermentative advanced yeast bioconversion solution ready for biomass biorefineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj Kumar, PhD

    2011-05-04

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  12. Complete genome sequence of the marine, cellulose and xylan degrading bacterium Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klippel, Dr Barbara [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wiebusch, Sigrid [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Basner, Alexander [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Abe, Fumiyoshi [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Horikoshi, Koki [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Antranikian, Garabed [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology)

    2011-01-01

    Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5 was isolated from deep sea sediments at Suruga Bay in Japan and is capable of efficiently hydrolyzing cellulose and xylan. The complete genome sequence of Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5 revealed several genes encoding putatively novel glycoside hydrolases associated with plant biomass degradation.

  13. Fuel Etanol from Cellulosic Biomass LEE R. LYND, JANET H. CusHmAN, ROBERTA J. NICHOLS, CHARLES E. WYMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    in the United States, petroleum supplies the largest share of total energy used and has the highest fraction, global climate change, bal- ance oftrade, and energy security. Energy balance, feed- stock supply from cellulosic bio- mass. The focus is on the use of ethanol as the primary fuel component on a scale

  14. Reducing Enzyme Costs Increases the Market Potential of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    Cellulosic ethanol prices depend heavily on the cost of the cellulase enzymes used to break down the biomass into fermentable sugars. To reduce these costs, NREL partnered with two leading enzyme companies, Novozymes and Genencor, to engineer new cellulase enzymes that are exceptionally good at breaking down cellulose. Genencor is now part of DuPont Industrial Biosciences.

  15. Improved oxidation resistance of organic/inorganic composite atomic layer deposition coated cellulose nanocrystal aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sean W.; Matthews, David J.; Conley, John F., E-mail: jconley@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1148 Kelley Engineering Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Buesch, Christian; Simonsen, John [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 119 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels are coated with thin conformal layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using atomic layer deposition to form hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} penetrated more than 1500??m into the aerogel for extended precursor pulse and exposure/purge times. The measured profile of coated fiber radius versus depth from the aerogel surface agrees well with simulations of precursor penetration depth in modeled aerogel structures. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated CNC aerogel nanocomposites do not show significant thermal degradation below 295?°C as compared with 175?°C for uncoated CNC aerogels, an improvement of over 100?°C.

  16. Maciek R. Antoniewicz DuPont Young Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kelvin H.

    in superconductivity, catalysis and fast ion conduction. Jingguang G. Chen Claire D. LeClaire Professor Professor

  17. Case Study- Steam System Improvements at Dupont Automotive Marshall Laboratory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, A.

    2002-01-01

    and implement small scale cogeneration. These recommendations included reducing the medium pressure steam distribution to low pressure, eliminating the medium pressure to low pressure reducing stations, installing a back pressure steam turbine generator...

  18. Results from tests of DuPont crossflow filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.L.

    2000-05-05

    Crossflow filtration will be used to filter radioactive waste slurry as part of the Late Wash Process.

  19. Lattice based language models Pierre Dupont y and Ronald Rosenfeld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , statistical language models typically estimate P r(wjh) -- the conditional distribution of the identity@univ­st­etienne.fr #12; Keywords: speech recognition, statistical language modeling, lattice based models, smoothing techniques #12; 1 Introduction Statistical language modeling is concerned with estimating the probability

  20. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  1. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cellulase, [beta]-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

    1994-12-13

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35 C to about 40 C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol. 2 figures.

  2. A study of cellulose gasification in a fluidized bed using a high-temperature solar furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    A 4.2-meter solar furnace was used to study the gasification of cellulose with steam in a fluidized bed. The heating value of the high-temperature equilibrium products is about twenty percent higher than that of the reactants. The increase represents stored solar energy; and the product, synthesis gas, is valuable as a chemical feedstock or pipeline gas. All experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure. Pure tabular alumina as well as crushed automotive exhaust was used as a bed material. Microcrystalline {alpha}-cellulose, entrained in argon, entered the fluidized bed just above the distributor. Steam heated to the operating temperature in a 10 cm packed bed section below the fluidized bed. In all cases, the process ran with more steam than required to produce an equimolar mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. We used a quartz reactor between 1100 and 1430 K; a steel reactor at 1500 K and an Inconel reactor at 1600 K. Reactor inside diameter, nominally 5 cm, varied slightly; the bed height was adjusted to keep the gas residence time constant. Hydrogen production rate was measured before and after experiments with steam alone, with this amount subtracted. Equilibrium mixtures were not achieved. Catalysts improved hydrogen yields with higher than expected concentrations of carbon monoxide, methane and lighter hydrocarbons such as ethylene and acetylene. Experiments performed without catalyst at 1300 K, achieved a mixture (dry, argon-free) of 46 mole% CO, 30% H{sub 2} 14% CH{sub 4} 5% CO{sub 2} and 5% C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. An equilibrium mixture at this temperature would have contained 39% CO, 30% H{sub 2} 7% CO{sub 2} and no CH{sub 4} or C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. With the catalyst, the CO and CH{sub 4} decreased to 40% and 2% respectively, the H{sub 2} increased to 47%, and CO{sub 2} remained the same. No ethylene was formed. The hydrocarbon-rich mixtures achieved are typical of rapid-pyrolysis processes.

  3. Lignin-Derived Carbon Fiber as a Co-Product of Refining Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langholtz, Matthew H; Downing, Mark; Graham, Robin Lambert; Baker, Fred S; Compere, A L; Griffith, William {Bill} L; Boeman, Raymond G; Keller, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Lignin by-products from biorefineries has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to petroleum-based precursors to manufacture carbon fiber, which can be combined with a binding matrix to produce a structural material with much greater specific strength and specific stiffness than conventional materials such as steel and aluminum. The market for carbon fiber is universally projected to grow exponentially to fill the needs of clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and to improve the fuel economies in vehicles through lightweighting. In addition to cellulosic biofuel production, lignin-based carbon fiber production coupled with biorefineries may provide $2,400 to $3,600 added value dry Mg-1 of biomass for vehicle applications. Compared to producing ethanol alone, the addition of lignin-derived carbon fiber could increase biorefinery gross revenue by 30% to 300%. Using lignin-derived carbon fiber in 15 million vehicles per year in the US could reduce fossil fuel consumption by 2-5 billion liters year-1, reduce CO2 emissions by about 6.7 million Mg year-1, and realize fuel savings through vehicle lightweighting of $700 to $1,600 per Mg biomass processed. The value of fuel savings from vehicle lightweighting becomes economical at carbon fiber price of $6.60 kg-1 under current fuel prices, or $13.20 kg-1 under fuel prices of about $1.16 l-1.

  4. Microstructural characterization of low-density foams. [Silica, resorcinol/formaldehyde, cellulose/acetate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    Low-density foams (of the order 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/) synthesized from silica aerogel, resorcinol/formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate have fine, delicate microstructures that are extremely difficult to characterize. Improved low-voltage resolution of an SEM equipped with a field-emission gun (FESEM) does permit these materials to be examined directly without coating and at sufficient magnification to reveal the microstructures. Light coatings applied by ion-beam deposition can stabilize the specimens to some extent and reduce electron charging without seriously altering the microstructure, but coatings applied by conventional techniques usually obliterate these microstructures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is required to provide unambiguous microstructural interpretations. However, TEM examinations of these materials can be severely restricted by specimen preparation difficulties and electron-beam damage, and considerable care must be taken to ensure that reasonably accurate TEM results have been obtained. This work demonstrates that low-voltage FESEM analyses can be used to characterize microstructures in these foams, but TEM analyses are required to confirm the FESEM analyses and perform quantitative measurements. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazi, F. K.; Fortman, J.; Anex, R.; Kothandaraman, G.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Dutta, A.

    2010-06-01

    A techno-economic analysis on the production of cellulosic ethanol by fermentation was conducted to understand the viability of liquid biofuel production processes within the next 5-8 years. Initially, 35 technologies were reviewed, then a two-step down selection was performed to choose scenarios to be evaluated in a more detailed economic analysis. The lignocellulosic ethanol process was selected because it is well studied and portions of the process have been tested at pilot scales. Seven process variations were selected and examined in detail. Process designs were constrained to public data published in 2007 or earlier, without projecting for future process improvements. Economic analysis was performed for an 'nth plant' (mature technology) to obtain total investment and product value (PV). Sensitivity analysis was performed on PV to assess the impact of variations in process and economic parameters. Results show that the modeled dilute acid pretreatment process without any downstream process variation had the lowest PV of $3.40/gal of ethanol ($5.15/gallon of gasoline equivalent) in 2007 dollars. Sensitivity analysis shows that PV is most sensitive to feedstock and enzyme costs.

  6. Cellulose nanocrystal-based composite electrolyte with superior dimensional stability for alkaline fuel cell membranes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Yuan; Artmentrout, Aaron A.; Li, Juchuan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Nanda, Jagjit; Ozcan, Soydan

    2015-05-13

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-based composite films were prepared as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and silica gel hybrid was used to bind the CNCs to form a robust composite film. The mass ratio (i.e., 1 : 1, 1 : 2) of PVA and silica gel was tuned to control the hydrophobicity of the resulting films. Composite films with a range of CNC content (i.e., 20 to 60%) were prepared to demonstrate the impact of CNC on the performance of these materials as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Different from previously reported cross-linked polymermore »films, CNC-based composite films with 40% hydrophobic binder (i.e., PVA : silica gel=1 : 2) exhibited simultaneous low water swelling (e.g., ~5%) and high water uptake (e.g., ~80%) due to the hydrophilicity and extraordinary dimensional stability of CNC. It also showed a conductivity of 0.044 and 0.065 S/cm at 20 and 60 oC, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the film with 60% CNC and 40% binder is characterized by the lowest hydroxide conductivity-normalized swelling ratio. Decreased CNC content (i.e., 40 and 20%) resulted in comparable hydroxide conductivity but a greater swelling ratio. These results demonstrate the advantage of CNC as a key component for a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells over conventional polymers, suggesting the great potential of CNCs in improving the dimensional stability while maintaining the conductivity of existing anion exchange membranes.« less

  7. An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

    2012-07-01

    Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

  8. A pilot plant scale reactor/separator for ethanol from cellulosics. Quarterly report No. 1 & 2, October 1, 1997--March 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.C.

    1998-06-01

    The basic objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a continuous, low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. This process involves a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic release of sugars and the consecutive saccharification/fermentation of cellulose (glucans) followed by hemi-cellulose (glucans) in a multi-stage continuous stirred reactor separator (CSRS). During year 1, pretreatment and bench scale fermentation trials will be performed to demonstrate and develop the process, and during year 2, a 130 L or larger process scale unit will be operated to demonstrate the process using straw or cornstalks. Co-sponsors of this project include the Indiana Biomass Grants Program, Bio-Process Innovation, Xylan Inc as a possible provider of pretreated biomass.

  9. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  10. Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H.C.

    1998-08-04

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials. 5 figs.

  11. Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials.

  12. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yongchao; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Liao, James C; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Guss, Adam M; Yang, Yunfeng; Graham, David E

    2012-01-01

    Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to significantly alter the mixture of fermentation products. The initial application of this system successfully engineered a strain with high ethanol productivity from complex biomass substrates.

  13. The rheology of aqueous solutions of ethyl hydroxy-ethyl cellulose (EHEC) and its hydrophobically modified analogue (hmEHEC): extensional flow response in capillary break-up, jetting (ROJER) and in a cross-slot extensional rheometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vivek

    Cellulose derivatives containing associating hydrophobic groups along their hydrophilic backbone are used as rheology modifiers in the formulation of water-based spray paints, medicinal sprays, cosmetics and printable inks. ...

  14. Application in the Ethanol Fermentation of Immobilized Yeast Cells in Matrix of Alginate/Magnetic Nanoparticles, on Chitosan-Magnetite Microparticles and Cellulose-coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanova, Viara; Hristov, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were entrapped in matrix of alginate and magnetic nanoparticles and covalently immobilized on magnetite-containing chitosan and cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles with covalently immobilized thermostable {\\alpha}-amylase and chitosan particles with immobilized glucoamylase were also prepared. The immobilized cells and enzymes were applied in column reactors - 1/for simultaneous corn starch saccharification with the immobilized glucoamylase and production of ethanol with the entrapped or covalently immobilized yeast cells, 2/ for separate ethanol fermentation of the starch hydrolysates with the fixed yeasts. Hydrolysis of corn starch with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase and glucoamylase, and separate hydrolysis with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase were also examined. In the first reactor the ethanol yield reached approx. 91% of the theoretical; the yield was approx. 86% in the second. The ethanol fermentation was affected by the typ...

  15. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  16. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda. A Research Roadmap Resulting from the Biomass to Biofuels Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-30

    A robust fusion of the agricultural, industrial biotechnology, and energy industries can create a new strategic national capability for energy independence and climate protection. In his State of the Union Address (*Bush 2006), President George W. Bush outlined the Advanced Energy Initiative, which seeks to reduce our national dependence on imported oil by accelerating the development of domestic,renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuels. The president has set a national goal of developing cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable alternative energy sources to substantially replace oil imports in the coming years.Fuels derived from cellulosic biomass—the fibrous, woody, and generally inedible portions of plant matter—offer one such alternative to conventional energy sources that can dramatically impact national economic growth, national energy security, and environmental goals. Cellulosic biomass is an attractive energy feedstock because it is an abundant, domestic, renewable source that can be converted to liquid transportation fuels.These fuels can be used readily by current-generation vehicles and distributed through the existing transportation-fuel infrastructure.

  17. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano (Madison, WI); West, Ryan M. (Madison, WI)

    2012-04-03

    Described is a method to make liquid chemicals, such as functional intermediates, solvents, and liquid fuels from biomass-derived cellulose. The method is cascading; the product stream from an upstream reaction can be used as the feedstock in the next downstream reaction. The method includes the steps of deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be converted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid so formed can be further reacted to yield a host of valuable products. For example, the pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes. Alternatively, the nonene may be isomerized to yield a mixture of branched olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of branched alkanes. The mixture of n-butenes formed from .gamma.-valerolactone can also be subjected to isomerization and oligomerization to yield olefins in the gasoline, jet and Diesel fuel ranges.

  18. A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 5 and 6, October 1, 1998 through March 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

    1999-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

  19. A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 7, 8 and Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

    1999-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast stran, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

  20. MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Frey

    2009-02-22

    This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

  1. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI; Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano [Madison, WI; West, Ryan M [Madison, WI

    2014-01-07

    Described is a method to make liquid chemicals. The method includes deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be conveted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes.

  2. Trajectory Optimization for Dynamic Needle Insertion* Matt Heverly and Pierre Dupont John Triedman, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Pierre

    into the left ventricle and passing a balloon through the needle into the aortic valve. The balloon to a restriction in the aortic valve. As depicted in Fig. 1, correcting this defect involves inserting a needle is then inflated, which expands the valve, reducing the pressure in the ventricle and allowing it to develop

  3. SRL history, Volume 4, E.I. DuPont Nemours and Co. Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-04-01

    This volume summarizes general information on personnel, safety, security, and service at the Savannah River Laboratory.

  4. used in energy applications. DuPont says the NSF center is helping to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    the water that is con- verted to steam in the boiler and sent on to drive the turbines that generate

  5. Applications of DuPont photopolymer cromalin® for dry deposition of particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurt, Michielle Helene

    2006-01-01

    Thermoplastic..2.1.2.1 Thermoset vs. Thermoplastic A polymer material iswhether it is a thermoplastic or thermoset. Thermoplastics

  6. Applications of DuPont photopolymer cromalin® for dry deposition of particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurt, Michielle Helene

    2006-01-01

    display screens and photocatalysis processes. The thermaltreated through photocatalysis are trichloroethylene and

  7. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) E. Dupont,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Atomic Energy Agency, Austria 8 Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan 9 China Institute of Atomic Energy 12 Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk, Russia 13 Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Petten, Netherlands 14 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, South Korea 15 Argonne

  8. E I DuPont De Nemours & Co (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDouble Oak,Durra BuildingCane FuelFuelE I

  9. E I DuPont De Nemours & Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDouble Oak,Durra BuildingCane FuelFuelE IE I

  10. Label-free Quantitative Proteomics for the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis Reveal Distinct Abundance Patterns upon Growth on Cellobiose, Crystalline Cellulose, and Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Lochner, Adriane [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL; Antranikian, Garabed [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Graham, David E [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis cultures grown on four different carbon sources identified 65% of the cells predicted proteins in cell lysates and supernatants. Biological and technical replication together with sophisticated statistical analysis were used to reliably quantify protein abundances and their changes as a function of carbon source. Extracellular, multifunctional glycosidases were significantly more abundant on cellobiose than on the crystalline cellulose substrates Avicel and filter paper, indicating either disaccharide induction or constitutive protein expression. Highly abundant flagellar, chemotaxis, and pilus proteins were detected during growth on insoluble substrates, suggesting motility or specific substrate attachment. The highly abundant extracellular binding protein COB47-0549 together with the COB47-1616 ATPase might comprise the primary ABC-transport system for cellooligosaccharides, while COB47-0096 and COB47-0097 could facilitate monosaccharide uptake. Oligosaccharide degradation can occur either via extracellular hydrolysis by a GH1 {beta}-glycosidase or by intracellular phosphorolysis using two GH94 enzymes. When C. obsidiansis was grown on switchgrass, the abundance of hemicellulases (including GH3, GH5, GH51, and GH67 enzymes) and certain sugar transporters increased significantly. Cultivation on biomass also caused a concerted increase in cytosolic enzymes for xylose and arabinose fermentation.

  11. Assessment of fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for Fischer-Tropsch diesel from coal and cellulosic biomass.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, X.; Wang, M.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

    2011-04-01

    This study expands and uses the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model to assess the effects of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and cellulosic biomass and coal cofeeding in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) plants on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of FT diesel (FTD). To demonstrate the influence of the coproduct credit methods on FTD life-cycle analysis (LCA) results, two allocation methods based on the energy value and the market revenue of different products and a hybrid method are employed. With the energy-based allocation method, fossil energy use of FTD is less than that of petroleum diesel, and GHG emissions of FTD could be close to zero or even less than zero with CCS when forest residue accounts for 55% or more of the total dry mass input to FTD plants. Without CCS, GHG emissions are reduced to a level equivalent to that from petroleum diesel plants when forest residue accounts for 61% of the total dry mass input. Moreover, we show that coproduct method selection is crucial for LCA results of FTD when a large amount of coproducts is produced.

  12. A case study of agricultural residue availability and cost for a cellulosic ethanol conversion facility in the Henan province of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin [ORNL; Wu, Yun [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    A preliminary analysis of the availability and cost of corn stover and wheat straw for the area surrounding a demonstration biorefinery in the Henan Province of China was performed as a case study of potential cooperative analyses of bioenergy feedstocks between researchers and industry in the US and China. Though limited in scope, the purpose of this analysis is to provide insight into some of the issues and challenges of estimating feedstock availability in China and how this relates to analyses of feedstocks in the U.S. Completing this analysis also highlighted the importance of improving communication between U.S. researchers and Chinese collaborators. Understanding the units and terms used in the data provided by Tianguan proved to be a significant challenge. This was further complicated by language barriers between collaborators in the U.S. and China. The Tianguan demonstration biorefinery has a current capacity of 3k tons (1 million gallons) of cellulosic ethanol per year with plans to scale up to 10k tons (3.34 million gallons) per year. Using data provided by Tianguan staff in summer of 2011, the costs and availability of corn stover and wheat straw were estimated. Currently, there are sufficient volumes of wheat straw and corn stover that are considered 'waste' and would likely be available for bioenergy in the 20-km (12-mile) region surrounding the demonstration biorefinery at a low cost. However, as the industry grows, competition for feedstock will grow and prices are likely to rise as producers demand additional compensation to fully recover costs.

  13. Overcoming the Recalcitrance of Cellulosic Biomass by Value Prior to Pulping: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-221

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Value Prior to Pulping (VPP) project goal was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of introducing a new value stream into existing pulp and paper mills. Essentially the intent was to transfer the energy content of extracted hemicellulose from electricity and steam generated in the recovery boiler to a liquid transportation fuel. The hemicellulose fraction was extracted prior to pulping, fractionated, or conditioned if necessary, and fermented to ethanol. Commercial adaptation of the process to wood hemicelluloses was a prerequisite for using this less currently valued component available from biomass and wood. These hemicelluloses are predominately glucurono-xylan in hardwoods and galactoglucomannan in softwoods (with a significant softwood component of an arabino-xylan) and will yield fermentation substrates different from cellulose. NREL provided its expertise in the area of fermentation host evaluation using its Zymomonas strains on the CleanTech Partner's (CTP) VPP project. The project was focused on the production of fuel ethanol and acetic acid from hemicellulose streams generated from wood chips of industrially important hardwood and softwood species. NREL was one of four partners whose ethanologen was tested on the hydrolyzed extracts. The use of commercially available enzymes to treat oligomeric sugar extracts was also investigated and coupled with fermentation. Fermentations by NREL were conducted with the Zymomonas mobilis organism with most of the work being performed with the 8b strain. The wood extracts hydrolyzed and/or fermented by NREL were those derived from maple, mixed southern hardwoods, and loblolly pine. An unhydrolyzed variant of the mixed southern hardwood extract possessed a large concentration of oligomeric sugars and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed with a number of enzymes, followed by fermentation. The fermentation of the wood extracts was carried out at bench scale in flasks or small bioreactors, with a maximum volume of 500 mL.

  14. Environmental Sustainability of Cellulosic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    forms of energy extraction/production/use have environmental footprints, most of which have not been the expectation is that those crops would be grown on existing croplands and with only minor inputs of water and crop residue harvested from existing agricultural land cleared or culti- vated prior to December 19

  15. Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd Jump to: navigation,Cauvery Hydro Energy LtdCellana

  16. Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROM BOILING NITRIC

  17. THE SETTLERS PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTION 1894 - 1945 & THE DUPONT PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTION 1943 - 1945 BRINGING HISTORY TO LIFE IN SOUTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHULTZ CR PH.D.

    2009-07-13

    Washington is called the 'Evergreen State' and it evokes images like this of lush forests, lakes and mountains. However, such images apply primarily to the half of the state west of the Cascade Mountains, where we are today. Eastern Washington state is quite a different matter and I want to draw your attention to a portion of Eastern Washington that is the focus ofmy presentation to you this morning. This image was taken on a part of the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, a 586-square mile government reservation, the second largest DOE facility in the nation . Here you can see where I am talking about, roughly 220 miles southeast of Seattle and about the same distance northeast of Portland.

  18. Local Vector-based Models for Sense Discrimination M.-C. de Marneffe, C. Archambeau, P. Dupont, M. Verleysen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verleysen, Michel

    thesaurus)-based and unsupervised techniques. All these tech- niques use the possible senses is used but a dictionary or a thesaurus gives the addi- tional knowledge to define senses. The third

  19. Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass Recalcitrance Factors Using Reference Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Xiaohui; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    Three commercial cellulase preparations, Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, Dupont Accellerase® 1500, and DSM Cytolase CL, were evaluated for their hydrolytic activity using a set of reference biomass substrates with controlled substrate characteristics. It was found that lignin remains a significant recalcitrance factor to all the preparations, although different enzyme preparations respond to the inhibitory effect of lignin differently. Also, different types of biomass lignin can inhibit cellulose enzymes in different manners. Enhancing enzyme activity toward biomass fiber swelling is an area significantly contributing to potential improvement in cellulose performance. While the degree of polymerization of cellulose in the reference substrates did not present a major recalcitrance factor to Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, cellulose crystallite has been shown to have a significant lower reactivity toward all enzyme mixtures. The presence of polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) in Novozymes Ctec2 appears to enhance enzyme activity toward decrystallization of cellulose. This study demonstrated that reference substrates with controlled chemical and physical characteristics of structural features can be applied as an effective and practical strategy to identify cellulosic enzyme activities toward specific biomass recalcitrance factor(s) and provide specific targets for enzyme improvement.

  20. Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels RFS2 Approved Modular facilities producing 5-20 million gallons year of RFO Capex of 20-100 MM 20+ years of combustion experience - over 15 million gallons...

  1. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carbon alleviation Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate,...

  2. Production of High Value Cellulose from Tobacco

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berson, R Eric; Dvaid, Keith; McGinley, W Mark; Meduri, Praveen; Clark, Ezra; Dayalan, Ethirajulu; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Sunkara, Mahendra; Colliver, Donald

    2011-06-15

    The Kentucky Rural Energy Supply Program was established in 2005 by a federal direct appropriation to benefit the citizens of the Commonwealth by creating a unified statewide consortium to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency in Kentucky. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Biomass Programs initially funded the consortium in 2005 with a $2 million operational grant. The Kentucky Rural Energy Consortium (KREC) was formed at the outset of the program to advance energy efficiency and comprehensive research on biomass and bioenergy of importance to Kentucky agriculture, rural communities, and related industries. In recognition of the successful efforts of the program, KREC received an additional $1.96 million federal appropriation in 2008 for renewal of the DOE grant. From the beginning, KREC understood the value of providing a statewide forum for the discussion of Kentucky's long term energy needs and economic development potential. The new funding allowed KREC to continue to serve as a clearinghouse and support new research and development and outreach programs for energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  3. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 CN form Wide Variety of Sources Tunicate Wheat Straw Cotton Sugar Beet Sisal Ramie Bacteria Trees Plants Other Algae Banana Potato Alfa, Hemp, Flax, Jute, etc 5 Biosynthesis...

  4. Advanced Cellulosic Biofuels - Leveraging Ensyn's Commercially...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to % Yields from VGO (ratio of yields) Gasoline + Diesel Diesel Gasoline Decant Oil Upstream Downstream Crude Oil Diesel Gasoline RFO 15 Refinery Coprocessing vs...

  5. Visualization of biomass solubilization and cellulose regeneration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95(5):904-910. Dale BE. 2008. Biofuels: Thinking clearly about the issues. J Agric Food Chem 56(11):3885-3891. Das P, Ganesh A, Wangikar P. 2004. Influence of pretreatment for...

  6. PROCESS DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF CELLULOSE HYDROLYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Marshal - Stevens Cost Index (dimensionless) Number of BTU'sby the Marshall Steven cost index for the year of reference.MSIaMARSHALL STEVEN COST INDEX TABLE 8-4 DETERMINATION OF

  7. ATTACHMENT 6 Crosslinkingof CelluloseAcetate with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, Ramani

    and washed twice more with watexacetone as above. Finally the gels were filtered, dried, and dried over P205, only catalytic amounts of triflic acid would be required to form crosslinks. Triflic anhydride, NY; viscosity (ASTM-A): 25 s; 4058 acetyl] was dried overnight in a vacuum oven over phosphorus

  8. Degradation of cellulosic material by cellulomonas fimi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Steven Daniel

    2015-06-29

    The world stocks of fossil fuels are dwindling and may be all but out before the end of the century. Despite this there is increasing demand for them to be used for transport, and the ever increasing green house gases ...

  9. Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Forest Service held on June 26, 2012

  10. Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    infrastructure Hydrokinetic energy, Marine infrastructure Barrier films and coatings Food packaging Organic electronics (PV, OLED) Energy Storage Building envelope: Vacuum...

  11. Enzymatic hydrolysis of low substituted carboxymethyl cellulose 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanona Dominquez, Guadalupe

    1984-01-01

    and Jeffrey Nash for their personal help. Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACyT) and the Food Protein Research and Development Center for the financial assistance which made this Master program possible. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page...

  12. PROCESS DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF CELLULOSE HYDROLYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Process Design and Economic Evaluation . • Determination ofOPTIMAL PROCESS DESIGN AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION Based on the

  13. Cellulosome preparations for cellulose hydrolysis - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReportsDeterminatIonFornl7 Winn,Kim SEnergyMaking Same

  14. Four Cellulosic Ethanol Breakthroughs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report toDepartment ofEnergy4

  15. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartmentAuditsDepartmentj.BETOBILIWG:

  16. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUS SERVICE SUBSIDIES ATj. IndirectEngines |BGE6,Tomorrow

  17. Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWest KentuckyRestorationThat SaveRM ExitEnergyDraft

  18. Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | InternationalLandLiquefiedof Energy Louisiana:

  19. Electrospinning of Cellulose and Carbon Nanotube-Cellulose Fibers for Smart Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankonien, Alexander

    2008-08-19

    temperature heat source, a heat gun. The potentiometer on the heat gun allowed for flow temperatures up to 500 oC. However, the high airspeed from the heat gun threatened to disturb the formation of the Taylor cone and the nano-scale fibers. Thus a shield... gun from the heat sink around the needle, the temperature of the solution within the needle was carefully calibrated to higher temperatures. Setup C also conserved the solution’s concentration of solvent by allowing for heating within the syringe...

  20. 2014 Statistical Consulting Co-Op Co-Operative Education Position Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepp, Larry

    forecasting and Six Sigma training. Application areas include operations, research and development, marketingPont Six Sigma certification possible). DuPont at a Glance: DuPont is a global Fortune 100 company

  1. SRS Dose Reconstruction Report August 2006 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1954 to 1992, first by EI duPont de Nemours and Company (Dupont) for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission representative activities. SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility that produced nuclear materials

  2. Evaluation of fungicide programs for management of Botrytis bunch rot of grapes: 2009 field trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, Christopher N; Bay, Ian S.; Herche, Ryan W; Gubler, W D

    2009-01-01

    Manufacturer Bayer Crop Science DuPont Arysta Life ScienceInc. JMS Flower Farms, Inc. DuPont Bayer Crop ScienceBayer Crop Science Isagro, USA OE444: DuGassa/Goldschmidt

  3. Flags in Space: NASA Symbols and Flags in the U.S. Manned Space Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platoff, Anne M.

    Fabrics,” web page, http:// www.dupont.com/solarmax/html/Program,” web pages, http://www.dupont.com/solarmax/html/web page, http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/02/ 0220_0220_johnglenn.html [

  4. Six Flags over Luna: The Role of Flags in Moon Landing Conspiracy Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platoff, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    web page, http://web.archive.org/web/20040309040240/http://www.dupont.com/solarmax/html/web pages, http://web.archive.org/web/20040308183349/http://www.dupont.com/solarmax/html/

  5. The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States Language: English Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES biofuels (including algae and biomass), bio-inspired, membrane, carbon sequestration, materials and chemistry by...

  6. EFFECT OF NITROGEN OXIDE PRETREATMENTS ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrevik, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    57) TO EXTRACTION WATER (6276) _________________________ ~~~focus this study on the extraction using water only, with noe followed by water leaching, then extraction for 11 hOl.lr

  7. Cellulose and Biomass Conversion Technology and Its Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    . C.E. WYMAN National Renewable Energy Laboratory ] .ansportation fuels are almost totally derived from petroleum and accounted for more than one-quarter of the total energy used in the U.S. in 1989 system, and nitrogen oxides and unburned hydrocarbons from auto- motive exhaust contrihute [0 ozone

  8. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01

    Mike Ladisch, Purdue University • Lime pretreatment - MarkControlled pH AFEX ARP Lime *Cumulative soluble sugars asStage 2 Stage 1 Maximum possible Lime ARP AFEX Controlled pH

  9. Electric Field Alignment of Cellulose Based-Polymer Nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalidindi, Sanjay Varma

    2012-07-16

    of approximately 30. The behavior of CWs (alignment and chain formation) under an applied electric field was found to be a function of applied electric field magnitude, frequency and duration. Following alignment, the CW/PVAc nanocomposites are thermally dried...

  10. Preliminary Economics for Hydrocarbon Fuel Production from Cellulosic Sugars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, James R.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2014-05-18

    Biorefinery process and economic models built in CHEMCAD and a preliminary, genome-scale metabolic model for the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi were used to simulate the bioconversion of corn stover to lipids, and the upgrading of these hydrocarbon precursors to diesel and jet fuel. The metabolic model was based on the recently released genome sequence for L. starkeyi and on metabolic pathway information from the literature. The process model was based on bioconversion, lipid extraction, and lipid oil upgrading data found in literature, on new laboratory experimental data, and on yield predictions from the preliminary L. starkeyi metabolic model. The current plant gate production cost for a distillate-range hydrocarbon fuel was estimated by the process model Base Case to be $9.5/gallon ($9.0 /gallon of gasoline equivalent) with assumptions of 2011$, 10% internal return on investment, and 2205 ton/day dry feed rate. Opportunities for reducing the cost to below $5.0/gallon, such as improving bioconversion lipid yield and hydrogenation catalyst selectivity, are presented in a Target Case. The process and economic models developed for this work will be updated in 2014 with new experimental data and predictions from a refined metabolic network model for L. starkeyi. Attaining a production cost of $3.0/gallon will require finding higher value uses for lignin other than power generation, such as conversion to additional fuel or to a co-product.

  11. Advanced Biofuels from Cellulose via Genetic Engineering of Clostridiu...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kg from 2010-2013. By eliminating the aeration step, anaerobic pathway has less CapEx comparing to aerobic pathway (compressor, small reactor, mass transfer). Isoprene...

  12. Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandor, D.; Wallace, R.; Peterson, S.

    2008-04-01

    This report identifies, outlines, and documents a set of plausible scenarios for producing significant quantities of lignocellulosic ethanol in 2017. These scenarios can provide guidance for setting government policy and targeting government investment to the areas with greatest potential impact.

  13. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01

    largest source of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions comes fromLittle if any net carbon dioxide emissions Solid waste

  14. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01

    Grid Electricity SSCF Raw Materials Cellulase DistillationGrid Electricity SSCF Raw Materials Cellulase Distillation

  15. The Journey to Commercializing Cellulosic Biofuels in the United...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    radius of the plant. The state-of-the-art facility will feature an electricity cogeneration component that will generate up to 21 megawatts of electricity -- enough to power...

  16. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by U.S. Forest Service and Purdue University held on June 26, 2012

  17. Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    target"blank">Watch a video segment about Bruce's story at the beginning of the film "Bioenergy: America's Energy Future." EERE Energy Impacts: Biorefineries Give Local...

  18. Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Russian Federation...809 million ha...20.6% world's forests Brazil...520 million ha...12.9% world's...

  19. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01

    on historic estimates by NREL Corn EtOH Price Time Now 24Reaction System 5 inches NREL Bench Systems Commercialglucose Courtesy of M. Himmel, NREL Key Question: How Much

  20. Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantaged Jet Fuel Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distillate Range Hydrocarbons with a focus on Jet Fuel Critical Success Factors Ash Removal Necessary to Reduce Potential Catalyst Poisons Partial Removal during...

  1. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    press release. Bioproducts-products produced using biological resources instead of fossil fuels-are part of BETO's approach to replace the whole barrel of oil, which...

  2. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that can be used to commercially produce high-quality bio-based chemicals, in a project funded by the Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO). Genomatica...

  3. Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    test the latest engineering advancements and accelerate commercial production. The Indian River County BioEnergy Center (Center) will have an annual output of eight million gallons...

  4. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01

    improve technology and reduce costs • In response to recentuses and to advance technologies to reduce costs Basis of MyEthanol • Operating costs are low • Technology is ready to

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Cellulose-degrading bacteria associated with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transcontinental movement during human trade and travel is resulting in increased rates of biological invasions

  6. Identification and Characterization of Non-Cellulose-Producing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: biofuels (including algae and biomass), bio-inspired, membrane, carbon sequestration, materials and chemistry by design,...

  7. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01

    all but one energy source: petroleum – We use more petroleumMetrics for Ethanol Petroleum in/Energy out Fossil energyMetrics for Ethanol Petroleum in/Energy out Fossil energy

  8. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Composition in Agro-ecosystems Purdue University Task A. 2 Perennial grasses had lower sediment losses * Greater loss of soil following rain events from poplar, maize, and...

  9. Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReportsDeterminatIonFornl7 Winn,Kim SEnergyMaking Same - Energy

  10. Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReportsDeterminatIonFornl7 Winn,Kim SEnergyMaking Same -

  11. Cost-Effective Enzyme for Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic Biomass -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentratingPortalCoolCoronary StentsTheEnergy Innovation

  12. Property:RenewableFuelStandard/CellulosicBiofuel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to: navigation,PowerAdvancedBiofuel Jump

  13. Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Function - Symposium: Cellulose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1,Center OrganizationInfraredEFRCInverse

  14. Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,BreakoutRetooling Michigan:EnergyImmobilizationof

  15. Pilot Integrated Cellulosic Biorefinery Operations to Fuel Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1,an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage FrameworkPilotPilot

  16. Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research at NREL Advanced PetroleumDepartment|

  17. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make6,Energy1 DOEDepartmentDOE/SC-0095

  18. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make6,Energy1

  19. Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping into Funding forFY'17 Projects forgrayCommercial-Scale |

  20. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests ofO y (Journal Article)ethanol production (Patent) |

  1. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests ofO y (Journal Article)ethanol production (Patent)

  2. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests ofO y (Journal Article)ethanol production

  3. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests ofO y (Journal Article)ethanol productionethanol

  4. Identification and Characterization of Non-Cellulose-Producing Mutants of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article) |SciTech ConnectIWTUSciTech

  5. The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACE Observations (JournalTheSciTechTrimers in

  6. The Journey to Commercializing Cellulosic Biofuels in the United States |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority J-I-12 GeV CEBAFTheThe February 27,TheDepartment

  7. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTIONEnergy ScientistsinArab Emiratesand

  8. Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic Biofuel

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1ResearchUniversity CommencementTransition Effort |Plant |

  9. The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »TanklessResearchEnergy2Fall 2011The ChiefThe

  10. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, Inc | DepartmentPeer20InsulatedofBEST OFFERJune 2013

  11. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, IncBio CentersBreaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To

  12. Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting in Minority Banks InvestingLab Labs and

  13. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I Due

  14. Intense pulsed light sintering of copper nanoink for printed electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hak-Sung; Dhage, Sanjay R.; Shim, Dong-Eun; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    triazine) epoxy composite, polyimide ?lm (Kapton, Dupont),copper nanoink on: (a) polyimide ?lm; (b) glass ?ber BT (

  15. Convective heating analysis of an IFE target in a high temperature, low Reynolds number xenon environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdener, Dain Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Group, “Material Properties: Polyimide (Kapton)”, Polyimide%20Kapton/PolyimideKaElectronics : Kapton® Polyimide Film." DuPont. The Miracles

  16. ""Test Before TouchTest Before Touch"" Easier Said Than DoneEasier Said Than Done

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ""Test Before TouchTest Before Touch"" Easier Said Than DoneEasier Said Than Done Ken Crawford, DuPontKen Crawford, DuPont Kent Haggerty, DupontKent Haggerty, Dupont #12;OverviewOverview · Test Before Touch (TBT Voltage Testing · Summary & Conclusions #12;#12;How Would You Verify Power is Off?How Would You Verify

  17. Morphological characterization of O-rings from the GCEP long-term test program. [Dupont 1141, 3M 4762 and 4768, and Parker V884-75 O-rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, M.R.; Nolan, T.A.

    1984-07-30

    Based on the results of the morphological and structural characterizations reported herein the following conclusions have been reached. (1) O-rings of any of the four materials studied should last at least 10 years when employed in a standard static seal configuration utilizing a groove that holds the O-ring. (2) Such a static seal provides considerable protection from reaction. (3) The reaction of UF/sub 6/ with the O-ring material is the dominant degradation reaction; however there are effects on a least one compound that appear to be related to HF penetration into the O-ring matrix. The slow nature of the reaction of UF/sub 6/ with the flanged O-rings makes life projections quite difficult using any means. It would appear that one of the best methods for determining the life of these materials would be actual use combined with routine long-term inspection/sampling of a selected typical subset of O-rings. At GCEP conditions it would not be surprising to find the actual life of the O-rings is longer than any anticipated operation time of the plant facility. 16 figures, 1 table.

  18. Sustainable Nano-Materials: What is happening at the cellular...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level NanoCellulose Balls Cellulose Whiskers Cellulosics Artificial SkinBlood Vessels High surface area, Hydrophilicity, Biocompatibility, and Biodegradability...

  19. Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    while reducing fuel losses. Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) was founded in 1993 in Wilmington, DE, with the acquisition of rights to certain DuPont polymer membrane...

  20. Analytical Development and Support Presentation for BETO 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Bt-D. Pretreatment Processing Timeline Budget Barriers * Rapid prediction models and analytical work facilitated partnerships with: * INL * Shell * Toyota * DuPont *...

  1. QUATERNIONIC ALGEBRAIC CYCLES AND REALITY PEDRO F. DOS SANTOS AND PAULO LIMAFILHO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    two equivariant spectra. The first one classifies Dupont/Seymour's quaternionic K covering the involution # and satisfying # 2 = -1. Subsequently, R. M. Seymour reintroduced this theory

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-055

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DUPONT COMPANY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0002593

  3. Adding Insulation to an Existing Home | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Incentives for Your Home References High Performance Insulation Professionals Cellulose Insulation Information: Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association...

  4. VISITING COMMITTEE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    present form by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 and updated by the America COMPETES Act covered by this report: Dr. Sujeet Chand (Rockwell Automation), Dr. Uma Chowdhry (DuPont), Dr. Shaygan Dr. Sujeet Chand Rockwell Automation Dr. Uma Chowdhry DuPont Dr. Paul A. Fleury Yale Universi

  5. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01

    by Clostridium thermocellum: Bioenergetics and hydrolysisby Clostridium thermocellum: Bioenergetics and hydrolysisby Clostridium thermocellum: Bioenergetics and hydrolysis

  6. EFFECT OF ACIDIC CONDITIONS ON INTERFACE AND STRENGTH OF CELLULOSE FIBRES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1. Treatment of hemp fibres at varied pH levels. Fibre sliver produced by alignment of hemp fibres was mixed with water at varied pH levels in the range pH = 1-7. The suspensions with fibres were incubated for 1 h in a knife mill and passed through a 1 mm sieve. Consecutively, degradation and extraction of wax, water

  7. Evaluation of interphase properties in a cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene composite by nanoindentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    fibers such as glass, carbon or aramid fibers and talc [1­4]. Natural fibers have numerous advantages of carbon dioxide and can aid in the conservation of petroleum. Natural fiber-reinforced polymer composites (NFRPC) have also attracted attention as a method of recycling natural fibers and plastic waste

  8. Molecular Level Investigations and Mathematical Modeling of Cellulase-catalyzed Hydrolysis of Cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jerome M.

    2012-01-01

    policy motivation for development of renewable energyrenewable energy are also tied to price . Both motivationsrenewable energy to be developed and implemented in the next 10-30 years. Air pollution motivations

  9. Surface-Based Assays for Enzyme Adsorption and Activity on Model Cellulose Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Samuel Andrew

    2012-01-01

    24) Macmillan, J. D. Bioethanol Production: Status andRev (6) Macmillan, J. D. Bioethanol Production: Status and2005. (5) Macmillan, J. D. Bioethanol Production: Status and

  10. Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    ed. ). Handbook on Bioethanol, Production and Utilization.CE (ed. ). Handbook on Bioethanol, Production and Utiliza-design and costing of bioethanol technol- ogy: A tool for

  11. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    and- fermentation-based bioethanol process - Technical andand- fermentation-based bioethanol process. Technical andand- fermentation-based bioethanol process. Technical and

  12. Cellulose and Hemicellulose Models 81 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 8486, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    . However, advanced low- and no-acid technologies are critical if we are to reduce bioethanol costs: Biomass; hydrolysis; kinetics; bioethanol; pretreatment. Introduction When used as a transportation fuel, ethanol produced from lignocel- lulosic biomass, often termed bioethanol, has the potential to provide sig

  13. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01

    bioprocessing for bioethanol production using Saccharomycesconversion to bioethanol in a single bioreactor by b) a CBPof lignocellulose to bioethanol refers to the combining of

  14. Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation and Their Selective Inclusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    , the method is recyclable. XRD, FT-IR, NIR, and SEM were used to monitor the dissolution process necessary to react and/or graft CD chemically onto man-made polymers to increase its mechanical strength so

  15. DECOMPOSITION OF LIGNIN AND CELLOBIOSE IN RELATION TO THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamanaka, Y.

    2010-01-01

    culture of the fungus in a composting mode suggest thatresults were obtained in composting culture of ground woodfeasibility of the composting method remains in doubt. II.

  16. Starch composites reinforced by bamboo cellulosic crystals Dagang Liu a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and innovative processing technologies which offer sustainability and mitigation of the dependence on fossil fuel, competitiveness in price, and applicability to various industries (Yang et al., 2007; Lenz, 1993; Pandey et al

  17. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 42, 4269- 4276.Stover. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 42,sawdust. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 40,

  18. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01

    routes to combine eco-friendly and economical processes forarea is focused on developing eco-friendly and economical

  19. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to fuels and chemicals using boronic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raines, Ronald; Caes, Benjamin; Palte, Michael

    2015-10-20

    Methods and catalyst compositions for formation of furans from carbohydrates. A carbohydrate substrate is heating in the presence of a 2-substituted phenylboronic acid (or salt or hydrate thereof) and optionally a magnesium or calcium halide salt. The reaction is carried out in a polar aprotic solvent other than an ionic liquid, an ionic liquid or a mixture thereof. Additional of a selected amount of water to the reaction can enhance the yield of furans.

  20. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Figure 8.4, the total carbon dioxide emissions determined inof reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but because thesefacts- average carbon dioxide emissions resulting from

  1. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    COSTS DIRECT COSTS~-RAW MATERIALS VAC~FERM basis (1 atm \\ co3 gal H 0 $85. /ton RAW MATERIALS SUBTOTAL %/GAL DIRECTA.F, and Freitas, R.F" Raw Materials Evaluation and Process

  2. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    from traditional feedstocks or oil sands. Finally, Chapter 9hydrocarbons such as oil sands or coal, the use of whichblend that is 2% Canadian oil sands, 6.86% Alaskan crude,

  3. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    compounds, Lyophilization, resuspension to concentrate thepH 5.5. Lyophilization. resuspension to concentrate the

  4. Molecular Level Investigations and Mathematical Modeling of Cellulase-catalyzed Hydrolysis of Cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jerome M.

    2012-01-01

    renewable energy development and deployment in the near future.to a clean energy future. By making renewable technologies

  5. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    to softwoods. Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemicalrelationships. Abstracts of Papers of the American ChemicalHydrolysis. Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical

  6. DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201000426 A Study of the Acid-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of Cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    ­90% of the total mass and are the primary sources of products that can be blended into gasoline and diesel.[2 this sugar can be fermented to produce ethanol or butanol for blending with current transportation fuels.[1] It has also been demonstrated that glucose can be converted by nonbiological catalytic routes to gasoline

  7. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    via acid hydrolysis. Energy Biomass Wastes 13:1281- 16.lignocellulosic fraction. Energy from Biomass and Wastes 15:solid waste. Energy from Biomass and Wastes 15:471-9. 4.

  8. Uncertainty in techno-economic estimates of cellulosic ethanol production due to experimental measurement uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicari, Kristin Jenise

    Abstract Background Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuels remains a major financial and technical challenge at the industrial scale. A critical tool in biofuels process development is the techno-economic ...

  9. Methods for simultaneous control of lignin content and composition, and cellulose content in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Vincent Lee C.; Li, Laigeng

    2005-02-15

    The present invention relates to a method of concurrently introducing multiple genes into plants and trees is provided. The method includes simultaneous transformation of plants with multiple genes from the phenylpropanoid pathways including 4CL, CAld5H, AldOMT, SAD and CAD genes and combinations thereof to produce various lines of transgenic plants displaying altered agronomic traits. The agronomic traits of the plants are regulated by the orientation of the specific genes and the selected gene combinations, which are incorporated into the plant genome.

  10. Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    ed. ). Handbook on Bioethanol, Production and Utilization.ed. ). Handbook on Bioethanol, Production and Utiliza- tion.

  11. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01

    bioprocessing for bioethanol production using Saccharomycessugars. The cost of bioethanol production has become moredegraded for bioethanol production. However, the high cost

  12. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    in the production of bioethanol from lignocellulosicfrom the production and use of bioethanol by between 0.76 tothe production and use of fuel for the six bioethanol cases

  13. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Process Development and Design Studies· . · 9 1. Continuous Cellulase ProductionPROCESS DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN STUDIES Continuous Cellulase Production

  14. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    in fermentation of food waste. Water Science and Technology,agricultural wastes. Food and Bioproducts Processing, 87,

  15. The effect of mixing on the extrusion-spheronisation of a micro-crystalline cellulose paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, M. P.; Kent, M. D.; Rickenbach, J.; Rimmer, G.; Wilson, D. I.; Rough, S. L.

    2014-12-18

    –Bridgwater characterisation based on ram extrusion. Each paste was spheronised and pellet size and shape distributions obtained by automated size analysis. Mixer type (rather than shear strain rate) was found to have the strongest influence on the paste properties...

  16. The evolution of pellet size and shape during spheronisation of an extruded microcrystalline cellulose paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, C. L. S.; Yu, Q.; Lister, V. Y.; Rough, S. L.; Wilson, D. I.; Zhang, M.

    2014-01-17

    The process by which cylindrical rods of soft solid paste extrudate are converted into round pellets on a spheroniser (Marumeriser™) plate was studied by interrupting spheronisation tests and measuring the size and shape of the pellets. Batches...

  17. Photocatalytic cellulosic electrospun fibers for the degradation of potent cyanobacteria toxin microcystin-LR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    sources of pollution attributed from industrial and natural sources.1­6 Solar light driven photocatalysis% of the solar spectrum, which limits the amount of available sunlight that can be used for photocatalysis

  18. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL/TP-510-32438. Asghari,of Microbiology, 155, 601-606. NREL, 1996. EnzymaticSociety, 125, 14300- NREL, 1996. Enzymatic Saccharification

  19. 1 Electrospun Polyethylene Oxide/Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite 2 Nanofibrous Mats with Homogeneous and Heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ithaca, New York 14853, United States 7 bS Supporting Information 1. INTRODUCTION 25 Electrospinning of an all-aqueous system for electrospinning based 64on a combination of CNCs with water-soluble polymers biodegradable, and Received: March 23, 2011 Revised: May 5, 2011 8 ABSTRACT: An electrospinning process

  20. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    collected from the West Valley Material Recovery Facilitywas conducted at the West Valley MRF and Transfer Station (from green bins In the West Valley MRF and Transfer Station

  1. Net energy of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass M. R. Schmer*, K. P. Vogel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    .S. to determine net energy and economic costs based on known farm inputs and harvested yields. In this report, we summarize the agricultural energy input costs, biomass yield, estimated ethanol output, greenhouse gas renewable than nonrenewable energy consumed. Switch- grass monocultures managed for high yield produced 93

  2. The Economic and Financial Implications of Supplying a Bioenergy Conversion Facility with Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Will

    2012-02-14

    Comprehensive analyses are conducted of the holistic farm production-harvesting-transporting-pre-refinery storage supply chain paradigm which represents the totality of important issues affecting the conversion facility ...

  3. PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    5 EthanolBazua, D.C. and C.R. Wilke, "Ethanol Effects on the Kineticsto the Production of Ethanol, LBL-5963. (Submitted to

  4. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tien, Ming (State College, PA); Carlson, John (Port Matilda, PA); Liang, Haiying (Clemson, SC)

    2012-04-24

    Transgenic lignocellulosic plants are provided according to embodiments of the present invention, the transgenic plants transformed with an expression cassette encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which targets the protein to a cell wall of the transgenic plant, where at least 5% of the total amino acid residues of the protein are tyrosine, lysine, serine, threonine or cysteine. Methods of increasing lignin-protein bonds in a lignocellulosic plant are provided according to embodiments of the present invention which include expressing a recombinant nucleic acid in a lignocellulosic plant, the recombinant nucleic acid encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which targets the protein to the cell wall of a plant, where at least 5% of the total amino acid residues of the protein are tyrosine, lysine, serine, threonine or cysteine.

  5. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Technical and economic evaluation. Applied Biochemistry andprocess. Technical and economic evaluation. Appl. Biochem.process. Technical and economic evaluation. Appl. Biochem.

  6. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation" Jian Shi, Mirvatwaste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation Jian Shi, MirvatIn addition, techno- economic evaluation of large scale

  7. A study of surface morphology and phase separation of polymer/cellulose liquid crystal composite membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Mei; Han, Wanqing; Zeng, Rong; Best, Serena Michelle; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

    2012-08-05

    aggregates of LC domains which occurred on the surfaces of as prepared composite membranes disappeared when LC content after heat treatment. ? Fig.1. Surface texture of pure PU membrane and PU/BPC composite membranes, there are six groups of a-d, e-h, i... ?there are three groups of a-d, e-h, i-l, the LC content of each group is 10%, 30%, 50% respectively; the treatment condition for four membranes in each group is followed by as-prepared, cooling to 20°C, cooling to -20°C and natural oven-cooled To elucidate...

  8. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    waste, such as food and kitchen waste, green waste, paper;waste in view of their transformation into ethanol. Belgian Journal of Foodwastes, ADC final, ADC green, acid pretreatment, ethanol, lignin blocking, bovine serum albumin, Aspen model Introduction Overcoming challenges of food

  9. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    and Farrell (2005). Coal to liquid ( CTL) fuel productionBlend Canadian Oil Sands Coal to Liquid CO 2 Emissions fromfrom oil sands or coal to liquids. Conventional Gasoline

  10. Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    included improving the following: Biomass harvesting and feedstock supply system logistics, like more energy and cost-efficient mechanisms for preprocessing Biochemical...

  11. Whole-Cell Immobilization Using Cell Surface-Exposed Cellulose-Binding Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    processes, ranging from the production of ethanol (1) to the degradation of phenol (2). Industrial methods

  12. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01

    Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastBiomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

  13. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    unconventional hydrocarbons such as oil sands or coal, the use of which will result in even higher greenhouse gas

  14. Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21st Century

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by USDA Forest Service held on June 26, 2012

  15. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Enzymatic Conversion of Biomass for Fuels Production, 566,B. , 2002. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process DesignSummary of findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for

  16. Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Lignin-blocking treatment of biomass and uses thereof. Yangin the conversion of biomass to ethanol. American InstituteNY. p 15. Dale BE. 1983. Biomass refining — protein and

  17. Mechanisms and Regulation of Cellulose Degradation by Clostridia papyrosolvens C7 and Neurospora crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zepeda, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    yeast for improved biofuel production. Science, 2010. 330(Current methods for biofuel production are consideredin the slowest step of biofuel production, specifically the

  18. Surface-Based Assays for Enzyme Adsorption and Activity on Model Cellulose Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Samuel Andrew

    2012-01-01

    significant subsidy of biofuel production, the mechanismsmixtures for biofuel production. The kinetic constantsall industrial-scale biofuel production is accomplished by

  19. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01

    for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium Afor Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium byConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

  20. Topic T4 Claudia Hildenbrand #274 EDLC electrodes from cellulose-based carbon aerogels: influence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sources hazards reliable energy supply in the future. Energy efficiency, counteracting this risk, can be drastically augmented by efficient storage of surplus energy. Electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) store of oxygen or nitrogen atoms. 1. Introduction Our society's steadily growing dependency on fossil energy

  1. New process to convert lipids and cellulosic biomass to renewable diesel -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supportsFeet) UndergroundArgonneConversion ofEnergy

  2. High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls - Building America Topa High BindingVoltage||Andrewa

  3. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of WholeX-Raybiomass to

  4. Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol Production in E. Coli

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblemsGeneralGeneric Photovoltaic

  5. Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opens October 30 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | InternationalLand and Asset Transfer forfor»Workshop

  6. Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us| DepartmentFundsEntrepreneursDepartment of

  7. Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and mastheadLake CharlesLand-Use

  8. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLenslessLeslie Poch

  9. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLenslessLeslie Pochbiomass to

  10. Microbial Fuel Cells for Recycle of Process Water from Cellulosic Ethanol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matterEnergyPublicatonsSubstances |

  11. 11 Dupont Circle NW, Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036 | 202.588.5180 Fax 202.588.5185 | www.nwlc.org C Y B E R B U L LY I N G A N D S E X U A L H A R A S S M E N T FA C T S H E E T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    -sharing sites like YouTube, the creation of Facebook or MySpace pages that humiliate other students or partners. Conduct too often dismissed as just "boys being boys" or "mean girls," when severe, can actually that have actual knowledge of harassment and are deliberately indifferent to it may be held liable

  12. Dupont-Nivet, G., Sier, M., Campisano, C.J., Arrowsmith, J R., DiMaggio, E., Reed, K., Lockwood, C., Franke, C., and Hsing, S., 2008, Magnetostratigraphy of the eastern Hadar Basin (Ledi-Geraru research area, Ethiopia) and implications for hominin paleoen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    of the world's most complete collections of homi- nins (Johanson and Taieb, 1976; Johanson et al., 1982; Kimbel

  13. Laura Daz Anadn, CV page 1 LAURA DIAZ ANADON CURRICULUM VIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summer DuPont, Environmental Technology and Management Section, Asturias, Spain Sontara® Fiber Plant Researcher Bayer Pharmaceuticals, R&D and Quality Control Departments, Asturias, Spain Researcher #12;Laura

  14. Who Hires a Rice Jones Graduate School of Business MBA? The following is a list of employers who have hired MBAs from Rice within the past few years. These

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    Duke Energy DuPont Enterprise Products Partners L.P. Entessa Envirofuels Ernst & Young Exterran ExxonMobil Airlines Cooper Industries Credit Suisse DataCert Dell Deloitte Deutsche Bank Direct Energy DKRW Energy LLC

  15. Meetings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    13-14, 2015 Renaissance Washington DC Dupont Circle Washington, D.C. 2014 Meetings August STEAB Meeting August 20-21, 2014 Washington Marriott Georgetown Washington, D.C. March...

  16. Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation and Distribution:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John (2011) 18 Wind power forecasting : state-of-the-art 2009. Monteiro, C.; Bessa, R.; Miranda, V.;...

  17. DTT Energy Reduction Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, C.

    2004-01-01

    DuPont Titanium Technologies has developed a sustainable growth strategy that includes an initiative focused on improving energy efficiency. The energy efficiency initiative is a disciplined approach that began with creation of an Energy...

  18. Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors Veaceslav Coropceanu, Jero^me Cornil,, Demetrio A. da Silva Filho, Yoann Olivier, Robert Silbey,# and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    companies worldwide, such as Sumitomo, DuPont, Solvay, BASF, Ciba, and Merck to name but a few, are now-transfer and charge-transfer processes that take place in -conjugated polymers and oligomers can now be described

  19. 2014 EFRC NEES KICKOFF MEETING AGENDA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4:30pm LAB TOURS RUBLOFF ALD LAB, NISP LAB BY CUMINGS, GHODSSI MSAL BY KOSTAS (MSAL, MEMS SENSORS & ACTUATORS LAB) 5:30pm 7 O'CLOCK DINNER RESERVATION @ AGORA, DUPONT CIRCLE,...

  20. Population balance modeling -an application in particle technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrman, Sheryl H.

    Engineering, DuPont, Wilmington DE, USA · Matlab code: Brendan Hoffman, Kelly Tipton, Yechun Wang, Matt Mc today in sunscreen ­ High surface area catalyst supports (alumina, zirconia, etc..) ­ Chemical

  1. Silicon Ink Technology Offers Path to Higher Efficiency Solar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Silicon Ink Technology Offers Path to Higher Efficiency Solar Cells at Lower Cost Partnering with Sunnyvale-based Innovalight, which was acquired by DuPont in July 2011, EERE...

  2. Germ-Killing or Germ-Attracting? (Daily Press) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fabric first researched by DuPont loses its effectiveness with just a simple coating of dust. The synthetic material was first considered for its germ-killing properties...

  3. Energy Management Pathfinding: Understanding Manufacturers' Ability and Desire to Implement Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    2005-01-01

    for virtually all procedures at DuPont. • Who Decides to Act? A Six Sigma culture at DuPont is the incentive for all staff to seek improvement projects. • Organization: A corporate energy management team assists plants by providing technical assistance... engineers?to improve operations through application of Six Sigma. CONTINENTAL TIRE • Authority & Leadership: A Facilities Engineer takes nominal leadership of an in-plant energy team. Key supervisory engineers enforce energy discipline largely...

  4. PILOT PLANT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JUNE 30, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    phenolic resins and a hot water extraction to remove solubleu lts of alcohol and water extraction on various types o fJ u oj The yield on water extraction was 84 . 9 % and the

  5. Investigation of static zones and wall slip through sequential ram extrusion of contrasting micro-crystalline cellulose-based pastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, M. P.; Rough, S. L.; Wilson, D. I.

    2014-08-23

    glass windows to track the flow of an extruding wax-based tungsten carbide paste. The re- sults allowed a real time velocity profile to be calculated in the convergent zone of the extruder. Han and Ahn [11] limited the windowing to the flow after... - pletion of the static region towards the corner. The static zones observed here differ from images of the static zone reported by Wilmot et al. [10] for ram ex- trusion of wax-based tungsten carbide paste, which show the static area extending with a curved...

  6. Viscoelastic Behavior of Cellulose Acetate in a Mixed Solvent Collins Appaw, Richard D. Gilbert, and Saad A. Khan*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    even in dilute solution, the result of long-range hydrogen bond interactions between DMA and CA.6 Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 John F. Kadla* Advanced parameter () and, in particular, the Hansen hydrogen-bonding solubility parameter index (h) of the solvent

  7. 48 | FEB 2013 | North AmEricAN | SPEctrUm.iEEE.orG CirCuits on Cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    cards or package labels, but remarkable advances in materials science and simpler fabrica- tion methods

  8. PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JAN. 31, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    investigations of both batch and semicontinuous recycle operations,investigation, it was frequently observed that rapid cellulase production was obtained when continuous operation

  9. Fermentation of pectin and cellulose to short chain fatty acids: a comparative study with humans, baboons, pigs, and rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villalba, Leonilde Nonita

    1989-01-01

    Committee: Dr. Joanne R. Lupton The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production from the fermentation of dietary fiber may have important physiological effects on human health and disease, indicating the importance of selecting the appropriate animal model... DETERMINATION OF pH DETERMINATION OF PERCENT RECOVERY OF FIBERS 16 18 20 20 CHAPTER PAGE SHORT CHAIN FATTY ACID ANALYSIS 23 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 24 IV. RESULTS 25 INTERSPECIES DIFFERENCE OF SHORT CHAIN FATTY PRODUCTION PROFILE OF SCFA PRODUCTION...

  10. Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers (RB) with R11, R19, and R30 Cellulose and Rock Wool Insulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    In the sumner testlng (3 R-values, 2 Insulatlon types, and 2 test conf lguratlons--no RB and RBT), thf Latin Square deslgn used In the prevlous TVA testlng could no be used. Instead. a split-spllt-plot test deslgn was chosen (see table 1). Thls design.... The emisslvlty of both sldes of thls RB was approxlmately 0.05. Because of the large number of varlables to be studled In the sumner (3 R-values, 2 types of Insulatlon. 2 attlc conf lguratlons--no RB and RBR), only the RBR was tested In the sumner. With a...

  11. Cellulase for commodity products from cellulosic biomass Michael E Himmel*?, Mark F Ruth*1 and Charles E Wymans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    dramatically over the past two decades, to the point where the fuel is now competitive for blending with gasoline to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, enhance octane, extend the gasoline supply, and promote more

  12. A Bayesian model for predicting local El Niño events using tree ring widths and cellulose ?18O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nippert, Jesse B.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Sandquist, Darren R.; Ward, Joy K.

    2010-03-16

    when one climate factor dominates tree growth and when the trees studied have grown on a well drained soil and rely predominantly on rainwater [Fritts, 1991; Schweingruber, 1996; Cook et al., 2000]. Dendroclimatic analyses have been used to link changes... century: Instrumental data versus multiple proxies (tree-ring isotopes, grape harvest dates and forest fires), Clim. Change, doi:10.1007/ s10584-008-9516-8. G01011 NIPPERT ET AL.: EL NIN˜O PROXY USING TREE RINGS 8 of 9 G01011 Evans, M. N. (2007), Toward...

  13. Chemical composition and characterization of cellulose for Agave as a fast-growing, drought-tolerant biofuels feedstock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    -tolerant biofuels feedstock Hongjia Li,abd Marcus B. Foston,cd Rajeev Kumar,bd Reichel Samuel,cd Xiadi Gao,abd Fan lignocellulosic feedstock for biofuels production. Because agave composition will establish the maximum potential for further characterization and conversion of different agave species as biofuels feedstocks for semi

  14. Kinetic study of acid-catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium Zehui Zhang a,d,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Weixue

    . Zhao a,c, a Division of Biotechnology, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, CAS, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023, China b The State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, CAS, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023, China c Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian 116023

  15. Compounding and foaming of microfibrillatedCompounding and foaming of microfibrillated cellulose and polylactic acid biocompositescellulose and polylactic acid biocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    foamed with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) under different conditions. The structure of the foams CO2 foaming, based on the instability of fluids above the critical temperature and critical pressure foams. CO2 blowing agent was chosen due to its chemical environmental (non-toxic) and economic

  16. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A.

    2011-05-01

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  17. Stages in spheronisation: evolution of pellet size and shape during spheronisation of microcrystalline cellulose-based paste extrudates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, M. P.; Atherton, L. N.; Duffield, S.; Rough, S. L.; Wilson, D. I.

    2014-01-01

    The stages of extrudate breakup and rounding to form spheroidal pellets was investigated for MCC/water pastes and some MCC/water/calcium carbonate pastes using the interrupted technique reported by Lau et al. (2014). A new quantitative parameter...

  18. PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JAN. 31, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    of Solar Energy at Campinas, Brazil, 1976. LBL-5275 (inEnergy and Bioconversion Symposium, Sao Paulo (Campinas) Brazil,

  19. PILOT PLANT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JUNE 30, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    and Microorganisms in Food Industry Waste Processing andand Microorganisms in Food Industry Waste Processing and

  20. Evaluation of Microbial Communities from Extreme Environments as Inocula in a Carboxylate Platform for Biofuel Production from Cellulosic Biomass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cope, Julia Lee

    2013-08-06

    /6/2009 FRN Fly Ranch - Private NV 5 Geothermal springs 8/6/2009 CBHS Buckeye Hot Spring - Inyo National Forest CA 4 Hot spring 8/6/2009 MLNB Mono Lake Navy Beach - State Natural Reserve CA 5 Saline and alkaline lake 8/6/2009 MLIS Mono Lake Island Hot...

  1. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and trends concerning cellulosic materials processed in scCO2 such as cellulose drying to obtain aerogels for cellulose esters and ether synthesis, and fibres and film fabrication. These materials are used in coatings

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cellulose Synthesis Complex (CSC) is made of Three Cellulose Synthases (CesAs) in a 1:1:1 ratio Significance and Impact The arrangement of cellulose synthase proteins is one key...

  3. Artificial Cellulosomes and Arsenic Cleanup: From Single Cell Programming to Synthetic Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Shen-Long

    2011-01-01

    bioprocessing for bioethanol production using Saccharomyceson cellulosic biomass for bioethanol production, p. 12-14.beta-glucosidase for cellulosic bioethanol production. Appl

  4. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry 8833A Pulping and Bleaching Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    /Functionalization of cellulosic fibers f. Chemistry of bleaching recycled fiber: dye oxidation g. Kraft lignin recovery), Principal Journals: Carbohydrate Research, Cellulose, Carbohydrate Polymers, Can. J. Chem., Holzforschung, J

  5. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the cellulose surface lead to enhancement of cellulose microfibril rigidity (mechanics). This result adds novel insights into the complex action of moisture on plant cell...

  6. DOE and USDA Announce More than $10 Million in Bioenergy Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    than 10 million to accelerate fundamental research in the development of cellulosic biofuels. "Cellulosic biofuels offer one of the best near- to mid-term alternatives we have,...

  7. Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intracellular Drug Delivery 2. Oral Drug Delivery Maren Roman Untargeted Targeted Cellular Uptake of Cellulose Nanocrystals Pristine Labeled Chitosan Cellulose nanocrystal Drug...

  8. Department of Energy Offers Abengoa Bioenergy a Conditional Commitment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Groundbreaking Cellulosic Ethanol Project Expected to Create Over 300 Jobs and Build Nation's Capacity for Cellulosic Ethanol Production Washington D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary...

  9. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Achieving Water-Sustainable Bioenergy Production Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006...

  10. Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    API ships first RIN-qualified cellulosic ethanol from their Alpena Biorefinery. Photo: Alex Wisniewski API ships first RIN-qualified cellulosic ethanol from their Alpena...

  11. Clostridium thermocellum Transcriptomic Profiles after Exposure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thermocellum is a candidate consolidated bioprocessing (CBP)biocatalyst for cellulosic ethanol production. It is capable of both cellulose solubilization and its fermentation to...

  12. Winning Team Announced for 2015 BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cropped view of the winning infographic Cellulosic Ethanol. Cropped view of the winning infographic "Cellulosic Ethanol." Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director...

  13. The bulking effect of dietary fiber in the rat large intestine: an in vivo study of cellulose, guar, pectin, wheat bran and oat bran 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Jeanne Marie

    1985-01-01

    H. Chromium Concentration. IS 19 19 19 25 25 26 TABLE OF CONTENTS DISCUSSION. CONCLUSION. REFERENCES. . Page 32 47 50 LIST OF TABLES Page 1. COMPOSITION OF BASAI FIBER-FREE DIET. . . . 2. COMPOSITION OF THE EXPERIMENTAL DIETS. . . 13 3.... COMPOSITION OF WHEAT BRAN AND OAT BRAN SUPPLEMENTS. . 14 4. EFFECT OF FIBER SUPPLEMENTATION ON FOOD AND ENERGY INTAKE 5. EFFECT OF FIBER SUPPLEMENTATION ON WEIGHT GAIN. . 6. EFFECT OF FIBER ON 24-HOUR FECAL DRY WEIGHT. . . . . 20 21 22 7. EFFECT...

  14. IN VITRO SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS TO LPS-BINDING POLYAMINES AND CELLULOSE ETHER POLYMERS: TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MICROBICIDE AGAINST CHLAMYDIA INFECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osaka, Ichie

    2013-12-31

    individuals are asymptomatic. In women, untreated cases of Chlamydia infection can lead to serious reproductive health consequences. In the current absence of a safe and effective vaccine, my study focused on development of a vaginally-delivered topical...

  15. Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid hydrocarbon fuels: Vol. 6, The modeling and design of a staged indirect liquefaction reactor: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    A staged reactor was designed to convert biomass to useful fuels. The reactor consists of three stages. The first stage is a concentric combustor/pyrolyzer system where the biomass is gasified in a fluidized bed at high temperatures in the absence of oxygen. The second stage is a cyclonic scrubber where particulates and condensable materials are removed from the gas stream while the gas is cooled. In the final stage the gas undergoes a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a fluidized bed or slurry reactor. Mathematical models of the system were developed and used to create computer programs that would predict the behavior of the bed. The models were based on fundamental phenomena and were used to predict key dimensions of the staged reactor system. A transparent plastic, full-scale, cold flow reactor simulator was built using the models' predictions. The simulator was used to refine the models and determine the operating characteristics of the reactor. The design was determined to be workable and potentially useful. The reactor was, however, difficult to operate and would require extensive automated control systems.

  16. The pattern of xylan acetylation suggests xylan may interact with cellulose microfibrils as a two-fold helical screw in the secondary plant cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Gomes, Thiago C. F.; Tryfona, Theodora; Nikolovski, Nino; Stott, Katherine; Grantham, Nicholas J.; Bolam, David N.; Skaf, Munir S.; Dupree, Paul D.

    2014-06-02

    molecular architecture and properties, and biological degradation by pathogens and fungi. They will also impact strategies to improve lignocellulose processing for biorefining and bioenergy....

  17. An Experimental Study of the Performance of PCM-Enhanced Cellulose Insulation Used in Residential Building Walls Exposed to Full Weather Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Y.; Medina, M.; Evers, A.

    2008-01-01

    calorimeter (DSC) tests and mass change tests. To directly prove the concept that PCM-enhanced insulation can reduce the peak heat flux across walls as well as its potential to shift part of the space cooling loads to a later time of the day, the performance...

  18. 21 May 2014 www.hnei.hawaii.edu The Fundamentals of Biocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Growth in PV Market Island of Maui (Source: Maui Electric Company, Ltd.) Integrating High PenetrationsJ/kg-cellulose] cellulose specific heat carbon gas work sensible heat exotherm 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 input output Energy [kJ/kg-cellulose] cellulose specific heat carbon gas work sensible heat exotherm #12;1) Antal et al

  19. EA-1789: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Alpena Prototype Biorefinery, Alpena, Michigan

  20. EA-1597: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels, Inc., Treutlen County, Georgia