Sample records for dupont danisco cellulosic

  1. DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, New Jersey: EnergyDrewDrillingProject (2)Danisco

  2. DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise Plenary I: Progress in Advanced...

  3. DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary I: Progress in Advanced Biofuels DuPont’s Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise William Provine, Director–Science and Technology External Affairs, DuPont

  4. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DANISCO U.S. INC. (f/k...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the United Kingdom that will be owned equally and will be granted licenses from each joint venture partner. Specifically, Danisco will license certain rights to use its waived...

  5. Novel Biomass Conversion Process Results in Commercial Joint Venture; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing DuPont/NREL cooperative research and development agreement that resulted in biomass-to-ethanol conversion process used as a basis for DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, LLC and cellulosic ethanol demonstration plant.

  6. DuPont Energy Breakout Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, W. F.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 2005, DuPont launched the “Energy Breakout” initiative to accelerate improvement in energy efficiency and reduce energy costs in its US operations. This comprehensive program, led by the Senior Vice President of Operations, resulted...

  7. DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOORE, T.L.

    2003-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH&Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations.

  8. The Dupont Summit The New Administration Tackles Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    The Dupont Summit The New Administration Tackles Science and Technology: Priorities for the Road.S. Presidential Administration, the Policy Studies Organization is glad to announce that the upcoming Dupont of Energy · Chemical and Biological Engineering Genetics For more information please visit the Conference

  9. DuPont Technology Breaks Away From Glass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delaware-based DuPont is working to develop ultra-thin moisture protective films for photovoltaic panels — so thin they’re about 1,000 times thinner than a human hair.

  10. Case Study- Steam System Improvements at Dupont Automotive Marshall Laboratory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dupont's Marshall Laboratory is an automotive paint research and development facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The campus is comprised of several buildings that are served by Trigen-Philadelphia Energy Corporation's district steam loop...

  11. MULTIPLE ACOUSTIC AND VARIABILITY ESTIMATION MODELS FOR ASR Stephane Dupont and Christophe Ris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Stéphane

    Multitel, Avenue Copernic 1, B-7000 Mons, Belgium {dupont,ris}@multitel.be ABSTRACT In the paper, we expose

  12. DuPont Approach to Energy Management: A System Wide Approach to Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, J. W.

    Products Fibers Nonwovens Spandex Resins Elastomers Films Finishes Specialties Commodities Fuels Petroleum Products Figure 1. The DuPont Value Chain Customer Industries Aerospace Agriculture Apparel Automotive Chemical... Products Fibers Nonwovens Spandex Resins Elastomers Films Finishes Specialties Commodities Fuels Petroleum Products Figure 1. The DuPont Value Chain Customer Industries Aerospace Agriculture Apparel Automotive Chemical...

  13. DuPont Approach to Energy Management: A System Wide Approach to Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, J. W.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Twentieth National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1998 DuPont is a major industrial consumer of energy in the form of fuels and electricity. In fact, DuPont's global annual energy spending is about $1.5 billion which has... three equal components (Figure 5): ? Purchased electricity ? Purchased fuels ? Operating and maintenance Like all large energy consumers, DuPont worked very hard to improve energy efficiency following the 1974 OPEC oil embargo and the "oil shocks...

  14. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  15. A SIMULATION-BASED MODEL OF ABDUCTION Gildas Morvan Daniel Dupont Philippe Kubiak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A SIMULATION-BASED MODEL OF ABDUCTION Gildas Morvan Daniel Dupont Philippe Kubiak LGI2A - EA 3926 D.univ-artois.fr KEYWORDS simulation-based reasoning, abduction, forensic ento- mology ABSTRACT Abduction, or Inference of "surprising" observations. In this paper, a simulation-based model of abduction is intro- duced. This model

  16. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  17. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  18. Characterization of printing and laser trimming of DuPont 2000 series resistors on DuPont 951 {open_quotes}Green Tape{trademark}{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgenstern, H.; Bandler, S.; Barner, G.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont 2000 series resistors were reviewed and found to come closest to our requirement of 1% resistor tolerance over the expected 30-year life of our products. The evaluation performed involved the characterization of both the printing and trimming processes. The printing process was characterized for firing temperature print thickness, print direction, resistor geometry and encapsulant effect. Laser trimming was characterized by first finding an operating envelope and then selecting an operating point. The envelope was located by varying the trimming parameters and determining their acceptability to electrical and visual criteria. Samples from both the envelope and operating point were environmentally conditioned The conditioning included thermal shock temperature cycle, 1000-hour temperature aging, 1000-hour humidity aging, and a simulated gold/tin solder reflow.

  19. DuPont Displays Develops Low-Cost Method of Printing OLED Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DuPont Displays Inc. (DDI) has developed a novel way of printing color-tunable OLED lighting panels that keeps manufacturing costs low. The method involves processing the organic layers from solution, with most of the process steps taking place under atmospheric conditions rather than in a high vacuum. Industry-standard slot-coating methods are used in conjunction with nozzle printing—in which the solutions of organic materials are continuously jetted through an array of nozzles moving at high speed—allowing the light-emitting materials to be spatially patterned.

  20. Composition Control in the Direct Laser-Deposition Process R.R. UNOCIC and J.N. DuPONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    Composition Control in the Direct Laser-Deposition Process R.R. UNOCIC and J.N. DuPONT Laser functionally graded material (FGM) components by selectively depositing different pow- der materials in the melt pool at specific locations in the structure during part buildup. The compo- sition in each layer

  1. Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the cellulose chains, and in fact the observed rapid decline in the resonance absorption intensity at temperatures in excess of 600C was attributed to aromatization...

  2. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    number = just monomers . Refinery for Cellulosic Biomass tofrom biomass through cellulosic refinery concept that could

  3. Accelerated Cellulose Depolymerization Catalyzed by Paired Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cellulose to sugars is a critical step and has been a major barrier for improved economics in the utilization of cellulosic biomass. We report a novel catalytic system...

  4. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  5. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  6. Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

  7. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Myles A. (Falmouth, MA); Morris, Robert S. (Fairhaven, MA)

    1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

  8. Inverse Temperature-Dependent Pathway of Cellulose Decrystallization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inverse Temperature-Dependent Pathway of Cellulose Decrystallization in Trifluoroacetic Acid. Inverse Temperature-Dependent Pathway of Cellulose Decrystallization in...

  9. Cellulose degradation system of Cytophaga hutchinsonii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chao-Kuo

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Cytophaga hutchinsonii, an aerobic gliding bacterium with cellulose-degrading ability, was studied, since its cellulase system was unknown and might be very different from those of other cellulose-degrading ...

  10. Compositions for saccharification of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBrayer, Brett; Shaghasi, Tarana; Vlasenko, Elena

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to enzyme compositions for high temperature saccharification of cellulosic material and to uses thereof.

  11. Purification of aqueous cellulose ethers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartscherer, K.A.; de Pablo, J.J.; Bonnin, M.C.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufacture of cellulose ethers usually involves high amounts of salt by-products. For application of the product, salt must be removed. In this work, we have studied the injection of high-pressure CO{sub 2} into an aqueous polymer-salt solution; we find that upon addition of isopropanol in addition to CO{sub 2}, the solution separates into two phases. One phase is rich in polymer and water, and the other phase contains mostly isopropanol, water and CO{sub 2}. The salt distributes between the two phases, thereby offering interesting possibilities for development of a new purification process for water-soluble polymers. This work presents experimental phase-equilibrium data for hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose with sodium acetate and potassium sulfate, respectively, in the region 40{degree}C and 30 to 80 bar. Based on these data, we suggest a process for the manufacture and purification of water-soluble cellulose ethers. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  13. Electrospinning of Cellulose and Carbon Nanotube-Cellulose Fibers for Smart Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankonien, Alexander

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulose is one of the Earth’s most abundant natural polymers and is used as a raw material in various applications. Recently, cellulose based electro-active paper (EAPap) has been investigated for its potential as a smart material...

  14. CELLULOSE CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY Cellulose Chem. Technol., 44 (7-8), 217-221 (2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .e. how the solid cellulose xanthate fibres are dissolved under mixing conditions. A probable reason or a thermal treatment that reverts the cellulose derivative back to cellulose, with a noticeable change such experiments. The dissolution of a solid material into a solvent is a process of great importance in many

  15. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cellulose requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking...

  16. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking October...

  17. Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA) Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

  18. Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

  19. Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics...

  20. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

  1. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

  2. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  4. Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the flexibility to run on numerous biomass feedstocks including wood chips, tall grasses, corn stover (residual biofuels from cellulosic biomass. The company's Consolidated Bioprocessing method converts non-food biomass feedstocks #12;into cellulosic ethanol through the use of a patented process that eliminates the need

  5. Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

  6. Synthetic biology approach to cellulose degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhundi, Sahreena Saleem

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on earth, is composed of ? – 1,4 – linked glucose units, which in turn form a highly ordered crystalline structure that is insoluble and recalcitrant to degradation. It is the ...

  7. Enzymatic hydrolysis of low substituted carboxymethyl cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanona Dominquez, Guadalupe

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by liquid chromatography. Some of the hydrolyzates were subjected to fermentation by Saccharomyces spp. , and ethanol yields were determined by gas chromatography. Subjecting acetate grade cellulose pulp to mild carboxymethyl derivatization conditions...ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF LOW SUBSTITUTED CARBOXYMETHYL CELLULOSE A Thesis by GUADALUPE CHANONA DOMINGUEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  8. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the yeast chromosomes for direct conversion of cellulose tothe yeast chromosomes for direct conversion of cellulose to

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Two Cellulose Morphology Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 Producing Cellulose with Lower Crystallinity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of ?-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To addressmore »this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with noncellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the assembly of crystalline cellulose.« less

  10. Electric Field Alignment of Cellulose Based-Polymer Nanocomposites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalidindi, Sanjay Varma

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulose whiskers (CWs) obtained from naturally occuring cellulose are nano-inclusions which show a lot of promise as mechanical reinforcements in polymers. Typically, a relatively high content is added to realize improvement in effective...

  11. Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material Erin Baker Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty; Environmental policy 2 #12;1 Introduction This paper contains supplementary material for "Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement

  12. Research Advances Cellulosic Ethanol, NREL Leads the Way (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure highlights NREL's recent advances in cellulosic ethanol production. Research at NREL addresses both biochemical and thermochemical processes.

  13. Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

  14. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, J.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

  15. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered.

  16. Magnetic Alignment of Cellulose Nanowhiskers in an All-Cellulose Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Zuyan; Al-Haik, Marwan; Tehrani, Mehran; Murray, Frank; Tennenbaum, Rina; Garmestani, Hamid

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unidirectional reinforced nanocomposite paper was fabricated from cellulose nanowhiskers and wood pulp under an externally-applied magnetic field. A 1.2 Tesla magnetic field was applied in order to align the nanowhiskers in the pulp as it was being formed into a sheet of paper. The magnetic alignment was driven by the characteristic negative diamagnetic anisotropy of the cellulose nanowhiskers. ESEM micrographs demonstrated unidirectional alignment of the nanowhiskers in the all-cellulose composite paper. Comparing with control paper sheets made from wood pulp only, the storage modulus in the all-cellulose nanocomposites increased dramatically. The storage modulus along the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field was much stronger than that parallel to the magnetic field. This new nanocomposite, which contains preferentially-oriented microstructures and has improved mechanical properties, demonstrates the possibility of expanding the functionality of paper products and constitutes a promising alternative to hydrocarbon based materials and fibers.

  17. Structure and processing of fibrous cellulose: bacterial and ascidian material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandelwal, Mudrika

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    of bacterial cellulose gel produced at ridged PDMS/liquid interfaces (scale bar 50 ?m) [113] b) SEM images of the cellulose networks produced under voltage gradient 0.45 V/cm (scale bar 1?m)[114] 2.8 Cellulose Nanoparticles The properties, functionality... Few microns 20 x 20 5 x 20-30 Algae 100-4000 nm 8 x 20 nm Tunicates 50-500 nm 3-5 nm Plant, wood % crystallinity and % cellulose content increases Acid hydrolysis Acid hydrolysis 26 Figure 2.18: Cellulose nanoparticles a) SEM image...

  18. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Ashtead, GB)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  19. Introduction Proposed Strategy for Cellulosic Bioethanol Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Introduction Proposed Strategy for Cellulosic Bioethanol Production Bioethanol: Eco for industries interested in new approaches for synthesizing bioethanol. Lastly, we suggest which downstream use of bioethanol would be the most eco-effective and the most economic by considering both environmental health

  20. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  1. Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desert SouthwestofDepartmentCellulosic

  2. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  3. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN) [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  4. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  5. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  6. acid swollen cellulose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a uniaxial extensional flow that mimics 178 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  7. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale SustainableHydrogen Batteries Nuclear By Lee Lynd, Dartmouth Ethanol •Ethanol, ethyl alcohol, fermentation ethanol, or just “

  8. Enzymatic Degradation of Cellulose by the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Christopher Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of plant cell wall degradation by the model filamentousessential for chitin degradation, J. Biol. Chem. 280, 28492-Trichoderma-Reesei in the Degradation of Cellulose, Bio-

  9. Single-step conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of HMF directly from raw natural cellulose represents the last major barrier toward the development of a sustainable HMF platform. Here we report an unprecedented single-step...

  10. acetobacter xylinum cellulose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the structure and properties (more) Kuutti, Lauri 2013-01-01 78 HYDROGELS AND AEROGELS BASED ON CHEMICALLY CROSS-LINKED CELLULOSE NANOCRYSTALS. Open Access Theses and...

  11. Regenerating cellulose from ionic liquids for an accelerated enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Hua [Savannah State University; Jones, Cecil L [Savannah State University; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Xia, Shuqian [Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; Olubajo, Olarongbe [Savannah State University; Person, Vernecia [Savannah State University

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials into fuel ethanol has become a research priority in producing affordable and renewable energy. The pretreatment of lignocelluloses is known to be key to the fast enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Recently, certain ionic liquids (ILs)were found capable of dissolving more than 10 wt% cellulose. Preliminary investigations [Dadi, A.P., Varanasi, S., Schall, C.A., 2006. Enhancement of cellulose saccharification kinetics using an ionic liquid pretreatment step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 95, 904 910; Liu, L., Chen, H., 2006. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose materials treated with ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl. Chin. Sci. Bull. 51, 2432 2436; Dadi, A.P., Schall, C.A., Varanasi, S., 2007. Mitigation of cellulose recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis by ionic liquid pretreatment. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 137 140, 407 421] suggest that celluloses regenerated from IL solutions are subject to faster saccharification than untreated substrates. These encouraging results offer the possibility of using ILs as alternative and nonvolatile solvents for cellulose pretreatment. However, these studies are limited to two chloride-based ILs: (a) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl), which is a corrosive, toxic and extremely hygroscopic solid (m.p. 70 C), and (b) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl), which is viscous and has a reactive side-chain. Therefore, more in-depth research involving other ILs is much needed to explore this promising pretreatment route. For this reason, we studied a number of chloride- and acetate-based ILs for cellulose regeneration, including several ILs newly developed in our laboratory. This will enable us to select inexpensive, efficient and environmentally benign solvents for processing cellulosic biomass. Our data confirm that all regenerated celluloses are less crystalline (58 75% lower) and more accessible to cellulase (>2 times) than untreated substrates. As a result, regenerated Avicel cellulose, filter paper and cottonwere hydrolyzed 2 10 times faster than the respective untreated celluloses. A complete hydrolysis of Avicel cellulose could be achieved in 6 h given the Trichoderma reesei cellulase/substrate ratio (w/w) of 3:20 at 50 C. In addition,we observed that cellulase is more thermally stable (up to 60 C) in the presence of regenerated cellulose. Furthermore, our systematic studies suggest that the presence of various ILs during the hydrolysis induced different degrees of cellulase inactivation. Therefore, a thorough removal of IL residues after cellulose regeneration is highly recommended, and a systematic investigation on this subject is much needed.

  12. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EthanolOf Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol I Charles R. WilkeCELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of U.S.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric cellulose acetate Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    producing cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with corn-based ethanol by 2012 Hydrogen Vehicles... Batteries Biomass 12;Cellulosic Ethanol Pretreatment Enzymatic Hydrolysis...

  14. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Shimshon, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (North Gallilea, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  15. What is (and is not) vital to advancing cellulosic ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    to many, the uniqueness of cellu- losic ethanol as a sustainable, liquid transportation fuel, which canWhat is (and is not) vital to advancing cellulosic ethanol Charles E. Wyman Chemical of Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92506, USA Ethanol made biologically from cellulosic

  16. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  17. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  19. What is the Viability of Cellulosic Ethanol as an Alternative to Fossil Fuels in today's Economy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    mandates for cellulosic ethanol production, spurring an increase in bioethanol companies looking to profit

  20. NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

  1. The structure and mechanics of nanofibrillar cellulose foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zubaidah Mohammed

    Crystalline nanofibrillar cellulose has remarkable mechanical properties: a Young's modulus of about 130 GPa and a tensile strength in the range of 750–1000 MPa. Recently, there has been increasing interest in exploiting ...

  2. Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haward, Simon J.

    In this study, we characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIAc). In steady shear flow, the semidilute solutions ...

  3. affecting cellulose content: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and mass loss are important data to be measured for wildland fires modelling purpose and fire hazard studies on ligno-cellulosic fuels. Around 638 and 778 K, two dominating and...

  4. Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jessica J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

  5. Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuzens, J.E.

    1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

  6. Solvent-Driven Preferential Association of Lignin with Regions of Crystalline Cellulose in Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindner, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; Petridis, Loukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Schulz, Roland [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The precipitation of lignin onto cellulose after pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is an obstacle to economically viable cellulosic ethanol production. Here, 750 ns nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are reported of a system of lignin and cellulose in aqueous solution. Lignin is found to strongly associate with itself and the cellulose. However, noncrystalline regions of cellulose are observed to have a lower tendency to associate with lignin than crystalline regions, and this is found to arise from stronger hydration of the noncrystalline chains. The results suggest that the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to hydrolysis arises not only from the inaccessibility of inner fibers but also due to the promotion of lignin adhesion.

  7. Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by an engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima; Tsai, Shen-Long; Madan, Bhawna; DaSilva, Nancy A; Chen, Wilfred

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulase, clostridia, and ethanol. Microbiol Mol Biol RevNext- generation cellulosic ethanol technologies and theirProduction of cellulosic ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  8. Cellulose Simulations Demystify High-Temperature Behavior (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular simulations that model cellulose microfibrils at high temperature indicate regions that may be easier to break down, which could lead to more efficient processing of cellulose into biofuel.

  9. ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol...

  10. Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement and Jeffrey Keisler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement Erin Baker and Jeffrey Keisler funding and the likelihood of achieving advances in cellulosic biofuel technologies. While in collecting more information on this technology. Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty

  11. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. We discovered that C. papyrosolvens produces a multiprotein, multicom

  12. DuPont Energy Innovations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    21 1 6 2 9 9 U. S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2007 (Quadrillion BTU) Source by Energy Type, Indexed to 1970 INDEXEDPRICE Source: Energy Information Administration, website data #12 energy flat with 1990 levels. Progress: · Consumption down 7 percent overall as compared to 1990. · Since

  13. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e.g. waste water treatment, solid waste combustion) weretreatments. Results and Discussions Cellulosic MSW Feedstocks Municipal solid waste (

  14. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system.

  15. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

  16. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

  17. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

  18. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

  19. Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

  20. Quade, J., Levin, N.E., Simpson, S.W., Butler, R., McIntosh, W.C., Semaw, S., Kleinsasser, L., Dupont-Nivet, G., Renne, P., and Dunbar, N., 2008, The geology of Gona, Afar, Ethiopia, in Quade, J., and Wynn, J.G., eds., The Geology of Early Humans in the H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    ., Dupont-Nivet, G., Renne, P., and Dunbar, N., 2008, The geology of Gona, Afar, Ethiopia, in Quade, J Paper 446 2008 The geology of Gona, Afar, Ethiopia Jay Quade Department of Geosciences, University- central Ethiopia span most of the last ~6.4 m.y. and are among the longest and most complete

  1. Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, Raymond

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

  2. Cellulose and Biomass Conversion Technology and Its Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    have risen markedly over the last few years.' Because OPEC con- trols about 75% of tbe world's oil re-carbon sugar that has historically been more difficult to con- 68 FUEL REFORMULATION vert into useful products,700 million dry tons of cellulosic biomass per year at prices from $20-70 per dry ton." 10 This quantity

  3. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attrition mill and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system. 1 fig.

  4. Study of polyelectrolyte complexes of chitosan and sulfoethyl cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baklagina, Yu. G., E-mail: membrane@hq.macro.ru; Kononova, S. V.; Petrova, V. A.; Kruchinina, E. V.; Nud'ga, L. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Macromolecular Compounds (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Macromolecular Compounds (Russian Federation); Romanov, D. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Grebenshchikov Institute of Silicate Chemistry (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Grebenshchikov Institute of Silicate Chemistry (Russian Federation); Klechkovskaya, V. V.; Orekhov, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Bogomazov, A. V.; Arkhipov, S. N. [ZAO Nauchnye Pribory (Russian Federation)] [ZAO Nauchnye Pribory (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The complexing of polycation chitosan and polyanion sulphoethyl cellulose during the formation of polyelectrolyte simplex membranes using the layer-by-layer deposition of a solution of one polyion on a gel-like film of another one has been studied. The structural characteristics of the multilayer composites and their components have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. A technique is proposed for studying the structure of surface layers of thin polymer films (15-20 {mu}m) using a portable DIFREI-401 diffractometer. It is shown that the sequence of layer deposition during the formation of membrane films does not affect their structural characteristics. The interaction between positively charged chitosan groups (-NH{sub 3}{sup +}) and negatively charged sulfoethyl cellulose groups (-SO{sub 3}{sup -}) during the growth of polyelectrolyte complexes results in a packing of chitosan chains in the multilayer film.

  5. Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Somerville, Chris [Director, Energy Biosciences Institute

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

  6. Charging process of polyurethane based composites under electronic irradiation: Effects of cellulose fiber content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjadj, Aomar; Jbara, Omar; Tara, Ahmed; Gilliot, Mickael [Laboratoire d'Ingénierie et Sciences des Matériaux (LISM EA 4695), Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51687 Reims cedex 2 (France)] [Laboratoire d'Ingénierie et Sciences des Matériaux (LISM EA 4695), Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51687 Reims cedex 2 (France); Dellis, Jean-Luc [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC EA 2081), Université de Picardie Jules Vernes, 80009 Amiens cedex 1 (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC EA 2081), Université de Picardie Jules Vernes, 80009 Amiens cedex 1 (France)

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The study deals with the charging effect of polyurethanes-based composites reinforced with cellulose fibers, under electronic beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the leakage current and the trapped charge as well as the kinetics of charging process significantly change beyond a critical concentration of 10% cellulose fibers. These features are correlated with the cellulose concentration-dependence of the electrical properties, specifically resistivity and capacitance, of the composite.

  7. Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

  8. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    key to unlocking low-cost cellulosic ethanol. 2(1):26-40.1995 19941216. Commercial ethanol production process.facility and commercial ethanol production process.

  9. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 Javier Perez I II. ETHANOL FERMENTATION STUDIES A. B.Development Studies of Ethanol Production--------------- 19of Cellulose and Production of Ethanol." (June 1979) and (b)

  10. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    60,700 ETHANOL RECOVERY Dist. Column CondenserF2 Steam Exchanger Ethanol Absorber 10 ft. diameter. 38Cellulose and Production of Ethanol," Progress Report, LBL-

  11. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BIOCONVERSION TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL BERKELEY PROGRAM--JulyXylose Fermentation to Ethanol (a) (b) Fusarium oxysporum (OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of

  12. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  13. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process streams. Handb. Bioethanol:395-415. 10. Ehrman T.solid waste used as bioethanol sources and its relatedof cellulosic biomass into bioethanol as an alternative

  14. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand elasticities in the US ethanol fuel market. Energygreat opportunity for producing ethanol fuel. The new energyscenario for cellulosic ethanol fuel production, and speaks

  15. Composite polymer electrolytes based on MG49 and carboxymethyl cellulose from kenaf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafirin, Serawati; Ahmad, Ishak; Ahmad, Azizan [Polymer Research Centre (PORCE), School of Chemical Science and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of 49% poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted natural rubber (MG49) and carboxymethyl cellulose as a composite polymer electrolyte film incorporating LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} were explored. Carboxymethyl cellulose was synthesized from kenaf bast fibres via carboxymethylation process by alkali catalyzed reaction of cellulose with sodium chloroacetate. Reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy showed the presence of carboxyl peak after modification of cellulose with sodium chloroacetate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the crystallinity of cellulose was decrease after synthesis. High performance composite polymer electrolytes were prepared with various composition of carboxymethyl cellulose (2–10 wt%) via solution-casting method. The conductivity was increased with carboxymethyl cellulose loading. The highest conductivity value achieved was 3.3 × 10{sup ?7} Scm{sup ?1} upon addition of 6% wt carboxymethyl cellulose. 6% wt carboxymethyl cellulose composition showed the highest tensile strength value of 7.9 MPa and 273 MPa of modulus value which demonstrated high mechanical performance with accepatable level of ionic conductivity.

  16. The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yao; Stipanovic, Arthur J [SUNY-ESF; Winter, William T. [SUNY-ESF; Wilson, David B.; Kim, Young-Jun

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA "Roadmap" objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled "The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases" was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by "pure" enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH "pretreatment" provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

  17. The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stipanovic, Arthur J [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA “Roadmap” objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled “The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases” was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by “pure” enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH “pretreatment” provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

  18. Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSS LetterStateDepartment ofEqualityCellulosic Liquid

  19. Alkaline stability of cellulose ethers and impact of their degradation products on cement hydration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Alkaline stability of cellulose ethers and impact of their degradation products on cement-mail address: pourchez@emse.fr emse-00449712,version1-18Sep2010 Author manuscript, published in "Cement the potential role of cellulose ethers degradation on the alteration of the cement hydration kinetics

  20. Cellulosic Ethanol Technology on Track to Being Competitive With Other Transportation Fuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been driving down the cost of cellulosic ethanol and overcoming the technical challenges that surround it-major milestones toward the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012.

  1. Surface pre-coating of talc particles by carboxyl methyl cellulose adsorption : study of adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Surface pre-coating of talc particles by carboxyl methyl cellulose adsorption : study of adsorption and consequences on surface properties and settling rate P. Bacchin1 , J-P. Bonino2 , F. Martin3 This paper investigates the adsorption of different sized carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) onto talc particles

  2. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Coupled With Electricity Generation in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens generated electricity, and the power generated using soluble celluloseARTICLE Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Coupled With Electricity Generation in a Microbial Fuel.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22015 ABSTRACT: Electricity can be directly generated by bacteria in microbial fuel

  3. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  4. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  5. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), the Center for Non-Linear Studies, and the Laboratory are central to cost-effective biofuel production and the subject of new research from Los Alamos National and designer enzymes for biofuel production from cellulosic--or non-food--plant derived biomass. "Cellulose

  6. Silicon cantilever functionalization for cellulose-specific chemical force imaging of switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ida [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL; Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for direct functionalization of silicon and silicon nitride cantilevers with bifunctional silanes was tested with model surfaces to determine adhesive forces for different hydrogen-bonding chemistries. Application for biomass surface characterization was tested by mapping switchgrass and isolated switchgrass cellulose in topographic and force-volume mode using a cellulose-specific cantilever.

  7. Topic T4 Claudia Hildenbrand #274 EDLC electrodes from cellulose-based carbon aerogels: influence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Topic T4 Claudia Hildenbrand #274 EDLC electrodes from cellulose-based carbon aerogels: influence performance if used as EDLC electrode material. Carbon aerogels were synthesized by crosslinking cellulose atmosphere (1000°C, nitrogen atmosphere). Subsequently, the surface chemistry of the carbon aerogels

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Reactor scale up for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER Reactor scale up for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol Xiongjun scale-up approach for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to com- modity products of large scale bioreactors based on bench scale experimentation. Keywords CFD Á SSF Á Scale up Á Solids

  9. Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ARTICLE Kinetic Modeling of Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Via Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation: Part II. Experimental Validation Using Waste Paper Sludge and Anticipation of CFD AnalysisScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22047 ABSTRACT: A kinetic model of cellulosic biomass

  10. Fabrication of "Roll-off" and "Sticky" Superhydrophobic Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breedveld, Victor

    Fabrication of "Roll-off" and "Sticky" Superhydrophobic Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Processing. In Final Form: January 10, 2008 Most of the artificial superhydrophobic surfaces that have been fabricated, but it is not superhydrophobic. Superhydrophobicity on cellulose paper was obtained by domain- selective etching of amorphous

  11. Preliminary Review of the Degradation of Cellulosic, Plastic, and Rubber Materials in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and Possible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preliminary Review of the Degradation of Cellulosic, Plastic, and Rubber Materials in the Waste............................................... 2-1 2.1.1 Microbial Degradation of Cellulosic, Plastic, and Rubber Materials ...... 2-1 2.1.2 Anoxic-Biodegradable.............................................................................. 3-4 3.2.4 Uncertainties in Cellulosics, Plastics, and Rubber Inventory.................. 3-6 4

  12. Construction materials as a waste management solution for cellulose sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modolo, R., E-mail: regina.modolo@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Civil Engineering Department/CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ferreira, V.M. [University of Aveiro, Civil Engineering Department/CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Machado, L.M. [RAIZ - Forest and Paper Research Institute, Portucel-Soporcel, Eixo (Portugal); Rodrigues, M.; Coelho, I. [CIMIANTO - Sociedade Tecnica Hidraulica, S.A., Alhandra (Portugal)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable waste management system for effluents treatment sludge has been a pressing issue for pulp and paper sector. Recycling is always recommended in terms of environmental sustainability. Following an approach of waste valorisation, this work aims to demonstrate the technical viability of producing fiber-cement roof sheets incorporating cellulose primary sludge generated on paper and pulp mills. From the results obtained with preliminary studies it was possible to verify the possibility of producing fiber-cement sheets by replacing 25% of the conventional used virgin long fiber by primary effluent treatment cellulose sludge. This amount of incorporation was tested on an industrial scale. Environmental parameters related to water and waste, as well as tests for checking the quality of the final product was performed. These control parameters involved total solids in suspension, dissolved salts, chlorides, sulphates, COD, metals content. In the product, parameters like moisture, density and strength were controlled. The results showed that it is possible to replace the virgin long fibers pulp by primary sludge without impacts in final product characteristics and on the environment. This work ensures the elimination of significant waste amounts, which are nowadays sent to landfill, as well as reduces costs associated with the standard raw materials use in the fiber-cement industrial sector.

  13. Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35–50% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on various geographical factors and the types of systems used for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefi neries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that infl uence pioneer biorefi nery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial scenarios were postulated to develop a pioneer dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this pioneer design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply system improvements, and technology advancements to achieve government and private sector cost targets. Analysis of the pioneer supply system resulted in a delivered feedstock cost to the throat of the pretreatment reactor of $37.00 per dry tonne (2002 $). Pioneer supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefi neries using specifi c feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. As the industry develops and cost barriers are addressed, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefi neries located in different regions.

  14. Polymers, both natural and synthetic, play an integral role in our daily lives. Naturally-occurring polymers include cellulose (mentioned in gun cotton demo), rubber, skin, hair,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    . Naturally- occurring polymers include cellulose (mentioned in gun cotton demo), rubber, skin, hair, DNA, etc

  15. Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data supplied by a recent report from the National Research Council (NRC). The thermochemical system analysis revealed that most of the system inefficiency is associated with the gasification process and subsequent tar reforming step. For the biochemical process, the steam generation from residue combustion, providing the requisite heating for the conventional pretreatment and alcohol distillation processes, was shown to dominate the exergy loss. An overall energy balance with different potential distillation energy requirements shows that as much as 30% of the biomass energy content may be available in the future as a feedstock for thermochemical production of liquid fuels.

  16. Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

  17. Journal of Biotechnology 77 (2000) 3747 H NMR study of cellulose metabolism by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminga, Marcus A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -echo difference 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The degradation of unlabelled cellulose synthesised by Acetobacter xylinum bacterial fermentation products (glycogen, succinate, acetate). During the pre-incubation period of F

  18. A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleinser, Matthew A.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural and forestry wastes for the use of creating cellulosic ethanol were inventoried for each county in Texas. A simple forecast was created for each of the agricultural wastes and then a multivariate empirical distribution was used...

  19. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under auspices of22 Mohammad Riaz ETHANOL FERMENTATION STUDIES II I. A. B.Hydrolyzates to Ethanol J2 Ren-Der Yang

  20. Microbiology and physiology of anaerobic fermentations of cellulose. Progress report, September 1, 1979-May 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peck, H.D. Jr.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reseach progress is reported for the period September, 1979 to May, 1980. Studies on the mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms fermenting cellulose to various products (ethanol, acetate, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, and methane) are summarized. (ACR)

  1. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris R. (Portola Valley, CA); Scheible, Wolf (Golm, DE)

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  2. EA-1705: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Mascoma Corporation, Kinross Charter Township, Michigan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The frontier Project consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a proprietary pretreatment and fermentation process.

  3. The action of Trichoderma viride cellulase on purified and partially purified cellulosic substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villarreal, Anita

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ACTION OF TRICHODERMA VIRIDE CELLUI ASE ON PURIFIED AND PARTIALLY PURIFIED CELLULOSIC SUBSTRATES A Thesis by ANITA VILLARREAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirenent... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subject: Forest Science THE ACTION OF TRICHODERMA VIRIDE CELLULASE ON PURIFIED AND PARTIALLY PURIFIED CELLULOSIC SUBSTRATES A Thesis by ANITA VILLARREAL Approved as to style and content by...

  4. Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, L.

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added in an excess amount needed. 3 figures.

  5. DuPont Energy Breakout Initiative 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, W. F.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the major energy- consuming areas of the site. Approaches to im- proving energy efficiency were largely ad hoc and relied on Six Sigma practitioners to identify and eliminate obvious defects that increased energy use. Improvement projects were... structured en- ergy efficiency program and conceived the idea of the ?Energy Breakout? initiative. The key elements of Energy Breakout included: g120 The designation of a knowledgeable indi- vidual, usually a Six Sigma Black Belt, to serve as Site...

  6. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DUPONT SUPERCONDUCTIVITY...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    its participation under the above referenced contract entitled "High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator". This contract relates to the construction of...

  7. DuPont Apollo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, New Jersey: EnergyDrewDrillingProject (2)

  8. DuPont Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open EnergyProjectDraper, Utah:DuPage County,DuPont

  9. DuPont | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open EnergyProjectDraper, Utah:DuPage

  10. Dupont Fuel Cells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open EnergyProjectDraper,NC

  11. Characterization of cellulosic wastes and gasification products from chicken farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Paul, E-mail: p.joseph@ulster.ac.uk [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Tretsiakova-McNally, Svetlana; McKenna, Siobhan [School of the Built Environment and the Built Environment Research Institute, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, County Antrim, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gas chromatography indicated the variable quality of the producer gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The char had appreciable NPK values, and can be used as a fertiliser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bio-oil produced was of poor quality, having high moisture content and low pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mass and energy balances showed inadequate level energy recovery from the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future work includes changing the operating parameters of the gasification unit. - Abstract: The current article focuses on gasification as a primary disposal solution for cellulosic wastes derived from chicken farms, and the possibility to recover energy from this process. Wood shavings and chicken litter were characterized with a view to establishing their thermal parameters, compositional natures and calorific values. The main products obtained from the gasification of chicken litter, namely, producer gas, bio-oil and char, were also analysed in order to establish their potential as energy sources. The experimental protocol included bomb calorimetry, pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry (PCFC), thermo-gravimetric analyses (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD), mineral content analyses and gas chromatography. The mass and energy balances of the gasification unit were also estimated. The results obtained confirmed that gasification is a viable method of chicken litter disposal. In addition to this, it is also possible to recover some energy from the process. However, energy content in the gas-phase was relatively low. This might be due to the low energy efficiency (19.6%) of the gasification unit, which could be improved by changing the operation parameters.

  12. A cell is not a pan of water: Problems with using [delta]D composition in wood cellulose to interpret climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, V.J.; Deniro, M.J. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States) Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the isotopic composition of hydrogen in tree ring cellulose is related to that of water at the site of cellulose synthesis, then it records climatic information. Relationships between [delta]D tree ring cellulose and climate have been found, yet the mechanisms of hydrogen fractionation in the synthesis of wood cellulose were not examined. We grew avocadoes in water of controlled isotopic composition at different humidities until their stems became woody. Ambient humidity was consistently related to the isotopic composition of leaf water and leaf cellulose but not to wood cellulose. Both leaf and wood cellulose [delta]D values were higher than those of environmental water indicating that some of the hydrogen had been reallocated from stored post photosynthetic compounds. Effects of stored compounds on the isotopic composition of wood cellulose could significantly confound paleoclimatic reconstructions from this method.

  13. Cationic quaternization of cellulose with methacryloyloxy ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride via ATRP method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supeno [Cenderawasih University, Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia and School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Daik, Rusli, E-mail: rusli@ukm.edu.my [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); El-Sheikh, Said M. [Nano-Structured Materials Division, Advanced Materials Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of a cationic cellulose copolymer from cellulose macro-initiator (MCC-BiB) and quaternary compound monomer (METMA) via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was studied. By using dimethylformamide (DMF), the optimum condition for successful synthesis was at the mole ratio of MCC-BIB:Catalyst:METMA = 1:1:26. The highest copolymer recovery was 93.2 % for 6 h and at 40°C. The copolymer was insoluble in weak polar solvents such as THF and DMF but soluble in methanol and water. The chemistry of cellulose copolymer was confirmed by the FTIR and TGA in which the METMA monomer was used as a reference. The absence of CC bond in the CiB-g-METMA spectrum indicated that graft copolymerization occurred.

  14. Electrospun and oxidized cellulose materials for environmental remediation of heavy metals in groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Dong [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Halada, Gary P. [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Spalding, Brian Patrick [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter focuses on the use of modified cellulosic materials in the field of environmental remediation. Two different chemical methods were involved in fabricating oxidized cellulose (OC), which has shown promise as a metal ion chelator in environmental applications. Electrospinning was utilized to introduce a more porous structure into an oxidized cellulose matrix. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to study both the formation of OC and its surface complexation with metal ions. IR and Raman spectroscopic data demonstrate the formation of characteristic carboxylic groups in the structure of the final products and the successful formation of OC-metal complexes. Subsequent field tests at the Field Research Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory confirmed the value of OC for sorption of both U and Th ions.

  15. Sodium Chloride interaction with solvated and crystalline cellulose : sodium ion affects the tetramer and fibril in aqueous solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellesia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic salts are a natural component of biomass which have a significant effect on the product yields from a variety of biomass conversion processes. Understanding their effect on biomass at the microscopic level can help discover their mechanistic role. We present a study of the effect of aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) on the largest component of biomass, cellulose, focused on the thermodynamic and structural effect of a sodium ion on the cellulose tetramer, and fibril. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of a cellulose tetramer reveal a number of preferred cellulose-Na contacts and bridging positions. Large scale MD simulations on a model cellulose fibril find that Na+ perturbs the hydroxymethyl rotational state population and consequently disrupts the "native" hydrogen bonding network.

  16. Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

  17. Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Myers, Michele D. (Dacono, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

  18. Chapter 18: Understanding the Developing Cellulosic Biofuels Industry through Dynamic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newes, E.; Inman, D.; Bush, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss a system dynamics model called the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the burgeoning cellulosic biofuels industry in the United States. The model has also recently been expanded to include advanced conversion technologies and biofuels (i.e., conversion pathways that yield biomass-based gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, and butanol), but we focus on cellulosic ethanol conversion pathways here. The BSM uses a system dynamics modeling approach (Bush et al., 2008) built on the STELLA software platform.

  19. Process Design of Wastewater Treatment for the NREL Cellulosic Ethanol Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinwinder, T.; Gill, E.; Gerhardt, M.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a preliminary process design for treating the wastewater from NREL's cellulosic ethanol production process to quality levels required for recycle. In this report Brown and Caldwell report on three main tasks: 1) characterization of the effluent from NREL's ammonia-conditioned hydrolyzate fermentation process; 2) development of the wastewater treatment process design; and 3) development of a capital and operational cost estimate for the treatment concept option. This wastewater treatment design was incorporated into NREL's cellulosic ethanol process design update published in May 2011 (NREL/TP-5100-47764).

  20. Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

  1. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yongchao [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Tao [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL] [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL] [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress response to heavy carbon load and accumulation of metabolic products. These findings provide new perspectives to enhance the ability of cellulolytic bacteria to produce biofuels and biocommodities with high efficiency and at low cost directly from lignocellulosic biomass.

  2. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, F., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT (Germany); Elsner, P., E-mail: peter.elsner@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT, Germany and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  3. Separable fluorous ionic liquids for the dissolution and saccharification of cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raines, Ronald T.

    Cellulose (medium cotton linters, C6288) was from Sigma Chemical (St. Louis, MO). Other commercial chemicals silica gel was from Aldrich Chemical (Milwaukee, WI). The term "concentrated under reduced pressure unless indicated otherwise. Mass spectrometry was performed with a Micromass LCT (electrospray ionization

  4. NMR investigations of water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in cement-based materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 NMR investigations of water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in cement-based materials J of freshly-mixed white cement pastes. NMRD is useful to determine the surface diffusion coefficient of water, the specific surface area and the hydration kinetics of the cement-based material. In spite of modifications

  5. Relationship between wood elastic strain under bending and cellulose crystal strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Montero1* , Bruno Clair1 , Tancrède Alméras1 , Arie van der Lee2 , Joseph Gril1 1 Laboratoire de Mécanique-wall. In each layer, cellulose * Corresponding author: cedric.montero@univ-montp2.fr hal-00646489,version1-30Nov

  6. Hydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation and electrohydrogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    primarily of: acetic, lactic, succinic, and formic acids and ethanol. An additional 800 Æ 290 mL H2/gHydrogen production from cellulose in a two-stage process combining fermentation Electrolysis cell Fermentation Lignocellulose a b s t r a c t A two-stage dark-fermentation

  7. Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, J.

    1987-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Study of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose for Production of Fuel Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Study of the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose for Production of Fuel Ethanol by the Simultaneous to ethanol, a promising alternative fuel, can be carried out efficiently and economically using are presented in light of the impact of enzymatic hydrolysis on fuel ethanol production. Key words: enzymatic

  9. Nanoporous layered silicate AMH-3/cellulose acetate nanocomposite membranes for gas separations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Nanoporous layered silicate AMH-3/cellulose acetate nanocomposite membranes for gas separations Wun 20 March 2013 Available online 9 April 2013 Keywords: Layered silicates AMH-3 Composite membrane Exfoliation Interface CO2 separation a b s t r a c t Nanoporous layered silicate/polymer composite membranes

  10. A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleinser, Matthew A.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to simulate the range of biomass available by county and district. The probability that a district could support a 25, 50, 75, or 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plant is estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation results. Biomass in Texas is concentrated...

  11. Application of cellulase and hemicellulase to pure xylan, pure cellulose, and switchgrass solids from leading pretreatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    -glucosidase, Multifect xylanase, and beta-xylosidase were evaluated for hydrolysis of pure cellulose, pure xylan for transportation fuels are needed to replace depleting petroleum-based options and address global cli- mate change of technical and economical feasibilities (Wyman, 1994). A wide range of lignocellulosic biomass materials have

  12. Design of Superhydrophobic Paper/Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Enhanced Etching and Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breedveld, Victor

    Design of Superhydrophobic Paper/Cellulose Surfaces via Plasma Enhanced Etching and Deposition Superhydrophobicity has been achieved on different paper surfaces via plasma enhanced etching and film deposition. The effects of fiber types and paper making parameters on the superhydrophobic behavior were studied

  13. Evaluation of Microbial Communities from Extreme Environments as Inocula in a Carboxylate Platform for Biofuel Production from Cellulosic Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cope, Julia Lee

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The carboxylate biofuels platform (CBP) involves the conversion of cellulosic biomass into carboxylate salts by a mixed microbial community. Chemical engineering approaches to convert these salts to a variety of fuels (diesel, gasoline, jet fuel...

  14. EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for the Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Highlands County, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue a Federal loan guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for a cellulosic ethanol facility in Highlands County, Florida. This EA is on hold.

  15. Cellulose and psyllium supplementation in 10 females: the effect on food intake and in vitro fermentation variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Susan Renee

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CELLULOSE AND PSYLLIUM SUPPLEMENTATION IN 10 FEMALES: THE EFFECT ON FOOD INTAKE AND IN VITRO FERMENTATION VARIABLES A Thesis by SUSAN RENEE HAYNES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Nutrition CELLULOSE AND PSYLLIUM SUPPLEMENTATION IN 10 FEMAI ES: THE EFFECT ON FOOD INTAKE AND IN VITRO FERMENTATION VARIABLES A Thesis by SUSAN RENEE HAYNES Approved...

  16. Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

  17. Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantaged Jet Fuel Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desert SouthwestofDepartmentCellulosic Biomass

  18. Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus® conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus® conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

  19. Development of 500-kV AC cable employing laminar insulation of other than conventional cellulosic paper. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahder, G.; Eager, G.S. Jr.; Walker, J.J.; Dima, A.F.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an investigation to develop a 500 kV ac laminar dielectric power cable and joint having insulation with lower losses than conventional cellulosic paper insulation are presented. Background information is presented on proposed low-loss synthetic and composite synthetic/cellulosic paper insulations. From these studies, fibrous polypropylene paper tape and cellulosic paper-polypropylene film-cellulosic paper composite paper (PPP) were chosen. Extensive testing of hand-wrapped cable models fabricated with each type of tape served to eliminate the fibrous polypropylene paper tape from further consideration. Cable model tests indicate that the PPP tape is satisfactory for insulation in 500 kV ac cable, and that oil impregnants now used in conventional cellulosic paper insulated cables are unsuitable, but that silicone oil with an additive is satisfactory for PPP tapes. Laboratory data indicate that it may be necessary with the PPP tapes to use a significantly lower viscosity impregnating oil which has a greater tendency to drain from pipe-type cables than conventional oil. This may require a modification of the moisture seal. Four final pipe-type cables having a conventional moisture seal were manufactured for possible future field testing. The dielectric loss of the final cables is one-fifth that of conventional cellulosic paper insulated cables. The estimated installed cost per MVA-mile of the PPP insulated cable, neglecting losses, is higher than cellulosic insulated cables impregnated with conventional mineral oil. However, the capacitance of the cable insulated with PPP tape is 25% lower than conventional cable, and therefore, the reactance necessary to compensate for the cable charging current is significantly reduced.

  20. A pilot plant scale reactor/separator for ethanol from cellulosics. ERIP/DOE quarterly report no. 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.C.; Moelhman, M.; Butters, R.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a continuous, low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. This process involves a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic release of sugars and the consecutive simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) of cellulose (glucans) followed by hemi-cellulose (pentosans) in a multi-stage continuous stirred reactor separator (CSRS). During quarters 3 and 4, we have completed a literature survey on cellulase production, activated one strain of Trichoderma reesei. We continued developing our proprietary Steep Delignification (SD) process for biomass pretreatment. Some problems with fermentations were traces to bad cellulase enzyme. Using commercial cellulase enzymes from Solvay & Genecor, SSF experiments with wheat straw showed 41 g/L ethanol and free xylose of 20 g/L after completion of the fermentation. From corn stover, we noted 36 g/L ethanol production from the cellulose fraction of the biomass, and 4 g/L free xylose at the completion of the SSF. We also began some work with paper mill sludge as a cellulose source, and in some preliminary experiments obtained 23 g/L ethanol during SSF of the sludge. During year 2, a 130 L process scale unit will be operated to demonstrate the process using straw or cornstalks. Co-sponsors of this project include the Indiana Biomass Grants Program, Bio-Process Innovation.

  1. Breaking the Biological barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Alton, Anita Jean [ORNL; Andrews, Shirley H [ORNL; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn [ORNL; Casey, Denise [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL; Mills, Marissa [ORNL; Nylander, Kim [ORNL; Wyrick, Judy M [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust fusion of the agricultural, industrial biotechnology, and energy industries can create a new strategic national capability for energy independence and climate protection. In his State of the Union Address (Bush 2006), President George W. Bush outlined the Advanced Energy Initiative, which seeks to reduce our national dependence on imported oil by accelerating the development of domestic, renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuels. The president has set a national goal of developing cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable alternative energy sources to substantially replace oil imports in the coming years. Fuels derived from cellulosic biomass - the fibrous, woody, and generally inedible portions of plant matter - offer one such alternative to conventional energy sources that can dramatically impact national economic growth, national energy security, and environmental goals. Cellulosic biomass is an attractive energy feedstock because it is an abundant, domestic, renewable source that can be converted to liquid transportation fuels. These fuels can be used readily by current-generation vehicles and distributed through the existing transportation-fuel infrastructure. The Biomass to Biofuels Workshop, held December 7-9, 2005, was convened by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science; and the Office of the Biomass Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The purpose was to define barriers and challenges to a rapid expansion of cellulosic-ethanol production and determine ways to speed solutions through concerted application of modern biology tools as part of a joint research agenda. Although the focus was ethanol, the science applies to additional fuels that include biodiesel and other bioproducts or coproducts having critical roles in any deployment scheme. The core barrier is cellulosic-biomass recalcitrance to processing to ethanol. Biomass is composed of nature's most ready energy source, sugars, but they are locked in a complex polymer composite exquisitely created to resist biological and chemical degradation. Key to energizing a new biofuel industry based on conversion of cellulose (and hemicelluloses) to ethanol is to understand plant cell-wall chemical and physical structures - how they are synthesized and can be deconstructed. With this knowledge, innovative energy crops - plants specifically designed for industrial processing to biofuel - can be developed concurrently with new biology-based treatment and conversion methods. Recent advances in science and technological capabilities, especially those from the nascent discipline of systems biology, promise to accelerate and enhance this development. Resulting technologies will create a fundamentally new process and biorefinery paradigm that will enable an efficient and economic industry for converting plant biomass to liquid fuels. These key barriers and suggested research strategies to address them are described in this report. As technologies mature for accomplishing this task, the technical strategy proceeds through three phases: In the research phase, within 5 years, an understanding of existing feedstocks must be gained to devise sustainable, effective, and economical methods for their harvest, deconstruction, and conversion to ethanol. Research is centered on enzymatic breakdown of cellulosic biomass to component 5- and 6-carbon sugars and lignin, using a combination of thermochemical and biological processes, followed by cofermentation of sugars to specified endproducts such as ethanol. Processes will be integrated and consolidated to reduce costs, improve efficacy, reduce generation of and sensitivity to inhibitors, and improve overall yields and viability in biorefinery environments. The technology deployment phase, within 10 years, will include creation of a new generation of energy crops with enhanced sustainability, yield, and composition, coupled with processes for simultaneous breakdown of biomass to sugars and cofermentation of sugars via new biological system

  2. Compositions for enhancing hydroysis of cellulosic material by cellulolytic enzyme compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising a GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and an organic compound comprising a carboxylic acid moiety, a lactone moiety, a phenolic moiety, a flavonoid moiety, or a combination thereof, wherein the combination of the GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and the organic compound enhances hydrolysis of a cellulosic material by a cellulolytic enzyme compared to the GH61 polypeptide alone or the organic compound alone. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  3. Experimental study of the effect of sodium carbonate on the conversion of cellulose to oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Siu-Hung

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    monoxide , vater, methanol, phenols, carboxylic acids and a bitumen vere for~ed. The bitumen was further hydrogenated to form a syncrude which when fractionated yields qasoline, middle oils and heavier oils . Berl and Schmidt (8, 9) reported...EXPEBIEFNTAL STUDY OF IHZ ZFFZCT OF SODIUH CARHONATZ ON THE CONVERSION OF CELLULOSE 1G OIL A Thesis SIU-HUNG CHU Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas A 6 N University in partial fuifi llment of the requirement for the deqree of BASTZH...

  4. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest Newsbiomass to fuel Cellulose requires fewer

  5. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest Newsbiomass to fuel Cellulose requires

  6. Impact of cellulose ethers on the cement paste microstructure J. Pourchez*, P. Grosseau*, E. Rouche-Pourchez*, J. Debayle*, J.C. Pinoli*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact of cellulose ethers on the cement paste microstructure J. Pourchez*, P. Grosseau*, E to examine the effects of cellulose ethers on the cement paste microstructure. The obtained results show, the content of air volume and the stabilisation of the porosity from the fresh cement paste to the hardened

  7. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  8. Vertical Integration of Biomass Saccharification of Enzymes for Sustainable Cellulosic Biofuel Production in a Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj Kumar, PhD

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  9. Integrated cellulosic enzymes hydrolysis and fermentative advanced yeast bioconversion solution ready for biomass biorefineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj Kumar, PhD

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  10. Fuel Etanol from Cellulosic Biomass LEE R. LYND, JANET H. CusHmAN, ROBERTA J. NICHOLS, CHARLES E. WYMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    in the United States, petroleum supplies the largest share of total energy used and has the highest fraction, global climate change, bal- ance oftrade, and energy security. Energy balance, feed- stock supply corn and other starch- rich grains in the United States, ethanol also can be made from cellulosic

  11. How biomass is born: understanding cellulose synthesis for second generation Nadav Sorek, Energy Biosciences Institute, UC Berkeley, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    How biomass is born: understanding cellulose synthesis for second generation biofuels Nadav Sorek, Energy Biosciences Institute, UC Berkeley, USA Lignocellulosic biofuels, also known as second generation understand this process. In the second part I will cover the basic process of second generation biofuel

  12. Potential of nanocrystalline cellulose-fibrin nanocomposites for artificial vascular graft applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Elvie; Hu, Dehong; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline cellulose, a new bio-nanomaterial is utilized as a reinforcing material for biocompatible fibrin matrix to form into a nanocomposite for small-diameter replacement vascular graft application (SDRVG). The periodate oxidation of NCC, which provided it with a reactive carbonyl group, allowed molecular interaction between NCC and fibrin. Such interaction resulted into an effective mechanical reinforcement indicated by the improvement of max. force, elongation at break and modulus when oxidized NCC (ONCC) was incorporated into fibrin. The nanocomposite’s mechanical properties can be manipulated to conform to the native blood vessel by varying the ONCC to fibrin ratio and/or by controlling the degree of oxidation of NCC. Using atomic force microscopy had provided fundamental information on the effects of molecular interactions to the nanolevel mechanical properties of NCC/fibrin nanocomposites. This fundamental information established the positive feasibility and commenced continuing investigation for the practical SDRVG application of NCC/fibrin nanocomposite.

  13. Improved oxidation resistance of organic/inorganic composite atomic layer deposition coated cellulose nanocrystal aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sean W.; Matthews, David J.; Conley, John F., E-mail: jconley@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1148 Kelley Engineering Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Buesch, Christian; Simonsen, John [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 119 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels are coated with thin conformal layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using atomic layer deposition to form hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} penetrated more than 1500??m into the aerogel for extended precursor pulse and exposure/purge times. The measured profile of coated fiber radius versus depth from the aerogel surface agrees well with simulations of precursor penetration depth in modeled aerogel structures. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated CNC aerogel nanocomposites do not show significant thermal degradation below 295?°C as compared with 175?°C for uncoated CNC aerogels, an improvement of over 100?°C.

  14. Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

  15. Reducing Enzyme Costs Increases the Market Potential of Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic ethanol prices depend heavily on the cost of the cellulase enzymes used to break down the biomass into fermentable sugars. To reduce these costs, NREL partnered with two leading enzyme companies, Novozymes and Genencor, to engineer new cellulase enzymes that are exceptionally good at breaking down cellulose. Genencor is now part of DuPont Industrial Biosciences.

  16. The influence of various levels of cellulose and lipid and lipid sources on apparent digestibility and apparent protein digestibility in penaeid shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrer, Shellie Earle

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    College Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Addison Lawrence Dr. William Ellis Digestibility values of feeds are important for diet formulations. Apparent dry-matter digestibility (ADMD) and apparent protein digestibility (APD) of purified diets were... examined utilizing three Penaeid species (Penaeus aztecus, P. setiferus and P. vannamei). Diets varying in cellulose levels (0, 6 and 12X), level of lipids (0, 6 and 12X) and lipid source (coconut, corn, menhaden and lard), were evaluated. Cellulose...

  17. Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, March 1-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, D. I.C.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in this coordinated research program to effect the microbiological degradation of cellulosic biomass by anaerobic microorganisms possessing cellulolytic enzymes. Three main areas of research are discussed: increasing enzyme levels through genetics, mutations, and genetic manipulation; the direct conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuel (ethanol); and the production of chemical feedstocks from biomass (acrylic acid, acetone/butanol, and acetic acid). (DMC)

  18. Nitrogen and Sulfur Requirements for Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii on Cellulosic Substrates in Minimal Nutrient Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kridelbaugh, Donna M [ORNL; Nelson, Josh C [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth media for cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii bacteria usually contain excess nutrients that would increase costs for consolidated bioprocessing for biofuel production and create a waste stream with nitrogen, sulfur and phosphate. C. thermocellum was grown on crystalline cellulose with varying concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and growth rate and alcohol production response curves were determined. Both bacteria assimilated sulfate in the presence of ascorbate reductant, increasing the ratio of oxidized to reduced fermentation products. From these results, a low ionic strength, defined minimal nutrient medium with decreased nitrogen, sulfur, phosphate and vitamin supplements was developed for the fermentation of cellobiose, cellulose and acid-pretreated Populus. Carbon and electron balance calculations indicate the unidentified residual fermentation products must include highly reduced molecules. Both bacterial populations were maintained in co-cultures with substrates containing xylan or hemicellulose in defined medium with sulfate and basal vitamin supplements.

  19. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cellulase, [beta]-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

    1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35 C to about 40 C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol. 2 figures.

  20. Addressing the Recalcitrance of Cellulose Degradation through Cellulase Discovery, Nano-scale Elucidation of Molecular Mechanisms, and Kinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Larry P., Bergstrom, Gary; Corgie, Stephane; Craighead, Harold; Gibson, Donna; Wilson, David

    2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was designed to play a vital role in the development of low cost sugars from cellulosic biomass and contributing to the national effort to displace fossil fuel usage in the USA transportation sector. The goal was to expand the portfolio of cell wall degrading enzymes through innovative research at the nano-scale level, prospecting for novel cellulases and building a kinetic framework for the development of more effective enzymatic conversion processes. More precisely, the goal was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms for some cellulases that are very familiar to members of our research team and to investigate what we hope are novel cellulases or new enzyme combinations from the world of plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Hydrolytic activities of various cellulases and cellulase cocktails were monitored at the nanoscale of cellulose fibrils and the microscale of pretreated cellulose particles, and we integrated this insight into a heterogeneous reaction framework. The over-riding approach for this research program was the application of innovative and cutting edge optical and high-throughput screening and analysis techniques for observing how cellulases hydrolyze real substrates.

  1. Microstructural characterization of low-density foams. [Silica, resorcinol/formaldehyde, cellulose/acetate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, C.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-density foams (of the order 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/) synthesized from silica aerogel, resorcinol/formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate have fine, delicate microstructures that are extremely difficult to characterize. Improved low-voltage resolution of an SEM equipped with a field-emission gun (FESEM) does permit these materials to be examined directly without coating and at sufficient magnification to reveal the microstructures. Light coatings applied by ion-beam deposition can stabilize the specimens to some extent and reduce electron charging without seriously altering the microstructure, but coatings applied by conventional techniques usually obliterate these microstructures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is required to provide unambiguous microstructural interpretations. However, TEM examinations of these materials can be severely restricted by specimen preparation difficulties and electron-beam damage, and considerable care must be taken to ensure that reasonably accurate TEM results have been obtained. This work demonstrates that low-voltage FESEM analyses can be used to characterize microstructures in these foams, but TEM analyses are required to confirm the FESEM analyses and perform quantitative measurements. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazi, F. K.; Fortman, J.; Anex, R.; Kothandaraman, G.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Dutta, A.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A techno-economic analysis on the production of cellulosic ethanol by fermentation was conducted to understand the viability of liquid biofuel production processes within the next 5-8 years. Initially, 35 technologies were reviewed, then a two-step down selection was performed to choose scenarios to be evaluated in a more detailed economic analysis. The lignocellulosic ethanol process was selected because it is well studied and portions of the process have been tested at pilot scales. Seven process variations were selected and examined in detail. Process designs were constrained to public data published in 2007 or earlier, without projecting for future process improvements. Economic analysis was performed for an 'nth plant' (mature technology) to obtain total investment and product value (PV). Sensitivity analysis was performed on PV to assess the impact of variations in process and economic parameters. Results show that the modeled dilute acid pretreatment process without any downstream process variation had the lowest PV of $3.40/gal of ethanol ($5.15/gallon of gasoline equivalent) in 2007 dollars. Sensitivity analysis shows that PV is most sensitive to feedstock and enzyme costs.

  3. Lignin-Derived Carbon Fiber as a Co-Product of Refining Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Baker, Fred S [ORNL; Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL; Boeman, Raymond G [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin by-products from biorefineries has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to petroleum-based precursors to manufacture carbon fiber, which can be combined with a binding matrix to produce a structural material with much greater specific strength and specific stiffness than conventional materials such as steel and aluminum. The market for carbon fiber is universally projected to grow exponentially to fill the needs of clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and to improve the fuel economies in vehicles through lightweighting. In addition to cellulosic biofuel production, lignin-based carbon fiber production coupled with biorefineries may provide $2,400 to $3,600 added value dry Mg-1 of biomass for vehicle applications. Compared to producing ethanol alone, the addition of lignin-derived carbon fiber could increase biorefinery gross revenue by 30% to 300%. Using lignin-derived carbon fiber in 15 million vehicles per year in the US could reduce fossil fuel consumption by 2-5 billion liters year-1, reduce CO2 emissions by about 6.7 million Mg year-1, and realize fuel savings through vehicle lightweighting of $700 to $1,600 per Mg biomass processed. The value of fuel savings from vehicle lightweighting becomes economical at carbon fiber price of $6.60 kg-1 under current fuel prices, or $13.20 kg-1 under fuel prices of about $1.16 l-1.

  4. 2006/07 Field Testing of Cellulose Fiber Insulation Enhanced with Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Petrie, Thomas [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Syed, Azam M [ORNL

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most recent improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that in the near future, residences will be routinely constructed to operate with very low heating and cooling loads. In that light, the application of novel building materials containing active thermal components (e.g., phase change materials [PCMs,] sub-venting, radiant barriers, and integrated hydronic systems) is like a final step in achieving relatively significant heating and cooling energy savings from technological improvements in the building envelope. It is expected that optimized building envelope designs using PCMs for energy storage can effectively bring notable savings in energy consumption and reductions in peak hour power loads. During 2006/07, a research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a series of laboratory and field tests of several wall and roof assemblies using PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. This report summarizes the test results from the perspective of energy performance. The ORNL team is working on both inorganic and organic PCMs; this report discusses only paraffinic PCMs. A limited economical analysis also is presented. PCMs have been tested as a thermal mass component in buildings for at least 40 years. Most of the research studies found that PCMs enhanced building energy performance. In the case of the application of organic PCMs, problems such as high initial cost and PCM leaking (surface sweating) have hampered widespread adoption. Paraffinic hydrocarbon PCMs generally performed well, with the exception that they increased the flammability of the building envelope.

  5. Case Study- Steam System Improvements at Dupont Automotive Marshall Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, A.

    globe valve to enable manual throttling of the steam, a strainer, a steam trap and a pressure relief safety valve, in addition to the pressure reducing valve (pRY). Properly selected PRVs need to have seats replaced about every five years...

  6. Results from tests of DuPont crossflow filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.L.

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Crossflow filtration will be used to filter radioactive waste slurry as part of the Late Wash Process.

  7. Maciek R. Antoniewicz DuPont Young Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kelvin H.

    and simulation of complex flows, nonequilibrium thermodynamics and transport phenomena. Douglas J. Buttrey of neurodegenerative diseases. Abraham M. Lenhoff Gore Professor Transport phenomena, separation processes Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering of microbial systems for biofuels and chemicals production

  8. Lattice based language models Pierre Dupont y and Ronald Rosenfeld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , statistical language models typically estimate P r(wjh) -- the conditional distribution of the identity@univ­st­etienne.fr #12; Keywords: speech recognition, statistical language modeling, lattice based models, smoothing techniques #12; 1 Introduction Statistical language modeling is concerned with estimating the probability

  9. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY E. I. DUPONT DE NEMOURS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of this agreement encompasses building a full scale commercial High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Reciprocating Magnet Separation Unit. Ultimately, the device is to be used...

  10. An Integrated Modeling and Data Management Strategy for Cellulosic Biomass Production Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth Jr.; K. Mark Bryden; Joshua B. Koch

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging cellulosic bioenergy markets can provide land managers with additional options for crop production decisions. Integrating dedicated bioenergy crops such as perennial grasses and short rotation woody species within the agricultural landscape can have positive impacts on several environmental processes including increased soil organic matter in degraded soils, reduced sediment loading in watersheds, lower green house gas (GHG) fluxes, and reduced nutrient loading in watersheds. Implementing this type of diverse bioenergy production system in a way that maximizes potential environmental benefits requires a dynamic integrated modeling and data management strategy. This paper presents a strategy for designing diverse bioenergy cropping systems within the existing row crop production landscape in the midwestern United States. The integrated model developed quantifies a wide range environmental processes including soil erosion from wind and water, soil organic matter changes, and soil GHG fluxes within a geospatial data management framework. This framework assembles and formats information from multiple spatial and temporal scales. The data assembled includes yield and productivity data from harvesting equipment at the 1m scale, surface topography data from LiDAR mapping at the less than 1m scale, soil data from US soil survey databases at the 10m to 100m scale, and climate data at the county scale. These models and data tools are assembled into an integrated computational environment that is used to determine sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues for bioenergy production at the sub-field scale under a wide range of land management practices. Using this integrated model, innovative management practices including cover cropping are then introduced and evaluated for their impact on bioenergy production and important environmental processes. The impacts of introducing dedicated energy crops onto high-risk landscape positions currently being manage in row crop production are also investigated.

  11. REVISED GUIDELINES FOR USING CELLULOSE DEGRADATION PRODUCT-IMPACTED KD VALUES FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AND COMPOSITE ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic materials include wood, paper, rags, and cardboard products. These materials are co-disposed with radiological waste at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF). Cellulosic materials readily degrade in the environment to form cellulose degradation products (CDP) that will partition to the sediment or remain mobile in the groundwater. Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has conducted studies to estimate the impact of CDP on radionuclide sorption to SRS sediments (Kd values). It was found that CDP impact on radionuclide sorption varies with radionuclide and CDP concentration. Furthermore, it was found that the amount of carbon (C) in the system could increase or decrease Kd values with respect to the base case of when no CDP was added. Throughout the expected pH range of the ELLWF, a low concentration of CDP in the system would increase Kd values (because C would sorb to the sediment and provide more exchange sites for radionuclides to sorb), whereas greater concentrations of CDP ({ge}20 mg/L C) would decrease Kd values (because C would remain in solution and complex the radionuclide and not permit the radionuclide to sorb to the sediment). A review of >230 dissolved organic carbon (DOC) groundwater concentrations in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS indicated that the average DOC concentration, a gross measure of CDP, was 5 mg/L C. At approximately this DOC concentration, the laboratory studies demonstrated that no anions (Tc, I, or Se) or cations (Ni, Sr, Ce, Eu, Zr, or Th) have decreased sorption in the presence of carbon (an analogue for CDP).

  12. Degradation of the molecular weight and nitrate ester content of cellulose nitrate on thermal aging. [PBX-9404

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leider, H R

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in molecular weight and nitrate ester content for cellulose nitrate (NC), either pure or as a constituent of PBX-9404, were determined as a function of time and temperature. Changes in the number-averaged molecular weight, M/sub n/, are described by the simple theory of random chain scission, and M/sub n/ is found to correlate well with nitrate ester loss. Significant differences are seen between NC aged in the isolated condition and aged as the binder in PBX-9404.

  13. Fermentation of pectin and cellulose to short chain fatty acids: a comparative study with humans, baboons, pigs, and rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villalba, Leonilde Nonita

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    digestibility to the human results. SCFA were measured using gas chromatography. The pH was measured before and after the fermentations. The percent fiber remaining after fermentation was assayed colorimetrically. The greatest interspecies differences were...%I@ W, W, '. '" yW~, t . . . M~~~)~ '1 r FERMENTATION OF PECTIN AND CELLULOSE TO SHORT CHAIN FATTY ACIDS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY WITH HUMANS, BABOONS, PIGS, AND RATS A Thesis by LEONILDE NONITA VILLALBA IL W I Z IJ Z 4 Z 4 2 5 V Z I...

  14. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.rutkowski@pwr.wroc.pl

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  15. Processing of cellulosic material by a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from cellulase-producing bacteria, ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate, have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase degrading bacterium ATCC 55702, which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic materials.

  16. Accelerating business innovation; a Technology Strategy Board programme Procter & Gamble (P&G)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    , Novozymes and Danisco, was established seven years ago to address this problem. P&G, on behalf of the EDC

  17. Preparation and dielectric properties of SiC nanowires self-sacrificially templated by carbonated bacterial cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Lixia; Ma, Yongjun; Dai, Bo [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhou, Yong [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), School of Physics, National Lab of Solid State Microstructure, ERERC, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Eco-materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), School of Physics, National Lab of Solid State Microstructure, ERERC, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Jinsong [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Pei, Chonghua, E-mail: peichonghua@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? A new material – CBC is introduced as a template to prepare SiC nanowires. ? SiC nanowires are synthesized by the infiltration process of reactive vapor Si. ? The highest ?? of ?-SiC nanowires is obtained at 1400 °C. -- Abstract: SiC nanowires were synthesized by the infiltration process of reactive vapor Si in Ar atmosphere at 1350–1450 °C, using carbonated bacterial cellulose (CBC) as carbon template and a reactant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and vector network analyzer were employed to characterize the samples. The diameter of the resulting ?-SiC nanowires changes with calcination temperatures, specifically, 35–60 nm for 1350 °C, 40–80 nm for 1400 °C, and 30–60 nm for 1450 °C. The ?-SiC nanowires obtained at 1400 °C possess the highest ?? of complex permittivity.

  18. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Liao, James C [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to significantly alter the mixture of fermentation products. The initial application of this system successfully engineered a strain with high ethanol productivity from complex biomass substrates.

  19. The rheology of aqueous solutions of ethyl hydroxy-ethyl cellulose (EHEC) and its hydrophobically modified analogue (hmEHEC): extensional flow response in capillary break-up, jetting (ROJER) and in a cross-slot extensional rheometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vivek

    Cellulose derivatives containing associating hydrophobic groups along their hydrophilic backbone are used as rheology modifiers in the formulation of water-based spray paints, medicinal sprays, cosmetics and printable inks. ...

  20. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  1. Application in the Ethanol Fermentation of Immobilized Yeast Cells in Matrix of Alginate/Magnetic Nanoparticles, on Chitosan-Magnetite Microparticles and Cellulose-coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanova, Viara; Hristov, Jordan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were entrapped in matrix of alginate and magnetic nanoparticles and covalently immobilized on magnetite-containing chitosan and cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles with covalently immobilized thermostable {\\alpha}-amylase and chitosan particles with immobilized glucoamylase were also prepared. The immobilized cells and enzymes were applied in column reactors - 1/for simultaneous corn starch saccharification with the immobilized glucoamylase and production of ethanol with the entrapped or covalently immobilized yeast cells, 2/ for separate ethanol fermentation of the starch hydrolysates with the fixed yeasts. Hydrolysis of corn starch with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase and glucoamylase, and separate hydrolysis with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase were also examined. In the first reactor the ethanol yield reached approx. 91% of the theoretical; the yield was approx. 86% in the second. The ethanol fermentation was affected by the typ...

  2. Integrated ‘omics analysis for studying the microbial community response to a pH perturbation of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boaro, Amy A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Konopka, Allan; Callister, Stephen J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated ‘omics have been used on pure cultures and co-cultures, yet they have not been applied to complex microbial communities to examine questions of perturbation response. In this study, we used integrated ‘omics to measure the perturbation response of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor community fed with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). We predicted that a pH decrease by addition of a pulse of acid would reduce microbial community diversity and temporarily reduce reactor function such as cellulose degradation. However, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing results revealed increased alpha diversity in the microbial community after the perturbation, and a persistence of the dominant community members over the duration of the experiment. Proteomics results showed a decrease in activity of proteins associated with Fibrobacter succinogenes two days after the perturbation followed by increased protein abundances six days after the perturbation. The decrease in cellulolytic activity suggested by the proteomics was confirmed by the accumulation of Avicel in the reactor. Metabolomics showed a pattern similar to that of the proteome, with amino acid production decreasing two days after the perturbation and increasing after six days. This study demonstrated that community ‘omics data provides valuable information about the interactions and function of anaerobic cellulolytic community members after a perturbation.

  3. The bulking effect of dietary fiber in the rat large intestine: an in vivo study of cellulose, guar, pectin, wheat bran and oat bran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Jeanne Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE BULKING EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER IN THE RAT LARGE INTESTINE: AN IN VIVO STUDY OF CELLULOSE, GUAR, PECTIN, WHEAT BRAN AND OAT BRAN A Thesis by JEANNE MARIE GAZZANIGA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... JEANNE MARIE GAZZANIGA Approved as to style and content by: o~P L sc J nne R. Lupton (Chair of Committee) Karen S. Kubena (Member) ayne Suter (Member) G. C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1985 ABSTRACT The Bulking Effect of Dietary Fiber...

  4. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano (Madison, WI); West, Ryan M. (Madison, WI)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a method to make liquid chemicals, such as functional intermediates, solvents, and liquid fuels from biomass-derived cellulose. The method is cascading; the product stream from an upstream reaction can be used as the feedstock in the next downstream reaction. The method includes the steps of deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be converted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid so formed can be further reacted to yield a host of valuable products. For example, the pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes. Alternatively, the nonene may be isomerized to yield a mixture of branched olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of branched alkanes. The mixture of n-butenes formed from .gamma.-valerolactone can also be subjected to isomerization and oligomerization to yield olefins in the gasoline, jet and Diesel fuel ranges.

  5. Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200°C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cement’s self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

  6. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI; Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano [Madison, WI; West, Ryan M [Madison, WI

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a method to make liquid chemicals. The method includes deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be conveted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes.

  7. MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Frey

    2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

  8. SRL history, Volume 4, E.I. DuPont Nemours and Co. Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume summarizes general information on personnel, safety, security, and service at the Savannah River Laboratory.

  9. Technology demonstration summary, Dupont/Oberlin microfiltration system, Palmerton, Pennsylvania. April-May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April and May 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, demonstrated DuPont/Oberlin's microfiltration system at the Palmerton Zinc Superfund (PZS) site in Palmerton, Pennsylvania. The microfiltration system demonstrated at the PZS site was evaluated primarily in terms of its ability to remove metals (mainly zinc) and particulates from the contaminated groundwater on site, while producing a dry filter cake and filtrate that meet applicable disposal requirements.

  10. Applications of DuPont photopolymer cromalin® for dry deposition of particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurt, Michielle Helene

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    theory, a diffusion theory and a chemical bonding theory [theory, a diffusion theory and a chemical bonding theory.The diffusion theory is only applicable to the bonding of

  11. QUEEN'S DUPONT BACK PAIN STUDY Calibration of a Magnetic Tracking Device Using Locally Linear Fits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Duncan

    point i, p is a power variable used to compensate for distance related measurement variance with a grid spacing of 40cm. 1440 data points were collected at 60 positions. For each point, the true position vector x=(x,y,z) and the true orientation At were known, and the observed position vector xo

  12. Applications of DuPont photopolymer cromalin® for dry deposition of particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurt, Michielle Helene

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    display screens and photocatalysis processes. The thermaltreated through photocatalysis are trichloroethylene and

  13. Energy Secretary Chu to Tour DuPont Clean Energy Innovation Facilities |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNFEnergy PolicyEnvironmental Cleanup in

  14. E I DuPont De Nemours & Co (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek Europe GmbH Jump to:E EnergyE

  15. E I DuPont De Nemours & Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek Europe GmbH Jump to:E

  16. Manhattan Project: DuPont and Hanford, Hanford Engineer Works, 1942

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science, and technology-- Energy, science, andDCP-1 GOESThe president of

  17. Assessment of fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for Fischer-Tropsch diesel from coal and cellulosic biomass.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, X.; Wang, M.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study expands and uses the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model to assess the effects of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and cellulosic biomass and coal cofeeding in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) plants on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of FT diesel (FTD). To demonstrate the influence of the coproduct credit methods on FTD life-cycle analysis (LCA) results, two allocation methods based on the energy value and the market revenue of different products and a hybrid method are employed. With the energy-based allocation method, fossil energy use of FTD is less than that of petroleum diesel, and GHG emissions of FTD could be close to zero or even less than zero with CCS when forest residue accounts for 55% or more of the total dry mass input to FTD plants. Without CCS, GHG emissions are reduced to a level equivalent to that from petroleum diesel plants when forest residue accounts for 61% of the total dry mass input. Moreover, we show that coproduct method selection is crucial for LCA results of FTD when a large amount of coproducts is produced.

  18. Overcoming the Recalcitrance of Cellulosic Biomass by Value Prior to Pulping: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-221

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Value Prior to Pulping (VPP) project goal was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of introducing a new value stream into existing pulp and paper mills. Essentially the intent was to transfer the energy content of extracted hemicellulose from electricity and steam generated in the recovery boiler to a liquid transportation fuel. The hemicellulose fraction was extracted prior to pulping, fractionated, or conditioned if necessary, and fermented to ethanol. Commercial adaptation of the process to wood hemicelluloses was a prerequisite for using this less currently valued component available from biomass and wood. These hemicelluloses are predominately glucurono-xylan in hardwoods and galactoglucomannan in softwoods (with a significant softwood component of an arabino-xylan) and will yield fermentation substrates different from cellulose. NREL provided its expertise in the area of fermentation host evaluation using its Zymomonas strains on the CleanTech Partner's (CTP) VPP project. The project was focused on the production of fuel ethanol and acetic acid from hemicellulose streams generated from wood chips of industrially important hardwood and softwood species. NREL was one of four partners whose ethanologen was tested on the hydrolyzed extracts. The use of commercially available enzymes to treat oligomeric sugar extracts was also investigated and coupled with fermentation. Fermentations by NREL were conducted with the Zymomonas mobilis organism with most of the work being performed with the 8b strain. The wood extracts hydrolyzed and/or fermented by NREL were those derived from maple, mixed southern hardwoods, and loblolly pine. An unhydrolyzed variant of the mixed southern hardwood extract possessed a large concentration of oligomeric sugars and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed with a number of enzymes, followed by fermentation. The fermentation of the wood extracts was carried out at bench scale in flasks or small bioreactors, with a maximum volume of 500 mL.

  19. A case study of agricultural residue availability and cost for a cellulosic ethanol conversion facility in the Henan province of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin [ORNL; Wu, Yun [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary analysis of the availability and cost of corn stover and wheat straw for the area surrounding a demonstration biorefinery in the Henan Province of China was performed as a case study of potential cooperative analyses of bioenergy feedstocks between researchers and industry in the US and China. Though limited in scope, the purpose of this analysis is to provide insight into some of the issues and challenges of estimating feedstock availability in China and how this relates to analyses of feedstocks in the U.S. Completing this analysis also highlighted the importance of improving communication between U.S. researchers and Chinese collaborators. Understanding the units and terms used in the data provided by Tianguan proved to be a significant challenge. This was further complicated by language barriers between collaborators in the U.S. and China. The Tianguan demonstration biorefinery has a current capacity of 3k tons (1 million gallons) of cellulosic ethanol per year with plans to scale up to 10k tons (3.34 million gallons) per year. Using data provided by Tianguan staff in summer of 2011, the costs and availability of corn stover and wheat straw were estimated. Currently, there are sufficient volumes of wheat straw and corn stover that are considered 'waste' and would likely be available for bioenergy in the 20-km (12-mile) region surrounding the demonstration biorefinery at a low cost. However, as the industry grows, competition for feedstock will grow and prices are likely to rise as producers demand additional compensation to fully recover costs.

  20. Development of Low Cost Membranes (Ta, Nb & Cellulose Acetate) for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} Separation in WGS Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naidu Seetala; Upali Siriwardane

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of this work is to synthesize low temperature bimetallic nanocatalysts for Water Gas Shift reaction (WGS) for hydrogen production from CO and steam mixture; and develop low-cost metal (Nb/Ta)/ceramic membranes for H{sub 2} separation and Cellulose Acetate membranes for CO{sub 2} separation. Cu-Ni-Ce/alumina, Fe-Ni-Ce/alumina granular WGS catalysts incorporating metal oxide nanoparticles into alumina support were prepared using sol-gel/oil-drop methods. The catalysts were characterized by Powder X-ray Diffractometer (PXRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Differential Thermal Analyzer (DTA), Thermal Gravitational Analyzer (TGA), and Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) techniques. TGA shows sharp weight loss at approximately 215°C and DTA shows dehydration of metal hydroxides between 200°C and 250°C. The PXRD spectra show an increase in crystallinity as a result of heating to 1000°C, and indicating a fine dispersion of the metal oxide nanoparticles in alumina supports during the sol-gel synthesis and calcination at 450°C. BET analysis indicated a mesoporous structure of the granules with high surface area. A gas-phase dynamic flow reactor is used to optimize the reaction temperatures. A gas-phase batch reactor was used to obtain kinetic data and the parameters for maximum CO conversion. In Cu-Ni-Ce/alumina category, Cu(0%)Ni(10%)Ce(11%) was found to be the best WGS catalyst among six Low Temperature Shift (LTS) catalysts with optimum temperatures between 200-300�°C, while Ni(5%)Cu(5%)Ce(11%) was found to be the best among four High Temperature Shift (HTS) catalysts with optimum temperature between 350-400°C. In the Fe-Ni-Ce/alumina category catalysts, Fe(8%)Ni(0%)Ce(8%)/alumina and Fe(6%)Ni(2%)Ce(8%)/alumina catalysts showed optimum WGS reaction temperature below 150°C. All Ni(8-x%)Fe(x%)Ce(8%) had lower WGS reaction efficiencies compared to Ni(8-x%)Cu(x%)Ce(8%). Metal (Nb or Ta)/ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation from the WGS reaction gas products have been prepared using a) sputtering and b) aluminothermic techniques. A polyvinyl-glass permeability tester was used with a gas chromatograph (GC) for H{sub 2}/CO permeability testing. Nb films showed a higher permeability than Ta at a given disk porosity. The aluminothermically deposited membranes have higher H{sub 2} permeability compared to the sputtered films, and Nb-film coated disks showed lower H{sub 2} permeability than Ta-film. A three-stage prototype stainless steel reactor with integrated housing for 1) WGS reaction catalysts, 2) H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation metal/ceramic or metal/asbestos membranes, and 3) CO/CO{sub 2} separation cellulose acetate /filter-paper membranes has been designed and tested to have capabilities to perform WGS reactions at temperatures up to 400°C and withstand gas pressures up to 15 bars. The cracking of ceramic disks and gas leaks were successfully prevented by replacing ceramic disks with asbestos sheets that can easily withstand 400°C. Kinetic studies of H{sub 2} and CO permeabilities were performed through the single and double layer Nb and Ta membranes. Cellulose acetate (CA) films with 25% triethyl citrate (TEC) as plasticizer were prepared for H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2} gas separation with varying thickness of the films by acetone solutions at different concentrations and by dip-coating onto filter papers. The AFM analysis of the CA membrane showed that the uniform coating had fewer and smaller pores as the film thickness increased, and corroborated by gas permeability studies. The CO{sub 2} permeability has decreased faster than CO permeability with the CA/TEC membrane thickness, and findings support that the CA membrane could be used to entrap CO{sub 2}. Several CA/TEC membranes were also staked to increase the separation efficiency. Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS) was used to estimate the micro-porosity (pore size and concentration) and fractional free volume changes of CA/TEC films, and used to understand the variations observed in the CO{sub 2}/CO permeabilities.

  1. Environmental Sustainability of Cellulosic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    types of lands will be considered renewable biomass, and thus eligible to be used in production `renewable biomass' as defined in the rule and demonstrated by reporting and recordkeeping requirements.1426(f) [or qualify byway of an alternative pathway petition]; "Renewable Biomass means: 1) Planted crops

  2. Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o .FornlA Series ofTransforming Biomass

  3. Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd: China Datang Corporation TrinaCedobrasethanol Jump to:

  4. Final Technical Report: Improvement of Zymomonas mobilis for Commercial Use in Corn-based Biorefineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitz, William D.

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2007 and 2010 DuPont conducted a program under DOE award DE-FC36-07GO17056 to develop and improve Zymomonas mobilis as an ethanologen for commercial use in biorefineries to produce cellulosic ethanol. This program followed upon an earlier DOE funded program in which DuPont, in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) had developed a Zymomonas strain in conjunction with the development of an integrated cellulosic ethanol process. In the current project, we sought to maximize the utility of Zymomonas by adding the pathway to allow fermentation of the minor sugar arabinose, improve the utilization of xylose, improve tolerance to process hydrolysate and reduce the cost of producing the ethanologen. We undertook four major work streams to address these tasks, employing a range of approaches including genetic engineering, adaptation, metabolite and pathway analysis and fermentation process development. Through this project, we have developed a series of strains with improved characteristics versus the starting strain, and demonstrated robust scalability to at least the 200L scale. By a combination of improved ethanol fermentation yield and titer as well as reduced seed train costs, we have been able to reduce the capital investment and minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) by approximately 8.5% and 11% respectively vs. our starting point. Furthermore, the new strains we have developed, coupled with the learnings of this program, provide a platform for further strain improvements and advancement of cellulosic ethanol technology.

  5. Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass Recalcitrance Factors Using Reference Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Xiaohui; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three commercial cellulase preparations, Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, Dupont Accellerase® 1500, and DSM Cytolase CL, were evaluated for their hydrolytic activity using a set of reference biomass substrates with controlled substrate characteristics. It was found that lignin remains a significant recalcitrance factor to all the preparations, although different enzyme preparations respond to the inhibitory effect of lignin differently. Also, different types of biomass lignin can inhibit cellulose enzymes in different manners. Enhancing enzyme activity toward biomass fiber swelling is an area significantly contributing to potential improvement in cellulose performance. While the degree of polymerization of cellulose in the reference substrates did not present a major recalcitrance factor to Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, cellulose crystallite has been shown to have a significant lower reactivity toward all enzyme mixtures. The presence of polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) in Novozymes Ctec2 appears to enhance enzyme activity toward decrystallization of cellulose. This study demonstrated that reference substrates with controlled chemical and physical characteristics of structural features can be applied as an effective and practical strategy to identify cellulosic enzyme activities toward specific biomass recalcitrance factor(s) and provide specific targets for enzyme improvement.

  6. SSSPPPRRRIIINNNGGG 222000111111 EEENNNGGGIIINNNEEEEEERRRIIINNNGGG CCCAAARRREEEEEERRR FFFAAAIIIRRR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casavant, Tom

    Corporation Civco Medical Solutions Eaton Corporation Emerson Process Management/Fisher Division Ericsson ESCO Medical Solutions Eaton Corporation Ericsson Genencor, A Danisco Division Go Daddy HDR Engineering, Inc Corporation Cargill Cerner Corporation Civco Medical Solutions Eaton Corporation Emerson Process Management

  7. Degradation of cellulosic material by cellulomonas fimi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Steven Daniel

    2015-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The world stocks of fossil fuels are dwindling and may be all but out before the end of the century. Despite this there is increasing demand for them to be used for transport, and the ever increasing green house gases ...

  8. The Solvent Mediated Thermodynamics of Cellulose Deconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Adam S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solubility on the hydrogen- bonding properties of anions isto have hydrogen bond like properties in the crystal

  9. The Solvent Mediated Thermodynamics of Cellulose Deconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Adam S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 Preferential Interactions between Lithium Chloride and5 – Preferential Interactions between Lithium Chloride and

  10. Production of High Value Cellulose from Tobacco

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berson, R ERic; Dvaid, Keith; McGinley, W Mark; Meduri, Praveen; Clark, Ezra; Dayalan, Ethirajulu; Sumaneskera, Gamini; Donald Colliver, Mahendra Sunkara'

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kentucky Rural Energy Supply Program was established in 2005 by a federal direct appropriation to benefit the citizens of the Commonwealth by creating a unified statewide consortium to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency in Kentucky. The U.S. Department of Energy�s (DOE) Office of Biomass Programs initially funded the consortium in 2005 with a $2 million operational grant. The Kentucky Rural Energy Consortium (KREC) was formed at the outset of the program to advance energy efficiency and comprehensive research on biomass and bioenergy of importance to Kentucky agriculture, rural communities, and related industries. In recognition of the successful efforts of the program, KREC received an additional $1.96 million federal appropriation in 2008 for renewal of the DOE grant. From the beginning, KREC understood the value of providing a statewide forum for the discussion of Kentucky�s long term energy needs and economic development potential. The new funding allowed KREC to continue to serve as a clearinghouse and support new research and development and outreach programs for energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  11. Digital Color in Cellulose Nanocrystal Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumanli, Ahu Gu?mrah; van der Kooij, Hanne M.; Kamita, Gen; Reisner, Erwin; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    - photonics 2012, 6, 063516. (18) Vignolini, S.; Rudall, P. J.; Rowland, A. V.; Reed, A.; Moyroud, E.; Faden, R. B.; Baumberg, J. J.; Glover, B. J.; Steiner, U. Pointillist Structural Color in Pollia fruit. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2012, 109, 15712...

  12. The complexity of catalytically "cracking" cellulose | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chain length affects oxygen's departure in key reaction for building bio-fuels Replacing fossil fuels in industrial applications could reduce economic, environmental and security...

  13. Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to digest switchgrass biomass and synthesize its sugars into gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. | Image courtesy of Berkeley Lab. Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are...

  14. The complexity of catalytically "cracking" cellulose | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    However, transforming bio-feedstock into fuels means quickly and efficiently removing oxygen atoms. World energy consumption is predicted to grow by more than 50 percent between...

  15. Potential of nanocrystalline cellulose-fibrin nanocomposites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanocomposite’s mechanical properties can be manipulated to conform to the native blood vessel by varying the ONCC to fibrin ratio andor by controlling the degree of...

  16. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 Technique Summary: *Microscopy: light, e-, ion, scanning probe *Diffraction: e-, neutron, x-ray *Inelastic Scattering: Raman *Scattering: DLS, *Spectroscopy: NMR, IR,...

  17. Four Cellulosic Ethanol Breakthroughs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil Energy FY 2010 Budget FossilThirdFosteringFour

  18. Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring Solar forProject DevelopsDepartment of

  19. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWind Siting ArticlesAugustBETO Monthly

  20. Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prev next >PresentationsNow LEADER Web Conference 1

  1. Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing |Prepare for| Department ofof Energy

  2. Cellulosome preparations for cellulose hydrolysis - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o .FornlA Series ofTransforming

  3. Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999InspectionsAnnualTheEnergia y Clima de las Americas ||of

  4. Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof EnergyBILIWG:Background: Today's

  5. BIMODAL COMBINATION OF SPEECH AND HANDWRITING FOR IMPROVED WORD RECOGNITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Stéphane

    ´ephane Dupont TCTS lab - FPMs & MULTITEL Avenue Copernic, B-7000, Mons, Belgium woodruff@tcts.fpms.ac.be, dupont

  6. Bosboom, R. E., Dupont-Nivet, G., Mandic, O., Proust, J. N., Ormukov, C., and Amminov, J., (accepted 2014), Late Eocene paleogeography of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    , S Kyrgyzstan and SW Tajikistan): Geological Society of London Special Publications, v. Darius Central Asia. #12;Late Eocene paleogeography of the Proto-Paratethys Sea in1 Central Asia (NW China, S Kyrgyzstan and SW of Seismology: Kyrgyz Republic Bishkek, Asanbay 52/1, 720060, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan11 f Institute of geology

  7. Electrodes for PEMFC Operation on H2 and Reformate Los Alamos National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) : Ambient air impurities (CRADA) DuPont: MEA evaluation (CRADA) SMP (P. Atanasova): Catalyst Testing OMG

  8. Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandor, D.; Wallace, R.; Peterson, S.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, outlines, and documents a set of plausible scenarios for producing significant quantities of lignocellulosic ethanol in 2017. These scenarios can provide guidance for setting government policy and targeting government investment to the areas with greatest potential impact.

  9. An Environmental and Policy Evaluation of Cellulosic Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurtado, Lisa Diane

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As the global demand for energy rises, there are significant efforts to find alternative energy sources. In the United States (US), these efforts are primarily motivated by a desire to increase energy security and reduce the potential impacts...

  10. CELLULOSE ESTER / POLYOLEFIN BINARY BLENDS : RHEOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY AND IMPACT PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by a chemical modification to bring new properties is one of the paths to produce a bioplastic. Progressively

  11. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production and Demand: Actual and Forecasts thru 2030 Petroleum andproduction and demand are nearly balanced for all but one energy source: petroleum –

  12. Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    largest wind farms; several of the world's largest solar generation and thermal energy storage systems; the first new nuclear power plant to begin construction in the United...

  13. Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    innovative technologies that will help diversify our energy portfolio, reduce carbon pollution and lead to tomorrow's energy breakthroughs." As the President's Climate Action Plan...

  14. Unconventional Relationshipsfor Hemicellulose Hydrolysis and Subsequent Cellulose Digestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    of flow systems could lead to novel advanced pretreatments that reduce costs. Data and kinetic models be pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid to recover high yields of sugars directly from hemicellulose and chemicals with unique and powerful economic, environmental, and strategic benefits. Pretreatment is costly

  15. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.15 1.15 Petrolia (2008) Unloading 1.15 1.15 Truck Wait 1.329 19.68 0.87 0.87 Thompson & Tyner (2014) Oversize Permit 0.02 0.02 Author's Estimate Total 3.45 3.45 2014...

  16. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and ferment all sugars Ethanol recovery Fuel ethanol Residuecellulosic ethanol that is competitive as a pure fuel •Fuels Ocean/ hydro Geothermal Transportation Electricity Hydrogen Batteries Nuclear By Lee Lynd, Dartmouth Ethanol •

  17. Electric Field Alignment of Cellulose Based-Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalidindi, Sanjay Varma

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    for 30 minutes at 150 rpm to enable the evaporation of acetone. The viscosity of the silicone oil used was 100cp. 2.2.1.2 PVAc ? Basic Method In this study we used a non-covalent approach to exfoliate the CWs. As received CWs (0.1g) were... Method Due to the possibility of water (present in as-received CWs) acting as a plasticizer, a modified dispersion method was developed. A high power sonication method to exfoliate the CWs was used. A flowchart of the dispersion process is shown...

  18. EFFECT OF NITROGEN OXIDE PRETREATMENTS ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrevik, R.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    57) TO EXTRACTION WATER (6276) _________________________ ~~~focus this study on the extraction using water only, with noe followed by water leaching, then extraction for 11 hOl.lr

  19. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resources – Agricultural wastes • Sugar cane bagasse • Cornwaste disposal Low impact biomass crops Can improve air quality • Economic Abundant, inexpensive, domestic feedstock Low cost potential without subsidies Agricultural and

  20. EFFECT OF NITROGEN OXIDE PRETREATMENTS ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrevik, R.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an air compressor and gas scrubber are not needed. However,estimation. Compressor for Scrubber -- The compressor usedNO x Reaction Silo Off-Gas Scrubber Compressor 15,000 gal. ,

  1. Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Laboratory b13foustop-1.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Bio-based Jet Fuel Cross-cutting Technologies for Advanced Biofuels Process Design and Economics for...

  2. An Environmental and Policy Evaluation of Cellulosic Ethanol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurtado, Lisa Diane

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................................................................................... 126 viii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Yield of Various Biomass Feedstock .............................................................. 6 Figure 2. Life Cycle Assessment Framework (modified from ISO 14040...-contaminated groundwater and wastewater could be used to increase the productivity of feedstocks. Using highly productive biomass also reduces the depletion of natural resources. Some examples of the productivity or yield of certain feedstocks are given in Figure 1...

  3. Hydroxypropylation of cellulose as a pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Scott Tyson

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of substituted AHG. Fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates, obtained from HPC samples, confirmed that the presence of hydroxypropyl derivatives does not inhibit the production of ethyl alcohol. DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to Kim, Ryan, and Holly... Preparation of HPC 9 10 12 14 III MATERIALS AND METHODS 15 HPC Preparation Enzyme Hydrolysis Fermentation Analytical Procedures Molar Substitution Fraction of Substituted AHG Sugar Analysis Ethyl Alcohol Analysis IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 15 18...

  4. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wastes • Sugar cane bagasse • Corn stover and fiber • FutureSugarcane Sugarcane Bagasse Louisiana Rice Hulls Pile Energy

  5. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by U.S. Forest Service and Purdue University held on June 26, 2012

  6. Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    improve technology and reduce costs • In response to recentuses and to advance technologies to reduce costs Basis of MyEthanol • Operating costs are low • Technology is ready to

  7. acetylated cellulose cardboard: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: -off, waxed cardboard, cork or screw tops or paraffin seals such as glass or plastic containers of catsup in cardboard boxes, paper, foil, plastic, and cellophane such...

  8. advances cellulosic ethanol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Websites Summary: the flexibility to run on numerous biomass feedstocks including wood chips, tall grasses, corn stover (residual biofuels from...

  9. Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIA, AEO2009, High Oil Price Case 116 2.06 EIA, AEO2009, Reference Case 95 1.76 EIA, AEO2009, Low Oil Price Case 51 1.04 State of Technology Background Cost Targets Developed...

  10. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximatelyBoostingandDOEBreaking Up DOE/SC-0095

  11. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximatelyBoostingandDOEBreaking Up

  12. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximatelyBoostingandDOEBreaking UpDepartment of

  13. Preliminary Economics for Hydrocarbon Fuel Production from Cellulosic Sugars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, James R.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Biorefinery process and economic models built in CHEMCAD and a preliminary, genome-scale metabolic model for the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi were used to simulate the bioconversion of corn stover to lipids, and the upgrading of these hydrocarbon precursors to diesel and jet fuel. The metabolic model was based on the recently released genome sequence for L. starkeyi and on metabolic pathway information from the literature. The process model was based on bioconversion, lipid extraction, and lipid oil upgrading data found in literature, on new laboratory experimental data, and on yield predictions from the preliminary L. starkeyi metabolic model. The current plant gate production cost for a distillate-range hydrocarbon fuel was estimated by the process model Base Case to be $9.5/gallon ($9.0 /gallon of gasoline equivalent) with assumptions of 2011$, 10% internal return on investment, and 2205 ton/day dry feed rate. Opportunities for reducing the cost to below $5.0/gallon, such as improving bioconversion lipid yield and hydrogenation catalyst selectivity, are presented in a Target Case. The process and economic models developed for this work will be updated in 2014 with new experimental data and predictions from a refined metabolic network model for L. starkeyi. Attaining a production cost of $3.0/gallon will require finding higher value uses for lignin other than power generation, such as conversion to additional fuel or to a co-product.

  14. Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT8.pdf MoreRevised Guidelines for

  15. Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel CellsanCommercial-Scale

  16. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle School (6-8)Need for a Second RepositoryLNGBiorefinery

  17. Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic Biofuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle SchoolPhysicsDeliveryfor LoanEfficientTransition

  18. Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofitting Doors onNovemberHistoricalReviewof

  19. The Journey to Commercializing Cellulosic Biofuels in the United States |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTank 48HPublic DisseminationTechnologies, July

  20. Cost-Effective Enzyme for Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic Biomass -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrective Action1,a,Energy

  1. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »Usage »DownloadSolar »MiddleHighHighEnergyorofNeed for aand IAEA

  2. Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o .FornlA Series ofTransforming BiomassMaking Same

  3. Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o .FornlA Series ofTransforming BiomassMaking

  4. Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic Biofuel

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergy RightsAnnouncement | Department|Commitment forPlant | Department

  5. Pilot Integrated Cellulosic Biorefinery Operations to Fuel Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1Department of Energy Photovoltaics at DOE's2 DOEUraniumPilot

  6. The Journey to Commercializing Cellulosic Biofuels in the United States |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartmentTheEnergyDepartment ofThe

  7. Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromof EnergyBILIWG:Background: Today'sEnergy Bacterial

  8. Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes Jump to: navigation, search

  9. Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Function - Symposium: Cellulose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteriesmetal-organic frameworks EFRCContactsynthesis,

  10. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green BusNews andMayBradys EGSElizabeth

  11. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy andAprilWater andWatershed Scale

  12. The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartment

  13. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGo forDepartment ofGrand Challenges

  14. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting |Resources »

  15. Property:RenewableFuelStandard/CellulosicBiofuel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This property is set byisProperty Edit

  16. 2014 Statistical Consulting Co-Op Co-Operative Education Position Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepp, Larry

    forecasting and Six Sigma training. Application areas include operations, research and development, marketingPont Six Sigma certification possible). DuPont at a Glance: DuPont is a global Fortune 100 company

  17. FEATURE EXTRACTION AND ACOUSTIC MODELING: AN APPROACH FOR IMPROVED GENERALIZATION ACROSS LANGUAGES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Stéphane

    AND ACCENTS St´ephane Dupont , Christophe Ris , Olivier Deroo , S´ebastien Poitoux Multitel, Avenue Copernic

  18. Combined use of close-talk and throat microphones for improved speech recognition under non-stationary background noise.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Stéphane

    -stationary background noise. St´ephane Dupont, Christophe Ris and Damien Bachelart Multitel & FPMS-TCTS, Avenue Copernic

  19. Convective heating analysis of an IFE target in a high temperature, low Reynolds number xenon environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdener, Dain Steffen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Group, “Material Properties: Polyimide (Kapton)”, Polyimide%20Kapton/PolyimideKaElectronics : Kapton® Polyimide Film." DuPont. The Miracles

  20. Intense pulsed light sintering of copper nanoink for printed electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hak-Sung; Dhage, Sanjay R.; Shim, Dong-Eun; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    triazine) epoxy composite, polyimide ?lm (Kapton, Dupont),copper nanoink on: (a) polyimide ?lm; (b) glass ?ber BT (

  1. ""Test Before TouchTest Before Touch"" Easier Said Than DoneEasier Said Than Done

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ""Test Before TouchTest Before Touch"" Easier Said Than DoneEasier Said Than Done Ken Crawford, DuPontKen Crawford, DuPont Kent Haggerty, DupontKent Haggerty, Dupont #12;OverviewOverview · Test Before Touch (TBT Voltage Testing · Summary & Conclusions #12;#12;How Would You Verify Power is Off?How Would You Verify

  2. The DuPont powder challenge: The crystal structure of [C{sub 5}NH{sub 6}][Al{sub 3}F{sub 10}] -- A cautionary tale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlow, R.L.; Herron, N.; Li, Z.; Vogt, T.; Solovyov, L.; Kirik, S.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound previously reported as HAlF{sub 4} has been shown to be [pyridinium][Al{sub 3}F{sub 10}]. The structure of this phase was solved and refined using a combination of synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction techniques in association with a number of other analytical techniques. The structure consists of [Al{sub 3}F{sub 10}]{sub n}{sup {minus}} sheets containing both corner-sharing (common) and edge-sharing (unusual) AlF{sub 6} octahedra. The sheets are separated by pyridinium cations oriented perpendicular to the sheets. The final crystallographic data are as follows: monoclinic, space group C2/m, a = 8.2706(3), b = 6.1998(3), c = 10,525(1) {angstrom}, {beta} = 103.38(1){degree}, V = 525.0(1) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 2. This compound appears to be another example of a layered clay-like aluminum fluoride.

  3. Development of sustainable harvest strategies for cellulose-based biofuels: The effect of intensity and season of harvest on cellulosic feedstock and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Wildlife Foundation, "Budweiser Renewable Energy and Wildlife Conservation Prize," South Dakota Game, Fish) and by state and federal agencies. This project will examine how feedstock harvest will affect game bird, and Parks Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration, and South Dakota State University Agricultural Experiment

  4. Electrostatic charge generation in two-phase dispersions during impeller mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meschwitz, Gerard Edward

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the measurement of the electrical parameters inside the mixing tank, a specially designed 304 stainless steel probe with a Qa Teflon insulating case was inserted through the lid of the mixing tank. Two industrial grade surfactants (Dupont Stadis 450 and Shell... in capillaries and pipes. However, the test series utilizing DuPont Stadis 450 yielded relatively inconclusive results. The dependence of steady state electrical current (on the tank wall) versus mean drop diameter (when DuPont Stadis 450 surfactant...

  5. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to image automobile engine system components, two-phase fluid components in commercial cooling systems, and electrodes used for lithium batteries. Michael Crawford of DuPont,...

  6. Maximizing (Productivity and Efficiency) in Contemporary Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fixen, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paris, France. Dupont. 2009. Agriculture is up to globalFAO. 2008. State of Food and Agriculture (page 62).Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

  7. Radiological XPS | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors Using Reference Substrates. Three commercial cellulase preparations, Novozymes Cellic® Ctec2, Dupont Accellerase® 1500, and DSM Cytolase CL, were evaluated...

  8. COUR D'APPEL DE DIJONCOUR D'APPEL DE DIJON Premire Prsidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Samuel

    .02.03 - ARMENIEN T.G.I de DIJON 2005-2010 DUPONT née VARDANYAN Manon - (1974) 10 boulevard Rembrandt - 21000 DIJON

  9. FAQs on Employee Benefit Value Study (BenVal) and Comparator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battelle BCO Boeing Caterpillar CH2M Hill Curtiss-Wright DuPont GE Georgia Power Goodyear Tire Gulfstream Aerospace Jacobs Engineering Johnson Controls Lockheed Martin Los...

  10. Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2500 individual tort claims are pending against former Hanford contractors (DuPont, General Electric, and UNC Nuclear Industries) in the Eastern District of Washington. The...

  11. alloy composite membranes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    precious metals to Nafion a perfluorosulfonated ionomer developed by DuPont membrane surfaces, in which nanosized metal Heflin, Randy 233 Biomolecular simulations of...

  12. Engineering Enzymes in Energy Crops: Conditionally Activated Enzymes Expressed in Cellulosic Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Enzymes are required to break plant biomass down into the fermentable sugars that are used to create biofuel. Currently, costly enzymes must be added to the biofuel production process. Engineering crops to already contain these enzymes will reduce costs and produce biomass that is more easily digested. In fact, enzyme costs alone account for $0.50-$0.75/gallon of the cost of a biomass-derived biofuel like ethanol. Agrivida is genetically engineering plants to contain high concentrations of enzymes that break down cell walls. These enzymes can be “switched on” after harvest so they won’t damage the plant while it’s growing.

  13. UTILIZATION OF IMMOBILIZED B-GLUCOSIDASE IN THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, S.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be read illy used in a fixed bed reactor rather than performallowed ready use in a fixed-bed reactor. Experimental andin order to simulate a fixed-bed reactor with diffusion

  14. The evolution of pellet size and shape during spheronisation of an extruded microcrystalline cellulose paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, C. L. S.; Yu, Q.; Lister, V. Y.; Rough, S. L.; Wilson, D. I.; Zhang, M.

    2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The process by which cylindrical rods of soft solid paste extrudate are converted into round pellets on a spheroniser (Marumeriser™) plate was studied by interrupting spheronisation tests and measuring the size and shape of the pellets. Batches...

  15. Engineering of a High-Throughput Screening System to Identify Cellulosic Biomass,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    - grated high-throughput (HTP) screening pipeline. Herein, we report on the engineering of a novel HTP

  16. 1 Electrospun Polyethylene Oxide/Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite 2 Nanofibrous Mats with Homogeneous and Heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    property, and excellent flexibility for 32 chemical/physical surface functionalization. Hence, electrospun nanoparticles into polymer matrices is one 47 technique that has been developed and used as one of the most 48(acrylic acid) (PAA),14 polyethylene oxide (PEO),15 poly(lactic 57acid) (PLA),16,17 polystyrene (PS),18

  17. Mechanisms and Regulation of Cellulose Degradation by Clostridia papyrosolvens C7 and Neurospora crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zepeda, Veronica

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    279(11): p. 9867-74. Abdou, L. , et al. , Transcriptional104(10): p. 3747-3752. Abdou, L. , et al. , Transcriptional

  18. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation" Jian Shi, Mirvatwaste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation Jian Shi, MirvatIn addition, techno- economic evaluation of large scale

  19. Net energy of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass M. R. Schmer*, K. P. Vogel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    derived from switchgrass were 94% lower than estimated GHG from gasoline. This is a baseline study in conventional gasoline and in the long term because of U.S. government mandates (2, 3). Maize or corn (Zea mays production, but competing feed and food demands on grain supplies and prices will eventually limit expansion

  20. The quantification of oxygen toxicity by the technique of cellulose acetate electrophoresis of rat serum proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, Marcia Wagner

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    symptoms of atelectasis, pulmonary edema, congestion and consolidation of the lungs, alveoli filled with a granular fibrillar exudate, and a general pneumonic condition. Therefore, pulmonary pathology associated with oxygen toxicity has been termed... the epithelial cells of the lungs are in direct contact with the changes in partial pressures of oxygen. Exposure to oxygen at increased partial pressures has had some dramatic effects on the circulatory system, such as increased osmotic fragility (96, 105...

  1. Biotemplated Synthesis of Gold NanoparticleBacteria Cellulose Nanofiber Nanocomposites and Their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Limin

    produced by acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter xylinum using D-glucose as the carbon source, which usually of sisal fibers by in situ fermentation and obtained a new class of completely renewable and biodegradable

  2. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and fermentation) rate and increasing the production of neutral products at the expense of acetic andand acetic acid concen- trations on the rate of fermentationacetic acid production (data not shown). all fermentation

  3. Ability of the rumen ciliate protozoon Eudiplodinium maggii to digest and ferment microcrystalline cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Acetic acid followed by butyric acid were the main acids produced by protozoa. #12;Ability of the rumen ciliate protozoon Eudiplodinium maggii to digest and ferment microcrystalline and chloramphenicol resulted in an increase in the concentration of volatile fatty acids in the incubation medium

  4. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and acetic acid concen- trations on the rate of fermentationacetic acid production (data not shown). all fermentationand fermentation) rate and increasing the production of neutral products at the expense of acetic and other acids.

  5. The study on flow electrification of oil-cellulose insulating system in large power transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Cao, L.J. [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical breakdown due to charge accumulation from transformer oil flow has caused many failures of large power transformers world wide. The problem is due to the entrainment of diffused electrical double layer charges into circulating transformer oil. As the charges accumulate on the surface of solid insulating materials and in volume oil, static potential builds up. If the rate of charge accumulation is greater than the rate of charge relaxation, harmful spark discharge may occur. By employing a pressboard pipe model, the present study carried out revealed the influence of higher oil flow rate and upstream charge on flow electrification. By simulating an actual transformer internal structure, it is noticed that there is a probability of partial discharge inception under higher oil circulation velocity. However, the upstream charge and dry zone can lead to a great increase of electric field strength, which may become important potential causes of partial discharge inception under the condition of relative low oil velocity.

  6. On the Shrinkage and Stiffening of a Cellulose Sponge upon Drying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey, Justine; Vandamme, Matthieu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogen bonds play a significant role in the structure and on the mechanical propertieshydrogen bonds [13]. Moisture has an effect on the mechanical properties

  7. Evaluation of interphase properties in a cellulose fiber-reinforced polypropylene composite by nanoindentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    by nanoindentation and finite element analysis Seung-Hwan Lee a,*, Siqun Wang a , George M. Pharr b,c , Haitao Xu b- ing and separation, and biodegradability. Furthermore, the use of natural resources reduces releases author. Tel.: +1 865 974 4965; fax: +1 865 946 1109. E-mail address: lshyhk@hotmail.com (S.-H. Lee). www

  8. O of cellulose organic fraction combined with 18 O of calcite and 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    be attributed to isotopic enrichment of lake water. Isotopic enrichment of lake water in the order of 4 are usually of interdisciplinary character, comprising physicochemical, biological and isotopic tools. Isotope methods are considered as particularly useful (Leng et al., 2006). 18 O isotope composition of bulk

  9. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastBiomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

  10. Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    key carbon content modeling variables on LUC GHG emissions associated with the four bioethanol pathways we examined. Our results indicate that LUC GHG emissions may have a smaller...

  11. Cellulose and Hemicellulose Models 81 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 8486, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    . However, advanced low- and no-acid technologies are critical if we are to reduce bioethanol costs: Biomass; hydrolysis; kinetics; bioethanol; pretreatment. Introduction When used as a transportation fuel, ethanol produced from lignocel- lulosic biomass, often termed bioethanol, has the potential to provide sig

  12. Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Received in revised form 8 November 2011 Accepted 9 December 2011 Available online xxx Keywords: Bioethanol

  13. PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 EthanolBazua, D.C. and C.R. Wilke, "Ethanol Effects on the Kineticsto the Production of Ethanol, LBL-5963. (Submitted to

  14. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enzymatic Conversion of Biomass for Fuels Production, 566,B. , 2002. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process DesignSummary of findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for

  15. Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin-blocking treatment of biomass and uses thereof. Yangin the conversion of biomass to ethanol. American InstituteNY. p 15. Dale BE. 1983. Biomass refining — protein and

  16. Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Abstract Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry was previously proposed to measure energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. For that method, a reference silver nitrate-ray energy is high enough to avoid total a

  17. Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21st Century

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop by USDA Forest Service held on June 26, 2012

  18. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and- fermentation-based bioethanol process - Technical andand- fermentation-based bioethanol process. Technical andand- fermentation-based bioethanol process. Technical and

  19. Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ed. ). Handbook on Bioethanol, Production and Utilization.CE (ed. ). Handbook on Bioethanol, Production and Utiliza-design and costing of bioethanol technol- ogy: A tool for

  20. Surface-Based Assays for Enzyme Adsorption and Activity on Model Cellulose Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Samuel Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24) Macmillan, J. D. Bioethanol Production: Status andRev (6) Macmillan, J. D. Bioethanol Production: Status and2005. (5) Macmillan, J. D. Bioethanol Production: Status and

  1. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bioprocessing for bioethanol production using Saccharomycesconversion to bioethanol in a single bioreactor by b) a CBPof lignocellulose to bioethanol refers to the combining of

  2. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tien, Ming (State College, PA); Carlson, John (Port Matilda, PA); Liang, Haiying (Clemson, SC)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Transgenic lignocellulosic plants are provided according to embodiments of the present invention, the transgenic plants transformed with an expression cassette encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which targets the protein to a cell wall of the transgenic plant, where at least 5% of the total amino acid residues of the protein are tyrosine, lysine, serine, threonine or cysteine. Methods of increasing lignin-protein bonds in a lignocellulosic plant are provided according to embodiments of the present invention which include expressing a recombinant nucleic acid in a lignocellulosic plant, the recombinant nucleic acid encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which targets the protein to the cell wall of a plant, where at least 5% of the total amino acid residues of the protein are tyrosine, lysine, serine, threonine or cysteine.

  3. Enzymatically based cellulosic ethanol production technology was selected as a key area for biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    of biotechnology offered the promise for significant advances that could dramati- cally reduce costs and make Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA 5 Center for Environmental Research & Technology, Bourns

  4. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1982 19801205. Ethanol and fuel product production.The first generation fuel ethanol is derived from starch andfor bioconversion to fuel ethanol because it not only

  5. Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bacterial catalysts for fuel ethanol production. Biotech-of process streams in fuel ethanol production from softwoodtion of biotechnology to fuel ethanol production from

  6. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Clostridium thermocellum: Bioenergetics and hydrolysisby Clostridium thermocellum: Bioenergetics and hydrolysisby Clostridium thermocellum: Bioenergetics and hydrolysis

  7. PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the Kudzu Plant ..Chemical Analysis of the Kudzu Plant. As promised in a1-30-77), the study on the Kudzu plant has been completed.

  8. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    feedstocks, such as agricultural wastes and energy crops,feedstocks, such as agricultural wastes and forestry wastes,biomass, such as agricultural waste corn stover (112.7

  9. PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steven Isaacs, Chemical Engineering, M.I.T. , B.S. 1976,Richard Lindsey, Chemical Engineering, Illinois Inst. of1974. Harry Wong, Chemical Engineering, M.I.T. , M.S. 1973.

  10. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steven Wald, Chemical Engineering, Cornell, U. B.S.Candidate Dale Wiley, Chemical Engineering, UCSB, MS 1977,Candidate Harry Wong, Chemical Engineering, M.I.T. , M.S.

  11. The Effect of Iron Oxide on Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium (DNRA) in Lignin Cellulose medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    to miniature PRBs in the laboratory to capture hydrogen sulfide (H2S) because it is necessary for sulfur of sulfate to H2S because Fe (III) reducers outcompete sulfate reducers for electron donors. The iron removal in this system is thought to be denitrification, but DNRA pathways leading to the production

  12. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bovine serum albumin, Aspen model Introduction Overcominganalysis were conducted using Aspen Plus software based onand simulation model using Aspen, the cost of fuel ethanol

  13. DECOMPOSITION OF LIGNIN AND CELLOBIOSE IN RELATION TO THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamanaka, Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    culture of the fungus in a composting mode suggest thatresults were obtained in composting culture of ground woodfeasibility of the composting method remains in doubt. II.

  14. The effect of mixing on the extrusion-spheronisation of a micro-crystalline cellulose paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, M. P.; Kent, M. D.; Rickenbach, J.; Rimmer, G.; Wilson, D. I.; Rough, S. L.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -plastic) under the281 conditions studied, and the wall slip behaviour being linear in velocity but282 having a finite wall slip-yield stress (cf. a Coulombic static friction coefficient).283 Pex = 2?y ln D0 D + 4(?0 + ?V ) L D (3) The remaining parameters... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (m)427 m Power-law exponent for non-linear visco-plastic behaviour428 of extrusion material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (-)429 n Power-law exponent for wall slip of extrusion material (-)430 P1 Extrusion pressure...

  15. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996 19950414. Municipal solid waste processing facility andconversion of municipal-solid-waste to ethanol. Biotechnol.Bioconversion of municipal solid waste to glucose for bio-

  16. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production In shake flasks, Chaetomium trilaterat~ -2264 grows in pelletProduction In shake flask, Chaetomium trilaterate No. 2264 grows in pellet

  17. Uncertainty in techno-economic estimates of cellulosic ethanol production due to experimental measurement uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicari, Kristin Jenise

    Abstract Background Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuels remains a major financial and technical challenge at the industrial scale. A critical tool in biofuels process development is the techno-economic ...

  18. Optimization and Simulation for Designing the Supply Chain of the Cellulosic Biofuel Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Heungjo

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ) to devise an exact solution method to solve large-scale instances of BSCP, (4) to evaluate a biomass logistics system based on biomass modules, by using new simulation elements for new machines, and (5) to compare several biomass logistics systems based...

  19. The Economic and Financial Implications of Supplying a Bioenergy Conversion Facility with Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Will

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass feedstocks. Targeting the Middle Gulf Coast, Edna-Ganado, Texas area, mathematical programming in the form of a cost-minimization linear programming model(Sorghasaurus) is used to assess the financial and economic logistics costs for supplying a...

  20. Interactions between MUR10/CesA7-Dependent Secondary Cellulose Biosynthesis and Primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Markus

    Structure1[OA] Sonia Bosca2 , Christopher J. Barton, Neil G. Taylor, Peter Ryden, Lutz Neumetzler, Markus.B., K.R., G.J.S.); Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom (P.R.); Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1QW, United Kingdom (C

  1. Methods for simultaneous control of lignin content and composition, and cellulose content in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Vincent Lee C.; Li, Laigeng

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of concurrently introducing multiple genes into plants and trees is provided. The method includes simultaneous transformation of plants with multiple genes from the phenylpropanoid pathways including 4CL, CAld5H, AldOMT, SAD and CAD genes and combinations thereof to produce various lines of transgenic plants displaying altered agronomic traits. The agronomic traits of the plants are regulated by the orientation of the specific genes and the selected gene combinations, which are incorporated into the plant genome.

  2. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in above newsletter is for bagasse and not corn stover astheir Figure 19 is for bagasse. Therefore assumptions, basedthe Purdue analysis of bagasse. Presumably the results would

  3. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MATERIALS AND PROCESS EVALUATION Analysis of Bagasse. Ray P.AND PROCESS EVALUATION Analysis of Bagasse Approximately 2pounds of bagasse stalks and stems were received through the

  4. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. , 1994. Pretreatment of Bagasse by Nonionic Surfactantenzymatic hydrolysis of bagasse and decreased the amount of

  5. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    II, Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Bagasse Pith A, Sciamanna HighA, Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Bagasse Pith We recently receivedapproximately 2 KG of bagasse pith fraction (sucrose pre-

  6. PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, Charles R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compounds, Lyophilization, resuspension to concentrate thepH 5.5. Lyophilization. resuspension to concentrate the

  7. Nanoindentation of Biodegradable Cellulose Diacetate-graft-Poly(L-lactide) Copolymers: Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    increased in both CDA-g-PLLA and PLLA. The creep test performed by CSM showed that the creep strain of CDA and creep behavior. Continu- ous stiffness measurement (CSM) technique was used to obtained hardness was decreased by the grafting of PLLA. Thermal aging decreased the creep strain of CDA-g-PLLA and PLLA

  8. The Disintegration Process in Microcrystalline Cellulose Based Tablets I.: Influence of Temperature, Porosity and Superdisintegrants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yassin, Samy; Goodwin, Daniel J.; Anderson, Andrew; Sibik, Juraj; Wilson, D. Ian; Gladden, Lynn F.; Zeitler, J. Axel

    2015-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of penetration of the dissolution solvent as well as the initial release of the API16. The hydration times are of critical importance in controlling the rate of disintegration of immediate release formulations. An estimate of tablet porosity can be made based... on calculation of the volume of a tablet and the weighted average of the true density of the formulation components. Alternatively, more sophisticated methods to measure the porosity of tablets directly are using liquid or gas intrusion10,17. The analysis...

  9. Xylooligomers are strong inhibitors of cellulose hydrolysis by enzymes Qing Qing, Bin Yang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Carlo analysis decreased subject requirement without sacrificing power. This model provides a useful, the tissues contain the maximum nitrogen load possible for a given depth, so decompression from saturation saturation conditions are relatively sparse and, for ethical reasons, do not ap- proach the severe profiles

  10. Primary Radiation Defect Production in Polyethylene and Cellulose Jussi Polvi,* Petri Luukkonen, and Kai Nordlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    of Florida, PO Box 116400, Gainesville, Florida 32611, United States ABSTRACT: Irradiation effects. INTRODUCTION Irradiation has been used to process and modify polymeric materials since the 1960s.1 The earliest applications were cross- linking plastic materials, sterilizing medical equipment and preserving food products

  11. Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    tar and methane reforming capabilities and improved fuel synthesis strategies from syngas. The successful demonstration of these cost-efficient technologies is helping the...

  12. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is typically disposed of by incineration and/or landfill.on air pollution from incineration have halted construction

  13. anti-prl cellulose particles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system consisting of an array of high precision scintillator Time of Flight and silica Aerogel Counters, is discussed. The performances achieved in the beam tests are...

  14. Production of Cellulase on Mixtures of Xylose and Cellulose in a Fed-Batch Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ,2 * & ALAN D. AFTON3 1 School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA influencing time spent feeding in Ross's Geese, which may require a high time spent feeding at the expense 1996). Gut size scales linearly with body size and partly determines the rate of energy extraction from

  15. EFFECT OF ACIDIC CONDITIONS ON INTERFACE AND STRENGTH OF CELLULOSE FIBRES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Composites were made with furan as matrix and aligned hemp fibres as reinforcement to obtain a completely based fibres from hemp and flax it is important that a good interface is established and that the fibresH-level) that the fibres can tolerate without severe degradation. Composites were made with aligned hemp yarn in furan

  16. Photocatalytic cellulosic electrospun fibers for the degradation of potent cyanobacteria toxin microcystin-LR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    sources of pollution attributed from industrial and natural sources.1­6 Solar light driven photocatalysis% of the solar spectrum, which limits the amount of available sunlight that can be used for photocatalysis

  17. The Economic and Financial Implications of Supplying a Bioenergy Conversion Facility with Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Will

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass feedstocks. Targeting the Middle Gulf Coast, Edna-Ganado, Texas area, mathematical programming in the form of a cost-minimization linear programming model(Sorghasaurus) is used to assess the financial and economic logistics costs for supplying a...

  18. Optimization and Simulation for Designing the Supply Chain of the Cellulosic Biofuel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Heungjo

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    on the perspective gained from the review, fertile avenues for future research will be recommended. 1.3.2 Research objective 2 The flow of biofuels in the downstream and of several kinds of biomass feedstocks in the upstream can be described as multi...

  19. Review: Continuous hydrolysis and fermentation for cellulosic ethanol production Simone Brethauer, Charles E. Wyman *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    with powerful economic, environmental, and strategic attributes, but production costs must be competitive. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction According to the recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel to 379 ppm in 2005, primarily as a result of fossil fuel use (IPCC, 2007). Overall, petroleum

  20. Screening fungi isolated from historic Discovery Hut on Ross Island, Antarctica for cellulose degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    and supplies were abandoned. The hut was also used extensively by four other expeditions in the Heroic Age the south. After use by Shackleton's 1914­1917 Imperial Trans-Antarctic expedition, the hut was abandoned ships and scientists from the nearby research facilities, Scott Base and McMurdo Station. Of the three

  1. Materials Chemistry and Physics 95 (2006) 307312 Chemical etching characteristics for cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    available as LR 115 films were irradiated systematically with alpha particles in the energy range from 1 of Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Serbia and Monte Negro. parisons between the values calculated from and energies of the ions have been scarce. In most cases, comparisons have been limited to normal inci- dence

  2. Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartmentDecrease

  3. New process to convert lipids and cellulosic biomass to renewable diesel -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011RNew Visible toNew2 BONNEVILLEEnergy

  4. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News

  5. Visualization of biomass solubilization and cellulose regeneration during ionic liquid pretreatment of switchgrass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAFofEmailNORDUnet,govVisitorARTICLE

  6. Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21st Century

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desert SouthwestofDepartment

  7. Microbial Fuel Cells for Recycle of Process Water from Cellulosic Ethanol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals fromprocess used in miningMicroBooNEThruBiorefineries -

  8. High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p a a rDepartment| Departmenta d e b

  9. Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol Production in E. Coli

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene ControlsCounselGeneral- Energy

  10. ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want to follow this link? If so, clickYucca MountainZERHHigh-Impact

  11. off) the reaction rate steadily increases, and the PO selectivity steadily decreases, as a function of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, David W. C.

    catalysts, hurdles related to efficient and scalable harvesting of light (in- cluding abundant solar light support from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences.L. acknowledges the DuPont Young Professor grant by the DuPont corporation and the Camille Dreyfus Teacher

  12. Accelerated Aging Effects on Kevlar KM2 Fiber Survivability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Tony

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    as an alternative test method to the pneumatic grip setup. ........................................ 87 ix LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. DuPont?s Kevlar fiber grades and their tensile material properties ranked by ascending tensile modulus.... ................................................................................. 5 Table 2. Kevlar KM2 properties given by DuPont. ........................................................... 6 Table 3. Fiber rapid degradation Design of Experiment factors and levels. .................... 36 Table 4. Recorded experimentally...

  13. Site Energy Reduction Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagen, P. R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU...

  14. Dupont-Nivet, G., Sier, M., Campisano, C.J., Arrowsmith, J R., DiMaggio, E., Reed, K., Lockwood, C., Franke, C., and Hsing, S., 2008, Magnetostratigraphy of the eastern Hadar Basin (Ledi-Geraru research area, Ethiopia) and implications for hominin paleoen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    -Geraru research area, Ethiopia) and implications for hominin paleoenvironments, in Quade, J., and Wynn, J.G., eds Magnetostratigraphy of the eastern Hadar Basin (Ledi-Geraru research area, Ethiopia) and implications for hominin and climatic context. The Plio- cene Hadar Basin in the Afar region of northern Ethiopia (Fig. 1) includes some

  15. Artificial Cellulosomes and Arsenic Cleanup: From Single Cell Programming to Synthetic Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Shen-Long

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the yeast chromosomes for direct conversion of cellulose tothe yeast chromosomes for direct conversion of cellulose to

  16. Effect of Rate and Season of Application of Aminocyclopyrachlor on the Control of Acacia Farnesiana (L.) Willd. in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Joshua

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    throughout this study, and my committee members, Dr. Lyons and Dr. Senseman, for their help and support during this research project. I would like to thank DuPont for providing the funding necessary for this project and DuPont employees Eric Castner... significant negative impact on forage production and the vegetation composition of affected sites (Scifres et al. 1982a). Aminocyclopyrachlor, the active ingredient of a newly developed herbicide from DuPont (Wilmington, DE) currently known as DPX-MAT28...

  17. Role of Rhizobium endoglucanase CelC2 in cellulose biosynthesis and biofilm formation on plant roots and abiotic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for these bacteria. PVC tabs were used to examine the three-for biofilm-forming ability on PVC tabs. Wild type ANU843A-C) and biofilm formation on PVC (D-F) tabs of the studied

  18. Chemical composition and characterization of cellulose for Agave as a fast-growing, drought-tolerant biofuels feedstock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    -tolerant biofuels feedstock Hongjia Li,abd Marcus B. Foston,cd Rajeev Kumar,bd Reichel Samuel,cd Xiadi Gao,abd Fan lignocellulosic feedstock for biofuels production. Because agave composition will establish the maximum potential for further characterization and conversion of different agave species as biofuels feedstocks for semi

  19. A Bayesian model for predicting local El Niño events using tree ring widths and cellulose ?18O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nippert, Jesse B.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Sandquist, Darren R.; Ward, Joy K.

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . Eggemeyer, K. D., T. Awada, F. E. Harvey, D. A. Wedin, X. Zhou, and C. W. Zanner (2009), Seasonal changes in the depth of water uptake for encroaching trees Juniperus virginiana and Pinus ponderosa and two dominant C4 grasses in a semiarid grassland, Tree...

  20. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell Aijie Wang a, , Dan Sun a , Guangli Cao a , Haoyu Wang Microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) Microbial fuel cell (MFC) MEC­MFC coupled system Dark fermentation a b production pro- cess consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power

  1. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  2. How cellulose-based leaf toughness and lamina density contribute to long leaf lifespan of shade tolerant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitajima, Kaoru

    for the work needed to overcome inter-blade friction, which was measured prior to each sharing test. Analysis Stefanescu, Marta Vargas Timchenko, Peter W. Lucas, S. Joseph Wright Supporting levels, but the fundamental patterns reported in Fig. 3 remain the same. Details of cutting test

  3. Cellulase for commodity products from cellulosic biomass Michael E Himmel*?, Mark F Ruth*1 and Charles E Wymans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    and Charles E Wymans A vital objective for second millennium biotechnology will be the enzymatic conversion 03755, USA; e-mail: Charles.E.Wyman@Dartmouth.edu Current Opinion in Biotechnology 1999, 10:358-364 http- modity products, this vast resource can provide environmental, economic, and strategic benefits

  4. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 134506 (2011) Simulating infrared spectra and hydrogen bonding in cellulose I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a structural transformation above 450 K, a result in agreement with experimental IR results. The low-temperature structure (450­550 K), many of these transform to longer, weaker interchain hydrogen bonds. A three

  5. PILOT PLANT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JUNE 30, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phenolic resins and a hot water extraction to remove solubleu lts of alcohol and water extraction on various types o fJ u oj The yield on water extraction was 84 . 9 % and the

  6. Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers (RB) with R11, R19, and R30 Cellulose and Rock Wool Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, J. A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHODOLOGY Because of the large number of varlables In the sumner testlng (3 R-values, 2 Insulatlon types, and 2 test conf lguratlons--no RB and RBT), thf Latin Square deslgn used In the prevlous TVA testlng could no be used. Instead. a split... wlth 40-pound kraft paper backing was used. The emisslvlty of both sldes of thls RB was approxlmately 0.05. Because of the large number of varlables to be studled In the sumner (3 R-values, 2 types of Insulatlon. 2 attlc conf lguratlons--no RB...

  7. Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers (RB) with R11, R19, and R30 Cellulose and Rock Wool Insulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, J. A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHODOLOGY Because of the large number of varlables In the sumner testlng (3 R-values, 2 Insulatlon types, and 2 test conf lguratlons--no RB and RBT), thf Latin Square deslgn used In the prevlous TVA testlng could no be used. Instead. a split... wlth 40-pound kraft paper backing was used. The emisslvlty of both sldes of thls RB was approxlmately 0.05. Because of the large number of varlables to be studled In the sumner (3 R-values, 2 types of Insulatlon. 2 attlc conf lguratlons--no RB...

  8. Investigation of static zones and wall slip through sequential ram extrusion of contrasting micro-crystalline cellulose-based pastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, M. P.; Rough, S. L.; Wilson, D. I.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    , or alternatively lubricate the shear flow of MCC par- ticles in the convergent zone. The force reduction could also be attributed to increased water availability in the MCC-graphite matrix. As the graphite particles do not ab- sorb water (in contrast to MCC... the walls of the simulation geometry and towards the convergent and corner regions. References [1] P. Forzatti, D. Ballardini, L. Sighicelli, Preparation and char- acterization of extruded monolithic ceramic catalysts, Catal- ysis Today 41 (1-3) (1998) 87...

  9. Phenotypic Data Collection and Sample Preparation for Genomics of Wood Formation and Cellulosic Biomass Traits in Sunflower: Ames, IA location.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marek, Laura F.

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Three fields were planted in Ames in 2010, two association mapping fields, N3 and A, and a recombinant inbred line field, N13. Phenotype data and images were transferred to UGA to support genetic and genomic analyses of woody biomass-related traits.

  10. PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JAN. 31, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilke, C.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Solar Energy at Campinas, Brazil, 1976. LBL-5275 (inEnergy and Bioconversion Symposium, Sao Paulo (Campinas) Brazil,

  11. Advanced Biofuels from Cellulose via Genetic Engineering of Clostridium thermocellum Presentation for BETO 20150 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated agingDepartment of Energy 1 DOEBiofuels Cost ofof

  12. Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiadi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were generously provided by Novozymes North America, Inc. (assistance. We also thank Novozymes and DuPont™ Genencor®Aldrich Celic ® CTec 2 Novozymes Glass fiber filter paper C-

  13. Cornell University, Office of Sponsored Programs Awards Received in April 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    (DUPONT R&D) PRODUCT TESTING $10,000 AJP 61955 AFSHARI, EHSAN RANA, FARHAN Electrical & Computer THE ZONAL MEAN ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION CHANGES UNDER GLOBAL WARMING AND THE LINKAGE TO THE HYDROLOGICAL

  14. austenite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and correspond- ing microstructure that occur. This region was followed by a dual-phase austenitemartensite region near the in- terface between the grade DuPont, John N. 205...

  15. Paper on "Other Major Litigation of Direct Interest to DOE"

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that summarizes such cases. The claims in one of the cases, E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. v. Stanton, are briefly discussed in the Transition Paper entitled Pending Significant...

  16. Perfluorooctanoic acid Melting point ~55 C, boiling point ~190 C, pKa ~ 2.5, sparingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    developmental and other adverse effects in laboratory animals. · Flammable and forms hazardous products like HF the Parkersburg, WV · Eight companies (Arkema, Asahi, Ciba, Clariant, Daikin, 3M/Dyneon, DuPont, Solvay Solexis

  17. DTT Energy Reduction Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont Titanium Technologies has developed a sustainable growth strategy that includes an initiative focused on improving energy efficiency. The energy efficiency initiative is a disciplined approach that began with creation of an Energy...

  18. MICHAEL E. GORDON Business: School of Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    included AT&T, Aladdin Industries, Carrier Corporation, DuPont de Nemours, City of Knoxville, Combustion Engineering, General Shale, International Association of Machinists, ITT Life Insurance Company, Kimley

  19. CareerDevelopment From the Director 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Diageo Duff & Phelps, LLC DuPont Eaton Vance Investment Managers eBay EDF Climate Corps Education Center for U.S. Dairy InsightSquared Intel* International Finance Corporation ITA Software Jefferies

  20. air engine coolant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Maryville Clean Air Engineering DENSO Dow Chemical Duke Energy DuPont Eastman Chemical Eaton Corp. Emerson Process Management EMJ Corp. ExxonMobil FedEx Garmin General...

  1. acquisition instruments psychopharmacology: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. Rubin Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: used by DuPont Corporation to save on the order of one billion dollars. This paper will cover expert...

  2. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CHEMICAL INDUSTRY ENVIRONMENTAL...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air Products and Chemicals, Akzo Nobel, Battelle, DuPont, NL Industries, OxyChem, and Praxair. With the exception of Battelle, all of the Petitioner's member companies are major...

  3. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    concert with the NCTTA, LLNL plans to enter into the following CRADAs with DuPont: 1. CRADA T-150-91-1-JC, Industrial Laser Materials Processing (in the "field of technology"...

  4. NREL: Biomass Research - Yat-Chen Chou

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I was one of the key researchers in the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) project with DuPont, working on the construction and improvement of a robust...

  5. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS FOR CONCENTRATOR PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS R. H. French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    are evaluating the optical properties and solar radiation durability of a number of polymeric materials such as DuPont TM PV5300 have applications as encapsulant in c-Si and other flat plate PV applications

  6. Response of passive organic vapor dosimeters to a mixed gas exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Scott Merritt

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Richard B. Konzen The effects of the sampling order of two chemicals adsorbed onto a DuPont Pro-Tek Organic Vapor Dosimeters were investigated. The dosimeters were exposed to varying known concentrations of methyl methacrylate... experiment, Mr. Marvin Harrington of Rohm and Haas of Texas, and Mr. Fred Gsweng of Dupont for providing essential materials for the completion of this research. A special thank you must be extended to the National Institute for Occupational Safety...

  7. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and trends concerning cellulosic materials processed in scCO2 such as cellulose drying to obtain aerogels for cellulose esters and ether synthesis, and fibres and film fabrication. These materials are used in coatings

  8. ORNL 2010-G00952/jcn UT-B ID 200702002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are capable of degrading cellulose and can contribute to the production cellulose-derived ethanol/saccharification of cellulose ·· Improved biomass ethanol production Patent Yunfeng Yang, A Targeted Mutagenesis Tool

  9. Effect of Additives on the Digestibility of Corn Stover Solids Following Pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    cellulosic biomass offers high yields, the quantity of enzymes needed for conversion with high yields is high., 2005a) can breakdown cellulose and hemicellulose in cellulosic biomass to sugar oligomers and monomers

  10. Integrated 'omics analysis for studying the microbial community...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ‘omics to measure the perturbation response of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor community fed with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). We predicted that a pH...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetate-based multi-residue method Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Topic T4 Claudia Hildenbrand 274 EDLC electrodes from cellulose-based carbon aerogels: influence of Summary: organic aerogels. Cellulose-acetate-based organic aerogels...

  12. Artificial Cellulosomes and Arsenic Cleanup: From Single Cell Programming to Synthetic Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Shen-Long

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bioprocessing for bioethanol production using Saccharomyceson cellulosic biomass for bioethanol production, p. 12-14.beta-glucosidase for cellulosic bioethanol production. Appl

  13. Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic Ethanol Shipment Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified Cellulosic...

  14. Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 (Properties) 8808 9:40 AM 2810 10:10 AM Send Document Link Cellulosic biomass feedstocks and logistics for ethanol production Cellulosic biomass feedstocks and logistics...

  15. U.S. Department of Energy to Invest up to $33.8 Million to Further...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    enzyme systems to convert cellulosic material into sugars suitable for production of biofuels. Building on President Bush's goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by...

  16. Universit du Sud Toulon-Var Prsente en vue de l'obtention du diplme de DOCTORAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    starch foam reinforced by natural fibres (hemp, cellulose, wheat straw, cotton linter). The influence foam, natural fibres, hemp, cellulose, cotton linter, wheat straw, polycaprolactone, multilayer

  17. Supplementation with xylanase and beta-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing; Wyman, Charles E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters estimated by non-linear regression using Polymathsubstrates estimated by non-linear regression of adsorption

  18. An Experimental Study of the Performance of PCM-Enhanced Cellulose Insulation Used in Residential Building Walls Exposed to Full Weather Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Y.; Medina, M.; Evers, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and could potentially cause installation problems. Hydrated Salt Hydrated salts are formed by anhydrous salts and a few fixed number of water molecules, which are usually called ?water of crystallization? (Telkes, 1980). Hydrated salts have...-Enhanced Building Envelopes in Current ORNL Research Projects. Oak Ridge National Laboratory website. Telkes M. 1980. Thermal Storage in Salt-hydrates. Solar Materials Science, Academic Press: 337-404 Zhu D., 2005, A comparative heat transfer examination...

  19. An Experimental Study of the Performance of PCM-Enhanced Cellulose Insulation Used in Residential Building Walls Exposed to Full Weather Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Y.; Medina, M.; Evers, A.

    and could potentially cause installation problems. Hydrated Salt Hydrated salts are formed by anhydrous salts and a few fixed number of water molecules, which are usually called ?water of crystallization? (Telkes, 1980). Hydrated salts have...-Enhanced Building Envelopes in Current ORNL Research Projects. Oak Ridge National Laboratory website. Telkes M. 1980. Thermal Storage in Salt-hydrates. Solar Materials Science, Academic Press: 337-404 Zhu D., 2005, A comparative heat transfer examination...

  20. IN VITRO SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS TO LPS-BINDING POLYAMINES AND CELLULOSE ETHER POLYMERS: TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MICROBICIDE AGAINST CHLAMYDIA INFECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osaka, Ichie

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    shock protein 60 (hsp60), inclusion membrane proteins such as various Inc proteins, and effector proteins of the type III secretion system (T3SS) that are secreted into host cytosol. Vaginal Microbicide Although immunization would be an ideal strategy...-negative infection can lead to septic shock [139]. LPS is also recognized for the essential roles it plays in the pathogenesis and survival of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS contributes greatly to the structural integrity and stability of the outer membrane...

  1. The pattern of xylan acetylation suggests xylan may interact with cellulose microfibrils as a two-fold helical screw in the secondary plant cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Gomes, Thiago C. F.; Tryfona, Theodora; Nikolovski, Nino; Stott, Katherine; Grantham, Nicholas J.; Bolam, David N.; Skaf, Munir S.; Dupree, Paul D.

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    using up to 4000 steps of conjugate gradient method. The systems where thermalized during 2 ns simulation in the NPT ensemble at 1 bar and 300K, using the Nosé-Hoover barostat and the Langevin thermostat, as Page 29 of 64 SUBMITTED MANUSCRIPT... ), Introduction (737), Results (2929), Discussion (1204), Methods (986), Acknowledgements (86), Table and Figure legends (673), excludes References (1550) and Supporting information (198)) Page 3 of 64 SUBMITTED MANUSCRIPT The Plant Journal 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8...

  2. List of Journal Publications T. Wu, M. Frydrych, K. O'Kelly, B. Chen*: Poly(glycerol sebacate urethane)-cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ojovan, Michael

    polymer composites, Surface and Coatings Technology. 2014, 258, 458-466. · M. Frydrych, B. Chen*: Large, 2663-2671. · R. Justin, B. Chen*: Strong and conductive chitosan-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites-graphene oxide nanocomposites. Carbohydrate Polymers. 2014, 103, 70-80. · Y. Piao, B. Chen* : Self

  3. RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science Gene Discovery Research Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    Cellulose Production Research Team Synthetic Genomics Research Team Enzyme Research Team Bioplastic Research

  4. Lignol Innovations, Inc. Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lignol Innovations, Inc., biorefinery will produce cellulosic ethanol, high purity lignin, and furfural from hardwoods.

  5. EA-1789: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Alpena Prototype Biorefinery, Alpena, Michigan

  6. Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausser, Gordon C.; Papineau, Maya

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional biodiesel is a commercially proven technology,technologies include, inter alia, cellulosic ethanol, biodiesel,

  7. SURFACE-INITIATED ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION AS A TOOL FOR COATING OF VARIOUS SURFACES WITH FLUOROPOLYMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    microcrystalline cellulose, filter paper, cotton, jute and hemp fibers. Hydroxyl groups on the specific surfaces

  8. Purdue extension Overviewofthe2007USDAFarmBill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    million annually to "share the cost of biomass feedstocks used by cellulosic ethanol producers" over

  9. Testimony Before the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Hearing on Farm Bill Policy Proposals Relating to Farm and Rural Energy Issues and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    cellulosic biofuels industry is being launched and will soon be informed by experience. b. Biomass feedstocks

  10. The development of resistance to organophosphorus compounds by Tetranychus (T.) urticae Koch and laboratory and field toxicological responses of Tetranychus (T.) Cinnabarinus (Boisduval) to some current acaricides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras Galvez, Saul Edgardo

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conducted to study the toxicological responses of an organophosphorus-re- I. t ot ' ) Ld 't )~th (T. ) nus to Mobil NC-4044, DuPont 1410-1, e Chion, and di azi non, and the results were compared with a standard acaricide, monocrotophos. Spider mites... to monocrotophos. They had an intermediate resistance to Mobil MC-4044 and DuPont 1410-L, and were somewhat more resistant to ethion and diazinon. Field evaluations for control of organophosphorus- resistant carmine spider mites were also conducted. Carzol, 1...

  11. Protein, grain and sources of methionine in the nutrition of the laying hen and broiler chick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Herbert Lloyd

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meal, and methionine among treatment groups is shown in Table l. Adjustments were made in the dietary ingredients, in diets containing fish meal, to maintain the protein 1 Registered trade mark for Dupont Chemical Co. , Wilmington, Deleware. level... )2. 504 15. 09 15. 08 15. 08 $2. 50 15. 09 )2i50 15. 09 1 All groups were fed for 12 consecutive 28 dav periods. 2 Methionine source was "Hydan"~ methionine hydroxy analogue~ produced by DuPont Chemical Co. ~ Wilmington, Delaware. 18 Table...

  12. Inhomogeneous Broadening and the Kosterlitz-Thouless Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLLINS, M.; Agnolet, Glenn; SASLOW, WM; KROTSCHECK, E.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the hydrogen substrate consists of a 10 A film of solid H2 adsorbed on a glass substrate, using the sub- strate potential VH(z) suggested by Dupont-Roc, Izzz(z) = ?9.32 (?) ?24.8 (?) + 8.86 (?) ?19.6 i, z+ 10) VH(z) is given in K, the coordinate normal...). P. W. Adams and W. I. Glaberson, Phys. Rev. B 35, 4633 (1987). 6G. Agnolet, D. F. Mcgueeney, and J. D. Reppy, Phys. Rev. B 39, 8934 (1988). "V. Ambegaokar, B.I. Halperin, D. R. Nelson, and E. Siggia, Phys. Rev. B 21, 1806 (1980). DuPont Company...

  13. Helping people 2 Johnson Controls September 18, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    American Companies Recognized as a global leader and top corporate citizen 9 Campbell Soup Co. 10 Coca Labs 72 DuPont Largest Global Companies 276 Duke Energy US 277 Legal and General Group UK 278 Handelsbanken, Sweden 283 Sasol South Africa 284 Taiwan Semiconductor Taiwan 285 Indian Oil India Corporate

  14. The College thecollege.wlu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    . Campbell, Ph.D. Professor of Romance Languages George P. Carras, D.Phil. Professor of Classical Studies and Senior Research Fellow in Religion Alexandra R. Brown, Ph.D. Jessie Ball duPont Professor of Religion108 VIII The College thecollege.wlu.edu #12;109 The College Kenneth Patrick Ruscio, Ph.D. President

  15. The College thecollege.wlu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    . Lorig, Ph.D. Ruth Parmly Professor of Psychology Gwyn E. Campbell, Ph.D. Professor of Romance Languages;109The College Alexandra R. Brown, Ph.D. Jessie Ball duPont Professor of Religion Suzanne P. Keen, Ph.D107 VIII The College thecollege.wlu.edu #12;108 The College The College Kenneth Patrick Ruscio, Ph.D

  16. Method of preparation of bonded polyimide fuel cell package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan (Livermore, CA); Graff, Robert T. (Modesto, CA); Bettencourt, Kerry (Dublin, CA)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  17. Bonded polyimide fuel cell package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan; Graff, Robert T.; Bettencourt, Kerry

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  18. J. Environ. Radioactivity 5 (1987)425--444 The Mass Spectrometric Determination of Fallout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Justin E. Halverson Savannah River Laboratory,,Aiken, SouthCarolina29808,USA (Received 17November 1986 in this study is operated by E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. at the Savannah River Laboratory (S.R.L.) in South Carolina. The instrument was designed and built similar to other mass spectrometers within the national

  19. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 270 (2004) 5665 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    ,b and Donald L. Sparks a a Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717, USA b DuPont Engineering Technology, Brandywine Building, Wilmington, DE 19898, USA c Department(II) indicate that the existing thermodynamic framework for the modified TLM is able to reproduce the metal

  20. Lead Sorption onto Ferrihydrite. 2. Surface Complexation Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19717, and DuPont Engineering Technology, Brandywine Building, Wilmington, Delaware 19898 Few studies have combined molecular- and macro of existing SCMs to predict Pb(II) sorption onto 2-line ferrihydrite over a wide range of conditions seems

  1. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 270 (2004) 7785 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA b Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717, USA c DuPont Engineering Technology, Brandywine Building, Wilmington, DE 19898, USA d NRL with ubiquitously existing hydrous oxides of Fe, Al, and Mn as well as with clays and clay minerals are important

  2. Fabrication of Carbide-Particle-Reinforced Titanium AluminideMatrix Composites by Laser-Engineered Net Shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    -temperature applications in the automotive, aerospace, and power-generation industries.[1] The TiAl-based alloys have-Engineered Net Shaping WEIPING LIU and J.N. DuPONT TiAl-based titanium aluminide alloys and their composites of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. I. INTRODUCTION TITANIUM aluminide alloys based on TiAl and their com- posites

  3. Virtual Workshops: Using Today's Networking Tools to Train Tomorrow's Experts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radical new approach to deliver live, on-site training using DuPont's wide-area communications network and Microsoft's NetMeeting™ data conferencing software: "Virtual Workshops." In I999, the ETN used the virtual workshop approach to deliver timely...

  4. 2005 Minerals Yearbook ZirconiuM and HafniuM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Minerals Yearbook ZirconiuM and HafniuM U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey of the mining and processing of heavy-mineral sands containing the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile.). duPont produced zircon from its heavy-mineral sands operation near Starke, fL. iluka produced zircon

  5. Ryne P. Raffaelle National Center for Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmentally Safe · Non-Toxic Alternatives · Aqueous-Based Materials · Reuse, Reman, Recycle · Environmental Solar Applied Materials Applied Optical Sciences BASF BP Solar BRP Manufacturing Dow Chemical CaliSolar Dupont First Solar GT Solar Infoscitex Innovalight Konarka NanoSolar PrimeStar Solar Solar Power

  6. Universite catholique de Louvain Faculte des Sciences Appliquees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaventure, Olivier

    . P. Dupont, UCL-INGI (Co-Promoteur), Pr. P. Van Roy, UCL-INGI (Examinateur), Pr. L. Wolsey, UCL-CORE (Examinateur), Pr. C. Schulte, KTH-IMIT, Sweden (Examinateur), Pr. P. Prosser, University of Glasgow, U.K, Luis Quesada and Peter Van Roy for helping me in my study of constraint programming. I would like

  7. Anne Le Mouel, paper ID# 4-054-12 Fostering Energy Efficiency in manufacturing plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    economical breakthroughs in power and flow rate measurement Anne Le Mouel, EDF R&D Eco-Efficiency Cédex, FRANCE Email: anne.le-mouel@edf.fr Gilbert Schmitt, EDF R&D Eco-Efficiency & Industrial Process: gilbert-m.schmitt@edf.fr Maxime Dupont, EDF R&D Eco-Efficiency & Industrial Process Department Site des

  8. Long range forces between atomic impurities in liquid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long range forces between atomic impurities in liquid helium J. Dupont-Roc Laboratoire Kastler in a polarizable medium. We show that atomic impurities in liquid helium may indeed realize repulsive forces embedded in liquid helium, super uid or not. Solid helium have also been used. Successful theoretical

  9. BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH Assessing the Environmental, Health and Safety Impact of Nanoparticles are urgently needed to support risk assessments and regulatory policy decisions regarding materials containing · Environmental Protection Agency · DuPont · BASF · Evonik · Cabot · General Electric Approach The quartz crystal

  10. The Future of Material Science & Engineering A Polymer Industry Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Polymers6 We're We've Been US Production of Synthetic Polymers (semi-log scale) DuPont, 1994 Hollywood Insulation Phenol-Formaldehyde Electrical Housings ~10y 1920s Antifreeze Polysulfide Rubber Rocket Fuel ~10y 1920s Rubber Substitute IR, SBR, NBR, etc. Tires & Rubber goods ~ 5y 1920s Coatings PMA, PMMA Glazing

  11. 2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    subsidiary of Australian company Iluka Resources Ltd.). DuPont produced zircon from its heavy-mineral sands2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM. In 2010, the global economy began to recover, and consumption of zirconium ores and concentrates increased

  12. Extended stratigraphy, palynology and depositional environments record the initiation of the Himalayan Gyirong Basin (Neogene China)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, PR China d Xi'an Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources, Xi'an 710054, PR China e Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts), and strongly affected local and global climate (An et al., 2001; Garzione, 2008; Dupont-Nivet et al., 2008

  13. Materials Science and Engineering A 460461 (2007) 392402 High temperature corrosion resistance of candidate nickel-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of candidate nickel-based weld overlay alloys in a low NOx environment R.M. Deacon, J.N. DuPont, A.R. Marder overlay a more corrosion resistant alloy on top of existing tubes. Two nickel- based alloys developed: Microsegregation; Nickel-based alloys; Sulfidation 1. Introduction In an effort to reduce boiler emissions

  14. BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /21/12) APPLICANT DuPont Fabros Technology Richard Waddle, Director, Construction 1212 New York Avenue N.W., SteBEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY.CA.GOV APPLICATION FOR SMALL POWER PLANT

  15. Texas Rice, Volume 1, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (International Paper); fertilizer from Helena Chemical Company; herbicides and pesticides from Zeneca, Novartis, Rohm&Haas, FMC, BASF and DuPont; aerial applications provided by Garrett’s Flying Service; grain transportation by T&T Trucking of Alvin; crop drying...

  16. Controlling Weeds and Volunteer Crops During Fallow Periods.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiese, A.F.; Chenault, E.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BASF Poast Haloxyfop Dow Chemical Co. Verdict Sulfosate Stauffer Chemical Co. Touchdown Trimethylnonyl DuPont Co. WK Surfactant polyethoxyethanol 2,4-D Several 2,4-D 6 poor none 0.5 0.25 0.25 Formulation 90% 80% 2lb/gal 1.67Ib/gal 4lb...

  17. HOLYOKE PUBLIC SCHOOLS HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    HOLYOKE PUBLIC SCHOOLS HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS David L. Dupont, Superintendent of Schools POSTING with identified students. Teaches self-regulation skills and self care strategies to identified students Amendments of 1972, Chapter 622 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and Section 504

  18. Bonded polyimide fuel cell package and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan; Graff, Robert T.; Bettencourt, Kerry

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  19. 282 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS AND PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 22, NO. 2, JUNE 1999 In Situ Measurement of Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Polyimide Films Using Micromachined Resonant String Structures Yong resonant string structures, for the measurement of the polyimide residual stress and polyimide/metal adhesion durability have been developed. The residual stress of polyimide films, DuPont PI-2555 and PI-2611

  20. Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting Attendee List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark AEA Technology morgan@aeatech.com Pez Guido Air Products pezgu@apa.com Miller Robert N. Air.r.lustig@usa.dupont.com Tidball Rick EI rick.tidball@energyint.com Zhaosheng Tan Energy Conversion Devices ztan@ovonic.com Fox Tom ESC tfox@escentes.org Slattery Darlene FL Solar dkslatt@fsec.ucf.edu Burton Richard Florida Intl