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Sample records for duluth mn-superior wi

  1. Duluth Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA Biomass National Map Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDuluthBiomassFacility&oldid397416" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  2. Duluth, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Duluth is a city in St. Louis County, Minnesota. It falls under Minnesota's 8th congressional...

  3. Duluth co-disposal: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, I.J. )

    1988-10-01

    The Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (WLSSD) was formed to combat water pollution, not handle waste disposal. In 1971, the newly formed district hired an engineering firm to design a wastewater treatment facility, which resulted in the design of a 44 million gallon per day treatment plant in Duluth, home of about 70% of the districts residents. Sewage sludge from the wastewater process would be dried and burned in multiple hearth incinerators fired with No. 2 fuel oil. Design work was well underway when the 1973 oil embargo occurred, causing oil prices to quadruple, and oil or natural gas fuel to become non-existant for this type of usage. The engineers considered such fuels as coal, wood chips, and solid waste, and recommended solid waste in the form of refuse-derived fuel (RDF). The district obtained legislative authority in 1974 to control the solid waste stream in the area. All of this delayed design and construction of the sludge disposal portion of the project, but the rest of the treatment plant remained on schedule and was completed in 1978. The co-disposal portion was designed in 1975 and construction was essentially completed by November 1979. The total co-disposal project cost was about $20 million. This paper discusses special features of this system, operating problems, initial modifications, explosion hazards, and later modifications.

  4. WI Windinvest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WI Windinvest Jump to: navigation, search Name: WI Windinvest Place: Westfalen, Germany Zip: 48727 Sector: Wind energy Product: Westfalen based wind project developer Coordinates:...

  5. WiGL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-05-03

    WiGL is a graphical user interface library that was designed to be used in phyiscs applications with graphical interface elements. It was originally written to allow the creation of visual software for data acquistion systems.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Milwaukee Airport - WI 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Milwaukee Airport - WI 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MILWAUKEE AIRPORT (WI.04 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Milwaukee Airport , Milwaukee , Wisconsin WI.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 WI.04-1 Site Operations: Airport Facility received a shipment of Uranium oxides from Allegheny Ludlow sent to an AEC employee - final destination unknown. WI.04-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited scope of activities performed

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Research Products Corp - WI 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Research Products Corp - WI 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: RESEARCH PRODUCTS CORP. ( WI.02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1015 E. Washington Ave. , Madison , Wisconsin WI.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 WI.02-1 Site Operations: Absorber and ion-exchange resins production, and preparation of Titanium Zeolite samples. WI.02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at site

  8. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar PV at the Atlas Industrial Park in Duluth, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steen, M.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 5, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Atlas Industrial Park in Duluth, Minnesota, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The EPA provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of solar renewable energy generation at the Atlas Industrial Park. NREL provided technical assistance for this project but did not assess environmental conditions at the site beyond those related to the performance of a photovoltaic (PV) system. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for a possible PV installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV configurations. In addition, the study evaluates financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  9. WI Biodiesel Blending Progream Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redmond, Maria E; Levy, Megan M

    2013-04-01

    The Wisconsin State Energy Office?¢????s (SEO) primary mission is to implement cost?¢???effective, reliable, balanced, and environmentally?¢???friendly clean energy projects. To support this mission the Wisconsin Biodiesel Blending Program was created to financially support the installation infrastructure necessary to directly sustain biodiesel blending and distribution at petroleum terminal facilities throughout Wisconsin. The SEO secured a federal directed award of $600,000 over 2.25 years. With these funds, the SEO supported the construction of inline biodiesel blending facilities at two petroleum terminals in Wisconsin. The Federal funding provided through the state provided a little less than half of the necessary investment to construct the terminals, with the balance put forth by the partners. Wisconsin is now home to two new biodiesel blending terminals. Fusion Renewables on Jones Island (in the City of Milwaukee) will offer a B100 blend to both bulk and retail customers. CITGO is currently providing a B5 blend to all customers at their Granville, WI terminal north of the City of Milwaukee.

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Allis-Chalmers Co - WI 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Allis-Chalmers Co - WI 01 Site ID (CSD Index Number): WI.01 Site Name: Allis-Chalmers Co Site Summary: Site Link: External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Hawley Plant Alternate Name Documents: WI.01-1 Location: West Allis, Wisconsin Location Documents: WI.01-1 Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Manufactured electrical equipment - pumps, motors, and switchgears for K-25 and Y-12. Historical Operations Documents: WI.01-1 Eligibility Determination: Eliminated - Scope of testing

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Trane Co - WI 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Trane Co - WI 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TRANE CO. (WI.0-02/WA.0-02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: LaCrosse , Wisconsin WI.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 WI.0-02-1 Site Operations: Produced aluminum cans for fuel rod experiments at Argonne Met Lab; supplied construction materials to Oak Ridge. WI.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive materials used at this site WI.0-02-1 Radioactive

  12. AmeriFlux US-Wi4 Mature red pine (MRP) (Dataset) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wi4 Mature red pine (MRP) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AmeriFlux US-Wi4 Mature red pine (MRP) This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site ...

  13. TRIBAL ISSUES TOPIC GROUP MEETING SUMMARY Milwaukee, WI July 1998

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Milwaukee, WI July 1998 The Topic Group is developing a process to identify appropriate Topic Group membership, and will be working on a protocol for identifying and inviting individual tribes to participate he group identified five actions: (1) catalogue tribal transportation issues; (2) identify a level of tribal awareness of DOE transportation issues; (3) examine funding and tribal support; (4) develop a process for Tribal Topic Group membership; and (5) review the best channels to

  14. AmeriFlux US-Wi1 Intermediate hardwood (IHW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiquan

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi1 Intermediate hardwood (IHW). Site Description - The Wisconsin Intermediate Hardwoods site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. The intermediate hardwoods site is one of ten sites that collectively represent the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. In 2001, northern hardwood stands of all ages occupied 45% of the region.

  15. AmeriFlux US-Wi3 Mature hardwood (MHW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiquan

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi3 Mature hardwood (MHW). Site Description - The Wisconsin Mature Hardwood site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. As an assemblage, the ten Wisconsin sites are indicative of the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. The mature hardwood stand represents a typical naturally regenerated second-growth forest, free of anthropogenic disturbances for at least 70 years.

  16. Super Wi-Fi is Super for Energy Too | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wi-Fi is Super for Energy Too Super Wi-Fi is Super for Energy Too September 24, 2010 - 11:45am Addthis Super Wi-Fi is Super for Energy Too Nick Sinai U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy What does this mean for me? By integrating broadband into the emerging Smart Grid, consumers will have revolutionized communication with their utility -- they will have detailed information on their energy use that will help inform them how they can save on

  17. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-WI.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WI.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Wisconsin Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  18. WiTec at Sandia: Pushing a Great Tool Further. (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Meeting held September 24-27, 2012 in Ulm, Germany.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the WiTec Research&Development Meeting held September 24-27, ...

  19. Advisory Committee R. Thomas Baker, U of Ottawa Charles Casey, U of WI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advisory Committee R. Thomas Baker, U of Ottawa Charles Casey, U of WI Michael Hall, Texas A&M Katherine Ayers, Proton OnSite Thomas Rauchfuss, U of IL Carl Koval, U of CO Executive Committee Morris Bullock, PNNL Aaron Appel, PNNL James Mayer, Yale Sharon Hammes-Schiffer, U of IL Shannon Stahl, U of WI Simone Raugei, PNNL Governance Board Doug Ray, PNNL Bruce Garrett, PNNL Michael Thompson, PNNL Morris Bullock, Director Aaron Appel, Deputy Director Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis

  20. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 7 Duluth, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  1. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 7 Duluth, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  2. AmeriFlux US-Wi6 Pine barrens #1 (PB1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chen, Jiquan [Michigan State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi6 Pine barrens #1 (PB1). Site Description - The Wisconsin Pine Barrens site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. As an assemblage, the ten Wisconsin sites are indicative of the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. In order to establish and maintain both natural and plantation jack pine stands, pine barrens undergo prescribed burns and harvesting rotations. Pine Barrens occupy 17% of the region in 2001.

  3. AmeriFlux US-Wi0 Young red pine (YRP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiquan

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi0 Young red pine (YRP). Site Description - The Wisconsin Young Red Pine site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. As an assemblage, the ten Wisconsin sites are indicative of the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. Thinned every 7 years until they reach 100 to 150 years of age, the red pine plantations of all ages occupy approximately 25% of the region.

  4. AmeriFlux US-Wi4 Mature red pine (MRP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiquan

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi4 Mature red pine (MRP). Site Description - The Wisconsin Mature Red Pine site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. As an assemblage, the ten Wisconsin sites are indicative of the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. Thinned every 7 years until they reach 100 to 150 years of age, the red pine plantations of all ages occupy approximately 25% of the region.

  5. AmeriFlux US-Wi5 Mixed young jack pine (MYJP)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chen, Jiquan [Michigan State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi5 Mixed young jack pine (MYJP). Site Description - The Wisconsin Mixed Young Jack Pine site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. As an assemblage, the ten Wisconsin sites are indicative of the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. Clearcut on 40 to 70 year intervals, jack pine stands occupy approximately 13% of the region.

  6. AmeriFlux US-Wi7 Red pine clearcut (RPCC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chen, Jiquan [Michigan State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi7 Red pine clearcut (RPCC). Site Description - The Wisconsin Clearcut Red Pine site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. The red pine clearcut site is one of ten sites that collectively represent the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. Thinned every 7 years until they reach 100 to 150 years of age, the red pine plantations or all ages occupy approximately 25% of the region.

  7. AmeriFlux US-Wi8 Young hardwood clearcut (YHW)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chen, Jiquan [Michigan State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi8 Young hardwood clearcut (YHW). Site Description - The Wisconsin Clearcut Young Hardwood site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. The young hardwood clearcut site is one of ten sites that collectively represent the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. In 2001, northern hardwood stands of all ages occupied 45% of the region.

  8. AmeriFlux US-Wi9 Young Jack pine (YJP)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chen, Jiquan [Michigan State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi9 Young Jack pine (YJP). Site Description - The Wisconsin Young Jack Pine site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. As an assemblage, the ten Wisconsin sites are indicative of the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. Clearcut on 40 to 70 year intervals, jack pine stands occupy approximately 13% of the region.

  9. AmeriFlux US-Wi2 Intermediate red pine (IRP)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chen, Jiquan [Michigan State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi2 Intermediate red pine (IRP). Site Description - The Wisconsin Intermediate Red Pine site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. The intermediate red pine site is one of ten sites that collectively represent the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. Thinned every 7 years until they reach 100 to 150 years of age, the red pine plantations of all ages occupy approximately 25% of the region.

  10. Cytotoxic effects in 3T3-L1 mouse and WI-38 human fibroblasts following 72 hour and 7 day exposures to commercial silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stępnik, Maciej; Arkusz, Joanna; Smok-Pieniążek, Anna; Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Salvati, Anna; Lynch, Iseult; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Gromadzińska, Jolanta; De Jong, Wim H.; Rydzyński, Konrad

    2012-08-15

    The potential toxic effects in murine (3T3-L1) and human (WI-38) fibroblast cell lines of commercially available silica nanoparticles (NPs), Ludox CL (nominal size 21 nm) and CL-X (nominal size of 30 nm) were investigated with particular attention to the effect over long exposure times (the tests were run after 72 h exposure up to 7 days). These two formulations differed in physico-chemical properties and showed different stabilities in the cell culture medium used for the experiments. Ludox CL silica NPs were found to be cytotoxic only at the higher concentrations to the WI-38 cells (WST-1 and LDH assays) but not to the 3T3-L1 cells, whereas the Ludox CL-X silica NPs, which were less stable over the 72 h exposure, were cytotoxic to both cell lines in both assays. In the clonogenic assay both silica NPs induced a concentration dependent decrease in the surviving fraction of 3T3-L1 cells, with the Ludox CL-X silica NPs being more cytotoxic. Cell cycle analysis showed a trend indicating alterations in both cell lines at different phases with both silica NPs tested. Buthionine sulfoximine (γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase inhibitor) combined with Ludox CL-X was found to induce a strong decrease in 3T3-L1 cell viability which was not observed for the WI-38 cell line. This study clearly indicates that longer exposure studies may give important insights on the impact of nanomaterials on cells. However, and especially when investigating nanoparticle effects after such long exposure, it is fundamental to include a detailed physico-chemical characterization of the nanoparticles and their dispersions over the time scale of the experiment, in order to be able to interpret eventual impacts on cells. -- Highlights: ► Ludox CL silica NPs are cytotoxic to WI-38 fibroblasts but not to 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. ► Ludox CL-X silica NPs are cytotoxic to both cell lines. ► In clonogenic assay both silica NPs induce cytotoxicity, higher for CL-X silica. ► Cell cycle analysis shows

  11. WI DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DATE: STA. - LE ACE ID (14) Clearance Review (PrintSign):Dae A-6003-881 (REV 1) RPP-RPT-43173, Rev. 0 2009 Auto-TCR for Tank 241 -T-203 R.S. Disselkamp Washington River ...

  12. Training Session: Madison, WI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero net-energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be...

  13. US ENC WI Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. * Wisconsin homes are typically larger and older than homes in other states. CONSUMPTION BY END USE ...

  14. RiverHeath Appleton, WI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The goal of the project is to produce a closed loop neighborhood-wide geothermal exchange system using the river as the source of heat exchange.

  15. US ENC WI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin All data from EIA's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey www.eia.govconsumptionresidential Space heating Water ...

  16. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  17. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Korr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; December 1, 1994-January 19, 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, A.V.

    2003-09-15

    This document describes the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations taken during the R/V Knorr Indian Ocean cruises (Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2) in 1994-1996. The measurements were conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). The expedition began in Fremantle, Australia, on December 1, 1994, and ended in Mombasa, Kenya, on January 22, 1996. During the nine cruises, 12 WOCE sections were occupied. Total carbon dioxide was extracted from water samples and measured using single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzers (SOMMAs) coupled to coulometers. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.20 {micro}mol/kg. The second carbonate system parameter, TALK, was determined by potentiometric titration. The precision of the measurements determined from 962 analyses of certified reference material was {+-} 4.2 {micro}mol/kg (REFERENCE). This work was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the U. S. Department of Energy, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. The R/V Knorr Indian Ocean data set is available as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of 18 oceanographic data files, two FORTRAN 77 data retrieval routine files, a readme file, and this printed documentation, which describes the contents and format of all files as well as the procedures and methods used to obtain the data. Instructions for accessing the data are provided.

  18. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ELTRON RESEARCH, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-05NT42469

  19. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by MICHAEL BROCKWELL for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  20. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-003

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by UOP, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG26-04NT42121

  1. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by UOP, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG26-04NT42121

  2. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by UOP, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG26-04NT42121

  3. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BENEQ OY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC36-08GO28308

  4. R:\DATA\AS\ERORPTS\WI@INEEL\ig0454.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INCINERATION AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES DECEMBER 1999 DOE/IG-0454 AUDIT REPORT December 15, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION : Audit Report on "Waste Incineration at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) Incinerator

  5. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC04-94AL85000

  6. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by LASER APPARATUS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC04-04AL85000.

  7. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by THERMALLY CONDUCTIVE for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC05-OO0R22725.

  8. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by NORMANN, RANDY A. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC04-94AL85000

  9. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-006

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORY for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC04-95AL85000.

  10. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by SCHWEITZER ENGINEERING LAB INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-07NT43311

  11. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by RUSSO, A. J. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement AT(29-1)-789

  12. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BATTELLE MEMORIAL INSTITUTE for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  13. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - LBNL for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-05CH11231

  14. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UOP, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FG26-04NT42121

  15. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2009-004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by URS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314

  16. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. TRIBAL ISSUES TOPIC GROUP MEETING SUMMARY Milwaukee, WI July...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    issues on tribal lands; because tribes are unique political entities with unique cultural characteristics DOE might consider working with tribes in developing...

  18. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SINTERED POLYCRYSTALLINE for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by CLAGHORN, RONALD for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC27-01RV14136

  20. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by RESONANT CAVITY APPARATUS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Patent Waiver W(I)2011-013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ALSTOM POWER, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-01NT41223.

  2. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ALSTOM POWER, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-01NT41223.

  3. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by ALSTOM POWER, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-01NT41223.

  4. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2009-001

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DUSAN RADOSAVLJEVIC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC07-05ID14516

  5. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SABIC INNOVATIVE PLASTICS for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-03GO13000

  6. IIdentified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-003

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by NORMANN, RANDY A. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC04-94AL85000

  7. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CERAMATEC, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0000408.

  8. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CERAMATEC, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0000408.

  9. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by CERAMATEC, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0000408.

  10. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by DR. F. JEFFREY MARTIN for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  11. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. EnWi Etec GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 84329 Product: Bavaria-based firm involved in connection technology for photovoltaic plants. Coordinates: 48.35248, 12.785725 Show Map Loading map......

  13. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  14. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-003

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by SANDIA CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC04-94AL85000

  16. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-001

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by IMAGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC07-94ID13223

  17. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by GOURLEY, PAUL for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC04-94AL85000

  18. Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-001

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  19. Vacuum Insulation for Window

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - New construc;on - 90.1---2004 - Post---1980 construc;on (90.1---1989) - Pre---1980 ... Minneapolis, MN 14 6B Helena, MT Helena, MT 15 7 Duluth, MN Duluth, MN 16 8 Fairbanks, AK ...

  20. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujit Banerjee

    2005-12-15

    Contaminants present in paper recycling mills can degrade product properties and can also lead to substantial downtime. Of these, adhesive material such as hot melts and pressure sensitive adhesives are especially troublesome. These are known as ?¢???? stickies ?¢??? and their handling and re- moval requires process equipment such as screens and cleaners as well as chemical additives. In the preceding phase of the project we demonstrated that firing an underwater spark in a tank of stock reduces the tack of the stickies and reduces their impact. The present phase was to demon- strate the technology in full-scale trials, address any issues that might arise, and commercialize the process. Trials were run at the Appleton papers mill in West Carrollton, OH, the Graphics Packag- ing mill at Kalamazoo, MI, Stora Enso mills at Duluth, MN, and Wisconsin Rapids, WI, and the Jackson Paper mill at Sylva, NC. It was shown that the sparker not only detackified stickies but also increased the efficiency of their removal by centrifugal cleaners, improved the effectiveness of dissolved air flotation, and increased the efficiency of flotation deinking. It is estimated that the sparker improves the efficiency of hydrocyclone cleaner, deinking cells and dissolved and dispersed air flotation units by 10-15%. This translates to a corresponding energy benefit in operating these units. The technology has been licensed to Eka Chemicals, a division of Akzo Nobel.

  1. Conservation Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by expanding it. Conservation Technologies is a company located in Duluth, Minnesota. Conservation Technologies specializes in energy efficiency in building construction, and...

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Pamela Gray-Hann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internet map server applications GIS web page PVWatts Outreach Meeting planning Project support Education and background training University of Minnesota-Duluth GIS technical ...

  3. Gwinnett County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BJ Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Places in Gwinnett County, Georgia Auburn, Georgia Berkeley Lake, Georgia Braselton, Georgia Buford, Georgia Dacula, Georgia Duluth, Georgia...

  4. DOE-CX-00009_WiMAX_Upgrades_on_Gable_Mountain.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  5. 3200 East Ave. S. * PO Box 817 * La Crosse, WI 54602-0817 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the Dairyland system is generated primarily at coal facilities but we have a diverse energy portfolio that also includes natural gas, hydro, wind, solar, biomass and biogas. ...

  6. Assessment of chronic toxicity from stormwater runoff in Lincoln Creek, Milwaukee, WI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleist, J.; Crunkilton, R.

    1995-12-31

    Stormwater runoff is believed to be responsible for a severely degraded biotic community in Lincoln Creek, a stream which drains portions of metropolitan Milwaukee. A previous study using Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas indicated little or no acute toxicity could be attributed to stormwater runoff. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for chronic toxicity in the stream during periods of stormwater runoff. Reproduction and survival in Daphnia magna, and growth and survival in P. promelas were monitored to assess chronic effects. Seven consecutive 14 day tests were performed between June and September, 1994, in eighteen flow-through aquaria housed within a US Geological Survey gauging station located adjacent to Lincoln Creek. Mortality in D. magna consistently did not occur before day 4 of exposure, but averaged 64% at day 14. Reproduction in D. magna and growth in P. promelas in surviving individuals was not significantly reduced; all effects were manifested as mortality. Results of data analysis after 14 days of exposure contrast markedly with analysis made earlier in the same test. Statistical interpretation of the mortality data at typical endpoints of 48 hours for invertebrates and 96 hours for fish failed to identify adverse impacts of stormwater runoff the authors observed in longer exposures. Short-term toxicity tests appear insensitive to the detection of contaminant related effects. Long-term tests (greater than 7 days) were needed to identify adverse biological impacts that could in part explain the severely degraded biotic community of this urban stream.

  7. Materials Data on WI3O (SG:136) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Commercial Application of Biomass Energy Laurentian Energy Authority

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application of Biomass Energy Laurentian Energy Authority Date: May 20, 2013 Technology Area Review: Feedstock Supply & Logistics Principal Investigators: Bill Hafdahl, Laurentian Energy Authority Bill Berguson, University of Minnesota, Duluth Organizations: Laurentian Energy Authority - prime contractor University of Minnesota, Duluth - subcontract for biomass source research Commercial Application of Biomass Energy Laurentian Energy Authority, Virginia, MN CHP systems - Virginia and

  9. CX-100140 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Local Energy Matters: Market Pathway Development in Duluth, MN Award Number: DE-EE0006808 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/12/2014 Location(s): MN Office(s): Golden Field Office

  10. PROJECT PROFILE: Ecolibrium3 (Solar Market Pathways) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecolibrium3 (Solar Market Pathways) PROJECT PROFILE: Ecolibrium3 (Solar Market Pathways) Title: Local Energy Matters: Solar Market Development in Duluth, MN Ecolibrium3.png Funding Opportunity: Solar Market Pathways SunShot Subprogram: Soft Costs Location: Duluth, MN Amount Awarded: $209,005 Awardee Cost Share: $52,266 Ecolibrium3's "Local Energy Matters" Solar Market Pathways project is working with state and local stakeholders to further develop residential rooftop, community, and

  11. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40 SECTION A. Project Title: Quantifying Properties for a Mechanistic, Predictive Understanding of Aqeous Impact on Ageing of Medium and Low Voltage AC and DC Cabling in Nuclear Power Plants - University of Minnesota, Duluth SECTION B. Project Description The University of Minnesota, Duluth proposes to develop a mechanistic, predictive model for medium and low voltage cable failure based on the primary environmental degradation parameters of aqueous immersion time, temperature, and the oxidation

  12. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage Type of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... reduction of water saturation S w with the increasing capillary pressure P c : S w S wi + (1 - S wi )(P t P c ) , (2.1) where S wi is the irreducible water saturation; P t ...

  13. NREL: Energy Analysis - Katherine Young

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rock Fracture Group, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (1998) Research Assistant, Stormwater Management Group, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (1997-1998) Field Engineer, ...

  14. Analysis of the Phlebiopsis gigantea Genome, Transcriptome and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Technology, Vienna (Austria) USDA, Madison, WI (United States) Univ. of Wisconsin Biotechnology Center, Madison, WI (United States) Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States) Univ. ...

  15. Oconomowoc Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: 262-569-2196 Website: www.oconomowoc-wi.govindex.as Twitter: @OconomowocWI Outage Hotline: 262-569-2196 or 262-567-4401 After Hours References:...

  16. Closing_Language_Patent_Waiver_Grant_Cases.pdf | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ClosingLanguagePatentWaiverGrantCases.pdf More Documents & Publications Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2009-004 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-004 Advance Patent Waiver...

  17. Obama Administration Announces Additional $37,157,700 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes: WI WisconsinTotal Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All 37,157,700 WI Wisconsin State Energy Office ...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Besley-Wells - Wisconsin...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Also see Documents Related to Besley-Wells - Wisconsin WI.03-1 - DOE Memorandum; Williams to File; Subject: Elimination of Sites from FUSRAP; August 29, 1994 WI.03-2 -...

  19. Project of the Month | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems...

  20. Village of Cashton, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.cashton.com Twitter: @CashtonWi Facebook: https:www.facebook.comCashtonWi?refbrtf Outage Hotline: 608-654-7828 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  1. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date:","12312015" ,"Next Release Date:","01292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3050wi3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghistn3050wi3m.htm"...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    cooperatives* to offer net metering to customers who generate electricity using solar energy, wi... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit,...

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: ABB, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joined the Challenge: June 2013Headquarters: Cary, NCCharging Locations: New Berlin, WI; Raleigh, NC; Houston, TXDomestic Employees: 20,000

  4. Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Coordinating Energy Efficiency with Disaster Resiliency and Response Call Slides and Discussion Summary, January 9, 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordinating Energy Efficiency with Disaster Resiliency and Response Call Slides and Discussion Summary January 9, 2014 Agenda  Call Logistics and Introductions  Poll  Featured Participant  Jodi Slick, Ecolibrium3 (Duluth, MN)  Discussion:  What are programs doing to help communities respond to natural disasters?  What kinds of plans or protocols need to be in place so that energy efficiency can be incorporated into disaster recovery?  Who are critical partners? 

  5. Case Study - Minnesota Power - Accelerating Grid Modernization in Minnesota - November 2012.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study-Minnesota Power November 2012 1 SGIG Accelerates Grid Modernization in Minnesota Headquartered in Duluth, Minnesota Power (MP) serves approximately 144,000 customers and manages almost 9,000 miles of power lines and over 160 substations. Grid modernization is a top corporate priority and is driven by needs to upgrade the company's electric distribution and metering systems, load control programs, and customer engagement strategies for improved reliability and energy efficiency, lower

  6. Lac Courte Oreilles Band - Energy Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Location of Lac Courte Oreilles * The Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) Reservation is in Northern Wisconsin, 90 miles from Duluth, Minnesota and 11 miles from Hayward. About Lac Courte Oreilles * The reservation is presently 76,465 acres and is 15 miles wide. * We have a seven member Tribal Governing Board with four year terms. * LCO's membership is about 6,700 with nearly half of its members residing on or near the reservation * There are 25 distinctly different communities within the reservation for

  7. Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe Leslie Isham, Director/Assistant Director Lac Courte Oreilles Energy Project Lac Courte Oreilles Public works Department First Steps towards Tribal Weatherization Assessing the Feasibility of the Hydro Dam About Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) * Located in Upper Northwest Wisconsin * 76,000 acres and 15 miles wide * 90 miles from Duluth 100 miles from Eau Claire 10 miles from Hayward * Close to 6,000 members, 50% live on or near the reservation * 68% unemployment

  8. Companies Selected for Small Wind Turbine Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Companies Selected for Small Wind Turbine Project For more information contact: Terry Monrad (303) 972-9246 Golden, Colo., Nov. 27, 1996 -- In an effort to develop cost-effective, low-maintenance wind turbine systems, the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has selected four companies to participate in the Small Wind Turbine Project. The four companies are Windlite Co., Mountain View, Calif.; World Power Technologies, Duluth, Minn.; Cannon/Wind Eagle Corp.,

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Besly-Welles - Illinois/Wisconsin -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IL 0-08/WI 03 Besly-Welles - Illinois/Wisconsin - IL 0-08/WI 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Besly-Welles (IL.0-08/WI.03) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Besly Cutting Tools, Inc Besley Products Co; Industrial Tools Division of Bendix Corporation Location: 100 Dearborn Avenue, South Beloit, Illinois WI.03-2 Evaluation Year: 1990 WI.03-3 Site Operations: 1953 proposal for a trial lot of 500 uranium slugs to be machined by Besly

  10. Interior Foundation Insulation Upgrade - Madison

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Madison Residence Madison, WI PROJECT INFORMATION Private residence, basement renovation Madison, WI Builder: TDS Custom Construction, Madison WI Designer: Moisture / thermal management: TDS Custom Construction Architectural: John Gibson, Gibson/Darr Architects Building Component: Envelope: Foundation W all Application: Single family home, retrofit (also suitable for multi-family) Project year: 2011 Climate Zone 6A (applicable to most climate zones. Termite risk must be assessed) PERFORMANCE

  11. 2014 Year-End Wind Power Capacity

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    2 0 1 4 Y e a r E n d Wi n d P o we r C a p a c i t y ( MW)

  12. A s o f 1 2 / 3 1 / 2 0 1 5

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    2 0 1 5 Y e a r E n d Wi n d P o w e r C a p a c i t y ( MW)

  13. City of Lodi, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lodi Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (608) 592-3246 Website: lodiutilities.org Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Lodi-WI187000488154840 Outage Hotline: (608)...

  14. Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Program Manager Research Scientists David Bruhwiler ... Low Energy Nuclear Theory Richard Jones University of ... University of Washington Lattice QCD W.I. (Chip) Watson ...

  15. TSD Custom Construction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TSD Custom Construction Jump to: navigation, search Name: TSD Custom Construction Place: Madison, WI Website: www.tsdcustomconstruction.com References: TSD Custom Construction1...

  16. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2191-0855 Publisher: Springer Research Org: Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Madison, WI ...

  17. Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation Address: 431 Charmany Dr Place: Madison, WI Sector: Efficiency Year Founded:...

  18. Butler Ridge Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown Developer Midwest Wind EnergyEurus Energy Purchaser WPPI Location Dodge County WI...

  19. A Geometric Rendezvous-Based Domain Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Wisconsin - Madison 1500 Engineering Dr. Madison, WI 53716 sslattery@wisc.edu March 20, 2013 1 A Geometric Rendezvous-Based Domain Model for Data Transfer...

  20. The University of Wisconsin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: The University of Wisconsin Place: Madison, WI Website: www.wisc.edu References: The University of Wisconsin 1 Information About Partnership with NREL...

  1. Envision America Launches Inaugural Workshop to Help Cities Meet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The selected cities slated to present their respective projects include: Pittsburgh, PA; Los Angeles, CA; San Diego, CA; Milwaukee, WI; Portland, OR; Dallas, TX; Cambridge, MA; ...

  2. Biodiesel Systems LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biodiesel Systems, LLC Place: Madison, Wisconsin Zip: WI 53704 Product: The core business of Biodiesel Systems is plan, design,...

  3. Village of Waunakee, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesVillage-of-Waunakee-WI282084728476060?refhl Outage Hotline: 608-849-4111 After Hours References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data...

  4. Village of Cascade | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Village of Cascade Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Village of Cascade Energy Purchaser Village of Cascade Location Cascade WI...

  5. Energy Concepts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Concepts Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Location Hudson WI Coordinates 44.942933, -92.701608 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Biogas Direct LCC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LCC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biogas Direct LCC Place: Spring Green, Wisconsin Zip: WI 53588 Product: Biogas Direct is specialized in constructing Biogas plants for the...

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Midwest Renewable Energy Association (Solar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    logo.jpg Funding Opportunity: Solar Market Pathways SunShot Subprogram: Soft Costs Location: Custer, WI Amount ... To facilitate these investments, the Midwest Renewable Energy ...

  8. MHK ISDB/Instruments/HOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring System | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pro processing software recommended. Weatherproof enclosure ( NEMA 4x), powered by ONSET solar panel, AC adapter, or DC power supply. Ethernet, WiFi, and Cellular remote...

  9. User:Nlangle/export | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pro processing software recommended. Weatherproof enclosure ( NEMA 4x), powered by ONSET solar panel, AC adapter, or DC power supply. Ethernet, WiFi, and Cellular remote...

  10. Structural considerations for solar installers : an approach...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Richards, Elizabeth H. ; Schindel, Kay 1 ; Bosiljevac, Tom ; Dwyer, Stephen F. ; Lindau, William 2 ; Harper, Alan 1 + Show Author Affiliations (City of Madison, WI) ...

  11. FY 2015 Vehicle Technologies Office Incubator Funding Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Description Total Federal Share Silatronix New Advanced Stable Electrolytes for High Voltage Electrochemical Energy Storage Madison, WI This project will develop an innovative...

  12. Freedom of Information Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on this form. -...- ... Name : Bradley Williarn& Email bradley.wiUiamsaes.com City Indianapolis r 11- 17 1i9i9r *....

  13. WE Energies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: WE Energies Place: Milwaukee, Wisconsin Zip: WI 53290 Product: We Energies is the trade name of Wisconsin Electric Power Co and Wisconsin Gas Co, the principal utility...

  14. Optima Batteries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Optima Batteries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Optima Batteries Place: Milwaukee, WI Website: www.optimabatteries.com References: Optima Batteries1 Information About...

  15. ARM TR-008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies - SSEC University of Wisconsin-Madison 1225 W. Dayton St. Madison, WI 53706 Ralph Dedecker Phone: 608-263-6779 E-mail: ...

  16. A I K E N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SHINE Signs License Agreement for SRNL Innovation Proven, advanced process supports high-efficiency domestic medical isotope production MONONA, WI. and AIKEN, S.C. (October 13, ...

  17. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Manufacturing R&D (Round 4)...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the competitive selection of five projects for ... Recipient: Eaton Corporation (Menomonee Falls, WI) Title: Print-Based Manufacturing of ...

  18. Document13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    urban homesteading, community supported agriculture, and edible landscaping and permaculture. Instructor Biography: Michelle Povinelli is an Assistant Professor and WiSE...

  19. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decoupling ude: & Control tion itoring Parts & FPG vironment op ility System boratories ha pplications. services" wi me custom ra aging, test, fa om microele Hard S tructured Ap...

  20. Slinger Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Slinger Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Slinger Utilities Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (262)644-5265 Website: www.vi.slinger.wi.govindex.as Outage Hotline: (262)...

  1. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ilt.hll8dpOPItWiStObO comended for the file job of decantmain8~~ the l8ttm qeed ia the operation, ,

  2. USDA Forest Products Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Products Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: USDA Forest Products Laboratory Place: Madison, WI Website: www.fpl.fs.fed.us References: USDA Forest Products...

  3. Low-Cost Gas Heat Pump For Building Space Heating | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Credit: Stone Mountain Technologies Lead Performer: Stone Mountain Technologies - Erwin, TN Partners: -- A.O. Smith - Milwaukee, WI -- Gas Technology Institute - Des Plaines, IL ...

  4. A.O. Smith: Demonstrate Underutilized Micro-CHP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: A.O. Smith – Milwaukee, WIPartners: Briggs & Stratton – Milwaukee, WI; YANMAR America – Adairsville, GA

  5. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program "First Steps"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SMITH RIVER RANCHERIA Department Department of of Energy Energy Tribal Energy Program ... Reduction Specialists of Madison, WI SMITH RIVER RANCHERIA PROJECT GOAL PROJECT GOAL ...

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Hotels, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 60.9 13.2 76.3 8.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Small Hotels, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 36.6 2.7 12.0 3.9 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 38.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones.

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 31.7 1.7 0.6 1.3 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones.

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Supermarkets, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 145.6 0.3 0.6 20.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Hospitals, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 89.1 25.2 3.9 13.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Outpatient Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 99.7 8.8 1.4 17.7 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and are designed to provide a consistent

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Primary Schools, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 59.6 0.5 3.1 1.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Secondary Schools, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 96.7 2.2 2.8 5.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They

  16. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Question on Antimatter I am an undergraduate student at the University of Minnesota at Duluth. I am doing a research paper on the need to increase alternative/new energy R&D funding. I would appreciate it if you could answer a couple of questions for me. Steven, My name is Glenn Blanford. In addition to working with Fermilab's Public Affairs Office, I am a researcher on the Antihydrogen Production experiment, E862, a small group (8) who have started to observe antihydrogen atoms (at

  17. Bagley University Classroom Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Duluth, MN, MN LEED PLATINUM CERTIFIED AND PASSIVHAUS ( certification pending) CLASSROOM BUILDING The Nature Preserve where this building is located is a contiguous natural area, 55 acres in size, deeded to the University in the 1950's for educational and recreational use. The site has hiking trails through old growth hard woods frequented by the university students as well as the public. We were charged with designing a facility to serve eight different departments for the nature portions of their teaching and study at a regional University.

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2014 Company Name Plant Location Top Ten Manufacturers American Crystal Sugar Co MN, ND Archer Daniels Midland IA, IL, MN, NE Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc AL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, WI Cemex Inc AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX Dakota Gasification Company ND Eastman Chemical Company TN Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LP AL, GA, OK, VA, WI Holcim (US) Inc AL, CO, MD, MO, MT, OK, SC, TX, UT NewPage Corporation MD, MI, WI U S Steel

  19. Fermilab Today | Physics in a Nutshell Archive | 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Wi-Fi Nov. 6, 2014 Nine weird facts about neutrinos Oct. 23, 2014 Unparticle physics Oct. 9, 2014 In a nutshell: Neutrinos meet liquid argon Sept. 25, 2014 What is the...

  20. City of Evansville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: City of Evansville Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: 608-882-2280 Website: www.ci.evansville.wi.govcity Outage Hotline: 608-882-2288 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  1. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Refinery and Blender Net Production of Finished Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, 2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND,...

  2. Identified Patent Waivers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    W(I)2012-014 This is a request by CERAMATEC, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FE0000408. November 25, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(...

  3. Multivariate Calibration Models for Sorghum Composition using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Madison, WI: American Society of Agronomy-Crop Science Society of America-Soil Science Society of America, 2004. 15. Williams, P. and Norris, K., eds. Near-Infrared Technology in ...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","52016" ,"Release Date:","7292016" ,"Next Release Date:","8312016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  5. BPA-2013-00247-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steven Weber Power Line Systems, Inc. 610 N. Whitney Way, Suite 160 Madison, WI 53705 FOIA BPA-2013-00247-F Dear Mr. Weber: Thank you for your request for records that you made to...

  6. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Labor charging in Worker Safety was higher than planned due to President's Zero Accident ... In the near future, one of the MCMS units is to be retrofitted with a new Wi-Fi wireless ...

  7. CX-014106: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayou Choctaw Wi-Fi/Radio Replacement Pilot CX(s) Applied: B1.7Date: 08/12/2015 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: University...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WI web site. This poster will present AHSRL data obtained during MPACE and show examples of it's application in synergism with other MPACE observations. lidar.ssec.wisc.edu...

  9. CX-100330 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Equipment in Dairy Processing Plant Award Number: DE-EE0000163 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 State Energy Program Date: 08/11/2015 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  10. City of Kiel, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kiel, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Kiel Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: 920-894-2909 Website: ci.kiel.wi.usmain.asp?Section Outage Hotline:...

  11. Bloomer Electric & Water Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bloomer Electric & Water Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bloomer Electric & Water Co Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: 715-568-3331 Website: www.ci.bloomer.wi.usutilities Outage...

  12. BPA-2014-01562-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Valle: 'ilo*'fi'l*'r@Wi PrlciiiJ Mtdlocl : BPA Connct 2273 Mod 88 P-ee 1 I I i. I ;. BO NNEVILLE POWER ADMTI'ITSTRATION Mail Invoice To: ACCOUNTS PAYABLE- KGRD-2 BPA CORPORATE...

  13. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 382 8 390 2,072 157 116 2,345 EthaneEthylene 10...

  14. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 331 -18 313 2,398 -147 -220 2,031 EthaneEthylene...

  15. CX-100549 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Grow Solar Partnership Award Number: DE-EE00006544 CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Solar Energy Technologies Office Date: 07/31/2014 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-100458 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data Award Number: DE-EE0006760 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Geothermal Technologies Office Date: 01/28/2016 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-100495 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    POROELASTIC TOMOGRAPHY BY ADJOINT INVERSE MODELING OF DATA Award Number: DE-EE0006760 CX(s) Applied: A9 Geothermal Technologies Office Date: 09/11/2014 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  18. A=17O (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 17O) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 17.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978WI1B, 1982BA53, 1982KU1B, 1982WA1Q, 1982YA1D, 1982ZH01, 1984ZI04). Collective and cluster models: (1983JA09, 1983ME18, 1984ZI04, 1985ME06). Special states: (1978WI1B, 1981WI1K, 1982BA53, 1982HA43, 1982ZA1D, 1983AU1B, 1983LI10, 1983ME18, 1983SH15, 1984ANZV, 1984ST1E, 1984WI17, 1985AR1H, 1985ME06, 1985SH24). Electromagnetic transitions and giant

  19. CX-100278 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Accelerate Performance: Driving Demand For Proven Energy Performance Award Number: DE-EE0007068 CX(s) Applied: A9 Building Technologies Office Date: 06/11/2015 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  20. September2015News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special News & Events Museum Now Offering Public WiFi This ... it will offer this service in its galleries. "We know ... biology and biophysics group, Ruy Ribeiro has been ...

  1. CX-100333 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Cycles Award Number: DE-EE0007120 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Solar Energy Technologies Office Date: 08/13/2015 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  2. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... probability We focused on two wireless communication protocols: IEEE 802.11 - WLAN Wi-Fi IEEE 802.15.4 - ZigBee 14 Technology Impact n Impact on overall NE mission ...

  3. Building Energy Management Open-Source Software (BEMOSS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... BEMOSS Interoperability Communication Technologies Ethernet (IEEE 802.3) Serial Interface (RS-485) ZigBee (IEEE 802.15.4) WiFi (IEEE 802.11) Data Exchange Protocols ...

  4. DOE DIRECTIVES, DELEGATIONS, AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS PORTAL What...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Those assotiated with a directive(s) can 111.50 be found in d uded wi t h the di rective In the "Retated Content" section. Prin t this "" RSQ""c Oi rect i Y T"'" Referces ...

  5. IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... None of these technical comments would substantially alter the approach or content of Inb3met At:.dmss (URL) .http:wWI.epa.gov RecyC:lodRecyclabie .PmlBl1 wan Vegetable Oi d ...

  6. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... OR Wroblewski, Ron info@productiveenergy.com 608-232-1861 WI Z Zhang, Zhiqin (Jeremy) jeremy.zhang@dnvkema.com 510-891-0446 x44245 CA Zhao, Ivan izhao@nexant.com ...

  7. A.O. Smith | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    O. Smith Jump to: navigation, search Name: A.O. Smith Place: Milwaukee, WI Zip: 53224 Sector: Efficiency Phone Number: 414-359-4000 Website: www.aosmith.com Coordinates:...

  8. CX-100276 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Solar Electric Deployment on Tribal Facilities Award Number: DE-EE0006948 CX(s) Applied: B5.16 Tribal Energy Program Date: 06/04/2015 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. ... AmeriFlux US-Wi0 Young red pine (YRP) Chen, Jiquan This is the AmeriFlux version of the ...

  10. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply NickL Hi-Yes, you are correct wi... Posted by: NickL 10 Sep 2013 - 10:02 Hi- Yes, you are correct...

  11. Geospatial - Q & A | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 13:59 1 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi-Yes, you are correct wi... How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in...

  12. CX-100125 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A novel unit operation to remove hydrophobic contaminants Award Number: DE-EE0005772 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/26 /2014 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","03312016" ,"Next Release Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","03312016" ,"Next Release Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  15. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0, ePegasus Correspondence and Action Tracking Instructions 7. LASO WI 00.14 Rev. 0, ... actions are entered into ePegasus for tracking and management. 3. Corrective actions ...

  16. Den Hartog OS2010 proceedings v3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pablant, 3 J. A. Reusch, 1 P. E. Robl, 1 H. D. Stephens, 1 H. P. Summers, 4 and Y. M. Yang 1 1 University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 USA 2 Center for Magnetic...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million ... Midwest",,,..."IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI","IN, ...

  18. Teppei Katori Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Technology Phenomenology 2011 symposium (Pheno11), Madison, WI, May 9, 2011 Test of Lorentz and CPT violation with MiniBooNE excesses Outline 1. MiniBooNE neutrino...

  19. CX-100289 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Electric Deployment on Tribal Facilities Award Number: DE-EE0006948 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Tribal Energy Program Date: 06/04/2015 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  20. NERSC Rollin Thomas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    via login or compute nodes (salloc). o Or via batch script (sbatch). o Variety of approaches for achieving parallelism. Users may install packages in HOME or ask for system-wi...

  1. TO: FILE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... C . Young ,.+-' E. Mitchal file FUS,RAP WI.4,, PA.40 L.-J Iany in :ee, anda Area ' radioactive *hap 6 as a d2 EC stop for 100 employee, and )mme :nd both these Ind Milwaukee

  2. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Davenport, IL Besley-Wells Co., Beloit, WI innati, OH (*) R. Brew Company,.Concord; NH Cincinnati Milling Machine, Cinc Fenwal, Ashland, CIA Food Machining Corp., Nitro, YV General ...

  3. American Transmission Company LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Transmission Company LLC Place: Waukesha, WI References: SGIC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  4. Building Energy Management Open-Source Software Development ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Currently, BEMOSS supports the following prevalent communication technologies: Ethernet (IEEE 802.3), Serial (RS-485), ZigBee (IEEE 802.15.4) and Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11); and ...

  5. Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Plan, North Slope Borough, AK, Review Period Ends: 01292013, Contact: Serena Sweet 907-271-4543. EIS No. 20120398, Final EIS, NPS, WI, Ice Age Complex at Cross Plains ...

  6. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: Blink

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRoGRAM EVSE Features Touch screen PLC, WiFi, cellular, LAN communications Backlit screen Web-based bi-directional data fow User charge scheduling via PDA, internet, and touchpad ...

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laborotory Safety Basis Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Each action item is verified to be complete, and LSO is notified in writing when the plan ... with LSO Work Instruction (WI) 226.1.1, Writing and Managing Contractor Assessments, ...

  8. Other Matters - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    109); no coins necessary. Top What kind of internet access is there? Should I bring my laptop? Wi-Fi is free for a guest's first seven days on campus; lecture notes will be...

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE MEBA Storage letter.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NORTH AMERICA Veolia ES Technical Solutions, L.L.C. 1275 Mineral Springs, Drive, Port Washington, WI 53074 tel: 262 243 8900 - fax: 262 284 3775 www.VeoliaES.com January 3,...

  10. Secretary Chu Announces Funding for Clean Energy Projects on...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Efficiency, General Renewables, Geothermal, Wave, Wind, Solar CA 76,738 6,755 83,493 ... Indians Feasibility: Renewables Hydro-power WI 201,643 0 201,643 Lower Sioux Indian ...

  11. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 503-579-8984 OR Simon, Tony simont@energy.wsu.edu 360-956-2141 OR Skupien, Nick NSS@Brabazon.com 920-883-7071 WI Smith, Ben benjamin.smith@cp.com 803-817-7128 SC ...

  12. A=19O (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19O) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 19.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1978WI1B, 1983BR29, 1983PO02, 1983SH44, 1984BA24, 1984CH1V, 1984RA13, 1986WA1R). Special states: (1978WI1B, 1983BR29, 1983HU1J, 1983PO02, 1983SH44, 1984BA24, 1984CH1V, 1984RA13, 1984WI17, 1985LE1L, 1986AN07). Electromagnetic transitions: (1983BR29, 1985LE1L). Complex reactions involving 19O: (1983FR1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A, 1984HO23, 1985PO11,

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Small-Scale Biorefineries: Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boardman Oregon Wheat straw, Stover, Poplar residuals Biogasol New Page 83,653,212 30,000,000 64.14% 5,500,000 Wisconsin Rapids, WI Woody Biomass - mill residues GTL (FT)

  14. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah law requires their only investor-owned utility, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), and most electric cooperatives* to offer net metering to customers who generate electricity using solar energy, wi...

  15. Full page fax print

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    )lIJfjlHfllmj)mmllillruJt ((I(m(ti.JmlmmmlllWI ll .. . I*mw lffi )( HI I) SOVELEV RECELEV 40 40 Immlll1 illllmJil11)Immm lfm lli m l.lmillm(mj...

  16. Windows and Building Envelope Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LBNL’s has three facilities specifically dedicated to windows: the Optical Properties Laboratory, the Infrared Thermography Laboratory, and the Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility (MoWiTT). These...

  17. O:\\IM-20\\E-Government Program Office\\FDMS\\FDMS database\\DOE\\2011...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Name: Charles W Adams Address: A.O. Smith Corporation 11270 W. PARK PLACE MILWAUKEE, WI, 53224 Email: cadams@aosmith.com Phone: 414-359-4274 Organization: A.O. Smith Corporation ...

  18. Mesaba next-generation IGCC plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    Through a US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement awarded in June 2006, MEP-I LLC plans to demonstrate a next generation integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generating plant, the Mesaba Energy Project. The 606-MWe plant (the first of two similarly sized plants envisioned by project sponsors) will feature next-generation ConocoPhillips E-Gas{trademark} technology first tested on the DOE-funded Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering project. Mesaba will benefit from recommendations of an industry panel applying the Value Improving Practices process to Wabash cost and performance results. The project will be twice the size of Wabash, while demonstrating better efficient, reliability and pollutant control. The $2.16 billion project ($36 million federal cost share) will be located in the Iron Range region north of Duluth, Minnesota. Mesaba is one of four projects selected under Round II of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. 1 fig.

  19. Energy and Cost Savings of Retro-Commissioning and Retrofit Measures for Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Moser, Dave; Liu, Guopeng; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

    2012-08-03

    This paper evaluates the energy and cost savings of seven retro-commissioning measures and 29 retrofit measures applicable to most large office buildings. The baseline model is for a hypothetical building with characteristics of large office buildings constructed before 1980. Each retro-commissioning measure is evaluated against the original baseline in terms of its potential of energy and cost savings while each retrofit measure is evaluated against the commissioned building. All measures are evaluated in five locations (Miami, Las Vegas, Seattle, Chicago and Duluth) to understand the impact of weather conditions on energy and cost savings. The results show that implementation of the seven operation and maintenance measures as part of a retro-commissioning process can yield an average of about 22% of energy use reduction and 14% of energy cost reduction. Widening zone temperature deadband, lowering VAV terminal minimum air flow set points and lighting upgrades are effective retrofit measures to be considered.

  20. Petition for Identified Waiver of Patent Rights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Identified Waiver of Patent Rights Petition for Identified Waiver of Patent Rights This the DOE form to petition for an identified waiver of DOE patent rights under regulation 10 C.F.R. PART 784. Identified Waiver Petition (24.59 KB) More Documents & Publications Petition for Advance Waiver of Patent Rights Under 10 CFR Part 784 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2009-001 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-005

  1. Nature of the wiggle instability of galactic spiral shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Jeong-Gyu, E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kimyh@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jgkim@astro.snu.ac.kr [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Gas in disk galaxies interacts nonlinearly with an underlying stellar spiral potential to form galactic spiral shocks. While numerical simulations typically show that spiral shocks are unstable to wiggle instability (WI) even in the absence of magnetic fields and self-gravity, its physical nature has remained uncertain. To clarify the mechanism behind the WI, we conduct a normal-mode linear stability analysis and nonlinear simulations assuming that the disk is isothermal and infinitesimally thin. We find that the WI is physical, originating from the generation of potential vorticity at a deformed shock front, rather than Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities as previously thought. Since gas in galaxy rotation periodically passes through the shocks multiple times, the potential vorticity can accumulate successively, setting up a normal mode that grows exponentially with time. Eigenfunctions of the WI decay exponentially downstream from the shock front. Both shock compression of acoustic waves and a discontinuity of shear across the shock stabilize the WI. The wavelength and growth time of the WI depend on the arm strength quite sensitively. When the stellar-arm forcing is moderate at 5%, the wavelength of the most unstable mode is about 0.07 times the arm-to-arm spacing, with the growth rate comparable to the orbital angular frequency, which is found to be in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  2. Influences of wide-angle and multi-beam interference on the chromaticity and efficiency of top-emitting white organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Lingling; Zhou, Hongwei; Chen, Shufen Liu, Bin; Wang, Lianhui; Shi, Hongying

    2015-02-28

    Wide-angle interference (WI) and multi-beam interference (MI) in microcavity are analyzed separately to improve chromaticity and efficiency of the top-emitting white organic light-emitting diodes (TWOLEDs). A classic electromagnetic theory is used to calculate the resonance intensities of WI and MI in top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TOLEDs) with influence factors (e.g., electrodes and exciton locations) being considered. The role of WI on the performances of TOLEDs is revealed through using ?-doping technology and comparing blue and red EML positions in top-emitting and bottom-emitting devices. The blue light intensity significantly increases and the chromaticity of TWOLEDs is further improved with the use of enhanced WI (the blue emitting layer moving towards the reflective electrode) in the case of a weak MI. In addition, the effect of the thicknesses of light output layer and carrier transport layers on WI and MI are also investigated. Apart from the microcavity effect, other factors, e.g., carrier balance and carrier recombination regions are considered to obtain TWOLEDs with high efficiency and improved chromaticity near white light equal-energy point.

  3. Insecurity of Wireless Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon, Frederick T; Weber, John Mark; Yoo, Seong-Moo; Pan, W. David

    2012-01-01

    Wireless is a powerful core technology enabling our global digital infrastructure. Wi-Fi networks are susceptible to attacks on Wired Equivalency Privacy, Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), and WPA2. These attack signatures can be profiled into a system that defends against such attacks on the basis of their inherent characteristics. Wi-Fi is the standard protocol for wireless networks used extensively in US critical infrastructures. Since the Wired Equivalency Privacy (WEP) security protocol was broken, the Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) protocol has been considered the secure alternative compatible with hardware developed for WEP. However, in November 2008, researchers developed an attack on WPA, allowing forgery of Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) packets. Subsequent enhancements have enabled ARP poisoning, cryptosystem denial of service, and man-in-the-middle attacks. Open source systems and methods (OSSM) have long been used to secure networks against such attacks. This article reviews OSSMs and the results of experimental attacks on WPA. These experiments re-created current attacks in a laboratory setting, recording both wired and wireless traffic. The article discusses methods of intrusion detection and prevention in the context of cyber physical protection of critical Internet infrastructure. The basis for this research is a specialized (and undoubtedly incomplete) taxonomy of Wi-Fi attacks and their adaptations to existing countermeasures and protocol revisions. Ultimately, this article aims to provide a clearer picture of how and why wireless protection protocols and encryption must achieve a more scientific basis for detecting and preventing such attacks.

  4. A=11C (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11C) GENERAL: See also (1980AJ01) and Table 11.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1981RA06, 1983SH38). Special states:(1981RA06). Complex reactions involving 11C:(1979BO22, 1980GR10, 1980WI1K, 1980WI1L, 1981MO20, 1982GE05, 1982LY1A, 1982RA31, 1983FR1A, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A). Electromagnetic transitions:(1978KR19). Applied work:(1979DE1H, 1982BO1N, 1982HI1H, 1982KA1R, 1982ME1C, 1982NE1D, 1982PI1H, 1982YA1C,

  5. A=16O (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 16O) GENERAL: See also Table 16.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (DE54C, FL54A, HE55F, JA55A, MA55F, MA55O, SC55A, WI55F, EL56, FE56B, JA56C, KA56A, MO56, PE56A, RE56B, WI56C, EL57B, FE57D, GR57C, HE57B, RE57, TA57A, TO57A, CA58C, DA58A, DA58D, FE58A, FE58B, HA58B, MO58, RA58F, UM58, WI58G). 1. 12C(α, γ)16O Qm = 7.148 Resonant capture radiation to 16Og.s. is observed at Eα ~ 3.24 MeV, corresponding to the known J = 1- state at

  6. A=17F (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 17F) GENERAL: See (1982AJ01) and Table 17.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1982ZH01, 1983BR29, 1984ZI04, 1985ME06). Special states: (1981WI1K, 1983AU1B, 1983BR29, 1983WI15, 1984ANZV, 1985ME06, 1985SH24). Electromagnetic transitions: (1982BR24, 1983BR29, 1983TO08, 1984SAZW, 1985AL21). Astrophysical questions: (1981WA1Q, 1981WE1F, 1982WI1B). Complex reactions involving 17F: (1984GR08, 1984HI1A, 1984HO23). Pion reactions: (1980CR03).

  7. Microphysical Consequences of the Spatial Distribution of Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-07-28

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds can persist even with steady ice precipitation fluxes, and the origin and microphysical properties of the ice crystals are of interest. Vapor deposition growth and sedimentation of ice particles along with a uniform volume source of ice nucleation, leads to a power law relation between ice water content wi and ice number concentration ni with exponent 2.5. The result is independent of assumptions about the vertical velocity structure of the cloud and is therefore more general than the related expression of Yang et al. [2013]. The sensitivity of the wi-ni relationship to the spatial distribution of ice nucleation is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking and ice growth with cloud-volume, cloud-top, and cloud-base sources of ice particles through a time-dependent cloud field. Based on observed wi and ni from ISDAC, a lower bound of 0.006 m^3/s is obtained for the ice crystal formation rate.

  8. A=19F (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19F) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 19.6 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978WI1B, 1979GO13, 1982RA1N, 1983BR29, 1983PO02, 1984MI1H, 1984RA13, 1985BR15, 1986WA1R, 1987KA09). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1979GO13, 1982RA1N, 1984ME02, 1985DI16, 1985MO20, 1985OH01, 1987DE05, 1987KA09). Special states: (1978WI1B, 1982RA1N, 1983BI1C, 1983BR29, 1983CS01, 1983PO02, 1984AD1E, 1984HO1H, 1984ME02, 1984MI1H, 1984RA13, 1984WI17,

  9. A=20F (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20F) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 20.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1978WI1B, 1982HA43, 1983BR29, 1984FO16, 1984RA13, 1986CA27, 1986COZZ, 1986VO05, 1986WA1R, 1987HA08, 1987IA1B). Complex reactions involving 20F:(1983BE02, 1983DE26, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HO23, 1984KO25, 1985BE40, 1985HA1N, 1985PO11, 1986GA1I, 1986HA1B, 1986ME06, 1986PO06, 1987RI03, 1987RO10). Hypernuclei:(1984AS1D). Other topics:(1978WI1B, 1983AR1J,

  10. A=20O (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    87AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20O) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 20.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1978WI1B, 1982SH30, 1984CH1V, 1984HA14, 1984RA13, 1984SA37, 1985HA15, 1985HU08, 1985LE1L, 1986COZZ, 1986HE13, 1986HU1G, 1986VO07, 1986WA1R, 1987IA1B). Complex reactions involving 20O:(1983FR1A, 1983WI1A, 1984HI1A, 1985HA1N, 1985PO11, 1986HA1B, 1986IR01, 1986PO06, 1986PO15, 1987RI03). Other topics:(1978WI1B, 1983SH32, 1984PO11, 1984SA37, 1985AN28,

  11. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection under conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Kara; Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D'Aquila, Robert

    2015-04-15

    Adding large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. Our paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. Moreover, the main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  12. Ward identities and chiral anomalies for coupled fermionic chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, L. C.; Ferraz, A.; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2013-12-15

    Coupled fermionic chains are usually described by an effective model written in terms of bonding and anti-bonding fermionic fields with linear dispersion in the vicinities of the respective Fermi points. We derive for the first time exact Ward Identities (WI) for this model, proving the existence of chiral anomalies which verify the Adler-Bardeen non-renormalization property. Such WI are expected to play a crucial role in the understanding of the thermodynamic properties of the system. Our results are non-perturbative and are obtained analyzing Grassmann functional integrals by means of constructive quantum field theory methods.

  13. Wisconsin Tribal Leaders Work Towards a Clean Energy Future | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wisconsin Tribal Leaders Work Towards a Clean Energy Future Wisconsin Tribal Leaders Work Towards a Clean Energy Future July 17, 2012 - 11:54am Addthis Secretary Chu and Office of Indian Energy Director Tracey LeBeau meet with Wisconsin tribal leaders in Milwaukee, WI. | Photo courtesy of Mark Appleton. Secretary Chu and Office of Indian Energy Director Tracey LeBeau meet with Wisconsin tribal leaders in Milwaukee, WI. | Photo courtesy of Mark Appleton. Tracey A. LeBeau Former

  14. d:\

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 (2002) 496-509 PII: S0029-5515(02)35741-7 Tearing mode stability with equilibrium flows in the reversed-field pinch R. Gatto 1 , P.W. Terry 1 and C.C. Hegna 2 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2 Department of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA E-mail: rgatto@facstaff.wisc.edu Received 9 October 2001, accepted for publication 23 January 2002 Published 17 May 2002 Online at

  15. Measurement of fenestration performance under realistic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klems, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The need for fenestration performance measurements under realistic conditions is noted, and the Mobile Window Thermal Test facility (MoWiTT), newly constructed at LBL to make these measurements, is described. A key feature of the MoWiTT is the direct measurement of instantaneous net energy flow in the presence of sunlight. Ongoing calibration to establish the accuracy of this facility is described, and calibration data so far obtained are presented. Estimates from these data indicate that the facility will have sufficient accuracy for most fenestration measurements of interest.

  16. Brief Communication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    112001 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0741-3335/53/11/112001 BRIEF COMMUNICATION Electron temperature fluctuations during sawtooth events in a reversed-field pinch C P Kasten 1 , D J Den Hartog 1,2 , H D Stephens 1,2,3 , C C Hegna 1 and J A Reusch 1 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA 2 Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA E-mail: cale.kasten@gmail.com and djdenhar@wisc.edu

  17. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT) Qualified Specialists June 2016 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Alas, Victor vmalas@crimson.ua.edu 256-473-3486 AL Allen, Ron rallen@onsitenergy.com 530-304-4454 CA Altfeather, Nate altfeathern@saic.com 608-443-8458 WI Anderson, Bob randerson@barr.com 952-832-2721 MN Aue, Jerry jaue@charter.net 715-343-6118 WI B Baesel, Bryan bbaesel@cec-consultants.com 216-749-2992 OH Banuri, Nishit nbanuri3@gmail.com 304-685-6247 PA Bartels, Jeff

  18. Plasma Sources Sci. Technol.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources Sci. Technol. 6 (1997) 492-498. Printed in the UK PII: S0963-0252(97)87196-4 Impurities, temperature and density in a miniature electrostatic plasma and current source D J Den Hartog†, D J Craig†, G Fiksel‡ and J S Sarff‡ † Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA ‡ Sterling Scientific, Inc., 1415 Rutledge Street, Madison, WI 53703, USA Received 23 October 1996, in final form 25 July 1997 Abstract. We have

  19. A=18Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 18.22 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1982ZH01, 1983BR29, 1984SA37, 1985RO1G). Special states:(1982ZH01, 1983BI1C, 1983BR29, 1984SA37, 1985RO1G, 1986AN10, 1986AN07). Electromagnetic transitions:(1982BR24, 1982RI04, 1983BR29, 1985AL21, 1986AN10). Astrophysical questions:(1982WI1B, 1987WI11). Complex reactions involving 18Ne:(1986HA1B). Pion capture and reactions (See also reaction

  20. A=16N (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 6.7 0.5 sec (FR57B), 5.43 0.22 sec (ZI59) is much too long for dipole radiation, and J 0- is indicated (WI57D). The third excited state (Ex 392 keV),...

  1. Wisconsin Energy Institute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Avenue | Madison, WI 53726 www.energy.wisc.edu August 1 , 2 014 Dr. K aren W ayland U.S. D epartment o f E nergy 1000 I ndependence A ve., S W Washington, D C 2 0585 Dear D r. ...

  2. DOE/EIS-0132-F United States Department ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... T h e U . S. N u c l ea r R eg u l a to ry C omi s sion ( NR C ) wi l l c o n c u r in t h ... E . 2 . 1 3 ) . The dRAP sumary, however, omi ts hydra u l i c condu c t i v i ty v a l ...

  3. A=17F (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and 18Ne by (1987WI11). See also the studies of this reaction in the framework of the generator coordinate method by (1988FU02, 1989FU01). 5. (a) 14N(6Li, t)17F Qm 0.047 (b)...

  4. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Box 2501.301 L b o n t a y R o d , O d ; R I 3 7 8 3 1 35. L. K Ria, Fcrma Sks Ra' " Wi&m, Oak Ridge Fmld U . S . -of Emgy, P . O . Bolt 2001, Ollr Ridge. TN 37831-8723 3 6 . ...

  5. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 14,825 298 15,123 33,928 1,840 2,446 38,214...

  6. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Total Net Input 16,465 108 16,573 10,405 2,208 1,923 14,536 Pentanes Plus...

  7. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Natural Gas Liquids 359 5,914 6,273 26,874 4,786 77,174 108,834 Pentanes...

  8. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refining Districts, 2005 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 2.5 0.9 2.4 4.2 1.2 0.9 3.1 Finished Motor...

  9. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Total Net Input 17,809 97 17,906 9,452 1,740 1,790 12,982 Pentanes Plus 0...

  10. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Natural Gas Liquids 44 526 570 1,615 417 5,414 7,446 Pentanes Plus 5 89 94...

  11. F-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH...

  12. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Total Net Input 199,173 1,285 200,458 117,409 24,041 20,032 161,482...

  13. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2005 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 0.7 -0.6 0.6 3.5 -1.1 -1.0 1.9 Finished Motor Gasoline a 50.3...

  14. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2005 (Thousand Barrels) East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Natural Gas Liquids 0 508 508 2,142 393 6,367 8,902 Pentanes Plus 0 90 90...

  15. F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE...

  16. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    September 2005 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total IN, IL, KY MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 0.7 0.3 0.7 2.9 1.3 0.5 2.2 Finished Motor Gasoline a 47.9...

  17. CX-100191 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cost-Optimized Modular Helical Rotors Turbine-Generator System for Small Hydro Power Plants Award Number: DE-EE0006927 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Water Power Program Date: 03/04/2015 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM2008_poster_mbc_raf [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 NASA L l R h C t 2 U i it f Wi i M di 3 S i S t d A li ti I 4 P ifi N th t N ti l L b t1 NASA Langley Research Center 2 University of Wisconsin-Madison 3 Science Systems and ...

  19. shaleoil1.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... USA CANADA SD ND MT Saskatchewan Manitoba Dunn Wa rd Dawson McL ea n McK en zie Morton ... SIGNIFICANT BAKKEN OIL FIELDS Bakken Shale Extent Canada MT ID IL IA WY NV NE SD MN ND WI ...

  20. A=13N (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements are also reported at Ep-bar 0.45 to 0.60 MeV (1979KR18; study of Mott-Schwinger interaction), Ep 7.16 to 7.43 MeV (1977ME06), Ep-bar 14.2 MeV (WI80D),...

  1. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    MN, WI, ND, SD OK, KS, MO Total Liquefied Refinery Gases 382 8 390 2,072 157 116 2,345 EthaneEthylene 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 Ethane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ethylene 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 Propane...

  2. National Trust for Historic Preservation: America Saves! Energizing Main Street Small Businesses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: National Trust for Historic Preservation – Washington, DC Partners: - National Renewable Energy Laboratory – Golden, CO - Lend Lease – New York, NY - Energy Center of Wisconsin – Madison, WI - EnerPath – Rochester, NY - Ecology Action – Santa Cruz, CA - Community Power Works – Seattle, WA

  3. A=11Be (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special reactions: (1969AR13, 1971AR02, 1972VO06, 1973BA81, 1973KO1D, 1973WI15). Muon capture (See also reaction 2.): (1967DE1E, 1968DE20, 1969BE41, 1970VA24, 1971BE57,...

  4. H2A Delivery: GH2 and LH2 Forecourt Land Areas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Setback distances specified by NFPA 55 Compressed Hydrogen Wall Opening: ... (wi ) 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 15 15 15 15 i m m m 2 99 115 115 130 1 1 2 3 ) m 2 1112 1112 1112 ...

  5. A=20F (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are listed in Table 20.4 Resonances in 19F(n, )16N (in PDF or PS) (BO55A, MA55L: see graph in (HU58)). See also (WI37E, BO55D, GR55D, KO58A). 15. 19F(d, p)20F Qm 4.379 Q0 ...

  6. A=17Ne (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See also Table 17.22 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Theory: (WI64E, MA65J, MA66BB). Reviews: (BA60Q, GO60P, BA61F, GO62N, GO64J, GO66J, GO66L,...

  7. A=5He (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1970IR01, 1970RA1D, 1970ZO1A, 1971RA15, 1971WA08, 1972KA38, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49). Cluster calculations: (1965NE1B, 1966HO06, 1967BE1G, 1969ME1C, 1969WI1C, 1971LE1N, 1972DE30)....

  8. A=19Ne (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF or PS). Shell model: (WI57H, TA60L, BH62, BO67K, GU67A, EL68, WA68E, AR71L, LE72). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (RA60B, BA69E, BA70F, LE72). Astrophysical...

  9. A=19O (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EL68, GU68A, HA68H, HA68T, MO68A, FE69C, HO69U, KU69G, MA69N, TA70H, AR71L, WI71B). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (CH63A, FE65B, FE69C). Astrophysical questions:...

  10. A=10Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    width of the ground state is 1.2 0.3 MeV. 10Lig.s. is unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV (1975WI26). See also (1974BA15, 1974CE1A, 1974TH01,...

  11. A=10Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MeV) corresponds to the ground state. 10Lig.s. would the be unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV (1975WI26). However (1979AB11, 1980AB16), on the...

  12. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Milwaukee, WI, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  13. Madison, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Madison, WI, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  14. Madison, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Madison, WI, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  15. A=17N (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See also (1971AJ02) and Table 17.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Theory and reviews: (1973PA1F, 1973RE17, 1973TO16, 1973WI15, 1974HA61, 1975BE31). Experimental...

  16. A=17N (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (1982AJ01) and Table 17.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Theoretical papers and reviews: (1983ANZQ, 1983AU1B, 1983EN04, 1983FR1A, 1983MA06, 1983WI1A, 1984AS1D, 1984BA24,...

  17. OFFICE FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFFICE FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 155OP STREETNW. WiSHINGTON. D.C. ' , iQns 25,19&L At-t :. I' .' at l530 P Btmat, IO&, XtwMn&m, 0. 6., at 9130 A.Jb Sa 1 llmbemupoftbaaomlttaal8f...

  18. A=16O (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 16O) GENERAL: See also (1971AJ02) and Table 16.9 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1969BO1B, 1969FE1A, 1969IK1A, 1969WI1C, 1970BO33, 1970BO1J,...

  19. A = 16O (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 16O) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 16.10. Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1978WI1B, 1981AN18, 1981BR16, 1981CO1X, 1981DE2G, 1981FO12,...

  20. A=16O (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagrams for 16O) GENERAL: See also (59AJ76) and Table 16.9 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (WI57H, BR59M, FE59C, PA59A, TA60H, TA60L, BA61N, TR61, BA62F,...

  1. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ER RI I W Wi in nt te er r S Su ur rf fa ac ce e G Gr re ee en nh ho ou us se e F Fl lu ux xe es s Greenhouse Gas Emission Band (cm -1 ) GL Flux (Wm 2 ) AERI Flux (Wm 2 ) CFC-11...

  2. ENERGY RESEARCH AND 0EVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systeii-,,wi-ch u p ti p.rurly to the exosr rom elfore ei rv noutb ul proof and reliable. Exein dt.teetIc system shoulld be restored by ni, 11%-i v'ttr he interlock located...

  3. The gasification of coal-peat and coal-wood chip mixtures in the University of Minnesota, two-stage coal gasifier: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.P.

    1986-12-01

    The technical feasibility of gasifying coal-peat and coal-wood chip mixtures with the University of Minnesota, Duluth Campus commercially technology two-stage coal gasifier was demonstrated during a series of experimental tests. Three types of processed peat products were mixed with coal and gasified. The three peat products were: peat briquettes, peat pellets and sod peat. The best peat product for gasification and handling was found to be peat pellets with a diameter of 7/8 inch and a length of .75 to 2 inches. A mixture of 65% coal and 35% peat pellets was found to cause no loss in gasifier efficiency and no operational problems. However, there was found to be no economic advantage in using coal-peat mixtures. The very limited testing performed with coal-wood chip mixtures indicated that the wood chips would be difficult to handle with the coal handling-equipment and there would be no economic advantage in using wood chips. 3 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  5. A=11Be (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    85AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11Be) GENERAL: See also (1980AJ01) and Table 11.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1981RA06, 1981SE06, 1983MI1E, 1984VA06). Electromagnetic transitions:(1980MI1G). Complex reactions involving 11Be:(1979BO22, 1980WI1L, 1983EN04, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A). Hypernuclei:(1979BU1C, 1982IK1A, 1982KA1D, 1982KO11, 1983FE07, 1983KO1D, 1983MI1E). Other topics:(1981SE06, 1982NG01). Ground-state properties of 11Be:(1981AV02, 1982NG01,

  6. A=12Be (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12Be) GENERAL: See also (1985AJ01) and Table 12.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. General theoretical papers: (1984FR13, 1985AN28, 1985BA51, 1985WI1B, 1986WI04, 1987BL18, 1987GI1C, 1987SA15, 1987YA16, 1988RU01, SU88C, 1989BE03). Hypernuclei: (1984IW1B, 1984YA04, 1985BE31, 1985GA1C, 1985IK1A, 1985WA1N, 1985YA01, 1985YA07, 1986BA1W, 1986BI1G, 1986DO1B, 1986GA14, 1986GA33, 1986GA1H, 1986HA26, 1986MA1J, 1986ME1F, 1986MI1N, 1986PO1H, 1986YA1T,

  7. A=12N (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12N) GENERAL: See also (1975AJ02) and Table 12.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1976IR1B). Pion reactions (See also reaction 2.): (1975NA16, 1976NA16, 1978BU1J, 1978EP01, 1978NA1N, 1979BO1W, 1979BO2C, 1979DI1A, 1979EP1B, 1979NA1Q, 1979WI1A). Other topics: (1975HU14, 1976AB04, 1976BE1K, 1976IR1B, 1977SI1D, 1978SE1B, 1979WI1A). Ground state of 12N: (1974SHYR, 1975BE31, 1977YO1D, 1978LEZA). μ = +(0.4571 ± 0.005) nm (1968SU05).

  8. A=13B (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13B) GENERAL: See also (1970AJ04) and Table 13.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Special reactions:(1971AR02, 1973KO1D, 1975AB1D, 1975FO09). Theoretical papers:(1972AN05, 1973KI12, 1973MU11, 1973MU1B, 1973NA1H, 1973NA14, 1973SA30, 1973WI15, 1975BE31, 1975HU14). Q = 0.048 ± 0.005 b (1973HAVZ, 1974SHYR). μ = 3.1771 ± 0.0005 nm (1971WI09, 1973HAVZ). See also (1973TO16). 1. 13B(β-)13C Qm = 13.437 The half-life of 13B is 17.33 ± 0.17 msec

  9. Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2013-07-28

    The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

  10. A=18F (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18F) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 18.13 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978WI1B, 1982ZH01, 1983BR29, 1983KI13, 1984MI1H, 1984MI17, 1985LE1K, 1986YU1B). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1983ME12, 1984QU1A, 1985BA1A, 1987ER05). Special states: (1978WI1B, 1982ZH01, 1983BI1C, 1983BR29, 1983ME12, 1983KI13, 1984AD1E, 1984HA14, 1984HO1H, 1984MI1H, 1984MI17, 1985AD1A, 1985HA18, 1985LE1K, 1985MI10, 1985SO12, 1985YU1B, 1986AN07,

  11. A=20F (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20F) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 20.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1972LE13, 1972WI13, 1973LA1D, 1973MA1K, 1973MC06, 1974CO39, 1975BA81). Electromagnetic transitions: (1970HE1B, 1974MC1F). Special states: (1972LE13, 1973MC06, 1975BA81, 1975MI03). Complex reactions involving 20F: (1972MI11, 1973BA81, 1973WI15, 1974HA61, 1975BA1Q, 1976HI05, 1977AR06). Muon and pion capture and reactions: (1974LI1D). Other topics: (1972CA37,

  12. A=7Be (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 7.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1978RE1A, 1979WI1B, 1980HA1M, 1981KU13, 1982FI13, 1983WA1M). Astrophysical questions: (1978BU1B, 1979MO04, 1979RA20, 1979RA1C, 1980CA1C, 1980LA1G, 1980WI1M, 1983LI01). Applied work: (1979LA1E, 1982HA1D, 1983HA1W). Complex reactions involving 7Be: (1978DI1A, 1978DU1B, 1978HA40, 1978HE1C, 1979BO22, 1979KA07, 1979LO11, 1979PO10, 1979RA20, 1979SC1D,

  13. A=7Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965KU09, 1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966WI1E, 1967BO1C, 1967BO22, 1967CO32, 1967FA1A, 1969GU03, 1969TA1H, 1969VA1C, 1970ZO1A, 1971CO28, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Cluster model: (1965NE1B, 1968HA1G, 1968KU1B, 1969ME1C, 1969SM1A, 1969VE1B, 1969WI21, 1970BA1Q, 1972HA06, 1972HI16, 1972JA23, 1972KU12, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03, 1973KU12).

  14. A=9Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1978DU1B, 1979AL22, 1979BO22, 1979JA1C, 1980BO31, 1980WI1L, 1981BO1X, 1981MO20, 1982BO1Y). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1980MU1B). Reactions involving pions and other mesons (See also reaction 3.): (1978FU09, 1979BO21, 1979PE1C, 1979WI1E, 1980NI03, 1980ST15, 1981YA1A). Hypernuclei: (1978DA1A,

  15. B'. ~. ,* o

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    B'. ~. ,* o .,, ..... . :.....^ORL^ r . ....... :^q ;^1 - ! '' : . :' , ; i*: * . ,. td^ .. '...E *z '. e* ;f i ~ ~i'' .' '~ Ip^ E w ,,r,:,,~:. .' - _ ^ F 'CLASSIFICATICN CAN6i1 E'''/E''i'GL- 1943 tzse 1 Xr--| -^ -D^ |0 _;.,1 ~, ,t I *:t. . . '- ; *'*; i }.;r w ~*--W-- X'-y u.uti ' $l .' *h - .l *, ws^wf so , wr' W it PM* fi -a «Wt% t. o -wS * . StItiat hit . to ti . Rj s" pwtd t to WI wi 1i94 3 ,*t * I IA mWP at 6» u « h*t t$SU22owiW S a t vuft 1913"a. iwi VW ty U tjsas riu a l

  16. SWRHL-37~ OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7~ OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from January through June 1966 /' A w-'i 'Z ii-. iL ~, .e i,.<. 1 ,a Lx $8 <:: .- ,\" k. -7. -.=d ,) by the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare Public Health Service Environmental Health Service January 1970 This surveillance performed under a Memorandum of Understanding (No. SF 54 373) for the U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SWRHL-37r

  17. Mr. John E. Kieling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ca rlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 JUN 1 7 2013 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe , New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Planned Physical Alteration to the Permitted Faci lity, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, No: NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling: The purpose of this letter is to notify you of a planned physical alteration to the permitted facility in accordance with the Waste Isolation PHot Plant (WI??)

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Aerosols in Fair-Weather Clouds During CHAPS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shrivastava, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shrivastava M, LK Berg, J Fast, R Easter, A Laskin, WI Gustafson, Y Liu, and CM Berkowitz. 2013. "Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study." Journal of

  19. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Digging Into Climate Models' Needs with SPADE Download a printable PDF Submitter: Gustafson, W. I., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Gustafson WI, PL Ma, H Xiao, B Singh, PJ Rasch, and JD Fast. 2013. "The separate physics and dynamics experiment (SPADE) framework for determining resolution awareness: A case study of microphysics." Journal of Geophysical Research -

  20. Bucyrus say HydraCrowd could generate revenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-15

    Amongst news of new products from US suppliers is the announcement by Bucyrus International of HydraCrowd which eliminates the need for rope crowd change intervals in electric shovels. Active Control Technology has had its Wi-Fi mesh network system for underground communications and tracking system approved by the MSHA. The Spatial Solutions Division of Leica Geosystems has gone into partnership with Maptek to supply laser scanners and associated mine scanning software. 2 photos.

  1. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    'ID Lahw FROM: ---A---L------ SUBJECT: (5j;WI;M&0ur +?6%.f?lyw\0&&-- OEPIEELSL past: _----------------------- current: -------------~_-~--------- Owner contacted q yes pnno; if yes, date contacted TYPE OF UPERATION ~~~----------____ ,@ Research & Development q Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale a Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis Facility Type B Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Clrganitation 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other

  2. The Honorable Patricia Titer -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    JAN G -&; The Honorable Patricia Titer - 301 King.Street Alexandria, Virginia -22314 Dear Mayor Titer:, Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a'new approach, to, openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications wi-th the public. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward.the enclosed information related to the former. American Machine and Foundry Co. site in your ' jurisdiction that performed work for DOE's predecessor agencies. This ,informatibn is

  3. National Electric Transmission Study 2006 Western Interconnection Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Western Interconnection 2006 Congestion Assessment Study Prepared by the Western Congestion Analysis Task Force May 08, 2006 2 Western Interconnection 2006 Congestion Study - DOE Task 3 - 1. 2008 Modeling Study 2. 2015 Modeling Study - 2015 Planned Resource Development (IRPs and RPS) 3. W.I. Historical Path Usage Studies - 1999 thru 2005 - Physical congestion - Commercial congestion 3 WCATF Modeling Studies ABB Gridview Model * Model uses WECC 2005 L&R load forecast, modified with NPCC data

  4. PII: S0097849397000897

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Graphics ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NET ATTRACTORS J. C. SPROTT Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA AbstractÐAesthetically appealing patterns are produced by the dynamical behavior of arti®cial neural networks with randomly chosen connection strengths. These feed-forward networks have a single hid- den layer of neurons and a single output, which is fed back to the input to produce a scalar time series that is always bounded and often chaotic. Sample attractors

  5. PII: S0375-9601(00)00026-8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2000 Ž . Physics Letters A 266 2000 19-23 www.elsevier.nlrlocaterphysleta A new class of chaotic circuit J. C. Sprott ) Department of Physics, UniÕersity of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA Received 30 November 1999; received in revised form 4 January 2000; accepted 4 January 2000 Communicated by C.R. Doening Abstract A new class of chaotic electrical circuit using only resistors, capacitors, diodes, and inverting operational amplifiers is { Ž . Ž . described. This circuit solves

  6. albers.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Papers International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos, Vol. 8, No. 7 (1998) 1463-1478 c World Scientific Publishing Company ROUTES TO CHAOS IN NEURAL NETWORKS WITH RANDOM WEIGHTS D. J. ALBERS and J. C. SPROTT Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA W. D. DECHERT Department of Economics, University of Houston, Houston TX 77204-5882, USA Received January 13, 1998; Revised May 9, 1998 Neural networks are dense in the space of dynamical

  7. bectno-recyclone | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler NOx Control - Project Brief [PDF-320KB] The Babcock & Wilcox Company, Cassville, WI Program Publications Final Reports Demonstration of Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler NOx Control, Final Project Report [PDF-14.4MB] (Feb 1994) Appendices 1 - 5 [PDF-2.6MB] (Feb 1994) Appendix 1: Small Boiler Simulator Description Appendix 2: Statement of Work by Task and Subtask Appendix 3: Evaluation of Reburning for NOx Control from Lignite-Fired Cyclone Boilers Appendix

  8. doi:10.1016/j.physd.2004.10.006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physica D xxx (2004) xxx-xxx A comparison of correlation and Lyapunov dimensions Konstantinos E. Chlouverakis a,∗ , J.C. Sprott b a Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK b Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA Received 14 February 2004; received in revised form 6 September 2004; accepted 22 October 2004 Communicated by R. Roy Abstract This paper investigates the relation between the correlation

  9. 2014 news listings | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Wind Market Report 2014 Wind Market Report Addthis 1 of 8 2 of 8 3 of 8 4 of 8 5 of 8 6 of 8 7 of 8 8 of 8

    0 1 4 Y e a r E n d Wi n d P o we r C a p a c i t y ( MW)

    Departments

  10. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    48 times Category Energy Security, Manual, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Technology Validation author D.L. King, W.E. Boyson, B.R. Hansen, and W.I. Bower, Sandia event 2nd World Conference and Exhibition on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion location Vienna, Austria slide_template default Accurate measurements of broadband (full spectrum) solar irradiance are fundamental to the successful implementation of solar power systems, both photovoltaic and solar thermal. Historically,

  11. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    115 times Category Energy Security, Manual, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar Energy, Technology Validation event 2nd World Conference and Exhibition on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion location Vienna, Austria year 1998 author D.L. King, W.E. Boyson, B.R. Hansen, W.I. Bower Thousands of photovoltaic systems, large and small, are now being installed worldwide. As a result, there is a growing demand for inexpensive devices for accurately monitoring the solar irradiance. Most often, the

  12. Final Report - Grow Solar Wisconsin Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grow Solar Wisconsin Team Final Report - Grow Solar Wisconsin Team Awardee: Midwest Renewable Energy Association Location: Custer, WI Subprogram: Soft Costs Funding Program: Rooftop Solar Challenge 1 The Grow Solar Wisconsin Team is working to reduce the cost of photovoltaic (PV) system installations through the removal of process and institutional barriers. Grow Solar Wisconsin RSC 5686.pdf (264.43 KB) More Documents & Publications QER - Comment of Edison Electric Institute (EEI) 2 Final

  13. Print-based Manufacturing of Integrated, Low Cost, High Performance SSL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Luminaires | Department of Energy Print-based Manufacturing of Integrated, Low Cost, High Performance SSL Luminaires Print-based Manufacturing of Integrated, Low Cost, High Performance SSL Luminaires Lead Performer: Eaton Corporation - Menomonee Falls, WI Partners: - Heraeus Materials Technology, LLC - Conshohocken, PA - Haiku Tech, Inc - Miami, FL - Eaton Cooper Lighting Innovation Center - Peachtree City, GA DOE Total Funding: $2,468,672 Cost Share: $2,468,676 Project Term: 9/15/2013 -

  14. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fair-Weather Cloud Statistics at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site: Temporal and Spatial Variability L.K. Berg, E. Kassianov, C.N. Long, and W.I. Gustafson Jr. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Motivation In previous work, Berg and Stull (2005) developed a new parameterization for Fair-Weather Cumuli (FWC). Preliminary testing of the new scheme used data collected during a field experiment conducted during the summer of 1996. This

  15. LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Implementation Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Implementation Strategy WI Gustafson Jr. AM Vogelmann September 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

  16. C:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Letters, 760:L22 (5pp), 2012 December 1 doi:10.1088/2041-8205/760/2/L22 C 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC DISCONTINUITIES IN THE SOLAR WIND AND IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE Vladimir Zhdankin 1 , Stanislav Boldyrev 1 , and Joanne Mason 2 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2 Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640

  17. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F - Seismicity Relocation Analyses Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 F.1 Appendix F Seismicity Relocation Analyses Final Report: High-Resolution Seismicity Study of the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt Region, Washington Prepared by Clifford H. Thurber Department of Geoscience University of Wisconsin-Madison 1215 W. Dayton St. Madison, WI 53706 January 31, 2014 Final Report: Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA): High-Resolution Seismicity Analysis

  18. 2016 Race to Zero Competition: Net Zero Wisconsin Team Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Net Zero Wisconsin Forward House Project Summary Forward House is located in Milwaukee, WI, in a neighborhood blighted by foreclosure in the 30th corridor. A return to a classic Wisconsin craftsman style with a Milwaukee flair will help reinvigorate the neighborhood while remaining true to its roots. The overarching goal to provide an affordable home with a people-centered interior design that will deliver comfort and high energy performance, reducing the cost of living to a first time home

  19. IEA/RFP Workshop 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Energy Agency (IEA) | UW Madison Plasma Physics RFP Workshop Madison, WI - 2011 Home Presentations Contact Admin ETN_Logo_Colour_WEB uwlogo_web_sm_ctr The 15th International RFP Workshop was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison October 10-12, 2011. IEA-RFP attendees This workshop series was organized through the framework of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement on the Research and Development of Reversed Field Pinches (RFP). The last workshop was held

  20. Instrument Development H. E. Revercomb, F. A. Best, R. G. Dedecker, T. P. Dirkx,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. E. Revercomb, F. A. Best, R. G. Dedecker, T. P. Dirkx, R. A. Herbsleb, R. O. Knuteson, J. F. Short, and W. L. Smith University of Wisconsin -Madison Space Science and Engineering Center Madison, WI 53706 Ground-based Folurier Transform infrared (FTIR) instru- ments are being produced at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and the Unliversity of Denver (UD) for the Atmo- spheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Te:stbed (CART) sites as part of a joint Instrument

  1. paper250.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JOURNAL OF CHAOS THEORY AND APPLICATIONS Volume 5 (2000), No. 2 _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Invited paper Algebraically Simple Chaotic Flows J. C. Sprott Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 USA Stefan J. Linz Theoretische Physik I, Institut für Physik, Universität Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg, Germany Abstract 1 It came as a surprise to most scientists when Lorenz in 1963 discovered chaos in a

  2. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cause of Sudden Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma S. Choi, D. Craig, F. Ebrahimi, and S. C. Prager University of Wisconsin - Madison and the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA (Received 4 January 2006; published 13 April 2006) The cause for sudden reconnection in reversed field pinch plasmas is determined experimentally for two cases: large reconnection events (the sawtooth crash) and small

  3. viennaking.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IMPROVED ACCURACY FOR LOW-COST SOLAR IRRADIANCE SENSORS D.L. King, W.E. Boyson, B.R. Hansen, and W.I. Bower, Sandia National Laboratories Presented at the 2 nd World Conference and Exhibition on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion, 6-10 July 1998, Vienna, Austria Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories Photovoltaic Systems Department Post Office Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-0753 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company,

  4. Susan Martindale

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    GREEN BAY, WI SEPTEMBER 13-14, 2006 Mark Abkowitz U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board c/o Vanderbilt University Box 1831, Station B Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (615) 343-3436 Mark.abkowitz@vanderbilt.edu Sandra Alexander Department of Science and Engineering Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation P.O. Box 638 Pendleton, Oregon 97801 (541) 278-0896 SandraAlexander@ctuir.com William (Bill) Andersen Northrop Grumman Marine Systems 401 East Hendy Avenue Sunnyvale, California

  5. Turtle Mountain Community College - Wind Turbine Installation and Geothermal Use

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians "First Steps to Implement Strategic Energy Plan" Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians "First Steps to Implement Strategic Energy Plan" Tribal Planning Staff - Charles Trottier Emphasis on capacity building URS Inc. Madison WI - Jim Yockey EERC, Grand Forks ND (Involve them on the next steps) Project Participants Furthest westward expansion of Chippwa Treaty of 1863, executive order 1882 executive order 1884, 2 townships, public

  6. L61 The Astrophysical Journal,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L61 The Astrophysical Journal, 672: L61-L64, 2008 January 1 ൴ ᭧ 2008. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. ON WEAK AND STRONG MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE Jean Carlos Perez and Stanislav Boldyrev Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin at Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706; jcperez@wisc.edu, boldyrev@wisc.edu Received 2007 October 4; accepted 2007 November 9; published 2007 December 6 ABSTRACT Recent numerical and observational

  7. A=19F (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RI67J, SH67K, ZA67C, EI68A, HA68M, RI68N, UN68, BE69G, BH69, CU69B, KR69A, WA70B, LE72). Cluster model: (WI59D, SH60C, MA63Q, MA64HH, ME68H, BA69E, HI69, ME69K, TA69G, BA70F)....

  8. Oneida Tribe Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Ray; Schubert, Eugene

    2014-08-15

    Project funding energy audits of 44 Tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI. Buildings were selected for their size, age, or known energy concerns and total over 1 million square feet. Audits include feasibility studies, lists of energy improvement opportunities, and a strategic energy plan to address cost effective ways to save energy via energy efficiency upgrades over the short and long term.

  9. ISIS DAQ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casperson, R. J.

    2014-06-10

    ISIS DAQ is a collection of data acquisition (DAQ) software that includes code developed for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), but is primarily based on code that was previously reviewed and released by LLNL for the author under BSD Licenses. The previously released software includes CS Analyzer, CS Forntend, and WiGL. Providing this code to DTRA is one of the deliverables for the project.

  10. Polymer Engineering Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polymer Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Experimental and Numerical Studies of the Temperature Field in Selective Laser Sintering to Improve Shrinkage and Warpage Prediction Prof. Dr.-Ing. Natalie Rudolph Polymer Engineering Center Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Wisconsin-Madison 1513 University Ave Madison, WI 53706 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop, July 20-21, 2015 in Santa Fe, NM Polymer Engineering Center University of

  11. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) | Department of Energy Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Milwaukee, WI, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community.

  12. WA_1995_033_BECHTEL_NEVADA_CORPORATION_OR_FCI_ENVIRONMENTAL_.pdf |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3_BECHTEL_NEVADA_CORPORATION_OR_FCI_ENVIRONMENTAL_.pdf WA_1995_033_BECHTEL_NEVADA_CORPORATION_OR_FCI_ENVIRONMENTAL_.pdf (3.94 MB) More Documents & Publications WA_1993_015_XSIRIUS_INC_Waiver_of_the_Governments_US_and_.pdf Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-030 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2008-008

  13. CX-000161: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    161: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000161: Categorical Exclusion Determination WI City Madison CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10/19/2009 Location(s): Madison, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant for: Light-emitting Diode Street Lights, Anaerobic Food Waste Digester - Pilot Study, Business Energy Efficiency Incentive Program, Residential Energy Efficiency Incentive Program,

  14. Chicago Operations Office 9800 South Cass Avenue

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    y,: y; , i 4- 1 .' f?Qj /J < b !. i-. .* ;+ ,.- Department of Energy Chicago Operations Office 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 : / *- I (jr-. _ __-rCILC-. .-WI __ James L. Liverman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Environment, HQ UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA On January 17, 1978, Edward J. Jascewsky, Department of Energy (DOE), and Walter H. Smith, Argonne National Laboratory (AX), visited the University of Arizona. The purpose of the visit teas to discuss the past operations of c$rtain

  15. Commercial Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Commercial Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partner: A.O. Smith Inc. - Milwaukee, WI DOE Funding: $2,000,000 Cost Share: Provided by CRADA partners Project Term: October 1, 2013 - September 30, 2016 Project Objective The objective of this project is to develop a gas-fired absorption heat pump water heater for the commercial

  16. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2002WI18 15N(α γ): σ 461 - 2642 keV X4 09/12/2011 1997WI12 15N(α γ): σ 0.65 - 2.65 X4 09/12/2011 1995WI26 15N(α γ): σ 0.67 - 0.69 X4 09/12/2011 1969AI01 15N(α γ): γ-ray excitation curve for 3.0 ≤ Eγ ≤ 7.0 MeV 2.5 - 3.2 1 11/30/2011 1977DI08 15N(α, γ): γ-ray excitation curve near Eα = 3.15 MeV for transitions to 3146 - 3158 keV five low-lying states, 4.65 MeV (13/2+) state

  17. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R.

    2015-10-15

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from −90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  18. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 NOV 1 4 2013 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Sa nta Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transm ittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Pl ant Annua l Waste Minimization Report Dea r Mr. Kieling : The purpose of this letter is to provide you wi th the Waste Isola lion Pilot Plant (W IPP) Annua l Waste Minimi za tion Report. This report is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the W IPP Haza rdou s Was te Faci lity

  19. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cotton-Ball Clouds Contained Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, WI Gustafson, EI Kassianov, and D Liping. 2013. "Evaluation of a modified scheme for shallow convection: Implementation of CuP and case studies." Monthly Weather Review, 141, doi:10.1175/MWR-D-12-00136.1. Cumulus Potential (CuP) parameterization leads to improved forecasts of

  20. TO: FILE FRml: J&-q Ma

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    nEnaRAt4Dun TO: FILE FRml: J&-q Ma __--------- SUBJECT:' g I**;&4 AfI~s-dd-rs , /y/u,,r(,, ALTERNATE AIA& ___-_-__--_____-____------------------- NAnE:--------_________--__ CITY: M.'Iw.r\CcrQ STATE: -em-- -- wes) fiv;s ____ --------- ti 1 w!!!!2%2. Past: _______----__------~~~~~ Current:____-_-___------- Owner cnntacted Pf yes Q no; if yes, date contacted--- /1,7-w~~~I ,I TYPE OF OPERATION (4MJ J?i- 5796 zb7~:r~ __-- ____ -----_--- q Research & Development cl Faci 1 i ty Type 0

  1. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 AUG i 3 1979 ,,~---Y--*. FCAF:Wi3 )I 70-364 : i: SNM-414,jAmendment No. 3 --A Babcock and Wilcox Company Nuclear Materials Division ATTN: Mr. Michael A. Austin Manager, Technical Control 609 North Warren Avenue Apollo, Pennsylvania 15613 Gentiemen: (1 i' \ (. \ In accordance with your application dated June 18, 1979, and pursuant to Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 70, Materials License SNM-414 is hereby amended to: 1. Delete the function of the Regulatory

  2. S C Prager, A F ALmagri, M Cekic, J Chapman, D J Den Hartog,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phys. Control. Fusion 37 (1995) A30SA311. Printed in the UK Plasma rotation, dynamo, and nonlinear coupling in the reversed field pinch S C Prager, A F ALmagri, M Cekic, J Chapman, D J Den Hartog, G Fiksel, C Hegna, H Ji and J S Sarff Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 USA J R Drake, S Mazur, P Nordlund and H E Saetherblom Division of Fusion Plasma Physics (Association EUROTAM-NFR), Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, S-100 44 Stockholm Abstract. Two

  3. FOIA May 2009 Responses (000362 - 000369)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mr. Phillip Manske 195 W. Puetz Road H-114 Oak Creek, WI 53154 RE: FOIA Request No. 2009-00362 Dear Mr. Manske: This is in response to the request for information that you made to the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552. l h s office is considered to be the office most likely to contain documents responsive to the request. You requested documentation that was submitted by the applicant that was hired for the Associate Chief Financial Officer

  4. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-006 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0-006 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-006 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by HYDROGEN ENERGY OF CALIFORNIA under agreement DE-FE0000663, as the DOE has determined that granting such a waiver best serves the interests of the United States and the general public. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-006 (229.05 KB) More Documents & Publications Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2010-006 Identified

  5. NEAC-RT ComLtr 11.1.12

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engineering Physics 1500 Engineering Drive Madison WI 53706 Phone: (608) 263-1646 Fax: (608) 263-7451 www.engr.wisc.edu/ep/ Nuclear Engineering Engineering Physics Engineering Mechanics Astronautics October 3 0, 2 012 To: Dr. R ichard M eserve, N EAC C hair From: NEAC N uclear R eactor T echnology S ubcommittee Re: Initial R eview o f A dvanced R eactor T echnology O ffice On S eptember 2 4 th , 2 012 o ur S ubcommittee m et w ith t he D oE N uclear R eactors Technologies Office (NE---7) s taff.

  6. PII: 0022-3115(93)90328-V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal of Nuclear Materials 2CO (1993) 177-183 North-Holland B,C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch D.J. Den Hartog, M. Cekic, G. Fiksel, S.A. Hokin, R.D. Kendrick, S.C. Prager and M.R. Stoneking University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Physics, Madison, WI 53706, USA Received 8 October 1992; accepted 20 November 1992 A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure

  7. PII: S0375-9601(99)00450-8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 1999 Ž . Physics Letters A 259 1999 240-245 www.elsevier.nlrlocaterphysleta Elementary chaotic flow Stefan J. Linz a , J.C. Sprott b a Theoretische Physik I, Institut fur Physik, UniÕersitat Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg, Germany ¨ ¨ b Department of Physics, UniÕersity of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA Received 21 April 1999; received in revised form 27 June 1999; accepted 29 June 1999 Communicated by C.R. Doering Abstract Using an extensive numerical search for the simplest chaotic

  8. d:\

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    42 (2000) L47-L53. Printed in the UK PII: S0741-3335(00)16535-2 LETTER TO THE EDITOR Isotropy of ion heating during a sawtooth crash in a reversed-field pinch D J Den Hartog and D Craig Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA E-mail: djdenhar@facstaff.wisc.edu Received 22 August 2000, accepted for publication 27 September 2000 Abstract. In the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch, ions are impulsively heated during a sawtooth crash; the ion

  9. d:\

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 (2001) 919-927 www.iop.org/Journals/pp PII: S0741-3335(01)21911-3 Magnetic fluctuations and energy transport in RFX G Serianni 1 , A Murari 1 , G Fiksel 2 , V Antoni 1,3 , M Bagatin 1,3 , D Desideri 1,3 , E Martines 1 and L Tramontin 1 1 Consorzio RFX-Corso Stati Uniti, 4-35127 Padova, Italy 2 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA 3 Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Unit` a di Padova, Italy Received 14 February 2001, in final form 8 May 2001

  10. doi:10.1016/j.cpc.2008.02.011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Communications 179 (2008) 245-249 www.elsevier.com/locate/cpc A parallel implementation of an MHD code for the simulation of mechanically driven, turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry K. Reuter a,∗ , F. Jenko a , C.B. Forest b , R.A. Bayliss b a Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching, Germany b Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706, USA Received 24 July 2007; accepted 20 February 2008

  11. Lower Hybrid Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lower Hybrid Experiments on MST M.C. Kaufman, J.A. Goetz, M.A. Thomas, D.R. Burke and D.J. Clayton Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madision, WI 53706 Abstract. Current drive using RF waves has been proposed as a means to reduce the tearing fluctuations responsible for anomalous energy transport in the RFP. A traveling wave antenna op- erating at 800 MHz is being used to launch lower hybrid waves into MST to assess the feasibility of this approach. Parameter studies show that edge

  12. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oakland Scientific Facility 415 Thomas L Berkley Way (20th Street) Room 238 Oakland, CA Please bring a WiFi-equipped laptop with ssh client software installed (this will be necessary to participate in the hands-on sessions). For some of the debugging software, an X windows server will be needed - this is usually already installed on MacOSX/Linux, but Windows users may need to install 3rd-party software. Monday, Feb. 7, 2011 Day 1: Getting

  13. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John F. Berry,1* Eckhard Bill,1 Eberhard Bothe,1 Serena DeBeer George,2 Bernd Mienert,1 Frank Neese1+ and Karl Wieghardt1 1 Max-Planck-Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie, Stiftstrasse 34-36, D-45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany 2 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94309, USA * Present address: The University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Chemistry, 1101 University Ave. Madison, WI 53706-1322, USA + Present address: Institut für

  14. paper-LSPP16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FL PADD 4: Rocky Mountain PADD 5: West Coast PADD 2: Midwest PADD 1: East Coast PADD 3: Gulf Coast PADD1A: New England PADD1B: Central Atlantic PADD1C: Lower Atlantic Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts AK HI WA OR CA NV AZ MT WY CO UT ID ND SD NE KS OK MO MN WI MI IL IN OH KY TN IA NM TX AR LA AL MS WV VA NC SC GA FL ME NH VT NY PA NJ MD DE MA CT RI

    pantex On Womens Equality Day, we celebrate NNSA's talented Women in STEM NNSA's systems administrators keep the computers running

  15. NEL-2011-03

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Engineering Physics 1500 Engineering Drive Madison WI 53706 Phone: (608) 263-1646 Fax: (608) 263-7451 www.engr.wisc.edu/ep/ Nuclear Engineering Engineering Physics Engineering Mechanics Astronautics October 3 0, 2 012 To: Dr. R ichard M eserve, N EAC C hair From: NEAC N uclear R eactor T echnology S ubcommittee Re: Initial R eview o f A dvanced R eactor T echnology O ffice On S eptember 2 4 th , 2 012 o ur S ubcommittee m et w ith t he D oE N uclear R eactors Technologies Office (NE---7) s taff.

  16. SUB ZERO GROUP, INC.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUB ZERO GROUP, INC. 4717 Hammersley Road. Madison, WI 53711 P: 800.532.7820 P: 608.271.2233 F: 608.270.3362 Memorandum To: David Foster, Senior Advisor, Office of the Secretary of Energy CQ Michael Lafave, Director of Production Workers, SMART Union Workers Marc Norberg, Assistant to the General President, SMART Union Workers From: Christopher Jessup, Corporate Compliance Manager, Sub-Zero Group, Inc. Date: June 21, 2016 Re: June 15, 2016 Meeting at Department of Energy Forrestal Building in

  17. A=13B (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13B) (Reactions on which no new work is reported are not always discussed.) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 13.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1981SE06, 1984VA06). Complex reactions involving 13B: (1983EN04, 1983MA06, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984HI1A). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1984KO1U). Pion capture and reactions (See also reactions 4 and 5.): (1981OS04, 1982CH16, 1983LI15). Hypernuclei: (1983FE07). Other

  18. Departm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POBox 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 1 Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Sa nta Fe, New Mexico 67505-6303 SEP 2 6 201 1 Subject: Transmittal of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Reports Dea r Mr. Kieling : The purpose of this leller is to provide you wi til the following annual reports as req uired by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permi t No. NM4890 13908B-TSDF, Part 4 ,

  19. Diagnosis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagnosis of Lower Hybrid on MST D. R. Burke, J. A. Goetz, M. C. Kaufman, A. F. Almagri, J. K. Anderson, C. B. Forest and S. C. Prager University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison WI 53706 Abstract. RF driven current has never been demonstrated in a Reversed Field Pinch. Recently the lower hybrid system on the Madison Symmetric Torus reached a new operating regime. This upgrade allows RF powers of up to 5% of the Ohmic input power to be injected. It is therefore anticipated that the lower hybrid

  20. padd map

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    FL PADD 4: Rocky Mountain PADD 5: West Coast PADD 2: Midwest PADD 1: East Coast PADD 3: Gulf Coast PADD1A: New England PADD1B: Central Atlantic PADD1C: Lower Atlantic Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts AK HI WA OR CA NV AZ MT WY CO UT ID ND SD NE KS OK MO MN WI MI IL IN OH KY TN IA NM TX AR LA AL MS WV VA NC SC GA FL ME NH VT NY PA NJ MD DE MA CT RI

  1. printer_friendly_org_chart

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    FL PADD 4: Rocky Mountain PADD 5: West Coast PADD 2: Midwest PADD 1: East Coast PADD 3: Gulf Coast PADD1A: New England PADD1B: Central Atlantic PADD1C: Lower Atlantic Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts AK HI WA OR CA NV AZ MT WY CO UT ID ND SD NE KS OK MO MN WI MI IL IN OH KY TN IA NM TX AR LA AL MS WV VA NC SC GA FL ME NH VT NY PA NJ MD DE MA CT RI

    Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Adam Sieminski Deputy Administrator Howard Gruenspecht Assistant Administrator

  2. Equilibrium magnetohydrodynamic flows of liquid metals in magnetorotational instability experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 644, pp. 257-280. c Cambridge University Press 2010 doi:10.1017/S0022112009992394 257 Equilibrium magnetohydrodynamic flows of liquid metals in magnetorotational instability experiments I. V. K H A L Z O V 1 †, A. I. S M O L Y A K O V 2 A N D V. I. I L G I S O N I S 3 1 Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2 University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N5E2, Canada 3

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2011_1012_Hansen_100-K_Remediation.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EIA Sh t T d Wi t F l O tl k EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook f for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) O b 12 2011 | h C October 12, 2011 | Washington, DC by www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Howard Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator Overview * EIA expects higher average fuel bills this winter heating season for heating oil, propane, and natural gas, but little change in electricity

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - loehnert_breakout_cops.ppt [Kompatibilitätsmodus]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UC microwave radiometry and sensor synergy d i h COPS AMF d l during the COPS AMF deployment U Löhnert S Crewell K Ebell T Reinhardt U. Löhnert, S. Crewell, K. Ebell, T. Reinhardt, C. Selbach, S. Kneifel University of Cologne, Germany (UC) D D Turner D. D. Turner University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI www.arm.gov COPS Breakout Session, ARM STM 2009 Standard UC Microwave Products * Quality controlled (i.e. dew Q y ( problematic) TBs from HATPRO (22-58 GHz) and DPR (90/150 GHz) from April

  5. Microsoft Word - 14th_rf_conf.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lower Hybrid Antenna for Current Drive Experiments on MST J.A. Goetz, M.A. Thomas, C.B. Forest, S.C. Prager, E. Uchimoto a) , F.W. Baity b) , and R.I. Pinsker c) Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 a) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 b) Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 c) General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186 Abstract. RF current drive has been proposed as a mechanism for reducing the tearing

  6. Microsoft Word - CMOS7_Fact_Sheet_SAND2010-4822P_updated_format.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMO Rad In suppo microele needs. T chemica custom d defense. (ASIC) d products diverse s Sandia's radiation (Silicon- reliabilit CMOS7 Options Metal-In and N+ p Sandia u matching devices. operatin C  Sa de te ap  CM wi en Pe OS7 diatio ort of its prim ectronic prod These include al and biolog designs for o Sandia's A developmen s and engine set of custom s CMOS7 te n-hardened, -on-Insulato ty digital, an 7 is a 24 mas for analog a nsulator-Met poly resistor uses 0.35-mi g, higher sup

  7. 12N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1949AL05: 12N; measured T1/2. 1958VE20: 12N; measured T1/2. 1959FA03: 12N; measured T1/2. 1962MA22: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962PO02: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FI05: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963GL04: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963PE10: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963WI05: 12N; measured not

  8. 14O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements for Superallowed Beta Decay 1965KAZX: 14O. 1975HA45: 14O; calculated ft for superallowed β decays. 1978WI04: 14O; measured T1/2; deduced ft values. 1981WH03: 14O(β+); deduced Q. 14O deduced Qβ, radiative corrected ft. 2003TO03: 14N(p, n); deduced threshold energies. 14O deduced Q(EC) for superallowed decay. 2003TO29: 14O(EC); compiled, analyzed superallowed decays Q-values, T1/2, log ft, related data; deduced Vμd matrix element. 2004BA78: 14O(β+);

  9. International Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Engineering (M&C 2013) Sun Valley, Idaho, USA, May 5-9, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013) THE DATA TRANSFER KIT: A GEOMETRIC RENDEZVOUS-BASED TOOL FOR MULTIPHYSICS DATA TRANSFER S.R. Slattery and P.P.H. Wilson Department of Engineering Physics University of Wisconsin - Madison 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 sslattery@wisc.edu; wilsonp@engr.wisc.edu R.P. Pawlowski Sandia National Laboratories ∗ P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185

  10. C:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    77:41 (16pp), 2013 November 1 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/777/1/41 C 2013. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. TOWARD A THEORY OF ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMA TURBULENCE AT SUBPROTON SCALES Stanislav Boldyrev 1 , Konstantinos Horaites 1 , Qian Xia 1 , and Jean Carlos Perez 2 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2 Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA Received 2013

  11. C:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supplement Series, 213:30 (18pp), 2014 August doi:10.1088/0067-0049/213/2/30 C 2014. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION TURBULENCE IN STRONG GUIDE FIELDS: BASIC PROPERTIES AND APPLICATION TO CORONAL HEATING M. J. Pueschel 1 , D. Told 2 , P. W. Terry 1 , F. Jenko 2,3 , E. G. Zweibel 1 , V. Zhdankin 1 , and H. Lesch 4 1 Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2010 Regional New Construction and Renovations Expenditures for Public K-12 Schools ($Million) Region New Schools Additions Renovation Total Region 1 (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) Region 2 (NJ, NY, PA) Region 3 (DE, MD, VA, WV) Region 4 (KY, NC, SC, TN) Region 5 (AL, FL, GA, MS) Region 6 (IN, MI, OH) Region 7 (IL, MN, WI) Region 8 (IA, KS, MO, NE) Region 9 (AR, LA, OK, TX) Region 10 (CO, MT, ND, NM, SD, UT, WY) Region 11 (AZ, CA, HI, NV) Region 12 (AK, ID, OR, WA) Total Source(s): School Planning

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.1 ENERGY STAR

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Home Performance with ENERGY STAR, Completed Jobs Rank Program Sponsor State 1 NY State Energy R&D Authority NY 2 National Grid MA 3 Austin Energy TX 4 Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corp. WI 5 New Jersey Board of Public Utilities NJ 6 Energy Trust of Oregon OR 7 Sacramento Municipal Utility District (1) CA 8 Long Island Power Authority NY 9 Metropolitan Energy Center MO 10 Efficiency Vermont VT Total Note(s): Source(s): Personal communication, Chandler Von Schrader, U.S. EPA, February 10,

  14. HTPD2016_Crowley

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crowley P. J. Fimognari, D.R. Demers Xantho Technologies, Madison, WI Development of Heavy Ion Beam Probe Detector Elements with a Direct View of the Plasma X XA AN NT TH HO O Current (µ A) 0 1000 2000 Bias Plate at -200V with HP supply Current (µ A) 0 1000 2000 Bias Plate at -50V with HP supply Current (µ A) 0 1000 2000 Bias Plate at 0V with HP supply Current (µ A) 0 1000 2000 Bias Plate at +50V with HP supply Time (ms) 10 15 20 25 Current (µ A) 0 1000 2000 Bias Plate at +200V with HP

  15. HTPD2016_VelocityDetector_v4c

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P.J. Fimognari T.P. Crowley, D.R. Demers Xantho Technologies, Madison, WI DEVELOPMENT OF A BEAM ION VELOCITY DETECTOR FOR THE HEAVY ION BEAM PROBE X XA AN NT TH HO O The ability to measure the current density in a toroidal magnetic con�inement plasma experiment with a spatial resolution of order 1 cm and a temporal resolution of 1 μs will be invaluable to stability and transport studies. In an axisymmetric plasma, canonical angular momentum conservation constrains heavy ion beam probe (HIBP)

  16. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 (2004) 162-171 PII: S0029-5515(04)72612-5 Equilibrium reconstruction in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch J.K. Anderson, C.B. Forest, T.M. Biewer a , J.S. Sarff and J.C. Wright b Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA Received 21 December 2002, accepted for publication 18 November 2003 Published 17 December 2003 Online at stacks.iop.org/NF/44/162 (DOI: 10.1088/0029-5515/44/1/018) Abstract A non-linear Grad-Shafranov toroidal equilibrium

  17. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 (2006) 521-531 doi:10.1088/0029-5515/46/5/004 Coupling to the electron Bernstein wave using a phased array of waveguides in MST reversed field pinch M. Cengher, J.K. Anderson, V. Svidzinski and C.B. Forest 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706, USA E-mail: cbforest@wisc.edu Received 31 August 2005, accepted for publication 20 February 2006 Published 23 March 2006 Online at stacks.iop.org/NF/46/521 Abstract Coupling to the electron Bernstein

  18. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PLASMA PHYSICS AND CONTROLLED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 (2003) A457-A470 PII: S0741-3335(03)69356-5 Tokamak-like confinement at high beta and low field in the reversed field pinch J S Sarff 1 , J K Anderson 1 , T M Biewer 1 , D L Brower 2 , B E Chapman 1 , P K Chattopadhyay 1 , D Craig 1 , B Deng 2 , D J Den Hartog 1 , W X Ding 2 , G Fiksel 1 , C B Forest 1 , J A Goetz 1 , R O'Connell 1 , S C Prager 1 and M A Thomas 1 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2 Electrical Engineering

  19. kumar_ppcf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    032001 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0741-3335/53/3/032001 BRIEF COMMUNICATION Behaviour of carbon and boron impurities in the Madison Symmetric Torus S T A Kumar 1 , D J Den Hartog 1 , R M Magee 1 , G Fiksel 1,3 and D Craig 2 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA 2 Wheaton College, Wheaton, IL, USA E-mail: stkumar@wisc.edu Received 4 October 2010, in final form 2 December 2010 Published 28 January 2011 Online at stacks.iop.org/PPCF/53/032001 Abstract Temporally and

  20. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAJORITY ION HEATING BY NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTION AND CONFINEMENT OF FAST IONS IN THE MADISON SYMMETRIC TORUS REVERSED FIELD PINCH J. K. Anderson 1 , A. F. Almagri 1 , B. E. Chapman 1 , V. I. Davydenko 2 , P. Deichuli 2 , D. J. Den Hartog 1 , C. B. Forest 1 , G. Fiksel 1,3 , A. A. Ivanov 2 , D. Liu 1 , M. D. Nornberg 1 , J. S. Sarff 1 , N. Stupishin 2 , J. Waksman 1 1 University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; jkanders@wisc.edu 2 Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Prospekt Lavrent'eva 11,

  1. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Onset and Saturation of the Kink Instability in a Current-Carrying Line-Tied Plasma W. F. Bergerson, C. B. Forest, * G. Fiksel, D. A. Hannum, R. Kendrick, J. S. Sarff, and S. Stambler Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706, USA (Received 1 August 2005; published 4 January 2006) An internal kink instability is observed to grow and saturate in a line-tied screw pinch plasma. Detailed measurements show that an ideal, line-tied kink mode begins

  2. SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SUB ZERO GROUP, INC. 4717 Hammersley Road. Madison, WI 53711 P: 800.532.7820 P: 608.271.2233 F: 608.270.3362 Memorandum To: David Foster, Senior Advisor, Office of the Secretary of Energy CQ Michael Lafave, Director of Production Workers, SMART Union Workers Marc Norberg, Assistant to the General President, SMART Union Workers From: Christopher Jessup, Corporate Compliance Manager, Sub-Zero Group, Inc. Date: June 21, 2016 Re: June 15, 2016 Meeting at Department of Energy Forrestal Building in

  3. J. Plasma Physics:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics: page 1 of 18. c Cambridge University Press 2015 doi:10.1017/S0022377815000471 1 Prospects for observing the magnetorotational instability in the plasma Couette experiment K. Flanagan 1 †, M. Clark 1 , C. Collins 1,2 , C. M. Cooper 1 , I. V. Khalzov 1,3 , J. Wallace 1 and C. B. Forest 1 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2 University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA 3 National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow, 123182,

  4. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2014" "Company Name","Plant Location" "Top Ten Manufacturers" "American Crystal Sugar Co","MN, ND" "Archer Daniels Midland","IA, IL, MN, NE" "Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc","AL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, WI" "Cemex Inc","AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX" "Dakota Gasification Company","ND" "Eastman Chemical

  5. Supercomputers, Semi Trucks and America's Clean Energy Future |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Super Wi-Fi is Super for Energy Too Nick Sinai U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy What does this mean for me? By integrating broadband into the emerging Smart Grid, consumers will have revolutionized communication with their utility -- they will have detailed information on their energy use that will help inform them how they can save on their electric bills. Editor's Note: Cross-posted from the National Broadband Plan blog, which deals with

  6. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pumping System Assessment Tool (PSAT) Qualified Specialists June 2016 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Adidjaja, Jakub adijakub@gmail.com 951-776-2607 CA Ahlgren, Roy ‡ Royahlgren@comcast.net 847-751-0380 IL Alas, Victor vmalas@crimson.ua.edu 256-473-3486 AL Albright, David david.albright@simplot.com 559-301-8424 CA Altfeather, Nate altfeathern@saic.com 608-443-8458 WI Amundson, Todd tmamundson@bpa.gov 503-230-5491 OR Anderson, Kevin kanderson@us.grundfos.com 913-227-3400 KS Andrus,

  7. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Vovk, Mykhaylo V.; Mel'nychenko, Nina V.; Sukach, Volodymyr A.

    2012-08-14

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds. wi="59.94mm" file="US08242284-20120814-C00001.TIF" alt="embedded image" img-content="chem" img-format="tif"/>

  8. Assessing the Hydro Dam at Lac Courte Oreilles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Assessing the Hydro Dam at Lac Courte Oreilles" Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe Leslie Isham, Director, LCO Energy Project Assistant Director, LCO Public Works 9796N Cty. Hwy K Hayward, WI 54843 About Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) * Located in upper Northwest Wisconsin * Land base is about 76,000 acres * 7,275 members * Adopted Kyoto Protocol in 2005 * Land Use Comprehensive Plan adopted in 2006 * 2008 DOE First Steps Grant Awarded LCO Tribal Mission We, the Anishinaabeg,

  9. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE/CESA/TTC Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Webinar December 14, 2010 2 Examples of DOE-funded Partners and Locations - Fuel Cell Technologies Program TX NM AZ NC AR CA CO HI WA IL KY MA MN MO MS AL NV TN UT WV ID FL MI ND OR OH IN MT WY IO NE KS OK AK LA GA WI SC VA PA DE MD DC NJ NY RI CT VT NH ME SD Source: US DOE 12/2010 2 3 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges 4

  10. Print

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    < 5k 0 < 50k < 100k < 250k < 500k < 1M > 1M > 5M > 10M DE MD DC MA RI NJ AZ UT WY ID OR WA CA TX OK KS CO NE SD ND MN WI IL IA MO AR LA MS AL FL GA TN KY IN OH MI ME NH CT VT NY PA WV VA NC SC MT AK HI NV NM Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Procured Materials and Services 2015 (> $35M) Small business procurements in US: $14.73M

  11. Programmable Power Supply for MST'S Poloidal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IEEEINPSS 24th Symposium on Fusion Engineering SP3-47 Programmable Power Supply for MST'S Poloidal Field D. J. Holly, J. R. Adney, K. J. McCollam, J. C. Morin, and M. A. Thomas University of Wisconsin Madison, WI 53706 Abstract- We are designing a new programmable polo ida I feld power supply for the MST reversed-feld pinch. By providing fexible waveform control, the new supply will expand capabilities in oscillating feld current drive, inductive current profle control, and other inductive

  12. RENAMEDBYADMWHILEHIDDENTOALLOWDUPLICATEACCELERATORS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PV Manufacturing R&D Project Status and Accomplishments under "In-Line Diagnostics and Intelligent Processing" and "Yield, Durability and Reliability" Preprint D.J. Friedman, R.L. Mitchell, and B.M. Keyes National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.I. Bower Sandia National Laboratories R. King and J.A. Mazer U.S. Department of Energy Presented at the 2006 IEEE 4 th World Conference on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion (WCPEC-4) Waikoloa, Hawaii May 7-12, 2006 Conference Paper

  13. Department of Energy (DOE) OpenNet documents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Account Request *First Name: *Last Name: *Organization: *Phone: *Email: Fax: *Address: *City: *State: Select AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY Zip Code: *Affiliation: Select Federal Contractor *Access Level: Select View Release Official Releasing Official: release *Site Input Code: Select A2EDAP - Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Data Archive and Portal, Pacific Northwest National

  14. Microsoft Word - REPORT.13.final

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Grantee The George Washington University Department of Chemistry 725 21 st St., NW Corcoran Hall Washington, DC 20052 Grant Number DE-FG02-02ER15366 Project Title Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration P/I Dr. H. Henry Teng 202-994-0112 hteng@gwu.edu Co-PI Dr. Huifang Xu Dept. Geoscience University of Wisconsin-Madison 1215 W Dayton St Madison, WI 53706 FINAL REPORT Background Vast majority of literature work concludes that

  15. Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    38 (1996) A213-A225. Printed in the UK Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in tokamaks and RFP G Fiksel, Roger D Bengtson†, M Cekic, D Den Hartog, S C Prager, P Pribyl‡, J Sarff, C Sovinec, M R Stoneking, R J Taylor‡, P W Terry, G R Tynan‡ and A J Wootton† Department of Physics University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA Abstract. The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the edge plasma (r/a >

  16. Port hole perturbations to the magnetic field in MST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 (2010) 095002 (17pp) doi:10.1088/0741-3335/52/9/095002 Port hole perturbations to the magnetic field in MST P J Fimognari 1 , A F Almagri 1 , J K Anderson 1 , D R Demers 2 , J S Sarff 1 , V Tangri 1 and J Waksman 1 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA 2 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180, USA E-mail: fimognari@wisc.edu Received 26 February 2010, in final form 23 June 2010 Published 19 July 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/PPCF/52/095002

  17. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soils Soil Series and Phase DBaC i:JFu IIiiiiIO!:l _PK _TuE _Ud DVeD o o o 1180 Meters o 590 \' Community _ Loblolly Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood D Upland Hardwood D Bonomland Hardwood iiiI Bonomland HardwoodlPine N Streams * TES Plants (1) D TES Plants (2) U Monitoring Wells o SRS Bays 6 ~ Utili1y ROW !.! Openwells tit NPDES outfalls ** Areas WI Roads rnOther Set-Asides ~ Hydric Soils Figure 15-1. Plant cOllllllunities and soils associated with the WhippldOH ER Study Site Set-Aside Area. 15-7

  18. United States Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    03/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 DOE F 132,.8 W.I: ((07.9u) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 2, 2002 REPLY TO REPLY TO -36 (A02SR013) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-07 ATTN OF: SUBJECT: Audit of Subcontracting Practices at the Savannah River Site TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Acting Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) has contracted with Westinghouse Savannah River Company, LLC

  19. CX-100496 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    96 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100496 Categorical Exclusion Determination Demonstration of uCHP in Light Commercial Hot Water Applications Award Number: DE-EE0006796 CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.1, B5.1 Buildings Technologies Office Date: 09/11/2014 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to A. O. Smith Corporation to verify that large-scale deployment of micro combined heat and power (µCHP) systems does

  20. 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lower Hybrid Antenna Design for MST J.A. Goetz, M.A. Thomas, M.C. Kaufman, and S.P. Oliva Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 Abstract. Inter-digital line antennas are being used to test the feasibility of lower hybrid current drive in MST. The antennas use /4 resonators and launch slow waves at 800 MHz with n || ~ 7.5. Routine operation has been achieved with a good impedance match between antenna and plasma. High power antenna design improvements include larger

  1. 0. Y, ooopw

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Y, ooopw $letaIlurgical Haboratorp Irmqueat drosaing nor did It fill up* Althacgh it rpa roawnlmt ocarae, lt somod to give the best rentltr of any w hd trld. It mar l oar- bonmdullwbee1mrmbara6a3. Ontkyl8, aaae rhort plooer ofrod 2 um indhokr wro poundrt~ok prollaimry to oladdlzgdth atao Onyhy 25, ' 01110 S foottubm W I-. l oourotely ground et Olobeto b okd dthelllmimm. For N00.00~1 Ohtdhl& OXpUiWW ha &WI3 tbt tb tuba should not or bo out of round mom than about .002". 6 foot tube

  2. DESIGNATION SURVEY ADDENDUM REPORT II COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,111 DESIGNATION SURVEY ADDENDUM REPORT II COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE *I W INDSOR, CONNECTICUT 111 E. W . ABELQUIST Prepared for the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy I- II I- .:jj;jiE// .:::=::::: .ipij!li' ,:::i::.:. ..::I::::/. ,:ii~iiiiai, ..' iiiiiiiiii!!liiii~~~~,~:~:. ~i!i.~iii~' :' -' +g?' gg;; ,- ZY :i/ .:;i" .:!! .:::a .(/i?j i:/i;jl? I!kr ' -:~i~jg~;...,.;, ..,::&Si! :(j)//ji//(!: 3.. :jijiiiiiiqi:wi l~,. ,,v..::;:~/j~B/; g#;$ .;::::::::::!

  3. FROti:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    p.1, , 1' 3 ' - j ttEMORANDUtl TO: FILE - FJ+u? /WI - /3 DATE 2 /I/ / 9 / ----------^--______ FROti: D. s-f&J ---------------- SUBJECT: SITE NAME: --_-__----__-_--- _____ &----w' I+& - f*/crq ALTERNATE A t=l r---i ted ____ NAME: -----------__-________ CITY: ~+ZZL------ _______ STATE: ------ ff+$- OWNER(S) --y;;g-- && - /??#A~ ------------------------ Current: &v CA-J--;cJ Owner contacted ~--yes 0 noi -.-------me-we------- if yes, date contacted _ //t*/4/ -e-----N------

  4. CX-100172 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    72 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100172 Categorical Exclusion Determination Catalytic Processes for Production of alpha, omega-diols from Lignocellulosic Biomass Award Number: DE-EE0006878 CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.15 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 01/14/2015 Location(s): WI Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to the University of Wisconsin, Madison (UW) to develop an integrated and efficient process to produce

  5. Flexibility Reserve Reductions from an Energy Imbalance Market with High Levels of Wind Energy in the Western Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; S. Beuning

    2011-10-01

    The anticipated increase in variable generation in the Western Interconnection (WI) over the next several years has raised concerns about how to maintain system balance, especially in smaller Balancing Areas (BAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts (GW) of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. The consequent increase in variability and uncertainty that must be managed by the conventional generation fleet and responsive load make it attractive to consider ways in which Balancing Area Authorities (BAAs) can pool their variability and response resources, thus taking advantage of geographic and temporal diversity to increase overall operational efficiency. Our analysis considers several alternative forms of an Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) that have been proposed in the non-market areas of the WI. The proposed EIM includes two changes in operating practices that independently reduce variability and increase access to responsive resources: BAA cooperation and sub-hourly dispatch. As proposed, the EIM does not consider any form of coordinated unit commitment; however, over time it is possible that BAAs would develop formal or informal coordination plans. This report examines the benefits of several possible EIM implementations, both separately and in concert.

  6. A = 11B (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11B) GENERAL: See Table 11.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KU56, KU57A, BI60, TA60L, BA61D, BA61N, KO61L, KU61E, TR61, UM61, AM64, NE64C, CO65I, FA65A, FA65C, HA66F, MA66S, CO67M, FA67A, KU68A). Collective model:(BR59M, CL61D, CL62G, MA64HH, NE65E, EL66B, MI66J, RI67J, GO68). Ground state properties:(BE62L, BE63T, LI64H, LI64I, ST64, HU65C, RI66F, WI66E, BA67E, RH67A, SH67C, BA68B). Other:(SE63G, OL64A, TH64A, WI66F, BA67HH, PO67G).

  7. Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

    2009-02-26

    The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

  8. A Survey of Wireless Communications for the Electric Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyol, Bora A.; Kirkham, Harold; Clements, Samuel L.; Hadley, Mark D.

    2010-01-27

    A key mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is to enhance the security and reliability of the nation’s energy infrastructure. Improving the security of control systems, which enable the automated control of our energy production and distribution, is critical for protecting the energy infrastructure and the integral function that it serves in our lives. The DOE-OE Control Systems Security Program provides research and development to help the energy industry actively pursue advanced security solutions for control systems. The focus of this report is analyzing how, where, and what type of wireless communications are suitable for deployment in the electric power system and to inform implementers of their options in wireless technologies. The discussions in this report are applicable to enhancing both the communications infrastructure of the current electric power system and new smart system deployments. The work described in this report includes a survey of the following wireless technologies: • IEEE 802.16 d and e (WiMAX) • IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi) family of a, b, g, n, and s • Wireless sensor protocols that use parts of the IEEE 802.15.4 specification: WirelessHART, International Society of Automation (ISA) 100.11a, and Zigbee • The 2, 3, and 4 generation (G )cellular technologies of GPRS/EDGE/1xRTT, HSPA/EVDO, and Long-Term Evolution (LTE)/HSPA+UMTS.

  9. Review of the WECC EDT phase 2 EIM benefits analysis and results report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T.D.; Poch, L.A.; Botterud, A.

    2012-04-05

    A region-wide Energy Imbalance Market (EIM) was recently proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In order for the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to make more informed decisions regarding its involvement in the EIM, Western asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to review the EIM benefits study (the October 2011 revision) performed by Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3). Key components of the E3 analysis made use of results from a study conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); therefore, we also reviewed the NREL work. This report examines E3 and NREL methods and models used in the EIM study. Estimating EIM benefits is very challenging because of the complex nature of the Western Interconnection (WI), the variability and uncertainty of renewable energy resources, and the complex decisions and potentially strategic bidding of market participants. Furthermore, methodologies used for some of the more challenging aspects of the EIM have not yet matured. This review is complimentary of several components of the EIM study. Analysts and modelers clearly took great care when conducting detailed simulations of the WI using well-established industry tools under stringent time and budget constraints. However, it is our opinion that the following aspects of the study and the interpretation of model results could be improved upon in future analyses. The hurdle rate methodology used to estimate current market inefficiencies does not directly model the underlying causes of sub-optimal dispatch and power flows. It assumes that differences between historical flows and modeled flows can be attributed solely to market inefficiencies. However, flow differences between model results and historical data can be attributed to numerous simplifying assumptions used in the model and in the input data. We suggest that alternative approaches be explored in order to better estimate the benefits of introducing market

  10. Intrusion detection and monitoring for wireless networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Eric D.; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Lee, Erik J.; Stephano, Amanda; Tabriz, Parisa; Pelon, Kristen; McCoy, Damon (University of Colorado, Boulder); Lodato, Mark; Hemingway, Franklin; Custer, Ryan P.; Averin, Dimitry; Franklin, Jason; Kilman, Dominique Marie

    2005-11-01

    Wireless computer networks are increasing exponentially around the world. They are being implemented in both the unlicensed radio frequency (RF) spectrum (IEEE 802.11a/b/g) and the licensed spectrum (e.g., Firetide [1] and Motorola Canopy [2]). Wireless networks operating in the unlicensed spectrum are by far the most popular wireless computer networks in existence. The open (i.e., proprietary) nature of the IEEE 802.11 protocols and the availability of ''free'' RF spectrum have encouraged many producers of enterprise and common off-the-shelf (COTS) computer networking equipment to jump into the wireless arena. Competition between these companies has driven down the price of 802.11 wireless networking equipment and has improved user experiences with such equipment. The end result has been an increased adoption of the equipment by businesses and consumers, the establishment of the Wi-Fi Alliance [3], and widespread use of the Alliance's ''Wi-Fi'' moniker to describe these networks. Consumers use 802.11 equipment at home to reduce the burden of running wires in existing construction, facilitate the sharing of broadband Internet services with roommates or neighbors, and increase their range of ''connectedness''. Private businesses and government entities (at all levels) are deploying wireless networks to reduce wiring costs, increase employee mobility, enable non-employees to access the Internet, and create an added revenue stream to their existing business models (coffee houses, airports, hotels, etc.). Municipalities (Philadelphia; San Francisco; Grand Haven, MI) are deploying wireless networks so they can bring broadband Internet access to places lacking such access; offer limited-speed broadband access to impoverished communities; offer broadband in places, such as marinas and state parks, that are passed over by traditional broadband providers; and provide themselves with higher quality, more complete network coverage for use by emergency responders and other

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State-Level Energy Consumption Estimates and Estimated Consumption per Capita, 2010 Consumption Consumption per Capita 14 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 TX CA FL LA IL OH PA NY GA IN MI NC VA NJ TN WA KY AL MO MN WI SC OK CO IA MD AZ MA MS KS AR OR NE UT CT WV NM NV AK WY ID ND ME MT SD NH HI DE RI DC VT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 0 2 4 6 8 10

  12. OFFICE FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFFICE FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 155OP STREETNW. WiSHINGTON. D.C. ' , iQns 25,19&L At-t :. I' .' ~ at l530 P Btmat, IO&, XtwMn&m, 0. 6., at 9130 A.Jb Sa 1 llmbemupoftbaaomlttaal8~f~r :::i.: :;::j:/ :::.,:.,::: . . . -2, . -3- .,... .:.:. . . ,::;:: 2. lktlv4rsityof-ta ?oral8rtbnsfoaofth4~cnlLmd farumd4rContraotO~~9 t4a : lwlnde the d4v4logmullt. construotion j andop4ratloaofadditl~auls, s~tNm4t4ln. /; ./ 3. alllY4rsltyofcb.l4s&o on4fth4w*callyd sar tmdor OoBtroct OEUS~ 7 :;::.

  13. RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 , RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V : w ~?g+QZ FM USAEC NYK @5 TO USAEC LEMUMT Ill.. AEC WWC ; I _. _' FOR A TAMwsflO h@G NR tt0 PD Tti18~18~~10 APPROVE pf TWJNTY GRAM8 ENRICHED 1 '. , URANlUM TO 8YLyANI~q FOR W8E. IWTREPARIWG~F~VE U&AN,!UU SLUGS 7/.8 lF4j34 ' .' : ' . ~ , . LQ~JG m S/8 1%~ ~IAhiiilER pa THE-DIE WI& CW!. APOROX 300 DOLLARS Am " , SIX ~uN-~Y# WILL BE REQI!!REl! FW WJG FA~ICf' TlW PD ?eJJRCt+A= @ fmR woull] BE m OUT to 8YLVANIA AND WNT TO, V L PAf?SEGIAN Cy

  14. Home Area Networks and the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Hadley, Mark D.

    2011-04-01

    With the wide array of home area network (HAN) options being presented as solutions to smart grid challenges for the home, it is time to compare and contrast their strengths and weaknesses. This white paper examines leading and emerging HAN technologies. The emergence of the smart grid is bringing more networking players into the field. The need for low consistent bandwidth usage differs enough from the traditional information technology world to open the door to new technologies. The predominant players currently consist of a blend of the old and new. Within the wired world Ethernet and HomePlug Green PHY are leading the way with an advantage to HomePlug because it doesn't require installing new wires. In the wireless the realm there are many more competitors but WiFi and ZigBee seem to have the most momentum.

  15. A Process and Environment Aware Sierra/SolidMechanics Cohesive Zone Modeling Capability for Polymer/Solid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reedy, E. D.; Chambers, Robert S.; Hughes, Lindsey Gloe; Kropka, Jamie Michael; Stavig, Mark E.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    The performance and reliability of many mechanical and electrical components depend on the integrity of po lymer - to - solid interfaces . Such interfaces are found in adhesively bonded joints, encapsulated or underfilled electronic modules, protective coatings, and laminates. The work described herein was aimed at improving Sandia's finite element - based capability to predict interfacial crack growth by 1) using a high fidelity nonlinear viscoelastic material model for the adhesive in fracture simulations, and 2) developing and implementing a novel cohesive zone fracture model that generates a mode - mixity dependent toughness as a natural consequence of its formulation (i.e., generates the observed increase in interfacial toughness wi th increasing crack - tip interfacial shear). Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations were used to study fundamental material/interfa cial physics so as to develop a fuller understanding of the connection between molecular structure and failure . Also reported are test results that quantify how joint strength and interfacial toughness vary with temperature.

  16. craig_IAEA.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EX/P5-3 New Observations Concerning the Origin and Consequences of MHD Activity in the MST Reversed Field Pinch D. Craig 1), A.F. Almagri 1), J.K. Anderson 1), D.L. Brower 2), B.E. Chapman 1), S.H. Choi 1), D.J. Den Hartog 1), W.X. Ding 2), F. Ebrahimi 1), G. Fiksel 1), R. Fitzpatrick 3), C.B. Forest 1), P. Martin 4), L. Marrelli 4), R. O'Connell 1), P. Piovesan 4), S.C. Prager 1), J.S. Sarff 1), G. Spizzo 4) 1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI USA and the Center for Magnetic Self-

  17. 9978 AND 9975 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogle, R.

    2012-05-07

    The objective of this report is to document the findings from a series of proof-of-concept tests performed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R and D Engineering, for the DOE Packaging Certification Program to determine if a viable radio link could be established from within the stainless steel confines of several drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packagings. Two in-hand, off-the-shelf radio systems were tested. The first system was a Wi-Fi Librestream Onsight{trademark} camera with a Fortress ES820 Access Point and the second was the On-Ramp Wireless Ultra-Link Processing{trademark} (ULP) radio system. These radio systems were tested within the Model 9975 and 9978 Type B packagings at the SRNL. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

  18. A=10B (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10B) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 10.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966WI1E, 1967CO32, 1967EV1C, 1967HS1A, 1967PI1B, 1968GO01, 1969VA1C, 1970CO1H, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973JO1K, 1973KU03, 1973SA30). Cluster and α-particle model: (1965NE1B, 1967TA1C, 1969BA1J, 1969HU1F, 1969NA1M, 1970NA06, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03). Special levels: (1967CO32, 1967HS1A, 1968GO01,

  19. A=11Be (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11Be) GENERAL: See also (1985AJ01) and Table 11.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1984MI1H, 1984VA06, 1986WI04). Electromagnetic transitions:(1984MI1H, 1984VA06, 1987HO1L). Complex reactions involving 11Be:(1985BO1A, 1986AV1B, 1987TR05, 1987WA09, 1988BA53, 1988RU01, 1988TA1N, 1988TR03, 1989SA10). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions:(1984KO24). Hypernuclei:(1985IK1A, 1986ME1F). Other topics:(1984MI1H, 1985AN28, 1986AN07).

  20. A=11Be (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) GENERAL: Mass of 11Be: From the decay energy, 11Be(β-)11B, and using the Wapstra mass (WA55C) for 11B, the mass excess of 11Be, M - A = 23.39 ± 0.15 MeV (WI59). The binding energies of a neutron, deuteron and triton in 11Be are, respectively, 0.54, 18.4 and 15.76 MeV. 1. 11Be(β-)11B Qm = 11.48 The decay proceeds to 11Bg.s. and to several excited states. For the ground-state transition, Eβ(max) = 11.48 ± 0.15 MeV; τ1/2 = 13.57 ± 0.15 sec, log ft = 6.77 (AL58E,

  1. A=12Be (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 12Be) GENERAL: See also (1968AJ02) and Table 12.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Special reactions: (1965GI10, 1969AR13, 1971AR02, 1972VO06, 1973KO1D). General review: (1974CE1A). Theoretical papers: (1971DO1F, 1972ST1C, 1973WI15, 1974IR04, 1974MA1E). Mass of 12Be: The Q-value of the 14C(18O, 20Ne)12Be reaction [-15.77 ± 0.05 MeV] (1974BA15) leads to an atomic mass excess of 25.05 ± 0.05 MeV; that for the 7Li(7Li, 2p)12Be reaction [Q = -9.71 ±

  2. A=12Be (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    85AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12Be) GENERAL: See also (1980AJ01) and Table 12.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theoretical papers:(1979KO29, 1981AV02, 1981SE06, 1982NG01, 1983ANZQ, 1983MI1E, 1984VA06). Hypernuclei:(1980GA1P, 1982IK1A, 1982KA1D, 1982PO1C, 1983BR1E, 1983DO1B, 1983MI1E, 1984DO04). Other topics:(1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984HI1A). Mass of 12Be: The Q-value of the 10Be(t, p) reaction (-4809 ± 15 keV) (1978AL29) leads to an atomic mass excess of 25077 ± 15 keV for

  3. A=13C (1970AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13C) GENERAL: See Table 13.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1959BR1E, 1960PH1A, 1960TA1C, 1960ZE1B, 1961BA1G, 1961BA1E, 1961KU17, 1961KU1C, 1961NE1B, 1962EA01, 1963BO1G, 1963MA1E, 1963PE04, 1963SE19, 1963TR02, 1964AM1D, 1964NA1D, 1964ST1B, 1965CO25, 1965MA1T, 1965ME1C, 1965NE1C, 1965WE1D, 1966EL08, 1966GU08, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966NO1B, 1966RI12, 1966WI1E, 1967BA12, 1967CO32, 1967FA1A, 1967HU1C, 1967KU1E, 1967PO1J, 1967RI1B,

  4. A=13N (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13N) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 13.14 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1983SH38). Special states: (1981KO1Q, 1983AU1B, 1983WI15, 1984RO05). Electromagnetic transitions:(1980BA54, 1980RI06, 1981KO1Q, 1983AD1B, 1984MA2J). Astrophysical questions: (1980BA1P, 1983LI01, 1985GI1C). Applied work: (1982BO1N, 1982HA1V, 1982HI1H, 1982MA1T, 1982PI1H, 1982YA1C, 1983HA1W, 1983KO1Q, 1984HI1D, 1984MO1Q, 1984MO1R, 1984NI1C). Complex

  5. A=14B (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14B) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 14.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models: (1981SE06, 1984VA06). Complex reactions involving 14B: (1983WI1A, 1984HI1A). Pion capture and reactions: (1983TR1J). Hypernuclei: (1981WA1J, 1982KA1D, 1983FE07). Other topics: (1984PO11). Ground state of 14B: (1983ANZQ). Mass of 14B: We adopt the Wapstra atomic mass excess for 14B: 23664 ± 21 keV. See also (1981NA1H). 1. 14B(β-)14C Qm = 20.64 14B

  6. A=15C (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15C) GENERAL: See also (1970AJ04) and Table 15.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1973PH03, 1973RE17). Special levels: (1973PH03, 1974VA24). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1973BE16, 1973BU20). Pion capture and reactions: (1970JA11). Special reactions: (1971AR02, 1973KO1D, 1973WI15, 1974KO25, 1975UD01). Other topics: (1970SU1B, 1973PH03, 1973RE17, 1974VA24, 1975BE31). 1. 15C(β-)15N Qm = 9.772 The half-life is

  7. A=15C (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15C) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 15.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(1983ANZQ, 1984VA06). Electromagnetic transitions:(1980RI06). Complex reactions involving 15C:(1981GR08, 1983BE02, 1983EN04, 1983FR1A, 1983HO08, 1983MA06, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984HI1A, 1984HO23). Pion capture and reactions:(1981OS04). Hypernuclei:(1981WA1J, 1982KA1D, 1983DO1B, 1983FE07, 1983KO1V, 1984AS1D). Other topics:(1984PO11). Ground state

  8. A=15N (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15N) GENERAL: See Table 15.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(HA57B, BR59M, FE59E, TA60L, BA61N, BU63D, KU63I, MA64HH, CO65I, FA65A, GR65E, GU65A, ZA65B, EL66B, SO66A, CO67M, EL67C, PA67K, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, SH68D, WA68E, ZH68A, CH69, EL69B). General calculations and reviews:(EV64, BE65G, OL66B, WI66E, FA67A, LO67E, BI68C, ZH68, HA69M, IW69A). Electromagnetic transitions:(RO65O, HA66O, PO66F, RO66C, RO66M, WA66D, KU67J,

  9. A=15O (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15O) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 15.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models:(1982WA1Q, 1982YA1D, 1983SH38). Special states:(1979GO27, 1980GO1Q, 1980HI1C, 1984ST1E). Electromagentic transitions:(1980KO1L, 1980MI1G, 1980RI06, 1982AW02, 1983TO08, 1984CA02). Astrophysical questions:(1980BA1P, 1981WA1Q, 1983LI01, 1985GI1C). Complex reactions involving 15O:(1981HU1D, 1981SC1P, 1983DE26, 1983FR1A, 1983JA05, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A,

  10. A=16C (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    77AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 16C) GENERAL: See also (1971AJ02) and Table 16.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Experimental work: (1971AR02, 1973KO1D). Reviews: (1972CE1A, 1973TO16, 1974TH01). Theory: (1972ST1C, 1973RE17, 1973WI15, 1975BE31, 1976BE1G). 1. 16C(β-)16N Qm = 8.011 The half-life of 16C is 0.747 ± 0.008 sec: it decays to 16N*(3.36, 4.32) [both Jπ = 1+] with branchings of 84% and 16% respectively [log ft = 3.55, 3.83]; see Table 16.2 (in PDF or PS) (1976AL02). See

  11. A=16C (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 16C) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 16.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models: (1982LA26, 1984SA37). Complex reactions involving 16C: (1982FI10, 1983FR1A, 1983WI1A, 1984HI1A, 1985PO11, 1986CS1A). Hypernuclei (States observed in the 16O(K-, π+) reaction at EK- = 450 MeV/c are interpreted as due to the recoil-less production of Σ- particles in the p3/2 and p1/2 orbits of the Σ16C hypernucleus (1985BE31).): (1982DO1L,

  12. A=16N (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 16N) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 16.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1984BA24, 1984KA1H, 1984VA06). Complex reactions involving 16N: (1981ME13, 1981OL1C, 1983EN04, 1983FR1A, 1983MA06, 1983OL1A, 1983PL1A, 1983SA06, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A, 1984HO23, 1984KA1H, 1985BE40, 1985PO11, 1986HA1P). Reactions involving muons nad neutrinos (See also reaction 14.): (1981GM02, 1981TO16, 1983EG03, 1983JA10, 1984JA06,

  13. A=17B (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (Not illustrated) 17B has been observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of uranium: it is particle stable and its ground state Jπ is probably 3/2- (1973BO30, 1974BO05). Its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 44.37 MeV (transverse form of the mass equation): it is then stable with respect to decay into 15B + 2n by 0.53 MeV (1974TH01, 1975JE02). The Eβ-(max) for the decay to 17C would then be 23.1 MeV. See also (1971AJ02) and (1972GA1F, 1972TH13, 1972WI1C, 1975BE31

  14. Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2006-04-15

    The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

  15. Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckler, Edward S; Casler, Michael D; Cherney, Jerome H

    2012-01-20

    This project had six objectives, four of which have been completed: 1) Association panels of diverse populations and linkage populations for switchgrass and reed canarygrass (~1,000 clones each) were assembled and planted in two sites (Ithaca, NY and Arlington, WI); 2) Key biofeedstock characteristics were evaluated in these panels for three field seasons; 3) High density SNP markers were developed in switchgrass; and 4) Switchgrass association panels and linkage populations were genotyped. The remaining two original objectives will be met in the next year, as the analyses are completed and papers published: 5) Switchgrass population structure and germplasm diversity will be evaluated; and 6) Association mapping will be established and marker based breeding values estimated in switchgrass. We also completed a study of the chromosome-number variation found in switchgrass.

  16. Public knowledge and perceptions of chemical risks in six communities: Analysis of a baseline survey. Final report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallum, D.B.; Hammond, S.L.; Morris, L.A.; Covello, V.T.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of public knowledge and perceptions of chemical risk was conducted in six communities. The purpose was to establish a baseline for evaluating change over time in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in response to new information about toxic chemicals, especially as related to Superfund, the Community Right-to-Know Law (SARA Title III), and other risk communication activities. During July and August, 1988, over 500 citizens responded to a 25-minute telephone survey in each city: Albuquerque NM, Cincinnati, OH, Durham NC, Middlesex County NJ, Racine WI, and Richmond VA. The report provides an overview of how citizens in these communities view environmental risks, and how the communities differ in their basic knowledge and attitudes about such risks. Recommendations are provided, for use in preparing risk communication programs and materials.

  17. 10Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm(T1/2) for 10Li Adopted value: 2.0 ± 0.5 zs (2003AU02) Measured Mass Excess for 10Li Adopted value: 33051 ± 15 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1975WI26: 9Be(9Be, 8B), E = 121 MeV; measured σ(E(8B), θ); deduced Q. 10Li deduced mass excess. 1990AM05: 11B(π-, X), E at rest; measured inclusive p-, d-, t-spectra, X = 10Li production. 10Li deduced level, Γ. 1992AMZY: 11B(π-, X), E at rest; measured pion, deuteron, triton spectra. 10Li

  18. 11Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1958AL96: 11Be; measured T1/2. 1958NU40: 11Be; measured T1/2. 1959WI49: 11Be; measured T1/2. 1970AL21: 11Be; measured T1/2. 1971AL07: 11Be; measured T1/2, Eγ, Iγ, delayed α-spectra, αγ-coin; deduced log ft. 11B deduced levels, γ-branching. 1971ALZT: 11Be; measured Eγ, Iγ, Eα, Iα; deduced log ft. 11B deduced levels, J, π. 1980DEZF: 11Li; measured Eβ, Iβ, β-delayed (particle)(particle)-coin. 11Be deduced new decay modes. 11Be levels deduced

  19. 13B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1962MA19: 13B; deduced nuclear properties. 1968CH28: 13B; measured T1/2, delayed n(t); deduced log ft, delayed n/β-branching ratio. 1969JO21: 13B; measured βγ-coin, Eβ, β delayed n-delay; deduced log ft, β-branching. 13C deduced levels, J, π, neutron-emitting states. 1971WI07: 13B; measured T1/2; deduced ft ratios. 1974AL12: 13B; measured βn-coin; deduced log ft. 13C deduced level, J, π. 1988SA04: 13B; measured β-decay T1/2. 1994RE1R, 1991RE02:

  20. 13N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1950HO01: 13N. 1953CH34: 13N. 1954GR66: 13N. 1955WI43: 13N. 1957DA08: 13N. 1957DE22: 13N. 1957NO17: 13N. 1958AR15: 13N. 1958DA09: 13N. 1960JA12: 13N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960KI02: 13N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965BO42: 13N; measured T1/2. 1965EB01: 13N; measured T1/2. 1968RI15: 13N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1971GO40: 13N. 1973SIYS: 13N; measured T1/2. 1977AZ01: 13N;

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Home Performance with ENERGY STAR, Completed Jobs Rank Program Sponsor State 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total (2) 1 NY State Energy R&D Authority NY 4,301 5,206 6,343 6122 26209 2 National Grid MA 2,536 2,351 6,259 10019 26017 3 Austin Energy TX 1,950 2,223 2,773 2633 12579 4 Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corp. WI 840 1,012 1,944 2176 8717 5 New Jersey Board of Public Utilities NJ 17 163 1,138 4365 5686 6 Energy Trust of Oregon OR 560 1,040 767 777 3156 7 Sacramento Municipal Utility District (1)

  2. Microsoft Word - figure_14.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    42 Figure 14. Net interstate movements, imports, and exports of natural gas in the United States, 2014 (million cubic feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Yemen Trinidad/ Tobago Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI Other TX IN MA RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC VT MA NH MA WA M T I D O R W Y ND SD C A N V U T CO NE KS A Z NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR M S AL GA T N KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI A K Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada

  3. A=18F (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18F) GENERAL: See also (1959AJ76) and Table 18.10 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1957WI1E, 1959BR1E, 1960TA1C, 1961TR1B, 1962TA1D, 1964FE02, 1964IN03, 1964PA1D, 1964YO1B, 1965BA1J, 1965DE1H, 1965GI1B, 1966BA2E, 1966BA2C, 1966HU09, 1966IN01, 1966KU05, 1966RI1F, 1967EN01, 1967EV1C, 1967FE01, 1967FL01, 1967HO11, 1967IN03, 1967KU09, 1967KU13, 1967LY02, 1967MO1J, 1967PA1K, 1967PI1B, 1967VI1B, 1967WO1C, 1968AR02, 1968BE1T, 1968BH1B,

  4. A=18N (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78AJ03) (See the Isobar Diagram for 18N) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 18.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See (1972GA1F, 1973TO16, 1973WI15, 1974TH01, 1975BE31, 1977AR06). 1. 18N(β-)18O Qm = 14.06 The half-life of 18N is 0.63 ± 0.03 sec (1964CH19): Eβ(max) = 9.4 ± 0.4 MeV. The decay is to 18O*(4.46), which subsequently decays via 18O*(3.63, 1.98) [see reaction 21 in 18O]. The allowed nature [log ft = 4.88] of the decay to the 1- state at 4.46 MeV leads to Jπ = 0-, 1- or

  5. A=18N (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 18N) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 18.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See (1981NA1H, 1983ANZQ, 1983FR1A, 1983SH44, 1983WI1A, 1984AS1D, 1984HI1A, 1986AN07, 1986BI1A, 1986HA1B, 1986MA48, 1986ME1F, 1987RI03). Mass of 18N:The atomic mass excess derived from the Q-value of the 18O(7Li, 7Be)18N reaction is 13.117 ± 0.020 MeV (1983PU01). 18N is then stable with respect to breakup into 17N + n by 2.825 MeV. See (1983AJ01) for the earlier work. 1.

  6. A=18Ne (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See Table 18.23 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell and cluster model calculations: (1957WI1E, 1969BE1T, 1970BA2E, 1970EL08, 1970HA49, 1972KA01). Electromagnetic transitions: (1970EL08, 1970HA49). Special levels: (1966MI1G, 1969KA29, 1972KA01). Pion reactions: (1965PA1F). Other theoretical calculations: (1965GO1F, 1966KE16, 1968BA2H, 1968BE1V, 1968MU1B, 1968NE1C, 1968VA1J, 1968VA24, 1969BA1Z, 1969GA1G, 1969KA29, 1969MU09, 1969RA28,

  7. A=18O (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18O) GENERAL: See also (1959AJ76) and Table 18.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1957WI1E, 1960TA1C, 1962HO1C, 1962TA1B, 1962TA1D, 1963HA05, 1963PA03, 1963SA07, 1964CO24, 1964IN03, 1964MC1A, 1964PA1D, 1964WA1F, 1965BA1J, 1965BE1T, 1965DE1H, 1965EL06, 1965EN02, 1965FE1B, 1965FE02, 1965NA1A, 1965ZA1B, 1966AR10, 1966BA2E, 1966BA2C, 1966BO25, 1966BR1R, 1966HU09, 1966IN01, 1966KU05, 1966LA1E, 1966LE11, 1966RI1F, 1966RO01, 1967BA04,

  8. A=19Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 19.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models:(1983BR29, 1983PO02). Special states: (1983BI1C, 1983BR29, 1983PO02, 1986AN07). Electromagnetic transitions: (1982BR24, 1983BR29, 1985AL21). Astrophysical questions: (1981WA1Q, 1982WI1B, 1986LA07). Applications:(1982BO1N). Complex reactions involving 19Ne:(1981DE1P, 1983JA05, 1984GR08, 1985BE40, 1986GR1A, 1986HA1B, 1987RI03). Pion capture and reactions (See

  9. A=20F (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20F) GENERAL: See Table 20.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1959BR1E, 1963KU19, 1964MO1E, 1965DE1H, 1965DE1M, 1966CH1G, 1966PI1B, 1967BO09, 1967GU05, 1967GU1D, 1968AR02, 1968CO11, 1968GU1E, 1968HA17, 1968HA1P, 1969HO32, 1970AN27, 1970BA66, 1971AR25, 1971JO01, 1971WI01). Other theoretical calculations: (1967ST1N, 1968CE1A, 1968DW1A, 1969SC14, 1971LE1H, 1971TE06). General experimental work: (1970FA01, 1971AR02). Ground state: μ

  10. A=20N (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (Not illustrated) 20N has been observed. It is particle stable: see (1972AJ02). Recent calculations of the atomic mass excess of 20N are 21.67 MeV (1974TH01), 21.60 (1975JE02; transverse form of IMME), 21.88 (1976JA23) and 22.2 MeV (1977WA08). Assuming that the atomic mass excess is 22.0 MeV, 20N is then stable with respect to 19N + n by 1.9 MeV (see 19N). See also (1972TH13, 1973TO16, 1975VO09, 1976WA18, 1977AR06, 1977BH1B) and (1973WI15, 1975BE31; theor.

  11. A=20N (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (Not illustrated) 20N is particle stable. Its atomic mass excess is 21.64 ± 0.26 MeV (1986VI09), 22.20 ± 0.36 MeV (1986GI10), 21.62 ± 0.14 MeV (1987GI1E). We adopt 21.62 ± 0.14 MeV. 20N is then stable with respect to 19N + n by 2.32 MeV (see 19N). The half-life of 20N is 100+30-20 msec, Pn ~ 61% (1987MU1J; prelim.). See also (1984KL06; theor.). See also (1985PIZZ, 1986PI09), (1983WI1A, 1984HI1A, 1986AN07, 1986GU1D) and (1983ANZQ; theor.

  12. A=20Na (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See Table 20.35 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 20Na: From the threshold energy of the 20Ne(p, n)20Na reaction, Ethresh. = 15.419 ± 0.006 MeV, the atomic mass excess of 20Na is 6.850 ± 0.006 MeV (1971GO18, 1971WI07). See also (1964GA1C, 1966GA25, 1966KE16, 1969HA38). 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.892 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of excited states which decay by α-emission to the ground state of

  13. A=20Na (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 20.39 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). (1973HA77, 1973SU1B, 1974HA17, 1976CH1T, 1977SH13). J = 2 (1975SC20); μ = 0.3694 ± 0.0002 nm (1975SC20). 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.887 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of other excited states of 20Ne: see Table 20.37 (in PDF or PS). The half-life of 20Na is 442 ± 5 msec (1971GO18, 1971WI07), 446 ± 8 msec (1972MO08), 448 ± 4 msec

  14. A=5Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 5.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model discussions: (1984ZW1A, 1985BA68, 1985FI1E, 1985KW02). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983FE07, 1984BE1B, 1984FI20, 1984GL1C, 1984VA1C, 1984ZW1A, 1985BA68, 1985FI1E, 1985PO18, 1985PO19, 1985WI1A, 1987SV1A, 1988BA86, 1988KW02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1985FI1E, 1987KR16). Astrophysical questions: (1984BA74, 1984SU1A, 1985BO1E, 1986HU1D). Complex reactions

  15. A=6He (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6He) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 6.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model Calculations: (1979SH1C, 1980FI1D, 1981KU13, 1982FI13, 1982KR1B, 1982LE11, 1982VO01). Special states: (1982FI13, 1983DE16, 1983KR05, 1983LE01). Electromagnetic transitions: (1982AW02). Complex reactions involving 6He: (1978DU1B, 1978VO1A, 1979BO22, 1979VI05, 1980BO31, 1980WI1L, 1981BO1X, 1981CU05, 1981VO10, 1982BO1Q, 1982BO35, 1982BO1Y, 1982GU1H, 1982HE1D,

  16. A=6Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1966BA26, 1966GA1E, 1966HA18, 1966WI1E, 1967BO1C, 1967CO32, 1967PI1B, 1967WO1B, 1968BO1N, 1968CO13, 1968GO01, 1968LO1C, 1968VA1H, 1969GU10, 1969RA1C, 1969SA1C, 1969VA1C, 1970LA1D, 1970SU13, 1970ZO1A, 1971CO28, 1971JA06, 1971LO03, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1972LO1M, 1972VE07, 1973HA49, 1973JO1K, 1973KU03). Cluster and α-particle model:

  17. A=6Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978CH1D, 1978ST19, 1979CA06, 1980MA41, 1981BO1Y, 1982BA52, 1982FI13, 1982LO09). Cluster and α-particle models: (1978OS07, 1978PL1A, 1978RE1A, 1978SI14, 1979BE39, 1979CA06, 1979LU1A, 1979WI1B, 1980BA04, 1980KU1G, 1981BE1K, 1981HA1Y, 1981KR1J, 1981KU13, 1981VE04, 1981ZH1D, 1982AH09, 1982CH10, 1982GO1G, 1982JI1A, 1982KA24, 1982KR1B, 1982KR09, 1982KU05,

  18. A=8Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 8.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Special states: (1980OK01). Complex reactions involving 8Li: (1978BO1B, 1978DU1B, 1979BO22, 1979IV1A, 1980AN1T, 1980BO31, 1980GR10, 1980WI1L, 1981BO1X, 1981MO20, 1982BO35, 1982BO1Y, 1982GO1E, 1982GU1H, 1982MO1N). Muon and neutrino interactions: (1978BA1G). Reactions involving pions and other mesons: (1977VE1C, 1979BA16, 1980HA29, 1981JU1A, 1981NI03, 1982HA57).

  19. A=8Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 8.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models: (1983KU17, 1983SH38, 1984MO1H, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1988WO04). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983KU17, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1986XU02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1983KU17). Astrophysics: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 8Li: (1983FR1A, 1983GU1A, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A, 1984LA27, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MA13, 1985MO17, 1986AV1B,

  20. A=9B (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 9.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1977HO1F, 1977OK01, 1978HO1E). Special levels: (1974IR04, 1975WI1E, 1976IR1B, 1978HO1E). Astrophysical questions: (1977SI1D). Pion reactions: (1974KA07). Other topics: (1974HA1C, 1974IR04, 1976IR1B). Ground state properties: (1975BE31, 1977OK01). 1. (a) 6Li(3He, n)8B Qm = -1.975 Eb = 16.603 (b) 6Li(3He, p)8Be Qm = 16.7878 (c) 6Li(3He, d)7Be Qm = 0.113

  1. A=9Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965GR18, 1965VO1A, 1966AD06, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966WI1E, 1967CO32, 1967ST1C, 1968GO01, 1969BO1V, 1969BO19, 1969BO33, 1969GU03, 1969VA1C, 1970CO1H, 1971CO28, 1971GR02, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Aplha and cluster models: (1965NE1B, 1966HI1A, 1967TA1C, 1968KU1B, 1969BA1J, 1969NE1C, 1970BA1Q, 1971LE1N, 1971NO02,

  2. A=9C (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: See (55AJ61, SW56A, GR64C, WI64E, JA65C, WO65). Mass of 9C: The atomic mass excess of 9C is 28.99 ± 0.07 MeV: see 12C(3He, 6He)9C (CE65). 1. 9C(β+)9B → 8Be + p Qm = 16.76 Two groups of delayed protons are observed, indicating a component of the β+ decay to a level of 9B at 12.05 ± 0.2 MeV with Γ = 800 ± 100 keV which then decays to p + 8Be(0) and 8Be*(2.9). The half-life is 127 ± 3 msec. The allowed character of the decay suggests Jπ =

  3. A=9Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26). Special reactions: (1965DO13, 1966GA15, 1966KL1C, 1967AU1B, 1967CA1J, 1967HA10, 1968DO1C, 1972VO06, 1973KO1D, 1973MU12, 1973WI15). Other topics: (1972CA37, 1972PN1A, 1973JU2A). Ground state properties: (1966BA26, , 1969JA1M). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value of 18O(7Li, 16O)9Li, the atomic mass excess of 9Li is 24.9654 ± 0.005 MeV (1969NE1E; prelim.

  4. A=9Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1983KU17, 1984CH24, 1984VA06). Special states: (1983KU17, 1984VA06). Electromagnetic interactions: (1983KU17). Astrophysical questions: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MO17, 1986CS1A, 1986HA1B, 1986SA30, 1986WE1C, 1987BA38, 1987CH26, 1987JA06, 1987KO1Z, 1987SH1K, 1987TAZU, 1987WA09,

  5. 20Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1951SH38: 20Na; measured T1/2. 1953HO01: 20Na; measured T1/2. 1964MA44, 1969MAZT: 20Na; measured T1/2, α-spectrum; deduced β-branching. 20Ne deduced levels α-width. 1967SU05: 20Na; measured T1/2; deduced nuclear properties. 1970OA01: 20Na; measured T1/2, βα-coin, βα(θ). 1971GO18: 20Na; measured T1/2; deduced mass excess. 1971MA09: 20Na; measured β-delayed α-spectra; deduced βν anisotropy coefficients. 1971WI07: 20Na; measured T1/2; deduced ft

  6. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN I -. . Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1956 I. H.# 984 Sample Nos. l2 Date Collected- o/2g by&- Route to J" Location SSi4.X CUiTn! CXJitP. Type of Sample&-dust Analyzed for F Alpha x Remarks P~UXC~JGIi.' ON. 14lCI11~ U Beta - IIoll0Wi.n~ slucs - NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. 7573p Hour Sample Description 1355 CZ Orxxator sets slul: into place, closes shield over machine S starts &ill. oil coolant flows through hollow drill ____

  7. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , . d Sepmber 20, 1976 . e E. K. Limp, Chfdf, Process Facilities Safety liranch, ~%&iCj kP3RT uF FlhimiiS : &TECH SPECSALlY S-EL Cuwr)wTIa:i On huyusf 19, 1976, Fred F, Ha_ytaod, DRdL, and I visttdd be A?j-TzcILi - planf in ' dardrvlltit, ;ic# YorX, to i3ake a orelir;linary assczimx~f of tile radIo?ocjical status of facilities ut47fzad durfnb3 lW-51 for X': contract mrk f WI 1 vi n.; urd a. GcLwter, Ham r4tina+r, ;iismssicms warz &id ' cliL1 :Ir. tionalj fir. Ted Ckx, mo Has fmf 1

  8. Transmission Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale Solar Engagement within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, J.; Hurlbut, D.; Milligan, M.; Coles, L.; Green, B.

    2011-11-01

    This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. Market barriers unrelated to technology often limit the expansion of utility-scale solar power, even in areas with exceptional resource potential. Many of these non-technical barriers have to do with policy, regulation, and planning, and hardly ever do they resolve themselves in a timely fashion. In most cases, pre-emptive intervention by interested stakeholders is the easiest way to remove/address such barriers, but it requires knowing how to navigate the institutional waters of the relevant agencies and boards. This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. It focuses on the Western Interconnection (WI), primarily because the quality of solar resources in the Southwest makes utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) economically feasible, and because the relevant institutions have evolved in a way that has opened up opportunities for removing non-technical market barriers. Developers will find in this report a high-level field manual to identify the venues for mitigating and possibly eliminating systemic market obstacles and ensuring that the economic playing field is reasonably level. Project-specific issues such as siting for transmission and generation resources are beyond the scope of this report. Instead, the aim is to examine issues that pervasively affect all utility-scale PV and CSP in the region regardless of where the project may be. While the focus is on the WI, many of the institutions described here also have their counterparts in the Eastern and the Texas interconnections. Specifically, this report suggests a number of critical engagement points relating to generation and transmission planning.

  9. EV Charging Through Wireless Power Transfer: Analysis of Efficiency Optimization and Technology Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John M; Rakouth, Heri; Suh, In-Soo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is aimed at reviewing the technology trends for wireless power transfer (WPT) for electric vehicles (EV). It also analyzes the factors affecting its efficiency and describes the techniques currently used for its optimization. The review of the technology trends encompasses both stationary and moving vehicle charging systems. The study of the stationary vehicle charging technology is based on current implementations and on-going developments at WiTricity and Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). The moving vehicle charging technology is primarily described through the results achieved by the Korean Advanced Institute of Technology (KAIST) along with on-going efforts at Stanford University. The factors affecting the efficiency are determined through the analysis of the equivalent circuit of magnetic resonant coupling. The air gap between both transmitting and receiving coils along with the magnetic field distribution and the relative impedance mismatch between the related circuits are the primary factors affecting the WPT efficiency. Currently the industry is looking at an air gap of 25 cm or below. To control the magnetic field distribution, Kaist has recently developed the Shaped Magnetic Field In Resonance (SMFIR) technology that uses conveniently shaped ferrite material to provide low reluctance path. The efficiency can be further increased by means of impedance matching. As a result, Delphi's implementation of the WiTricity's technology exhibits a WPT efficiency above 90% for stationary charging while KAIST has demonstrated a maximum efficiency of 83% for moving vehicle with its On Line Vehicle (OLEV) project. This study is restricted to near-field applications (short and mid-range) and does not address long-range technology such as microwave power transfer that has low efficiency as it is based on radiating electromagnetic waves. This paper exemplifies Delphi's work in powertrain electrification as part of its innovation for the real world program geared

  10. MicroRNA Regulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Premature Senescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Yong; Scheiber, Melissa N.; Neumann, Carola; Calin, George A.; Zhou Daohong

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of many cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes DNA damage and induces premature senescence. However, the role of miRNAs in IR-induced senescence has not been well defined. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify and characterize senescence-associated miRNAs (SA-miRNAs) and to investigate the role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence. Methods and Materials: In human lung (WI-38) fibroblasts, premature senescence was induced either by IR or busulfan (BU) treatment, and replicative senescence was accomplished by serial passaging. MiRNA microarray were used to identify SA-miRNAs, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR validated the expression profiles of SA-miRNAs in various senescent cells. The role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence was characterized by knockdown of miRNA expression, using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides or by miRNA overexpression through the transfection of pre-miRNA mimics. Results: We identified eight SA-miRNAs, four of which were up-regulated (miR-152, -410, -431, and -493) and four which were down-regulated (miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a), that are differentially expressed in both prematurely senescent (induced by IR or BU) and replicatively senescent WI-38 cells. Validation of the expression of these SA-miRNAs indicated that down-regulation of miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a is a characteristic miRNA expression signature of cellular senescence. Functional analyses revealed that knockdown of miR-155 or miR-20a, but not miR-25 or miR-15a, markedly enhanced IR-induced senescence, whereas ectopic overexpression of miR-155 or miR-20a significantly inhibited senescence induction. Furthermore, our studies indicate that miR-155 modulates IR-induced senescence by acting downstream of the p53 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and in part via regulating tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) expression. Conclusion: Our

  11. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is

  12. SU-E-T-512: Electromagnetic Simulations of the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uselmann, A; Mackie, T

    2014-06-01

    low cost. Funding: Morgridge Institute for Research, Madison WI; Conflict of Interest: Dr. Mackie is an investor and board member at CPAC, a company developing compact accelerator designs similar to those discussed in this work, but designs discussed are not directed by CPAC. Funding: Morgridge Institute for Research, Madison WI; Conflict of Interest: Dr. Mackie is an investor and board member at CPAC, a company developing compact accelerator designs similar to those discussed in this work, but designs discussed are not directed by CPAC.

  13. Physical layer simulation study for the coexistence of WLAN standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howlader, M. K.; Keiger, C.; Ewing, P. D.; Govan, T. V.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the performance of wireless local area network (WLAN) devices in the presence of interference from other wireless devices. To understand the coexistence of these wireless protocols, simplified physical-layer-system models were developed for the Bluetooth, Wireless Fidelity (WiFi), and Zigbee devices, all of which operate within the 2.4-GHz frequency band. The performances of these protocols were evaluated using Monte-Carlo simulations under various interference and channel conditions. The channel models considered were basic additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN), Rayleigh fading, and site-specific fading. The study also incorporated the basic modulation schemes, multiple access techniques, and channel allocations of the three protocols. This research is helping the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) understand the coexistence issues associated with deploying wireless devices and could prove useful in the development of a technical basis for guidance to address safety-related issues with the implementation of wireless systems in nuclear facilities. (authors)

  14. Qualitative methods for assessing risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, J.A.; Hannaman, G.W.; Kryska, P.

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

  15. Porphyrin Based neuton capture agents for cancer therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vicente, Maria Da; Shetty, Shankar Jayaram; Jaquinod, Laurent; Smith, Kevin M.

    2006-06-27

    The invention describes the synthesis of a panel of novel carbon-carbon linked carboranyl-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrins bearing 25–44% boron by weight. In certain embodiments, a phenyl porphyrin compound has a carboranyl group attached to the phenyl group by a carbon-carbon linkage, wherein the phenyl group corresponds to the following formula wi="24.38mm" file="US07067653-20060627-C00001.TIF" alt="embedded image" img-content="chem" img-format="tif"/>
    where R7 through R11 are hydrogen, a carboranyl group, or are selected from the group consisting of hydroxyl, NMe3+, PMePh2+, PO(OH)2, SO3H, COOH, and NH2. In this embodiment, the carboranyl group is attached to the phenyl group by a carbon-carbon linkage, either one or two of R7 through R11 are other than hydrogen; and the phenyl porphyrin compound contains at least one phenyl group having at least one of said carboranyl groups.

  16. A new method for predicting the solar heat gain of complex fenestration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klems, J.H.; Warner, J.L.; Kelley, G.O.

    1995-03-01

    A new method of predicting the solar heat gain through complex fenestration systems involving nonspecular layers such as shades or blinds has been examined in a project jointly sponsored by ASHRAE and DOE. In this method, a scanning radiometer is used to measure the bidirectional radiative transmittance and reflectance of each layer of a fenestration system. The properties of systems containing these layers are then built up computationally from the measured layer properties using a transmission/multiple-reflection calculation. The calculation produces the total directional-hemispherical transmittance of the fenestration system and the layer-by-layer absorbances. These properties are in turn combined with layer-specific measurements of the inward-flowing fractions of absorbed solar energy to produce the overall solar heat gain coefficient. The method has been applied to one of the most optically complex systems in common use, a venetian blind in combination with multiple glazings. A comparison between the scanner-based calculation method and direct system calorimetric measurements made on the LBL MoWiTT facility showed good agreement, and is a significant validation of the method accuracy and feasibility.

  17. A new method for predicting the solar heat gain of complex fenestration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klems, J.H.; Warner, J.L.

    1992-10-01

    A new method of predicting the solar heat gain through complex fenestration systems involving nonspecular layers such as shades or blinds has been examined in a project jointly sponsored by ASHRAE and DOE. In this method, a scanning radiometer is used to measure the bidirectional radiative transmittance and reflectance of each layer of a fenestration system. The properties of systems containing these layers are then built up computationally from the measured layer properties using a transmission/multiple-reflection calculation. The calculation produces the total directional-hemispherical transmittance of the fenestration system and the layer-by-layer absorptances. These properties are in turn combined with layer-specific measurements of the inward-flowing fractions of absorbed solar energy to produce the overall solar heat gain coefficient. This method has been used to determine the solar heat gain coefficient of a double-glazed window with an interior white shade. The resulting solar heat gain coefficient was compared to a direct measurement of the same system using the Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility for measuring window energy performance, and the two results agreed. This represents the first in a series of planned validations and applications of the new method.

  18. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David

    2016-04-27

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with anmore » average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.« less

  19. Long-range restriction map of human chromosome 22q11-22q12 between the lambda immunoglobulin locus and the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDermid, H.E. ); Budarf, M.L.; Emanuel, B.S. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA )

    1993-11-01

    A long-range restriction map of the region between the immunoglobulin lambda locus and the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint has been constructed using the rare-cutting enzymes NotI, NruI, AscI, and BsiWI. The map spans approximately 11,000 kb and represents about one-fifth of the long arm of chromosome 22. Thirty-nine markers, including seven NotI junction clones as well as numerous genes and anonymous sequences, were mapped to the region with a somatic cell hybrid panel. These probes were then used to produce the map. The seven NotI junction clones each identified a possible CpG island. The breakpoints of the RAJ5 hybrid and the Ewing sarcoma t(11;22) were also localized in the resulting map. This physical map will be useful in studying chromosomal rearrangements in the region, as well as providing the details to examine the fidelity of the YAC and cosmid contigs currently under construction. Comparisons of this physical map to genetic and radiation hybrid maps are discussed. 52 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. GALAXY INTERACTIONS IN COMPACT GROUPS. I. THE GALACTIC WINDS OF HCG16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, Frederic P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2013-05-10

    Using the WiFeS integral field spectrograph, we have undertaken a series of observations of star-forming galaxies in compact groups. In this first paper dedicated to the project, we present the analysis of the spiral galaxy NGC 838, a member of the Hickson Compact Group 16, and of its galactic wind. Our observations reveal that the wind forms an asymmetric, bipolar, rotating structure, powered by a nuclear starburst. Emission line ratio diagnostics indicate that photoionization is the dominant excitation mechanism at the base of the wind. Mixing from slow shocks (up to 20%) increases further out along the outflow axis. The asymmetry of the wind is most likely caused by one of the two lobes of the wind bubble bursting out of its H I envelope, as indicated by line ratios and radial velocity maps. The characteristics of this galactic wind suggest that it is caught early (a few Myr) in the wind evolution sequence. The wind is also quite different from the galactic wind in the partner galaxy NGC 839 which contains a symmetric, shock-excited wind. Assuming that both galaxies have similar interaction histories, the two different winds must be a consequence of the intrinsic properties of NGC 838 and NGC 839 and their starbursts.

  1. A=12C (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 12C) GENERAL: See also Table 12.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (FE55A, HE55F, CA56E, EL56, GL56A, HA56G, HA56H, KU56, MO56, NA56B, PE56A, RE56B, WI56K, BA57, BI57F, HE57B, KU57A, PA57A, RE57, SA57C, CA58C, FR58B). 1. 7Li(6Li, n)12C Qm = 20.931 See (NO57A). 2. (a) 9Be(3He, n)11C Qm = 7.565 Eb = 26.286 (b) 9Be(3He, p)11B Qm = 10.329 (c) 9Be(3He, α)8Be Qm = 18.911 (d) 9Be(3He, d)10B Qm = 1.093 The yields and angular distributions of

  2. A=14N (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 14N) GENERAL: See Table 14.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(HU57D, BA59F, BR59M, OT59, SK59, PA60, TA60L, WA60, BA61D, BA61N, FR61B, TR61, IN62A, TA62F, WE62E, KU63I, NA63A, SE63N, TR63, WA63M, AM64, BR64C, FE64A, LO64C, MA64HH, NE64C, ST64, UL64, CO65I, GL65, BO66J, HA66F, HA66O, HE66G, MA66W, MI66C, WI66E, CO67M, EV67A, KU67J, LI67C, PA67K, SO67A, CO68M, DE68K, EI68, GO68, HO68, KU68, NO68C, RA68C, SO68, ZH68A, UL69B, VA69).

  3. HIC1 interacts with a specific subunit of SWI/SNF complexes, ARID1A/BAF250A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Leprince, Dominique

    2009-08-07

    HIC1, a tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced in many human cancers encodes a transcriptional repressor involved in regulatory loops modulating p53-dependent and E2F1-dependent cell survival and stress responses. HIC1 is also implicated in growth control since it recruits BRG1, one of the two alternative ATPases (BRM or BRG1) of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes to repress transcription of E2F1 in quiescent fibroblasts. Here, through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identify ARID1A/BAF250A, as a new HIC1 partner. ARID1A/BAF250A is one of the two mutually exclusive ARID1-containing subunits of SWI/SNF complexes which define subsets of complexes endowed with anti-proliferative properties. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in WI38 fibroblasts and in BRG1-/- SW13 cells showed that endogenous HIC1 and ARID1A proteins interact in a BRG1-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HIC1 does not interact with BRM. Finally, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-reChIP) experiments demonstrated that HIC1 represses E2F1 through the recruitment of anti-proliferative SWI/SNF complexes containing ARID1A.

  4. A study of potential sources of linguistic ambiguity in written work instructions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the results of a small experimental study that investigated potential sources of ambiguity in written work instructions (WIs). The English language can be highly ambiguous because words with different meanings can share the same spelling. Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous WIs can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. To study possible sources of ambiguity in WIs, we determined which of the recommended action verbs in the DOE and BWXT writer's manuals have numerous meanings to their intended audience, making them potentially ambiguous. We used cognitive psychology techniques to conduct a survey in which technicians who use WIs in their jobs indicated the first meaning that came to mind for each of the words. Although the findings of this study are limited by the small number of respondents, we identified words that had many different meanings even within this limited sample. WI writers should pay particular attention to these words and to their most frequent meanings so that they can avoid ambiguity in their writing.

  5. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010LA11 10B(p, α): deduced S(E) E(cm) = 0 - 0.15 1 11/30/2011 1993AN06 10B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/07/2011 1993AN09 10B(p, α): absolute fusion σ and S(E) E(cm) = 48 - 159 keV X4 11/07/2011 1972SZ02 10B(p, α): total reaction σ and S(E) 60 - 180 keV 1 X4 03/03/2011 1983WI09 10B(p, γ): γ yield, capture σ(E) 0.07 - 2.2 X4 11/07/2011 2003TO21 10B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced

  6. TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

    2012-07-08

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

  7. Porphyrin Based neuton capture agents for cancer therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vicente, Maria Da; Shetty, Shankar Jayaram; Jaquinod, Laurent; Smith, Kevin M.

    2006-06-27

    The invention describes the synthesis of a panel of novel carbon-carbon linked carboranyl-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrins bearing 2544% boron by weight. In certain embodiments, a phenyl porphyrin compound has a carboranyl group attached to the phenyl group by a carbon-carbon linkage, wherein the phenyl group corresponds to the following formula wi="24.38mm" file="US07067653-20060627-C00001.TIF" alt="embedded image" img-content="chem" img-format="tif"/>
    where R7 through R11 are hydrogen, a carboranyl group, or are selected from the group consisting of hydroxyl, NMe3+, PMePh2+, PO(OH)2, SO3H, COOH, and NH2. In this embodiment, the carboranyl group is attached to the phenyl group by a carbon-carbon linkage, either one or two of R7 through R11 are other than hydrogen; and the phenyl porphyrin compound contains at least one phenyl group having at least one of said carboranyl groups.

  8. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie

    2013-11-01

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  9. RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t9, S. nTCmI RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW OMA1ID9 V3 WMM I~UMMIM UU &!% W 2W WT AM 0? ?Ml U&O(1 LW pAM Mr MMW31 T!WOLVSD A GUS =-o &L MCMA I h MMK ON PLUPCMTtft GJ DR P -M~ CAM~ 07 W ULOW~ M *!Ti ~~mum 0sflOY iftJ A SLXQT OUT (Wi M I M ra IJJW MarB~ *~ W? $MOM.~ HMP~ IT V=h MMOTM RW1& 07W O RAttcMUU w~A0AO wAf~ K 43)AN wA BE tluywxwD (b(6 l~U %I S~)6 ASSA~ r 6 AM MWOim~~ SUM v~ DM 'VAT M OM1 IN * M S W IMIEf To MIK Row.

  10. ENHANCING NETWORK SECURITY USING 'LEARNING-FROM-SIGNALS' AND FRACTIONAL FOURIER TRANSFORM BASED RF-DNA FINGERPRINTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckner, Mark A; Bobrek, Miljko; Farquhar, Ethan; Harmer, Paul K; Temple, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Wireless Access Points (WAP) remain one of the top 10 network security threats. This research is part of an effort to develop a physical (PHY) layer aware Radio Frequency (RF) air monitoring system with multi-factor authentication to provide a first-line of defense for network security--stopping attackers before they can gain access to critical infrastructure networks through vulnerable WAPs. This paper presents early results on the identification of OFDM-based 802.11a WiFi devices using RF Distinct Native Attribute (RF-DNA) fingerprints produced by the Fractional Fourier Transform (FRFT). These fingerprints are input to a "Learning from Signals" (LFS) classifier which uses hybrid Differential Evolution/Conjugate Gradient (DECG) optimization to determine the optimal features for a low-rank model to be used for future predictions. Results are presented for devices under the most challenging conditions of intra-manufacturer classification, i.e., same-manufacturer, same-model, differing only in serial number. The results of Fractional Fourier Domain (FRFD) RF-DNA fingerprints demonstrate significant improvement over results based on Time Domain (TD), Spectral Domain (SD) and even Wavelet Domain (WD) fingerprints.

  11. Using Differential Evolution to Optimize Learning from Signals and Enhance Network Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmer, Paul K; Temple, Michael A; Buckner, Mark A; Farquhar, Ethan

    2011-01-01

    Computer and communication network attacks are commonly orchestrated through Wireless Access Points (WAPs). This paper summarizes proof-of-concept research activity aimed at developing a physical layer Radio Frequency (RF) air monitoring capability to limit unauthorizedWAP access and mprove network security. This is done using Differential Evolution (DE) to optimize the performance of a Learning from Signals (LFS) classifier implemented with RF Distinct Native Attribute (RF-DNA) fingerprints. Performance of the resultant DE-optimized LFS classifier is demonstrated using 802.11a WiFi devices under the most challenging conditions of intra-manufacturer classification, i.e., using emissions of like-model devices that only differ in serial number. Using identical classifier input features, performance of the DE-optimized LFS classifier is assessed relative to a Multiple Discriminant Analysis / Maximum Likelihood (MDA/ML) classifier that has been used for previous demonstrations. The comparative assessment is made using both Time Domain (TD) and Spectral Domain (SD) fingerprint features. For all combinations of classifier type, feature type, and signal-to-noise ratio considered, results show that the DEoptimized LFS classifier with TD features is uperior and provides up to 20% improvement in classification accuracy with proper selection of DE parameters.

  12. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  13. FROM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    t. IIk l Ser@ew of the Ai%daun M&~&B Co*. \ Bm st., lt4lu Ymc, IbY. 9e m. maJg83, c!7amma Ftadlum Bdl Ilbrus5ws carp., 6130 d)tE;r Avenue, Aew York, R. Ye i cot Qf tkk43 tpip wu tQ camurr; wl##h on to t&a Stat8 mmnt far ptw- thlOOc#nntpy4ootorroQfuraaiwJIO~ tobr eolAto~l~~~0 aold WiMr Ltd. at tba otma ttlm it ma13 La.lred t+ii?bLT ~f~~~ utteo Qf 6tVPSLablO mmf OP trolrn by rim. tmfg14F'6 a & t&k. omaP,a Q-f t&a dliereurrioao w&t&t I&* tis4mgl0 fw6ootuMwaolplla

  14. Vehicle to Grid Communication Standards Development, Testing and Validation - Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowri, Krishnan; Pratt, Richard M.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-09-01

    In the US, more than 10,000 electric vehicles (EV) have been delivered to consumers during the first three quarters of 2011. A large majority of these vehicles are battery electric, often requiring 220 volt charging. Though the vehicle manufacturers and charging station manufacturers have provided consumers options for charging preferences, there are no existing communications between consumers and the utilities to manage the charging demand. There is also wide variation between manufacturers in their approach to support vehicle charging. There are in-vehicle networks, charging station networks, utility networks each using either cellular, Wi-Fi, ZigBee or other proprietary communication technology with no standards currently available for interoperability. The current situation of ad-hoc solutions is a major barrier to the wide adoption of electric vehicles. SAE, the International Standards Organization/International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), ANSI, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and several industrial organizations are working towards the development of interoperability standards. PNNL has participated in the development and testing of these standards in an effort to accelerate the adoption and development of communication modules.

  15. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup }, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a redder NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (?) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of ????(dose){sup ??} with the component ? ? 0.25, which violated the classical ????(dose){sup ?0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial uniformity when compared with FBP

  16. 3D model generation using an airborne swarm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R. A.; Punzo, G.; Macdonald, M.; Dobie, G.; MacLeod, C. N.; Summan, R.; Pierce, G.; Bolton, G.

    2015-03-31

    Using an artificial kinematic field to provide co-ordination between multiple inspection UAVs, the authors herein demonstrate full 3D modelling capability based on a photogrammetric system. The operation of the system is demonstrated by generating a full 3D surface model of an intermediate level nuclear waste storage drum. Such drums require periodic inspection to ensure that drum distortion or corrosion is carefully monitored. Performing this inspection with multiple airborne platforms enables rapid inspection of structures that are inaccessible to on-surface remote vehicles and are in human-hazardous environments. A three-dimensional surface-meshed model of the target can then be constructed in post-processing through photogrammetry analysis of the visual inspection data. The inspection environment uses a tracking system to precisely monitor the position of each aerial vehicle within the enclosure. The vehicles used are commercially available Parrot AR. Drone quadcopters, controlled through a computer interface connected over an IEEE 802.11n (WiFi) network, implementing a distributed controller for each vehicle. This enables the autonomous and distributed elements of the control scheme to be retained, while alleviating the vehicles of the control algorithms computational load. The control scheme relies on a kinematic field defined with the target at its centre. This field defines the trajectory for all the drones in the volume relative to the central target, enabling the drones to circle the target at a set radius while avoiding drone collisions. This function enables complete coverage along the height of the object, which is assured by transitioning to another inspection band only after completing circumferential coverage. Using a swarm of vehicles, the time until complete coverage can be significantly reduced.

  17. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1991-12-01

    During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year`s project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

  18. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1991-12-01

    During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

  19. Sex ratios, bill deformities, and PCBs in nestling double-crested cormorants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stromborg, K.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay, WI (United States); Sileo, L. [National Biological Service, Madison, WI (United States); Tuinen, P. van [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Deformed double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nestlings examined from 1988--1992 had a sex ratio highly skewed toward females (66 of 81) compared to normal nestlings (43 of 80) (P < 0.005). The collection site, Green Bay, WI, is heavily contaminated with PCBs and the possibility of gender alteration was investigated in a designed study by comparing the sex of nestling birds determined using three techniques. These nestlings were collected at five sites, both contaminated and uncontaminated. Genetic sex was determined by cytogenetic techniques and phenotypic sex was determined by macroscopic and histologic examination of gonads. Differences between techniques resulted in a few instances of classifying genetic males as females by one or the other gonadal examinations. Sex ratios of the nestlings from the five sites were compared to binomial distributions assuming equal probabilities of males and females. Sex ratios of normal nestlings were not different from expected regardless of sex determination technique (P > 0.10). Deformed nestlings sexed cytogenetically or histologically did not differ from expected (P > 0.40), but deformed nestlings tended to be classified , macroscopically as females at a higher rate than expected (P = 0.092). The observed sex ratios obtained by macroscopic techniques did not differ between the 1968--1992 observational study and the designed study (P > 0.50). Histologic examination suggested two explanations for the skewed sex ratio: nestlings with undeterminable macroscopic sex usually had testes and, some gonads which grossly resembled ovaries were, in fact, testes. If phenotypic gender alteration is present in these birds, it is more evident at the gross structural level than at the histologic level.

  20. Baseline risk assessment for exposure to contaminants at the St. Louis Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The St. Louis Site comprises three noncontiguous areas in and near St. Louis, Missouri: the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS), and the Latty Avenue Properties. The main site of the Latty Avenue Properties includes the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and the Futura Coatings property, which are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. Contamination at the St. Louis Site is the result of uranium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1970s. Uranium processing took place at the SLDS from 1942 through 1957. From the 1940s through the 1960s, SLAPS was used as a storage area for residues from the manufacturing operations at SLDS. The materials stored at SLAPS were bought by Continental Mining and Milling Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1966, and moved to the HISS/Futura Coatings property at 9200 Latty Avenue. Vicinity properties became contaminated as a result of transport and movement of the contaminated material among SLDS, SLAPS, and the 9200 Latty Avenue property. This contamination led to the SLAPS, HISS, and Futura Coatings properties being placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the St. Louis Site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The primary goal of FUSRAP is the elimination of potential hazards to human health and the environment at former Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) sites so that, to the extent possible, these properties can be released for use without restrictions. To determine and establish cleanup goals for the St. Louis Site, DOE is currently preparing a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS). This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is a component of the process; it addresses potential risk to human health and the environment associated wi