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1

DUF6 Storage Safety  

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Storage Safety Depleted UF6 Storage line line How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored DUF6 Storage Safety Cylinder Leakage Depleted UF6 Storage Safety Continued cylinder storage is...

2

DUF6 Storage  

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of depleted UF6 is stored in steel cylinders at three sites in the U.S. Depleted UF6 Inventory and Storage Locations U.S. DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 consists of approximately...

3

Where DUF6 is Stored  

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DUF6 is Stored Depleted UF6 Storage line line How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored DUF6 Storage Safety Cylinder Leakage Where Depleted UF6 is Stored in the United States The UF6...

4

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 6: Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Permits and Compliance Requirements  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 6 ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PERMITS AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS 6.1 DUF 6 CYLINDER MANAGEMENT AND CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DUF 6 CONVERSION FACILITY DUF 6 cylinder management as well as construction and operation of the proposed DUF 6 conversion facility would be subject to many federal, state, and local requirements. In accordance with such legal requirements, a variety of permits, licenses, and other consents must be obtained. Table 6.1 at the end of this chapter lists those that may be needed. The status of each is indicated on the basis of currently available information. However, because the DUF 6 project is still at an early stage, the information in Table 6.1 should not be considered comprehensive or

5

DUF6 Guide  

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DUF6 Guide DUF6 Guide Depleted UF6 Guide An introduction to uranium and its compounds, depleted uranium, and depleted uranium hexafluoride (depleted UF6). Uranium has unique properties that make it valuable as an energy source, yet potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. The Guide provides basic information about the properties of uranium compounds and the uranium enrichment process that produces depleted UF6. This information will help you understand the unique challenges involved in managing DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 in a safe and efficient manner. Overview Presentation DUF6 Health Risks Uranium and Its Compounds DUF6 Environmental Risks Depleted Uranium DUF6 Videos Uranium Hexafluoride Uranium Quick Facts DUF6 Production and Handling

6

DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs  

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Sign Me Up Search: OK Button DUF6 Guide DU Uses DUF6 Management and Uses DUF6 Conversion EIS Documents News FAQs Internet Resources Glossary Home Conversion Facility EISs...

7

DUF6 Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion DOE/IG-0642 March 2004 Portsmouth Facility Design Details of Finding ...................................................................... 1 Recommendations and Comments ........................................... 3 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology ..................................... 5 2. Prior Audit Reports ............................................................... 6 3. Management Comments ...................................................... 7 DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Background In January 2002, the Department of Energy (Department) solicited proposals to design, build, and operate two facilities for the conversion of 704,000 tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) into a more

8

Documents: DUF6 Fact Sheets  

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Fact Sheets Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents DUF6 Fact Sheets PDF Icon Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program 174 KB...

9

DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis LEXINGTON, Ky. - The conversion plants at EM's Paducah and Portsmouth sites surpassed a fiscal year 2013 goal by converting 13,679 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), more than doubling production a year earlier. EM's Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) and contractor Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services LLC (BWCS) began operations in 2011 to convert the nation's 800,000-metric-ton inventory of DUF6 to more benign forms for sale, ultimate disposal or long-term storage. "Since 2011, we have been ramping up production to determine and achieve the safe, sustainable operating rate of the plants," said George E.

10

DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 DUF6 Project Doubles Production in 2013 November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis LEXINGTON, Ky. - The conversion plants at EM's Paducah and Portsmouth sites surpassed a fiscal year 2013 goal by converting 13,679 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), more than doubling production a year earlier. EM's Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) and contractor Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services LLC (BWCS) began operations in 2011 to convert the nation's 800,000-metric-ton inventory of DUF6 to more benign forms for sale, ultimate disposal or long-term storage. "Since 2011, we have been ramping up production to determine and achieve the safe, sustainable operating rate of the plants," said George E.

11

DUF6 Draft EIS Public Hearing Transcripts  

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Depleted UF6 Draft EIS Public Hearing Transcripts Transcripts from the DUF6 Conversion Draft EIS Public Hearings The following transcripts are from the DUF6 Conversion...

12

Documents: Disposal of DUF6 Conversion Products  

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DUF6 Conversion Products Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Disposal of DUF6 Conversion Products PDF Icon Engineering Analysis for Disposal of...

13

Documents: Procurement of DUF6 Services  

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of DUF6 Conversion Services Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Procurement of DUF6 Services HTML Icon Request for Proposals 34 KB details...

14

Documents: DUF6 Conversion EIS Supporting Documents  

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DUF6 Conversion EIS DUF6 Conversion EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents NEPA Compliance: DUF6 Conversion EIS Supporting Documents PDF Icon Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project 38 KB details PDF Icon Press Release: DOE Seeks Public Input for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Environmental Impact Statement 90 KB details PDF Icon Advance Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 52 KB details PDF Icon Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 60 KB details PDF Icon Overview: Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Management Program

15

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix G: Consultation Letters  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX G: CONSULTATION LETTERS Consultation Letters G-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LETTERS TO STATE AGENCIES AND RECOGNIZED NATIVE AMERICAN GROUPS Consultation Letters G-4 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-5 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-6 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-7 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-8 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-9 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-10 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-11 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-12 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS

16

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix H: Contractor...  

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Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX H: CONTRACTOR DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Disclosure Statement H-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Disclosure Statement H-3 Portsmouth...

17

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Summary  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS SUMMARY 1 S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in

18

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Summary  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS SUMMARY 1 S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF 6 from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and

19

DUF6 Conversion Facility EIS Schedule  

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Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs Schedule The final EISs for the DUF6 Conversion Facilities have been completed, and are available through this web site. The RODs are...

20

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix G-Part 1: Consultation...  

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Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX G: CONSULTATION LETTERS Consultation Letters G-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-3 Portsmouth DUF 6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DUF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives  

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Alternatives Alternatives Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives Alternatives included in the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs. Proposed Action The proposed action evaluated in each EIS is to construct and operate a conversion facility at each site for conversion of the DOE DUF6 inventory. The time period considered is a construction period of approximately 2 years, an operational period of 25 years at Paducah and 18 years at Portsmouth, and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facility of about 3 years. The EISs assess the potential environmental impacts from the following proposed activities: Construction, operation, maintenance, and D&D of the proposed DUF6 conversion facility at each site; Transportation of uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility;

22

DUF6 Materials Use Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. government has {approx}500,000 metric tons (MT) of surplus depleted uranium (DU) in various chemical forms stored at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites across the United States. This DU, most of which is DU hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) resulting from uranium enrichment operations, is the largest amount of nuclear material in DOE's inventory. On July 6, 1999, DOE issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as required by Public Law 105-204'', in which DOE committed to develop a ''Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap'' in order to establish a strategy for the products resulting from conversion of DUF{sub 6} to a stable form. This report meets the commitment in the Final Plan by providing a comprehensive roadmap that DOE will use to guide any future research and development activities for the materials associated with its DUF{sub 6} inventory. The Roadmap supports the decision presented in the ''Record of Decision for Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'', namely to begin conversion of the DUF{sub 6} inventory as soon as possible, either to uranium oxide, uranium metal, or a combination of both, while allowing for future uses of as much of this inventory as possible. In particular, the Roadmap is intended to explore potential uses for the DUF{sub 6} conversion products and to identify areas where further development work is needed. It focuses on potential governmental uses of DUF{sub 6} conversion products but also incorporates limited analysis of using the products in the private sector. The Roadmap builds on the analyses summarized in the recent ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride''. It also addresses other surplus DU, primarily in the form of DU trioxide and DU tetrafluoride. The DU-related inventory considered here includes the following: (1) Components directly associated with the DUF{sub 6} presently being stored at gaseous diffusion plant sites in Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee--470,500 MT of DU, 225,000 MT of fluorine chemically combined with the DU, and 74,000 MT of carbon steel comprising the storage cylinders; (2) Approximately 27,860 MT of DU in the form of uranium trioxide, tetrafluoride, and various other forms containing varying amounts of radioactive and chemical impurities, presently stored primarily at DOE's Savannah River Site. This Roadmap characterizes and analyzes alternative paths for eventual disposition of these materials, identifies the barriers that exist to implementing the paths, and makes recommendations concerning the activities that should be undertaken to overcome the barriers. The disposition paths considered in this roadmap and shown in Fig. ES.1 are (a) implementation of cost-effective and institutionally feasible beneficial uses of DU using the products of DUF{sub 6} conversion and other forms of DU in DOE's inventory, (b) processing the fluorine product resulting from DUF{sub 6} conversion to yield an optimal mix of valuable fluorine compounds [e.g., hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid), boron trifluoride] for industrial use, and (c) processing emptied cylinders to yield intact cylinders that are suitable for reuse, while maintaining an assured and cost-effective direct disposal path for all of the DU-related materials. Most paths consider the potential beneficial use of the DU and other DUF{sub 6} conversion products for the purpose of achieving overall benefits, including cost savings to the federal government, compared with simply disposing of the materials. However, the paths provide for assured direct disposal of these products if cost-effective and institutionally feasible beneficial uses are not found.

Haire, M.J.

2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

23

Documents: Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD  

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Portsmouth DUF6 Final EIS Portsmouth DUF6 Final EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and Record of Decision Full text of the Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site. The full text of the Record of Decision and Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD is available for downloading or browsing in Adobe Acrobat PDF format through the links below. Record of Decision PDF Icon Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision 3.8 MB details PDF Icon Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision: As Published in the Federal Register 82 KB details

24

Business Case Slide 1: DUF6 Conversion Program Background  

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to convert and dispose DUF6 Awarded to Uranium Disposition Services 8292002 Framatome ANPDuratek Federal ServicesBurns and Roe Design, construction, and 5 years operation of...

25

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix B: Estimation of...  

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(Gill et al. 1997). Because the DUF 6 autoclaves would operate at approximately 95C, testing should be conducted either prior to or during the conversion facility startup...

26

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix B: Issues Associated...  

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(Gill et al. 1997). Because the DUF 6 autoclaves would operate at approximately 95C, testing should be conducted either prior to or during the conversion facility startup...

27

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Notation  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS xxv NOTATION The following is a list of acronyms and abbreviations, chemical names, and units of measure used in this document. Some acronyms used only in tables may be defined only in those tables. GENERAL ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AEA Atomic Energy Act of 1954 AEC U.S. Atomic Energy Commission AIHA American Industrial Hygiene Association ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ANL Argonne National Laboratory ANP Advanced Nuclear Power (Framatone ANP, Inc.) ANSI American National Standards Institute AQCR Air Quality Control Region BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics CAA Clean Air Act CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 CFR Code of Federal Regulations CRMP cultural resource management plan

28

DUF6 Final EIS Document Request Form  

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EIS Request Form EIS Request Form Final EIS Document Request Form Use the form below to order copies of the DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EISs and Records of Decision. Step 3 Select the EIS that you want to receive. Select one of the three options below. My request applies to the Paducah Conversion Facility EIS My request applies to the Portsmouth Conversion Facility EIS My request applies to both the Paducah and the Portsmouth Conversion Facility EISs Step 1 Request EIS copies. Choose one or more of the following: Mail me a compact disc (CD-ROM) of the Final EIS and Record of Decision. Mail me a printed copy of the Final EIS and Record of Decision. Step 2 Enter your personal information. You must submit your full name and complete address including zip code to receive postal mail. You must provide an email address if you want to receive email notifications.

29

Documents: Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD  

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Paducah DUF6 Final EIS Paducah DUF6 Final EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and Record of Decision Full text of the Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site. The full text of the Record of Decision and Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD is available for downloading or browsing in Adobe Acrobat PDF format through the links below. You may also order a CD-ROM or paper copy of the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs by submitting a Final EIS Document Request Form. Record of Decision PDF Icon Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision 3.6 MB details

30

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix A: Text of Public...  

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Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law...

31

Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The operating room at a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant. The operating room at a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant. Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride.

32

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Table of Contents  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS v CONTENTS COVER SHEET.................................................................................................................... iii NOTATION .......................................................................................................................... xxv ENGLISH/METRIC AND METRIC/ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS..................................... xxx SUMMARY .......................................................................................................................... S-1 S.1 Introduction........................................................................................................... S-1 S.1.1 Background Information........................................................................... S-1

33

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 3: Affected Environment...  

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conversion facility at the Paducah site for conversion of the Paducah DUF 6 cylinder inventory. Section 3.1 presents a detailed description of the affected environment for the...

34

Storage  

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Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

35

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix F: Assessment Methodologies  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES Assessment Methodologies F-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Assessment Methodologies F-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES In general, the activities assessed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) could affect workers, members of the general public, and the environment during construction of new facilities, during routine operation of facilities, during transportation, and during facility or transportation accidents. Activities could have adverse effects (e.g., human health impairment) or positive effects (e.g., regional socioeconomic benefits, such as the creation of jobs). Some impacts would result primarily from the unique characteristics of the uranium and other chemical

36

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 1: Introduction  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 1 INTRODUCTION Over the last five decades, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has enriched large quantities of uranium for nuclear applications by means of gaseous diffusion. This enrichment has taken place at three DOE sites located at Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP, formerly known as the K-25 site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1-1). "Depleted" uranium hexafluoride (commonly referred to as DUF 6 ) is a product of this process. It is being stored at the three sites. The total DUF 6 inventory at the three sites weighs approximately 700,000 metric tons (t) (770,000 short tons [tons]) 1 and is stored in about 60,000 steel cylinders. This document is a site-specific

37

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Table of Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS v CONTENTS COVER SHEET.................................................................................................................... iii NOTATION .......................................................................................................................... xxv ENGLISH/METRIC AND METRIC/ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS..................................... xxx SUMMARY .......................................................................................................................... S-1 S.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................ S-1 S.1.1 Background Information........................................................................... S-1 S.1.1.1

38

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix G-Part 2: Responses...  

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Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS RESPONSES TO U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LETTERS TO STATE AGENCIES AND NATIVE AMERICAN GROUPS Consultation Letters G-32 Portsmouth DUF 6...

39

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 7: References  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 7 REFERENCES Acoustical Society of America, 1983, American National Standard Specification for Sound Level Meters, ANSI S1.4-1983, New York, N.Y., Feb. Acoustical Society of America, 1985, American National Standard Specification for Sound Level Meters, ANSI S1.4A-1985, Amendment to ANSI S1.4-1983, New York, N.Y., June. AIHA (American Industrial Hygiene Association), 2002, The AIHA 2002 Emergency Response Planning Guidelines and Workplace Environmental Exposure Level Guides Handbook, Fairfax, Va. Allison, T., 2002, "DUF 6 County, City, and School District Financial Data," intraoffice memorandum from Allison (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Ill.) to H. Avci (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Ill.), Aug. 1.

40

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 7: References  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 7 REFERENCES Acoustical Society of America, 1983, American National Standard Specification for Sound Level Meters, ANSI S1.4-1983, New York, N.Y., Feb. Acoustical Society of America, 1985, American National Standard Specification for Sound Level Meters, ANSI S1.4A-1985, Amendment to ANSI S1.4-1983, New York, N.Y., June. AIHA (American Industrial Hygiene Association), 2002, The AIHA 2002 Emergency Response Planning Guidelines and Workplace Environmental Exposure Level Guides Handbook, Fairfax, Va. Allison, T., 2002, "DUF 6 County, City, and School District Financial Data," intraoffice memo from Allison (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Ill.) to H. Avci (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Ill.), Aug. 1.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 3: Affected Environment  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 3 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT This EIS considers the proposed action of building and operating a conversion facility at the Portsmouth site for conversion of the Portsmouth and ETTP DUF 6 cylinder inventories. Section 3.1 presents a detailed description of the affected environment for the Portsmouth site. Because the option of shipping cylinders from the ETTP site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to the Portsmouth site for conversion is part of the proposed action, a detailed description of the affected environment for the ETTP site is provided in Section 3.2. 3.1 PORTSMOUTH SITE The Portsmouth site is located in Pike County, Ohio, approximately 22 mi (35 km) north of the Ohio River and 3 mi (5 km) southeast of the town of Piketon (Figure 3.1-1). The two

42

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS - Appendix A: Text of Public Law 107-206 Pertinent to the Management of DUF6  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

43

Paducah and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants Paducah and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants November 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis First cylinder enters plant. First cylinder enters plant. Paducah and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants First cylinder enters plant. Paducah and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants Paducah and Portsmouth - Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services (BWCS) began work at the Paducah and Portsmouth sites in March with the goal of making two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion plants fully operational. The DOE site operations contactor achieved that goal at 3:43 p.m. Sept. 30 when all seven conversion lines at the plants were designated fully operational. "Our next goal is to bring all seven lines to steady state commercial

44

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapter 2: Comment Documents  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 2 COMMENT DOCUMENTS This section provides copies of the actual letters or other documents containing public comments on the draft EISs that were submitted to DOE, including comments extracted from the transcripts of the public hearings. Table 2.1 contains an index of the comment documents by document number. Table 2.2 provides an index of comment documents by the commentors last name. Table 2.3 contains an index of comment documents by company or organization. Individual comments are denoted with vertical lines in the right margin. TABLE 2.1 Index of Commentors by Document Number Document Number Name Company/Organization Page D0001 Driver, Charles M. Individual 2-5 D0002 Kilrod, John Individual 2-7 D0003 Colley, Vina Portsmouth/Piketon Residents for Environmental Safety and Security

45

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 9: Glossary  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 9 GLOSSARY Accident: An unplanned sequence of events resulting in undesirable consequences, such as the release of radioactive or hazardous material to the environment. Accident consequence assessment: An assessment of the impacts following the occurrence of an accident, independent of the probability of that accident. The environmental impact statement (EIS) provides estimates of the consequences of a number of possible accidents, ranging from those with low probability (rare) to those with relatively high probability (frequent). Accident frequency: The likelihood that a specific accident will occur, that is, the probability of occurrence. If an accident is estimated to happen once every 50 years, the accident frequency is generally reported as

46

Why Are the DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs Needed?  

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Why is an EIS Needed Why is an EIS Needed Why the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs Are Needed The two Depleted UF6 Conversion EISs are needed to assess the potential environmental impacts of constructing, operating, maintaining, and decontaminating and decommissioning DUF6 conversion facilities at the Paducah and Portsmouth sites. National Environmental Policy Act Federal laws and regulations require the federal government to evaluate the effects of its actions on the environment and to consider alternative courses of action. The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) specifies when an environmental impact statement (EIS) must be prepared. NEPA regulations require, among other things, federal agencies to include discussion of a proposed action and the range of reasonable alternatives in an EIS. Sufficient information must be included in the EIS for reviewers to evaluate the relative merits of each alternative. Council for Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations provide the recommended format and content of Environmental Impact Statements.

47

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 9: Glossary  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 9 GLOSSARY Accident: An unplanned sequence of events resulting in undesirable consequences, such as the release of radioactive or hazardous material to the environment. Accident consequence assessment: An assessment of the impacts following the occurrence of an accident, independent of the probability of that accident. The environmental impact statement (EIS) provides estimates of the consequences of a number of possible accidents, ranging from those with low probability (rare) to those with relatively high probability (frequent). Accident frequency: The likelihood that a specific accident will occur, that is, the probability of occurrence. If an accident is estimated to happen once every 50 years, the accident frequency is generally reported as

48

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix G: Responses to U.S. Department of Energy Letters to State Agencies and Native American Groups  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS RESPONSES TO U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LETTERS TO STATE AGENCIES AND NATIVE AMERICAN GROUPS Consultation Letters G-32 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-33 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-34 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-35 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-36 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-37 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-38 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-39 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-40 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-41 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters G-42 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Consultation Letters

49

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix H: Contractor Disclosure Statement  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX H: CONTRACTOR DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Disclosure Statement H-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Disclosure Statement H-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX H: CONTRACTOR DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is the contractor assisting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in preparing the environmental impact statement (EIS) for depleted UF 6 conversion. DOE is responsible for reviewing and evaluating the information and determining the appropriateness and adequacy of incorporating any data, analyses, or results in the EIS. DOE determines the scope and content of the EIS and supporting documents and will furnish direction to ANL, as appropriate, in preparing these documents. The Council on Environmental Quality's regulations (40 CFR 1506.5(c)), which have

50

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 2: Description and Comparison of Alternatives  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 2 DESCRIPTION AND COMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVES Alternatives for building and operating a DUF 6 conversion facility at the Paducah site were evaluated for their potential impacts on the human and natural environment. This EIS considers the proposed action of building and operating a conversion facility and a no action alternative. Under the proposed action, three action alternatives are considered that focus on where to construct the conversion facility within the Paducah site. An option of shipping cylinders currently stored at ETTP to the Paducah facility is also considered. The no action alternative assumes that a conversion facility is not built at Paducah and that the DUF 6 cylinders at Paducah would continue to be stored indefinitely in a manner consistent with

51

DUF6 Management Cost Analysis Report (CAR): Part 2  

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. . . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of May 1997 Figure 4.5 Total Costs of Manufacture of Metal Options 900 800 700 Ctj 300 3 200 100 0 Metal Shielding Oxide Shielding Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride and Oxide Shielding s Decontamination & Decommissioning QI Operations & Maintenance s Regulatory Compliance u Balance of Plant u Manufacturing Facilities s Manufacturing Equipment u Engineering Development 57 ..- . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride May 1997 4.4 Long-term Storage Storage of depleted uranium is predicated on its use at some later date. In the engineering analysis, storage options are defined by the type of storage facility, and suboptions are defined by the chemical form in which the depleted uranium is stored. The types of storage facilities analyzed are (1) buildings, (2) below ground vaults,

52

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix F; Conversion  

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would be packaged and sent either for disposal or storage. The HF would be neutralized to calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and separately packaged for disposal or sale. It was assumed...

53

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document, Part 1  

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2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process,

54

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 4: Environmental Impact Assessment Approach, Assumptions, and Methodology  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT APPROACH, ASSUMPTIONS, AND METHODOLOGY This EIS evaluates potential impacts on human health and the natural environment from building and operating a DUF 6 conversion facility at three alternative locations at the Paducah site and for a no action alternative. These impacts might be positive, in that they would improve conditions in the human or natural environment, or negative, in that they would cause a decline in those conditions. This chapter provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the potential impacts associated with the EIS alternatives, summarizes the major assumptions that formed the basis of the evaluation, and provides some background information on human health

55

Public Hearing, DOE Release of DUF6 Conversion Facility Draft Environmental Impact Statements  

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1 1 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 PUBLIC HEARING 3 4 SUBJECT: DOE Release of DUF6 Conversion 5 Facility Draft Environmental Impact Statements 6 DATE: January 13, 2004 7 LOCATION: Department of Energy 8 Environmental Information Center 115 Memorial Drive 9 Paducah, Kentucky 42001 10 TIME: 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. 11 FACILITATOR: Darryl Armstrong 12 REPORTED BY: Amy S. Caronongan, RPR, CSR 13 14 15 16 17

56

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix D: Environmental Synopsis for the Depleted UF6 Conversion Project  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX D: ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT Environmental Synopsis D-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT (Solicitation No. DE-RP05-01OR22717) October 2002 Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Prepared for Office of Site Closure - Oak Ridge Office (EM-32) Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. October 2002 iii CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 1 2 BACKGROUND.............................................................................................................

57

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix D: Environmental Synopsis for the Depleted UF6 Conversion Project  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX D: ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT Environmental Synopsis D-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT (Solicitation No. DE-RP05-01OR22717) October 2002 Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Prepared for Office of Site Closure - Oak Ridge Office (EM-32) Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. October 2002 iii CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 1 2 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................. 3 3

58

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 8: List of Preparers  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 8 LIST OF PREPARERS Name Education/Expertise Contribution U.S. Department of Energy Gary S. Hartman B.A., Geology; 23 years of experience in NEPA compliance and environmental compliance and regulation DOE Document Manager Argonne National Laboratory 1 Timothy Allison M.S., Mineral and Energy Resource Economics; M.A., Geography; 16 years of experience in regional analysis and economic impact analysis Socioeconomic analysis Halil I. Avci Ph.D., Nuclear Engineering; 19 years of experience in environmental assessment, waste management, accident analysis, and project management Project Leader Bruce M. Biwer Ph.D., Chemistry; 13 years of experience in radiological pathway analysis, dose calculations, and radiological transportation risk analysis

59

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 8: List of Preparers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 8 LIST OF PREPARERS Name Education/Expertise Contribution U.S. Department of Energy Gary S. Hartman B.A., Geology; 23 years of experience in NEPA compliance and environmental compliance and regulation DOE Document Manager Argonne National Laboratory 1 Timothy Allison M.S., Mineral and Energy Resource Economics; M.A., Geography; 16 years of experience in regional analysis and economic impact analysis Socioeconomic analysis Halil I. Avci Ph.D., Nuclear Engineering; 19 years of experience in environmental assessment, waste management, accident analysis, and project management Project Leader Bruce M. Biwer Ph.D., Chemistry; 13 years of experience in radiological pathway analysis, dose calculations, and radiological transportation risk analysis

60

By-products from DU Storage (Fluorine and Empty Cylinders)  

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By-products from DU Storage By-products from DU Storage (Fluorine and Empty Cylinders) Potential applications involving by-products from DUF6 storage include fluorine applications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix D: Continued Cylinder Storage  

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data of 55 to 196 mremyr (Hodges 1996) because of the more vigorous inspection and maintenance activities planned to be implemented. The radiation dose to noninvolved workers...

62

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2, Appendix G; Long-Term Storage  

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LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLMW low-level mixed waste LLW low-level radioactive waste MEI maximally exposed individual NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

63

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix E: Impacts Associated with HF and CaF2 Conversion Product Sale and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE E.1 INTRODUCTION During the conversion of the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) inventory to depleted uranium oxide, products having some potential for sale to commercial users would be produced. These products would include aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and calcium fluoride (CaF 2 , commonly referred to as fluorspar). These products are routinely used as commercial materials, and an investigation into their potential reuse was done; results are included as part of

64

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix E: Impacts Associated with HF and CaF2 Conversion Product Sale and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE E.1 INTRODUCTION During the conversion of the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) inventory to depleted uranium oxide, products having some potential for sale to commercial users would be produced. These products would include aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and calcium fluoride (CaF 2 , commonly referred to as fluorspar). These products are routinely used as commercial materials, and an investigation into their potential reuse was done; results are included as part of

65

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary Report for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities - Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Process  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C: SCOPING SUMMARY REPORT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SCOPING PROCESS Scoping Summary Report C-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Scoping Summary Report C-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C This appendix contains the summary report prepared after the initial public scoping period for the depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities environmental impact statement (EIS) project. The scoping period for the EIS began with the September 18, 2001, publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (66 FR 23213) and was extended to January 11, 2002. The report summarizes the different types of public involvement opportunities provided and the content of the comments received.

67

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response...  

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Safety and Security 2-8 D0004 Howell, Linda Individual 2-13 D0005 Minter, Dan Southern Ohio Diversification Initiative 2-15 D0006 Justice, T.J. Ohio Governor's Office 2-16 D0007...

68

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision: As Published in the Federal Register  

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54 54 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 143 / Tuesday, July 27, 2004 / Notices accordance with the comprehensive set of DOE requirements and applicable regulatory requirements that have been established to protect public health and the environment. These requirements encompass a wide variety of areas, including radiation protection, facility design criteria, fire protection, emergency preparedness and response, and operational safety requirements. * Cylinder management activities will be conducted in accordance with applicable DOE safety and environmental requirements, including the Cylinder Management Plan. * Temporary impacts on air quality from fugitive dust emissions during reconstruction of cylinder yards or construction of any new facility will be controlled by the best available

69

DUF6 Environmental Risks  

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Risks A discussion of the potential environmental impacts associated with depleted uranium handling or processing facilities. Impacts Considered in the PEIS Depleted uranium...

70

DUF6 Management  

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Management Depleted UF6 Management An introduction to DOE's Depleted UF6 Management Program. The mission of the DOE's Depleted UF6 Management Program is to safely and efficiently...

71

DUF6 Videos  

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Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Videos NOTE: Due to recent security-related issues, you may experience problems playing these videos over the Internet. We are working to resolve...

72

Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

Bengston, S.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapters 3 and 4: Response to Documents and References  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 3 RESPONSES TO COMMENTS This section provides DOE's responses to comments received during the public comment period. Indices of the DOE responses are provided by document number (Table 3.1), by commentors' last name (Table 3.2), and by commentors' company/organization (Table 3.3). Most of the comments received apply to both the Portsmouth and the Paducah conversion facility EISs. However, there are some comment documents that apply specifically to one EIS or the other. An index of comment documents indicating their applicability to each EIS is given in Table 3.4. Table 3.5 lists only those comment documents that apply to the Portsmouth EIS, and Table 3.6 lists those comment documents that apply to the Paducah EIS. Table 3.7 lists the

74

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapters 3 and 4: Responses to Comments and References  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 3 RESPONSES TO COMMENTS This section provides DOE's responses to comments received during the public comment period. Indices of the DOE responses are provided by document number (Table 3.1), by commentors' last name (Table 3.2), and by commentors' company/organization (Table 3.3). Most of the comments received apply to both the Portsmouth and the Paducah conversion facility EISs. However, there are some comment documents that apply specifically to one EIS or the other. An index of comment documents indicating their applicability to each EIS is given in Table 3.4. Table 3.5 lists only those comment documents that apply to the Portsmouth EIS, and Table 3.6 lists those comment documents that apply to the Paducah EIS. Table 3.7 lists the

75

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6. This Introduction to the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES TSRs is not part of the TSR limits or conditions and contains no requirements related to WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES operations or to the safety analyses of the DSA.

Larson, H L

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Comparative safety analysis of LNG storage tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LNG storage tank design and response to selected release scenarios were reviewed. The selection of the scenarios was based on an investigation of potential hazards as cited in the literature. A review of the structure of specific LNG storage facilities is given. Scenarios initially addressed included those that most likely emerge from the tank facility itself: conditions of overfill and overflow as related to liquid LNG content levels; over/underpressurization at respective tank vapor pressure boundaries; subsidence of bearing soil below tank foundations; and crack propagation in tank walls due to possible exposure of structural material to cryogenic temperatures. Additional scenarios addressed include those that result from external events: tornado induced winds and pressure drops; exterior tank missile impact with tornado winds and rotating machinery being the investigated mode of generation; thermal response due to adjacent fire conditions; and tank response due to intense seismic activity. Applicability of each scenario depended heavily on the specific tank configurations and material types selected. (PSB)

Fecht, B.A.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, K.O.; Marr, G.D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Safety Advice for Storage and Handling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"This document is intended for information only and sets out advice for the safe storage and handling of anhydrous titanium tetrachloride. The information contained in these guidelines is provided in good faith and, while it is accurate as far as the authors are aware, no representations or warranties are made with regards to its completeness. For guidance on individual circumstances specific advice should be sought and in all cases the applicable national, European and international regulations should always be complied with. No responsibility will be assumed by Cefic in relation to the information

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.4.

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

79

Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting of buildings, tents, other structures, and open areas as described in Chapter 2 of the DSA. Section 2.4 of the DSA provides an overview of the buildings, structures, and areas in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, including construction details such as basic floor plans, equipment layout, construction materials, controlling dimensions, and dimensions significant to the hazard and accident analysis. Chapter 5 of the DSA documents the derivation of the TSRs and develops the operational limits that protect the safety envelope defined for the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. This TSR document is applicable to the handling, storage, and treatment of hazardous waste, TRU WASTE, LLW, mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste received or generated in the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Section 5, Administrative Controls, contains those Administrative Controls necessary to ensure safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. Programmatic Administrative Controls are in Section 5.6.

Laycak, D T

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities March 2010  

SciTech Connect

This Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements,' and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D T

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This documented safety analysis (DSA) for the Waste Storage Facilities was developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements', and utilizes the methodology outlined in DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 3. The Waste Storage Facilities consist of Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area portion of the DWTF complex. These two areas are combined into a single DSA, as their functions as storage for radioactive and hazardous waste are essentially identical. The B695 Segment of DWTF is addressed under a separate DSA. This DSA provides a description of the Waste Storage Facilities and the operations conducted therein; identification of hazards; analyses of the hazards, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions; and programmatic elements that describe the current capacity for safe operations. The mission of the Waste Storage Facilities is to safely handle, store, and treat hazardous waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste, combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL (as well as small amounts from other DOE facilities).

Laycak, D

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

82

Web Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help » Web Site Map Help » Web Site Map Web Site Map The links listed below include all pages on the site except document topic pages. Home Privacy/Security Help Web Site Map Mailing Services Remove me from the List Contact Us About Us News and Events News Archives News/Media FAQs Internet Resources Documents DUF6 EIS Historical Context What is an EIS? Why EIS is Needed Who is Responsible? EIS Process EIS Topics EIS Alternatives EIS Schedule Public Involvement Opportunities Public Comment Form For More Info DUF6 Management and Uses Management Responsibilities DUF6 Storage How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored Cylinder Leakage DUF6 Storage Safety DUF6 PEIS Cylinder Surveillance and Maintenance Conversion Potential DU Uses "Business Case" for R&D on Beneficial Uses of DU Catalysts for Destruction of Air Pollutants

83

How DUF6 is Stored  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cylinder combines with the iron on the inner surfaces to form a surface layer of iron fluoride that inhibits internal corrosion. A new depleted UF6 cylinder Cylinders that exhibit...

84

LPG land transportation and storage safety. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an analytical examination of fatal accidents involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) releases during transportation and/or transportation related storage. Principal emphasis was on accidents during the nine-year period 1971 through 1979. Fatalities to members of the general public (i.e., those at the scene of the accident through coincidence or curiosity) were of special interest. Transportation accidents involving railroad tank cars, trucks, and pipelines were examined as were accidents at storage facilities, including loading and unloading at such facilities. The main sources of the necessary historical accident data were the accident reports submitted to the Department of Transportation by LPG carriers, National Transportation Safety Board accident reports, articles in the National Fire Protection Association journals, other literature, and personal interviews with firemen, company personnel, and others with knowledge of certain accidents. The data indicate that, on the average, releases of LPG during transportation and intermediate storage cause approximately six fatalities per year to members of the general public. The individual risk is about 1 death per 37,000,000 persons; about the same as the risk of a person on the ground being killed by an airplane crash, and much less than the risk of death by lightning, tornadoes, or dam failures.

Martinsen, W.E.; Cavin, W.D.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

LPG land transportation and storage safety. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an analytical examination of fatal accidents involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) releases during transportation and/or transportation related storage. Principal emphasis was on accidents during the nine-year period 1971 to 1979. Fatalities to members of the general public (i.e., those at the scene of the accident through coincidence or curiosity) were of special interest. Transportation accidents involving railroad tank cars, trucks, and pipelines were examined as were accidents at storage facilities, including loading and unloading at such facilities. The main sources of the necessary historical accident data were the accident reports submitted to the Department of Transportation by LPG carriers, National Transportation Safety Board accident reports, articles in the National Fire Protection Association journals, other literature, and personal interviews with firemen, company personnel, and others with knowledge of certain accidents. The data indicate that, on the average, releases of LPG during transportation and intermediate storage cause approximately six fatalities per year to members of the general public. The individual risk is about 1 death per 37,000,000 persons; about the same as the risk of a person on the ground being killed by an airplane crash, and much less than the risk of death by lightning, tornadoes, or dam failures.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Site High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This criticality safety evaluation covers operations for waste in underground storage tanks at the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford site. This evaluation provides the bases for criticality safety limits and controls to govern receipt, transfer, and long-term storage of tank waste. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality accident cannot occur for tank farms operations, based on current fissile material and operating conditions.

ROGERS, C.A.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

LNG storage: Safety analysis. Annual report, January-December 1980  

SciTech Connect

Progress is summarized on three projects in the areas of LNG safety: Rollover phenomena; Simultaneous boiling and spreading of cryogenic liquids; Modelling of LNG tank dynamics.

Reid, R.C.; Smith, K.A.; Virk, P.S.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Final safety analysis report for the irradiated fuels storage facility  

SciTech Connect

A fuel storage facility has been constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to provide safe storage for spent fuel from two commercial HTGR's, Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom, and from the Rover nuclear rocket program. The new facility was built as an addition to the existing fuel storage basin building to make maximum use of existing facilities and equipment. The completed facility provides dry storage for one core of Peach Bottom fuel (804 elements), 1$sup 1$/$sub 2$ cores of Fort St. Vrain fuel (2200 elements), and the irradiated fuel from the 20 reactors in the Rover program. The facility is designed to permit future expansion at a minimum cost should additional storage space for graphite-type fuels be required. A thorough study of the potential hazards associated with the Irradiated Fuels Storage Facility has been completed, indicating that the facility is capable of withstanding all credible combinations of internal accidents and pertinent natural forces, including design basis natural phenomena of a 10,000 year flood, a 175-mph tornado, or an earthquake having a bedrock acceleration of 0.33 g and an amplification factor of 1.3, without a loss of integrity or a significant release of radioactive materials. The design basis accident (DBA) postulated for the facility is a complete loss of cooling air, even though the occurrence of this situation is extremely remote, considering the availability of backup and spare fans and emergency power. The occurrence of the DBA presents neither a radiation nor an activity release hazard. A loss of coolant has no effect upon the fuel or the facility other than resulting in a gradual and constant temperature increase of the stored fuel. The temperature increase is gradual enough that ample time (28 hours minimum) is available for corrective action before an arbitrarily imposed maximum fuel centerline temperature of 1100$sup 0$F is reached. (LK)

Bingham, G.E.; Evans, T.K.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel, OAS-L-13-11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel OAS-L-13-11 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 10, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for managing and storing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generated by weapons and research programs and recovered through nonproliferation programs. The SNF consists of irradiated reactor fuel and cut up assemblies containing uranium, thorium and/or plutonium. The Department stores 34 metric tons of heavy metal SNF primarily

90

PRELIMINARY NUCLEAR CRITICALITY NUCLEAR SAFETY EVLAUATION FOR THE CONTAINER SURVEILLANCE AND STORAGE CAPABILITY PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Washington Safety Management Solutions (WSMS) provides criticality safety services to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) at the Savannah River Site. One activity at SRS is the Container Surveillance and Storage Capability (CSSC) Project, which will perform surveillances on 3013 containers (hereafter referred to as 3013s) to verify that they meet the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) 3013 for plutonium storage. The project will handle quantities of material that are greater than ANS/ANSI-8.1 single parameter mass limits, and thus required a Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE). The WSMS methodology for conducting an NCSE is outlined in the WSMS methods manual. The WSMS methods manual currently follows the requirements of DOE-O-420.1B, DOE-STD-3007-2007, and the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) SCD-3 manual. DOE-STD-3007-2007 describes how a NCSE should be performed, while DOE-O-420.1B outlines the requirements for a Criticality Safety Program (CSP). The WSRC SCD-3 manual implements DOE requirements and ANS standards. NCSEs do not address the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) of non-reactor nuclear facilities that may be affected by overt or covert activities of sabotage, espionage, terrorism or other security malevolence. Events which are beyond the Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) are outside the scope of a double contingency analysis.

Low, M; Matthew02 Miller, M; Thomas Reilly, T

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microsoft Word - duf6 Report.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion DOE/IG-0751 December 2006 a-, 2 @I 5 - , & % %TEE.@ Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 26, 2006 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT : INFORMATION: "Follow-up Audit Report of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion" BACKGROUND -- - -- - - - - - In 1998, legislation was enacted requiring the Department of Energy (Department) to convert the 794,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at its gaseous diffusion plants to a more stable form. In August 2002, the Department awarded a contract to IJranium Disposition Services, LLC for the design, construction, and operation of conirersion facilities in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio. The

92

Summary: DUF6 Management Cost Analysis Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7650 7650 Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program Summary of the COST ANALYSIS REPORT for the Long-term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Prepared for the Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory September 1997 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer,

93

Documents: NEPA Compliance: DUF6 Programmatic EIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride PDF Icon Record of Decision for Long-term Management and Use...

94

DUF6 EIS Public Comment Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Comment Form Public Comment Form The public comment period for the Depleted UF6 Supplemental Analysis is closed. The public comment form is no longer available. Sorry The...

95

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Notation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Association ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ANL Argonne National Laboratory ANP Advanced Nuclear Power (Framatome ANP, Inc.) ANSI American National Standards Institute...

96

Canister storage building (CSB) safety analysis report phase 3: Safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canister Storage Building (CSB) will be constructed in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The CSB will be used to stage and store spent nuclear fuel (SNF) removed from the Hanford Site K Basins. The objective of this chapter is to describe the characteristics of the site on which the CSB will be located. This description will support the hazard analysis and accident analyses in Chapter 3.0. The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the CSB design criteria, the design's compliance with the applicable criteria, and the basis for authorization to proceed with construction of the CSB.

Garvin, L.J.

1997-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 8  

SciTech Connect

This Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was completed as required by DOE Order 5480.23. The purpose of this document is to construct a safety basis that supports the design and permits construction of the facility. The facility has been designed to the requirements of a Radioactive Solid Waste Facility presented in DOE Order 6430.1A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Worker health and safety in solar thermal power systems. III. Thermal energy storage subsystems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of the use of thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems in solar thermal power systems (STPS) on operating failures and on worker health and safety are examined. Revelant near- and medium-term designs for TES subsystems are reviewed. Generic failure events are considered by an event tree methodology. Three generic categories of initiating events are identified which can lead to release of storage fluids and other hazards. Three TES subsystem designs are selected for, and subjected to, analysis. A fluid release event tree for a sensible heat TES subsystem using mixed media organic oil/crushed rock and sand, designed for the Barstow, CA, 10 MWe pilot plant, is developed. Toxicology and flammability hazards are considered. The effect of component failures, including ullage and fluid maintenance units, on subsystem safety is considered. A latent heat subsystem using NaNO/sub 3//NaOH as the working medium is studied, and relevant failure events delineated. Mechanical equipment failures including the scraped wall heat exchangers, are examined. Lastly, a thermochemical TES subsystem using SO/sub 2//SO/sub 3/ interconversion is considered. Principle hazards identified include mechanical failures and storage fluid release. The integrity of the system is found to depend on catalyst and heat exchanger reliability. Dynamic response to off-normal system events is considered.

Ullman, A.Z.; Sokolow, B.B.; Daniels, J.; Hurt, P.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Safety-Basis Thermal Analysis for KE Basin Sludge Transport and Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of safety-basis thermal and gas generation analyses were completed and independently reviewed to assess the thermal performance of a large diameter container (LDC) containing KE Basin sludge. The results demonstrate: (1) the sludge transport system (STS) containing a LDC can safely transport a KE basin sludge payload up to 2.0 m{sup 3} and, (2) large diameter containers with sludge payloads up to 2.0 m{sup 3} can be safely stored in a process cell at T Plant. The transport and storage analyses are based on a conservative set of assumptions, including limiting environmental conditions. Conclusions drawn from the transport and storage results were not impacted by changes in the radial gap between the cask and LDC, purge gas (i.e., either helium or nitrogen), sludge porosity, or thermal conductivity. The design of the transport cask and large diameter container can accommodate reasonable changes in these values. Both transport from KE Basin and long-term storage at T Plant are addressed for sludge payloads up to 2.0 m{sup 3}. Additional analyses determined the expected range of T Plant environmental temperatures, the hydrogen and oxygen generation rate due to the radiolysis of water, and the maximum hydrogen concentration within a process cell due to chemical reactions and the radiolysis of water. All sludge temperature and hydrogen concentration criteria for transport and storage are met. The analyses assumed a safety-basis sludge mixture defined as 60% by volume floor and 40% by volume canister sludge with 35% retained gas, and a conservative segregated (axial) distribution of metallic uranium (resulting from particulate settling) with associated safety-basis properties. The analyses recognized that the retrieval process would produce non-uniform sludge distributions. Four batch process loadings of 0.5m{sup 3} each are assumed. Each process batch loading will settle and segregate (separate) into two layers: an active layer containing all the metallic uranium which is chemically active, and a non-active layer containing uranium oxide, non-uranium material, and no metallic uranium. This is a conservative representation of operational controls designed to limit the metallic uranium concentration. The sludge layers are assumed to remain intact during transport and storage.

HEARD, F.J.; SATHYANARAYANA, J.J.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for DUF 6 Conversion Project Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Meetings November/December 2001 Overview Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 2 DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart EM-10 Policy EM-40 Project Completion EM-20 Integration EM-50 Science and Technology EM-31 Ohio DUF6 Management Program EM-32 Oak Ridge EM-33 Rocky Flats EM-34 Small Sites EM-30 Office of Site Closure Office of Environmental Management EM-1 DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 3 DUF 6 Management Program DUF 6 Management Program * Mission: Safely and efficiently manage the DOE inventory of DUF 6 in a way that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, and protects the environment DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 4 DUF 6 Inventory Distribution

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

102

Managing Environmental and Human Safety Risks Associated with Geologic Storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0 Natural Gas Storage.0 Yaggy Natural Gas Storage Field: A Case Study................................................. 41 7 storage can be learned from other functionally similar activities such as underground natural gas storage

103

Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable.

Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

CSER 94-004: Criticality safety of double-shell waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

This criticality safety evaluation covers double-shell waste storage tanks (DSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), vault tanks, and the 242-A Evaporator located in the High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farms on the Hanford Site. Limits and controls are specified and the basis for ensuring criticality safety is discussed. A minimum limit of 1,000 is placed upon the solids/plutonium mass ratio in incoming waste. The average solids/Pu mass ratio over all waste in tank farms is estimated to be about 74,500, about 150 times larger than required to assure subcriticality in homogeneous waste. PFP waste in Tank-102-SY has an estimated solids/Pu mass ratio of 10,000. Subcriticality is assured whenever the plutonium concentration is less than 2.6 g. The median reported plutonium concentration for 200 samples of waste solids is about 0.01 g (0.038 g/gal). A surveillance program is proposed to increase the knowledge of the waste and provide added assurance of the high degree of subcriticality.

Rogers, C.A.

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Criticality Safety Evaluations on the Use of 200-gram Pu Mass Limit for RHWM Waste Storage Operations  

SciTech Connect

This work establishes the criticality safety technical basis to increase the fissile mass limit from 120 grams to 200 grams for Type A 55-gallon drums and their equivalents. Current RHWM fissile mass limit is 120 grams Pu for Type A 55-gallon containers and their equivalent. In order to increase the Type A 55-gallon drum limit to 200 grams, a few additional criticality safety control requirements are needed on moderators, reflectors, and array controls to ensure that the 200-gram Pu drums remain criticality safe with inadvertent criticality remains incredible. The purpose of this work is to analyze the use of 200-gram Pu drum mass limit for waste storage operations in Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Facilities. In this evaluation, the criticality safety controls associated with the 200-gram Pu drums are established for the RHWM waste storage operations. With the implementation of these criticality safety controls, the 200-gram Pu waste drum storage operations are demonstrated to be criticality safe and meet the double-contingency-principle requirement per DOE O 420.1.

Chou, P

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Criticality safety criteria for the handling, storage, and transportation of LWR fuel outside reactors: ANS-8.17-1984  

SciTech Connect

The potential for criticality accidents during the handling, storage, and transportation of fuel for nuclear reactors represents a health and safety risk to personnel involved in these activities, as well as to the general public. Appropriate design of equipment and facilities, handling procedures, and personnel training can minimize this risk. Even though the focus of the American National Standard, `Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors,` ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983, is general criteria for the ensurance of criticality safety, ANS-8.17-1984, provides additional guidance applicable to handling, storage, and transportation of light-water- reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel units in any phase of the fuel cycle outside the reactor core. ANS-8.17 had its origin in the late 1970s when a work group consisting of representatives from private industry, personnel from government contractor facilities, and scientists and engineers from the national laboratories was established. The work of this group resulted in the issuance of ANSI/ANS-8.17 in January 1984. This document provides a discussion of this standard.

Whitesides, G.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Safety implications associated with in-plant pressurized gas storage and distribution systems in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Storage and handling of compressed gases at nuclear power plants were studied to identify any potential safety hazards. Gases investigated were air, acetylene, carbon dioxide, chlorine, Halon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, propane, and sulfur hexaflouride. Physical properties of the gases were reviewed as were applicable industrial codes and standards. Incidents involving pressurized gases in general industry and in the nuclear industry were studied. In this report general hazards such as missiles from ruptures, rocketing of cylinders, pipe whipping, asphyxiation, and toxicity are discussed. Even though some serious injuries and deaths over the years have occurred in industries handling and using pressurized gases, the industrial codes, standards, practices, and procedures are very comprehensive. The most important safety consideration in handling gases is the serious enforcement of these well-known and established methods. Recommendations are made concerning compressed gas cylinder missiles, hydrogen line ruptures or leaks, and identification of lines and equipment.

Guymon, R.H.; Casto, W.R.; Compere, E.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Methodology for producing internal short for safety in energy storage devices  

Energy storage cells (also referred to herein as "cells" or "batteries") sold for consumer use in portable electronic devices and other applications have occasional failure in the field. These cells have typically passed a wide ...

109

FUNDAMENTAL SAFETY TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is seen as the future automobile energy storage media due to its inherent cleanliness upon oxidation and its ready utilization in fuel cell applications. Its physical storage in light weight, low volume systems is a key technical requirement. In searching for ever higher gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage materials and systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be studied and used. To make safe and commercially acceptable systems, it is important to understand quantitatively, the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate risk mitigation strategies to handle unforeseen accidental events. To evaluate these materials and systems, an IPHE sanctioned program was initiated in 2006 partnering laboratories from Europe, North America and Japan. The objective of this international program is to understanding the physical risks involved in synthesis, handling and utilization of solid state hydrogen storage materials and to develop methods to mitigate these risks. This understanding will support ultimate acceptance of commercially high density hydrogen storage system designs. An overview of the approaches to be taken to achieve this objective will be given. Initial experimental results will be presented on environmental exposure of NaAlH{sub 4}, a candidate high density hydrogen storage compound. The tests to be shown are based on United Nations recommendations for the transport of hazardous materials and include air and water exposure of the hydride at three hydrogen charge levels in various physical configurations. Additional tests developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials were used to quantify the dust cloud ignition characteristics of this material which may result from accidental high energy impacts and system breach. Results of these tests are shown along with necessary risk mitigation techniques used in the synthesis and fabrication of a prototype hydrogen storage system.

Anton, D

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Acceptability of DUF6 Converison Products at Envirocare Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

55 55 Chemical Technology Division EVALUATION OF THE ACCEPTABILITY OF POTENTIAL DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION PRODUCTS AT THE ENVIROCARE DISPOSAL SITE Allen G. Croff, J. Robert Hightower, and Nancy L. Ranek* *Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois December 2000 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6285 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1. SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. LICENSE RECEIPT LIMITS

111

Public Involvement Opportunities for the DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities Opportunities Public Involvement Opportunities The public comment period for the Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride is closed. Sorry! The public comment period for the Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride is closed. The public comment form is no longer available. For information on other public involvement opportunities, please visit Public Involvement Opportunities. Ways to Provide Comments Comments may be submitted via the Public Comment Form on this Web site. Comments can also be mailed to: DU Disposal Supplement Analysis Comment Argonne National Laboratory

112

Public Involvement Opportunities for the DUF6 Conversion Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Comment Form The public comment period for the Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted...

113

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 1: Introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Section 1.2. Uranium enrichment in the United States began as part of the atomic bomb development by the Manhattan Project during World War II. Enrichment for both civilian...

114

Who is Responsible for the DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who is Responsible Who is Responsible Who Is Responsible for the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs? The U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management is preparing the two Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs, with assistance from Argonne National Laboratory. Responsibilities The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for preparation of the Depleted UF6 Conversion EIS. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting EM in preparation of the EIS. About the Office of Environmental Management (EM) In 1989, the Department of Energy created the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to mitigate the risks and hazards posed by the legacy of nuclear weapons production and research. Although the nation continues to maintain an arsenal of nuclear weapons, as well as some production capability, the United States has embarked on new missions. The most ambitious and far ranging of these missions is dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War. Like most industrial and manufacturing operations, the nuclear complex has generated waste, pollution, and contamination. However, many problems posed by its operations are unique. They include unprecedented amounts of contaminated waste, water, and soil, and a vast number of contaminated structures that will remain radioactive for thousands of years.

115

DUF6 Management Technology Assessment Report (TAR) Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'(3/(7('85$1,80+(;$)/825,'( '(3/(7('85$1,80+(;$)/825,'( 0$1$*(0(17352*5$0 6800$5<2)7+( 7(&+12/2*<$66(660(175(3257 )257+(/21*7(500$1$*(0(172) '(3/(7('85$1,80+(;$)/825,'( K 1RYHPEHU 3UHSDUHGIRUWKH'HSDUWPHQWRI(QHUJ\E\ /DZUHQFH/LYHUPRUH1DWLRQDO/DERUDWRU\ DQG 6FLHQFH$SSOLFDWLRQV,QWHUQDWLRQDO&RUSRUDWLRQ  1RYHPEHU 6800$5<2)7+(7(&+12/2*<$66(660(175(3257)257+(/21* 7(500$1$*(0(172)'(3/(7('85$1,80+(;$)/825,'( ,1752'8&7,21 7KH 7HFKQRORJ\ $VVHVVPHQW 5HSRUW IRU WKH /RQJ7HUP 0DQDJHPHQW RI 'HSOHWHG 8UDQLX

116

DUF6 Managment Engineering Analysis Report (EAR) Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas is corrosive. To neutralize it, or make it harmless, lime would be added, forming calcium fluoride (CaF ). The analysis assumes that the cleaned, emptied cylinders will be...

117

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 6: Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facility at the appropriate time. Approval to Release Materials Containing Residual Radioactive Contamination: Required before releasing (1) nonuranium products from the DUF...

118

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 10: Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-42, (Appendix C Report, 2), (Appendix D Report, 2) Biotic Resources 3-17, 3-57, 6-10 Breached Cylinders 2-3, 2-4, 2-26, 2-28, 3-14, 3-53, 5-5, 5-6, 5-8, 5-9, 5-15, 5-18, 5-19,...

119

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 10: Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-59, (Appendix C Report, 2), (Appendix D Report, 2) Biotic Resources 3-17, 3-56, 6-12 Breached Cylinders 2-3, 2-4, 2-28, 2-31, 3-12, 3-51, 5-4, 5-5, 5-7, 5-8, 5-14, 5-16, 5-17,...

120

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Cover Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co- product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Cover Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not...

122

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

enrichment plant ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ANL Argonne National Laboratory ANP Advanced Nuclear Power, Inc. ATSDR Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry BAT...

123

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 5: Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Paducah site, would involve about 4,000 truck shipments of intact heel cylinders to NTS and about 6,000 rail shipments of U 3 O 8 and crushed heel cylinders to Envirocare....

124

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 4: Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(empty cylinders, if not used as disposal containers) Disposal; Envirocare (primary), NTS (secondary) a DOE plans to decide the specific disposal location(s) for the depleted U...

125

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix F: Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Conversion EIS a Material Origin Destination Depleted U 3 O 8 Portsmouth Envirocare, NTS LLW, empty cylinders Portsmouth Envirocare, NTS CaF 2 Portsmouth Envirocare, NTS HF...

126

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 5: Environmental...  

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survey suggest that these locations are too disturbed to warrant subsurface testing (Anderson 2002). However, unless these findings receive SHPO concurrence, a...

127

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 2: Description...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and packaged in intermodal containers. Disposal at Envirocare of Utah, Inc. a Disposal at NTS. a a DOE plans to decide the specific disposal location(s) for the depleted U 3 O 8...

128

Peer Review of Strategy for Characterizing Contamination in DUF6...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plant (GDP) sites. Therefore, the assumption in Smith 1984 that 25percent (4.6 kilograms) of the neptunium received (18.4 kilograms) in the UO 3 will enter the cascade,...

129

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. The agreement also requires DOE to continue its efforts to evaluate potential use or reuse of the material. The agreement expires in 2008. In 1994, DOE began work on the...

130

DUF6 Management Cost Analysis Report (CAR): Part 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..ll8 6.3.1 Disposal of CaF2 By-product from HF Neutralization Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

131

Final Plan for the Conversion of DUF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (Draft PEIS) 1 . The Draft PEIS and...

132

Notice of Intent (NOI) to Prepare DUF6 PEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, No. 17 / Thursday, January 25, 1996 / Notice 1, No. 17 / Thursday, January 25, 1996 / Notice [Pages 2239-2242] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use o f Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Notice of Intent (NOI). SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC 4321 et seq.). The PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of alternative strategies for the long-term management and use of 560,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) currently stored in cylinders at DOE's three gaseous diffusion plant sites located near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak

133

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix J; Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-i APPENDIX J: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF TRANSPORTATION OF UF 6 CYLINDERS, URANIUM OXIDE, URANIUM METAL, AND ASSOCIATED MATERIALS Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-ii Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-iii CONTENTS (APPENDIX J) NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-vi J.1 SUMMARY OF TRANSPORTATION OPTION IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-3 J.2 TRANSPORTATION MODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.1 Truck Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.2 Rail Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.2.3 Transportation Options Considered But Not Analyzed in Detail . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.3 IMPACTS OF OPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-10 J.3.1

134

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report CSER-96-019 for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Processing and Storage Facilities Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This criticality evaluation is for Spent N Reactor fuel unloaded from the existing canisters in both KE and KW Basins, and loaded into multiple canister overpack (MCO) containers with specially built baskets containing a maximum of either 54 Mark IV or 48 Mark IA fuel assemblies. The criticality evaluations include loading baskets into the cask-MCO, operation at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility,a nd storage in the Canister Storage Building. Many conservatisms have been built into this analysis, the primary one being the selection of the K{sub eff} = 0.95 criticality safety limit. This revision incorporates the analyses for the sampling/weld station in the Canister Storage Building and additional analysis of the MCO during the draining at CVDF. Additional discussion of the scrap basket model was added to show why the addition of copper divider plates was not included in the models.

KESSLER, S.F.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of the passage of decontaminated salt solution from the ITP filters into tank 50H for interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the nuclear criticality safety associated with the decontaminated salt solution after passing through the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) filters, through the stripper columns and into Tank 50H for interim storage until transfer to the Saltstone facility. The criticality safety basis for the ITP process is documented. Criticality safety in the ITP filtrate has been analyzed under normal and process upset conditions. This report evaluates the potential for criticality due to the precipitation or crystallization of fissionable material from solution and an ITP process filter failure in which insoluble material carryover from salt dissolution is present. It is concluded that no single inadvertent error will cause criticality and that the process will remain subcritical under normal and credible abnormal conditions.

Hobbs, D.T.; Davis, J.R.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

136

Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Activity (UESA) Storage Building and Associated Outside Storage, and the DUF6 Conversion Facility. The tours gave the site lead the opportunity to interact with...

137

Technical Plan --Safety 3.8. Hydrogen Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Technical Plan -- Safety 3.8. Hydrogen Safety Safe practices in the production, storage buoyancy of the gas, hydrogen requires different storage, handling and use techniques. The Safety, develop and promote the practices that will ensure the safe handling, storage and use of hydrogen

138

Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Critical Review of Practice of Equating the Reactivity of Spent Fuel to Fresh Fuel in Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses for PWR Spent Fuel Pool Storage  

SciTech Connect

This research examines the practice of equating the reactivity of spent fuel to that of fresh fuel for the purpose of performing burnup credit criticality safety analyses for PWR spent fuel pool (SFP) storage conditions. The investigation consists of comparing k{sub inf} estimates based on reactivity equivalent fresh fuel enrichment (REFFE) to k{sub inf} estimates using the actual spent fuel isotopics. Analyses of selected storage configurations common in PWR SFPs show that this practice yields nonconservative results (on the order of a few tenths of a percent) in configurations in which the spent fuel is adjacent to higher-reactivity assemblies (e.g., fresh or lower-burned assemblies) and yields conservative results in configurations in which spent fuel is adjacent to lower-reactivity assemblies (e.g., higher-burned fuel or empty cells). When the REFFE is determined based on unborated water moderation, analyses for storage conditions with soluble boron present reveal significant nonconservative results associated with the use of the REFFE. This observation is considered to be important, especially considering the recent allowance of credit for soluble boron up to 5% in reactivity. Finally, it is shown that the practice of equating the reactivity of spent fuel to fresh fuel is acceptable, provided the conditions for which the REFFE was determined remain unchanged. Determination of the REFFE for a reference configuration and subsequent use of the REFFE for different configurations violates the basis used for the determination of the REFFE and, thus, may lead to inaccurate, and possibly, nonconservative estimates of reactivity. A significant concentration ({approximately}2000 ppm) of soluble boron is typically (but not necessarily required to be) present in PWR SFPs, of which only a portion ({le} 500 ppm) may be credited in safety analyses. Thus, a large subcritical margin currently exists that more than accounts for errors or uncertainties associated with the use of the REFFE. Consequently, the findings presented here do not represent a significant safety concern unless/until the subcritical margin associated with the soluble boron (that is not currently explicitly credited) is offset by the uncertainties associated with burnup credit and/or the expanded allowance of credit for the soluble boron.

Wagner, J.C.; Parks, C.V.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Health Risks Associated with Disposal of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Disposal of Depleted Uranium A discussion of risks associated with disposal...

142

FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Safety Snapshot H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter on Facebook Tweet about FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter on Twitter Bookmark FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter on Google Bookmark FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter on Delicious Rank FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter on Digg Find More places to share FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Approaches to Safety, Codes & Standards DOE Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Education Systems Analysis

143

Superconducting x-ray lithography source Phase 1 (XLS) safety analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses safety aspects associated with the superconducting x-ray lithography source. The policy, building systems safety and storage ring systems safety are specifically addressed. (LSP)

Blumberg, L. (ed.)

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and ...  

Researchers at ORNL have developed an integrated system that reduces the total life-cycle cost of used fuel storage while improving overall safety. This multicanister ...

145

CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OBJECTIVE CS.1 The LANL criticality safety program provides the required technical guidance and oversight capabilities to ensure a comprehensive criticality safety program for the storage of nuclear materials in SSTs. (Core Requirements 3, 4, 8) Criteria * The Criticality Safety Program is an administrative TSR and meets the General and * Specific Requirements of DOE O 420.1A, Section 4.3 Nuclear Criticality Safety. * All processes and operations involving significant quantities of fissile materials are * described in current procedures approved by line management. * Procedures contain approved criticality controls and limits, based on HSR-6 evaluations and recommendations. * Supervisors, operations personnel, and criticality safety officers have received

146

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix I; Disposal of Oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-80 TABLES I.1 Summary of Depleted Uranium Chemical Forms and Disposal Options Considered . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

147

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 1: Chapter 4; Assessment Approach and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of people historically exposed to large doses of radiation, such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The factors used for the analysis in this PEIS were 0.0004 LCFperson-rem of...

148

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix H; Manufacture and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uses exist for depleted uranium. Depleted uranium could be mixed with highly enriched uranium from retired nuclear weapons to produce nuclear reactor fuel. This process is...

149

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision: As Published in the Federal Register  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49 49 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 143 / Tuesday, July 27, 2004 / Notices halseypj@oro.doe.gov or check the Web site at www.oakridge.doe.gov/em/ssab. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Board: The purpose of the Board is to make recommendations to DOE in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Tentative Agenda 8 a.m.-Introductions, overview of meeting agenda and logistics (Dave Mosby) 8:15 a.m.-Past year evaluation-Board and stakeholder survey results, what worked, what can be improved (Facilitator) 9:50 a.m.-Break 10:05 a.m.-Past year evaluation continued 10:45 a.m.-Summaries and Q&A on the most important issues to DOE, TN Department of Environment & Conservation, and EPA (Facilitator) 11:30 a.m.-Lunch

150

Microsoft Word - DUF6 final concurred-in SA.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED URANIUM OXIDE CONVERSION PRODUCT GENERATED FROM DOE'S INVENTORY OF DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE (DOE/EIS-0359-SA1 AND DOE/EIS-0360-SA1) March 2007 March 2007 i CONTENTS NOTATION........................................................................................................................... iv 1 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ................................................................. 1 1.1 Why DOE Has Prepared This Draft Supplement Analysis .............................. 1 1.2 Background ....................................................................................................... 3 1.3 Proposed Actions Considered in this Draft Supplement Analysis.................... 4

151

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest...

152

Criticality Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Left Tab EVENTS Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical...

153

Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment, safety and health supervisor, changes the DUF6 project sign to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment, safety and health supervisor, changes the DUF6 project sign to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident.

154

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Portsmouth Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Portsmouth Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Portsmouth Summary S-25 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Potential Locations for Construction of a New Cylinder Storage Yard at Portsmouth

156

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Safety Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Print LBNLPub-3000: Health and Safety Manual Berkeley Lab safety guide, policies and procedures. Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Staff Contact information for the...

159

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

160

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

K Basin safety analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of...

166

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

167

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume 2, Appendix A: Process and protocol  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains documentation prepared by the Plutonium ES and H Vulnerability Working Group for conducting the Plutonium ES and H Vulnerability Assessment and training the assessment teams. It has the following five parts. (1) The Project Plan describes the genesis of the project, sets forth the goals, objectives and scope, provides definitions, the projected schedule, and elements of protocol. (2) The Assessment Plan provides a detailed methodology necessary to guide the many professionals who have been recruited to conduct the DOE-wide assessment. It provides guidance on which types and forms of plutonium are to be considered within the scope of the assessment, and lays out the assessment methodology to be used. (3) The memorandum from the Project to Operations Office Managers provides the protocol and direction for participation in the assessment by external stakeholders and members of the public; and the guidance for the physical inspection of plutonium materials in storage. (4) The memorandum from the Project to the assessment teams provides guidance for vulnerability screening criteria, vulnerability evaluation and prioritization process, and vulnerability quantification for prioritization. (5) The Team Training manual was used at the training session held in Colorado Springs on April 19--21, 1994 for all members of the Working Group Assessment Teams and for the leaders of the Site Assessment Teams. The goal was to provide the same training to all of the individuals who would be conducting the assessments, and thereby provide consistency in the conduct of the assessments and uniformity in reporting of the results. The training manual in Section A.5 includes supplemental material provided to the attendees after the meeting.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Orientation Visit to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Low-Level Waste Storage Facility (HC-2), C- 410 D&D Project Complex (HC-2), and DUF6 Conversion Project (HC-3). The tours gave the site lead the opportunity to interact...

170

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by...

171

Bromine Safety  

SciTech Connect

The production and handling in 1999 of about 200 million kilograms of bromine plus substantial derivatives thereof by Great Lakes Chemical Corp. and Albemarle Corporation in their southern Arkansas refineries gave OSHA Occupational Injury/Illness Rates (OIIR) in the range of 0.74 to 1.60 reportable OIIRs per 200,000 man hours. OIIRs for similar industries and a wide selection of other U.S. industries range from 1.6 to 23.9 in the most recent OSHA report. Occupational fatalities for the two companies in 1999 were zero compared to a range in the U.S.of zero for all computer manufacturing to 0.0445 percent for all of agriculture, forestry and fishing in the most recent OSHA report. These results show that bromine and its compounds can be considered as safe chemicals as a result of the bromine safety standards and practices at the two companies. The use of hydrobromic acid as an electrical energy storage medium in reversible PEM fuel cells is discussed. A study in 1979 of 20 megawatt halogen working fluid power plants by Oronzio de Nora Group found such energy to cost 2 to 2.5 times the prevailing base rate at that time. New conditions may reduce this relative cost. The energy storage aspect allows energy delivery at maximum demand times where the energy commands premium rates. The study also found marginal cost and performance advantages for hydrobromic acid over hydrochloric acid working fluid. Separate studies in the late 70s by General Electric also showed marginal performance advantages for hydrobromic acid.

Meyers, B

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

172

Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters Storage Water Heaters June 15, 2012 - 6:00pm Addthis Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over its lifetime. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JulNichols. Consider energy efficiency when selecting a conventional storage water heater to avoid paying more over its lifetime. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/JulNichols. Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for the home. Here you'll find basic information about how storage water heaters work; what criteria to use when selecting the right model; and some installation, maintenance, and safety tips. How They Work A single-family storage water heater offers a ready reservoir -- from 20 to

173

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

174

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydrogen/halogen energy storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen/chlorine energy storage system has been considered at BNL for large scale energy storage. In FY1978 work included an assessment of system safety and cost, investigations of cell performance under conditions elevated pressure and temperature, determination of the transport properties of Nafion membranes and electrochemical engineering studies. Results are summarized.

Spaziante, P M; Sioli, G C; Trotta, R; Perego, A; McBreen, J

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Storage Integration Council (ESIC): 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent electric energy storage deployments have encountered several challenges, including problems stemming from poor system integration, grid integration difficulties, insufficient factory testing and qualification, safety and reliability issues, and inadequate common test protocols. The utility industry needs clear requirements developed so vendors can manufacture cost-effective energy storage products to support the generation, transmission, and distribution system. To address these and related ...

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Primer on lead-acid storage batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook was developed to help DOE facility contractors prevent accidents caused during operation and maintenance of lead-acid storage batteries. Major types of lead-acid storage batteries are discussed as well as their operation, application, selection, maintenance, and disposal (storage, transportation, as well). Safety hazards and precautions are discussed in the section on battery maintenance. References to industry standards are included for selection, maintenance, and disposal.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Pipeline Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pipeline Safety. Summary: Our goal is to provide standard test methods and critical data to the pipeline industry to improve safety and reliability. ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

182

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

183

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, February 24, 1998 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DUF DUF 6 and LiOH) State Ohio Agreement Type Director's Final Findings and Orders Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Establish Compliance Orders and schedules regarding the LiOH Storage Plan/LiOH removal, and the DUF 6 Management Plan. Parties DOE; Ohio Environmental Protection Agency; Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Date 2/24/1998 SCOPE * Establish Compliance Orders and schedules regarding the LiOH Storage Plan/LiOH removal, and the DUF 6 Management Plan. * Exempt Respondents from 1) the requirement to evaluate the LiOH, according to OAC rule 3745-52-11, and 2) evaluate the DUF 6 that is both generated and stored at the facility, according to OAC rule 3745-52-11. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * DOE shall submit to Ohio EPA on or before 31 December of each year until DOE's

184

Transcript of Public Hearing on DUF6 Conversion Facility Draft EISs, Held Jan. 7, 2004, Waverly, Ohio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- - - - - - Draft Environmental Impact Statements For the Construction and Operation of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at the Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio Sites - - - PUBLIC HEARING JANUARY 7, 2004 - - - LOCATION: Pike County YMCA 400 Pride Drive Waverly, Ohio TIME: 6:00

185

Transcript of Public Hearing on DUF6 Conversion Facility Draft EISs, Held Jan. 15, 2004, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PUBLIC MEETING PUBLIC MEETING ______________________________________________________ PRESENTATION BY MR. GARY HARTMAN SPEAKERS: MS. BARBARA WALTON MR. NORMAN MULVENON MS. SUSAN GAWARECKI MR. CHARLES FORSBERG FACILITATOR: MR. DARRYL ARMSTRONG JANUARY 15, 2004 ____________________________________________________ JOAN S. ROBERTS COURT REPORTER P.O. BOX 5924 OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE 37831

186

Safety, Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety, Security Safety, Security Safety, Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 We do not compromise safety for personal, programmatic, or operational reasons. Safety: we integrate safety, security, and environmental concerns into every step of our work Our commitments We conduct our work safely and responsibly to achieve our mission. We ensure a safe and healthful environment for workers, contractors, visitors, and other on-site personnel. We protect the health, safety, and welfare of the general public. We do not compromise safety for personal, programmatic, or

187

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY EMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICES ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Discovery 2 Building, Room 265 8888 University Drive BurnabyENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY EMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY SAFETY & RISK SIGNAGE 26740 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION Supervisors, Safety Committees, EHS LABORATORY SAFETY 27265

188

Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Safety Bulletins  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009-01: Sulfur Hexafluoride Awareness Safety Bulletin 2008-03: Reporting Work-Related Heart Attacks Safety Bulletin 2008-02: Quality Assurance Concern at Wright Industries, Inc....

190

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

191

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEEfor SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", inSuperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant, Advances in

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Usage Storage Storage Energy storage isnt just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research...

195

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

197

Safety Communications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communications Communications New Staff & Guests Safety Topics ISM Plan Safety Communications Questions about safety and environmental compliance should first be directed to your supervisor or work lead. The Life Sciences Division Safety Coordinator Scott Taylor at setaylor@lbl.gov , 486-6133 (office), or (925) 899-4355 (cell); and Facilities Manager Peter Marietta at PMarietta@lbl.gov, 486-6031 (office), or 967-6596 (cell), are also sources of information. Your work group has a representative to the Division Environment, Health, & Safety Committee. This representative can provide safety guidance and offer a conduit for you to pass on your concerns or ideas. A list of current representatives is provided below. Additional safety information can be obtained on-line from the Berkeley Lab

198

Vehicle Battery Safety Roadmap Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The safety of electrified vehicles with high capacity energy storage devices creates challenges that must be met to assure commercial acceptance of EVs and HEVs. High performance vehicular traction energy storage systems must be intrinsically tolerant of abusive conditions: overcharge, short circuit, crush, fire exposure, overdischarge, and mechanical shock and vibration. Fail-safe responses to these conditions must be designed into the system, at the materials and the system level, through selection of materials and safety devices that will further reduce the probability of single cell failure and preclude propagation of failure to adjacent cells. One of the most important objectives of DOE's Office of Vehicle Technologies is to support the development of lithium ion batteries that are safe and abuse tolerant in electric drive vehicles. This Roadmap analyzes battery safety and failure modes of state-of-the-art cells and batteries and makes recommendations on future investments that would further DOE's mission.

Doughty, D. H.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

OEM Perspective on Cryogenic H2 Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compressed compressed Hydrogen Storage. Tobias Brunner February 15 th , 2011, Washington D.C. BMW Hydrogen. Hydrogen Storage Workshop. BMW EfficientDynamics Less emissions. More driving pleasure. BMW Hydrogen Washington DC 02/15/2011 Page 2 BMW Hydrogen Technology Strategy. Advancement of key components. Source: BMW Advanced key components Next vehicle & infrastructure Hydrogen 7 small series LH 2 Storage  Capacity   Safety   Boil-off loss   Pressure supply   Complexity   Infrastructure  Technology leap storage & drive train Efficient long-range mobility:  Zero Emission  Focus on vehicles with high energy demand.  Range > 500 km (6-8 kg H 2 )  Fast refueling (< 4 min / 6 kg)  Optimized safety oriented vehicle package & component

200

Safety audit of refrigerated liquefied gas facilities  

SciTech Connect

An Exxon Research and Engineering Co. comprehensive review of engineering practices and application of safety requirements at Exxon's world-wide refrigerated liquefied hydrocarbon gas storage and handling installations, which included a field audit of about 90 tanks at 30 locations, showed that catastrophic tank failure was not a credible event with properly operated and maintained tanks designed, constructed, and tested in accordance with API Standard 620, Design and Construction of Large Welded Low-Pressure Storage Tanks, although supplemental requirements were suggested to further enhance safety. The review also showed that any meaningful safety audit should be comprehensive and must include all facilities with careful attention to detail. The review embraces products of -1 to -167C and included LNG, ethylene, LPG, and LPG olefins. Recent and proposed LNG safety legislation; some field audit results; and recommendations as to design, construction, and operation of LNG and LPG storage facilities, marine terminals, and tankers, are also discussed.

Feely, F.J.; Sommer, E.C.; Marshall, B.T.; Palmer, A.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daniel R. Borneo, PE Daniel R. Borneo, PE Sandia National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)/CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Presentation Outline * DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - FY07 Project Review * Zinc Bromine Battery (ZBB) Demonstration * Palmdale Super capacitor Demonstration * Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Regional Transit (RT) Super capacitor demonstration * Beacon Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) 3 Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration * Memorandum of Understanding Between CEC and DOE (SNL). - In Place since 2004

202

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Concept Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Washington, DC November 2-4, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Full Air Breathing Battery Concept * Concept is to use O 2 and N 2 as the electrodes in a battery * Novel because N 2 is considered inert * Our group routinely reacts N 2 electrochemically

203

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

204

Safety Advisories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Advisories Safety Advisories 2010 2010-08 Safety Advisory - Software Quality Assurance Firmware Defect in Programmable Logic Controller 2010-07 Safety Advisory - Revised Counterfeit Integrated Circuits Indictment 2010-06 Safety Advisory - Counterfeit Integrated Circuits Indictment 2010-05 Safety Advisory - Contact with Overhead Lines and Ground Step Potential 2010-04 Update - Leaking Acetylene Cylinder Shutoff Valves 2010-03 - Software Quality Assurance Microsoft Excel Software Issue 2010-02 - Leaking Acetylene Cylinder Shutoff Valves 2010-01 Update - Defective Frangible Ammunition 2009 2009-05 Software Quality Assurance - Errors in MACCS2 x/Q Calculations 2009-04 Update - SEELER Exothermic Torch 2009-03 - Defective Frangible Ammunition 2009-02 - Recall of Defense Technology Distraction Devices

205

Application-storage discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discovering application dependency on data and storage is a key prerequisite for many storage optimization tasks such as data assignment to storage tiers, storage consolidation, virtualization, and handling unused data. However, in the real world these ... Keywords: enterprise storage, experimental evaluation, storage discovery

Nikolai Joukov; Birgit Pfitzmann; HariGovind V. Ramasamy; Murthy V. Devarakonda

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Safety Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOE Workshop US DOE Workshop September 19-20, 2012 International perspective on Fukushima accident Miroslav Lipár Head, Operational Safety Section M.Lipar@iaea.org +43 1 2600 22691 2 Content * The IAEA before Fukushima -Severe accidents management * The IAEA actions after Fukushima * The IAEA Action plan on nuclear safety * Measures to improve operational safety * Conclusions THE IAEA BEFORE FUKUSHIMA 4 IAEA Safety Standards IAEA Safety Standards F undamental S afety Principles Safety Fundamentals f o r p ro te c ti n g p e o p l e a n d t h e e n v i ro n m e n t IAEA Safety Standards Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material 2005 E dit ion Safety Requirements No. T S-R-1 f o r p ro te c ti n g p e o p l e a n d t h e e n v i ro n m e n t IAEA Safety Standards Design of the Reactor Core for Nuclear Power Plants

207

Safety - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety The Nuclear Sciences Division (NSD) is committed to providing a safe workplace for its employees, contractors, and guests and conducting its research and operations in a...

208

Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification; project and national accounting of greenhouse gas emissions reductions at geologic storage sites; and evaluating potential regional, national, and international greenhouse gas reduction goals. The goal of our program area is to develop and demonstrate a broad portfolio of technologies, applications, and accounting requirements that

209

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

CHSP: Material Safety Data Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP WHO TO CALL MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES arrow image CHEMICAL PROCUREMENT, TRANSPORTATION AND INVENTORY arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD: DEFINITION arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS arrow image HAZARD CONTROLS arrow image TRAINING AND HAZARD INFORMATION arrow image EXPOSURE MONITORING & MEDICAL CONSULTATION arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image Material Safety Data Sheets and Chemical Information Resources A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a manufacturer/importer's informational document of a hazardous chemical that describes its physical and chemical properties, hazards, and recommended precautions for handling, storage and disposal. How to Read an MSDS

211

Safety Bulletin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulletin Bulletin Offtce 01 Health. Safety and Sa<:urtty Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis No. 2011-01 PURPOSE This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and the subsequent tsunami. While there is still a lot to be learned from the accident · about the adequacy of design specifications and the equipment failure modes, reports from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have identified some key aspects of the operational emergency at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.

212

Flywheel energy storage workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE hydrogen storage activity focuses primarily on the applied research and development (R&D) of low-pressure, materials-based technologies to allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles (500 km) while meeting packaging, cost, safety, and performance requirements to be competitive with current vehicles. While automakers have recently demonstrated progress with some prototype vehicles traveling more than 300 miles on a single fill, this driving range must be achievable across different vehicle models and without compromising space, performance, or cost. In addition, hydrogen storage will be needed for both other niche vehicular applications and off-board uses such as for stationary power generation and for hydrogen delivery and refueling infrastructure.

214

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Engineering Safety Engineering provides occupational safety services to support the Lab's mission. This includes injury and illness prevention and loss control systems for...

215

Integrated Safety Management (ISM) - Safety Culture Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Culture Resources Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Safety from the Operator's Perspective: We are All in this Together (2005) - Jim Ellis, President and CEO, Institute of...

216

ACTIVITY SPECIFIC FIREARMS SAFETY PLAN FOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Activity Specific Firearm Safety Plan for ACRF/North Slope of Alaska Sandia National Laboratories Department 6383, Energy, Climate & Atmospheric Management ACRF/NSA/AAO Revision 14 Activity Specific Firearm Safety Plan for June 2010 ACRF/North Slope of Alaska Signature Page This safety plan is approved by the undersigned and includes the firearm and ammunition storage practices described in this document. Mark D Ivey ACRF/NSA/AAO Site Manager _________________________________Date: ______ Mark D Ivey Department 06339 Manager _________________________________Date: _______ Michael L Heister SNL Safety Engineer _________________________________Date:________

217

A Korarchael Genome Reveals Insights into the Evolution of the Archaea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

protein of unknown function DUF6, transmembrane hypotheticalprotein of unknown function DUF6, transmembrane Gene Nameprotein of unknown function DUF6, transmembrane hypothetical

Elkins, James G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Functional genomics of the bacterial degradation of the emerging water contaminants: 1,4-dioxane and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drugs protein of unknown function DUF6 trans- drugs membraneprotein of unknown function DUF6 trans- drugs membraneprotein of unknown function DUF6 trans- putative membrane

Sales, Christopher Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

220

Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Safety Bulletins  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

222

Safety Advisories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

223

Safety Alerts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

224

Safety Bulletin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. BACKGROUND On March 11 , 2011 , the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan was damaged by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and...

225

Biological Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

226

Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 3, Site team reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self assessment was conducted of those Hanford facilities that are utilized to store Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Material, (RINM). The objective of the assessment is to identify the Hanford inventories of RINM and the ES & H concerns associated with such storage. The assessment was performed as proscribed by the Project Plan issued by the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group. The Project Plan is the plan of execution intended to complete the Secretary`s request for information relevant to the inventories and vulnerabilities of DOE storage of spent nuclear fuel. The Hanford RINM inventory, the facilities involved and the nature of the fuel stored are summarized. This table succinctly reveals the variety of the Hanford facilities involved, the variety of the types of RINM involved, and the wide range of the quantities of material involved in Hanford`s RINM storage circumstances. ES & H concerns are defined as those circumstances that have the potential, now or in the future, to lead to a criticality event, to a worker radiation exposure event, to an environmental release event, or to public announcements of such circumstances and the sensationalized reporting of the inherent risks.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

HSS Safety Shares  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Shares Safety Shares HSS Safety Shares Home Health, Safety and Security Home HSS Safety Shares 2013 Safety Shares National Weather Service - Lightning Safety General Lightning Safety 7 Important Parts of a Cleaning Label Kitchen Knife Safety Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards Rabies Hearing Loss Winter Driving Tips 2012 Safety Shares Holiday Decoration Safety Tips Countdown to Thanksgiving Holiday Fall Season Safety Tips Slips, Trips and Fall Safety Back To School Safety Tips for Motorists Grills Safety and Cleaning Tips Glass Cookware Safety Water Heater Safety FAQs Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards First Aid for the Workplace Preventing Colon Cancer Yard Work Safety Yard Work Safety - Part 1 Yard Work Safety - Part 2 High Sodium Risks Heart Risk Stair Safety New Ways To Spot Dangerous Tires

228

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At least we used to. We are Occult Trucking and Storage andNOTHING. FLASHBACK -- OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT --I saw him. FLASHBACK - OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT -

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Sorption Storage Technology Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Technology Summary DOE H2 Storage Workshop, Feb 14-15, 2011, Washington, DC 1 Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop February 14 - 15, 2011, Washington, DC...

230

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adki ns, "Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant- Ten Years2J O. D. Johnson, "Worldwide Pumped-Storage Projects", PowerUnderground Pumped Hydro Storage", Proc. 1976 Eng.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

233

Public Safety Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public Safety Communication. Summary: ... the development of quantitative requirements for public safety communications. ...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 11, 2011 February 11, 2011 Site Visit Report Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011 INTRODUCTION This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) documented safety analysis (DSA) at the Hanford Site. During discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE- RL), the review of WESF was jointly selected by HSS and DOE-RL based on the high hazards of the facility and the need to periodically evaluate the facility and DSA by independent reviewers. SCOPE The scope of the review was to evaluate the WESF safety and support systems in detecting, preventing and mitigating analyzed events as described in the facility's DSA, PRC-EDC-10-45190, 2010, Executive

235

Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 11, 2011 February 11, 2011 Site Visit Report Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility, January 2011 INTRODUCTION This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of the Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) documented safety analysis (DSA) at the Hanford Site. During discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE- RL), the review of WESF was jointly selected by HSS and DOE-RL based on the high hazards of the facility and the need to periodically evaluate the facility and DSA by independent reviewers. SCOPE The scope of the review was to evaluate the WESF safety and support systems in detecting, preventing and mitigating analyzed events as described in the facility's DSA, PRC-EDC-10-45190, 2010, Executive

236

Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new technology for energy storage called Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage (SPHS) has been evaluated from a techno-economical point of view. Intermittent renewable energy sources (more)

Erik, Almen John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energys Vehicle Technology Program to conduct various types of energy storage...

238

NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix...

239

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

240

Earthquake Experience Data on Anchored, Ground-Mounted Vertical Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earthquake experience data indicate that anchored, vertical storage tanks similar in structure to those used in nuclear power plant safety systems can survive greater ground motion than accounted for in most nuclear plant designs. Comparison of design parameters for nuclear and nonnuclear storage tanks confirmed the applicability of earthquake experience data to demonstrate the seismic adequacy of nuclear plant storage tanks.

1989-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

242

Boulder Safety Reps Receive 2010 NIST Safety Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Safety Award. Award Winner: Boulder Division Safety Representatives. Description: The NIST Safety Award, first presented ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

243

Gas Storage Act (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Gas Storage Act (Illinois) Gas Storage Act (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Utility Program Info State Illinois Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Illinois Commerce Commission Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate distribution to the public in the State of Illinois, if the said business of such corporation is regulated or subject to regulation under either the laws of the State of Illinois or the laws of the United States, shall have the right to enter upon, take or damage private property or any interest

244

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Storage Storage Energy storage isn’t just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more. Energy storage isn't just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more.

245

Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines This chapter constitutes rules for all underground storage tank facilities- including registration, reporting, permitting, certification, financial responsibility and to protect human health and the environment

246

Security, Safety and Health  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, Fourth Quarter, 2012 8, Fourth Quarter, 2012 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 Security and Sustainability A Column from the FE Director of Health, Security, Safety and Health 4 Training Goes 3-D NETL's AVESTAR Center Deploys New Virtual Training System 5 Secretary Achievement Awards Two FE Teams Earn Secretary of Energy Recognition 7 Vast Energy Resource Identified FE Study Says Billions of Barrels of Oil in Residual Oil Zones 8 Presidential Award NETL-RUA Engineer Earns Highest Government Honor in Science & Engineering This September marked a major mile- stone for one of the Office of Fossil Energy's largest carbon capture, utili- zation and storage projects: the opening

247

Gas Pipeline Safety (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section establishes the Pipeline Safety Division within the Utility Regulatory Commission to administer federal pipeline safety standards and establish minimum state safety standards for...

248

Electrical Safety Committee Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

safety and electrical safety awareness within the APS. The committee shall implement policies and practices adopted by the ANL Electrical Safety Committee and shall assist the ANL...

249

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, Appendix B, Part 9: Oak Ridge site site team report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the input to and results of the Department of Energy (DOE) - Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) DOE Plutonium Environment, Safety and Health (ES & H) Vulnerability Assessment (VA) self-assessment performed by the Site Assessment Team (SAT) for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL or X-10) and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12) sites that are managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES). As initiated (March 15, 1994) by the Secretary of Energy, the objective of the VA is to identify and rank-order DOE-ES&H vulnerabilities associated for the purpose of decision making on the interim safe management and ultimate disposition of fissile materials. This assessment is directed at plutonium and other co-located transuranics in various forms.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

National propane safety week caps fifth anniversary of GAS Check  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on National Propane Safety Week. The publicity encompassed everything from preventative maintenance to safe winter storage of cylinders. This campaign focused much of its attention on GAS (gas appliance system) Check, the propane industry's most well-known safety program.

Prowler, S.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Chemical and Laboratory Safety Program 1 November 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical and Laboratory Safety Program 1 November 2010 Chemical and Laboratory Safety Program employers to ensure that all chemicals are controlled, identified, labelled, handled, stored and disposed of in a prescribed manner. The safe use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals, particularly

Argerami, Martin

252

Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Status...

253

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDF, PPT) Badge Return (LBNL) (PDF, PPT) Battery Management (PDF, PPT) Bicycle Safety (PDF, PPT) Construction-Related Mercury Spills (PDF, PPT) Construction Vehicle Safety...

254

Safety Notices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Notices Safety Notices Fatigue August 2011 Sleep deprivation and the resulting fatigue can adversely affect manual dexteri- ty, reaction time, alertness, and judgment, resulting in people putting themselves and their co-workers at risk. Liquid-Gas Cylinder Handtruck Awareness May 2011 Failure of a spring assembly can result in a loss of control, allowing the Dewar to become separated from the hand truck, leading to a very dangerous situation. Safe Transport of Hazardous Materials February 2011 APS users are reminded that hazardous materials, including samples, cannot be packed in personal luggage and brought on public transport. Electrical Incidents September 2010 Two minor electrical incidents in the past months at the APS resulted in a minor shock from inadequately grounded equipment, and a damaged stainless

255

Stair Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stair Safety: Causes and Prevention of Stair Safety: Causes and Prevention of Residential Stair Injuries Cornell Department of Design & Cornell University Cooperative Environmental Analysis Martha Van Rensselaer Hall Extension 607-255-2144 Ithaca, NY 14853 In the United States during 1997 about 27,000 people were killed by unintentional home injuries. 1 Figure 1 illustrates the causes of some of the injuries that resulted in death. As you can see, falls account for the majority of incidents. Also in 1997, 6.8 million people suffered home accidents that resulted in disabling injuries. 1 While data on the number of injuries related to stairs and steps are not available for 1997, data from 1996 show that 984,000 people experienced injuries related to home stairs or steps during

256

Safety harness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety harness to be worn by a worker, especially a worker wearing a plastic suit thereunder for protection in a radioactive or chemically hostile environment, which safety harness comprises a torso surrounding portion with at least one horizontal strap for adjustably securing the harness about the torso, two vertical shoulder straps with rings just forward of the of the peak of the shoulders for attaching a life-line and a pair of adjustable leg supporting straps releasibly attachable to the torso surrounding portion. In the event of a fall, the weight of the worker, when his fall is broken and he is suspended from the rings with his body angled slightly back and chest up, will be borne by the portion of the leg straps behind his buttocks rather than between his legs. Furthermore, the supporting straps do not restrict the air supplied through hoses into his suit when so suspended.

Gunter, Larry W. (615 Sand Pit Rd., Leesville, SC 29070)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electrical Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by the Office of Health, Safety and Security and is available to all DOE components and their contractors. 2. Specific comments (recommendations, additions, deletions, and any pertinent data) to enhance this document should be sent to: Patrick Tran

258

Safety harness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety harness to be worn by a worker, especially a worker wearing a plastic suit thereunder for protection in a radioactive or chemically hostile environment. The safety harness comprises a torso surrounding portion with at least one horizontal strap for adjustably securing the harness about the torso, two vertical shoulder straps with rings just forward of the of the peak of the shoulders for attaching a life-line and a pair of adjustable leg supporting straps releasibly attachable to the torso surrounding portion. In the event of a fall, the weight of the worker, when his fall is broken and he is suspended from the rings with his body angled slightly back and chest up, will be borne by the portion of the leg straps behind his buttocks rather than between his legs. Furthermore, the supporting straps do not restrict the air supplied through hoses into his suit when so suspended.

Gunter, L.W.

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

259

Explosives Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

212-2012 212-2012 June 2012 DOE STANDARD EXPLOSIVES SAFETY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, DC 20585 MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1212-2012 i TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. PURPOSE, SCOPE and APPLICABILITY, EXEMPTIONS, WAIVERS, ABBREVIATIONS, ACRONYMS, AND DEFINITIONS .......... 1 1.0. PURPOSE ............................................................................................................. 1 1.1. Scope and Applicability.............................................................................. 1 2.0. STANDARD ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT ...................................... 3 3.0. EXEMPTIONS ....................................................................................................... 4

260

Safety valve  

SciTech Connect

The safety valve contains a resilient gland to be held between a valve seat and a valve member and is secured to the valve member by a sleeve surrounding the end of the valve member adjacent to the valve seat. The sleeve is movable relative to the valve member through a limited axial distance and a gap exists between said valve member and said sleeve.

Bergman, Ulf C. (Malmoe, SE)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cryogenics safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described. (LCL)

Reider, R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Recommended research on LNG safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the safety and other environmental aspects of liquefied energy gases including liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effort reported here was conducted as part of the planning for further research into the safety aspects of transporting and storing LNG, with primary emphasis on public safety. Although the modern LNG industry has enjoyed excellent success in providing for safe operations, significant questions remain on the part of many, the expressions of which were intensified with the addition of marine-based LNG import terminals. Public safety with regard to large-scale importation of this fuel has received widespread attention in the US Congress, state legislatures, county and city governments, and from various individuals and public groups, with coverage in all the news media, including books published on the subject. The safety concerns have centered around the consequences to the public of a large spill of the cryogenic liquid from an ocean tanker or a larger storage tank, either of which might hold as much as 125,000 m/sup 3/ of LNG.

Carpenter, H.J.; Gilmore, F.R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Office of Health & Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Beryllium Chemical Safety Biological Safety Radiation Safety Rules 10 CFR 707 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 850 10 CFR 851 OHS Document Collection Site Medical Clinics REACTS EEOICPA...

265

Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of nuclear experience on a common objectivethe safe and secure storage and disposition of excess fissile nuclear materials.

Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Disaster City Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety. What Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is needed to participate in this event? Personal ... On Site Safety Comes First. Be ...

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

Engineered Fire Safety Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered Fire Safety Group. Welcome. ... Employment/Research Opportunities. Contact. Jason Averill, Leader. Engineered Fire Safety Group. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Current Safety Performance Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support & Corporate Safety Analysis HS-20 Home Mission & Functions Office of Sustainability, Environment, Safety and Anaylsis (SESA) ...

269

Safety & Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination Management andor Coordination of APS Site WorkServices Safety & Emergency Management Database Maintenance Personnel Safety & Emergency Management Area...

270

Upcoming Natural Gas Storage Facilities.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Energy Hub Project Orbit Gas Storage Inc KY Leader One Gas Storage Project Peregrine Midstream Partners WY Tricor Ten Section Storage Project

271

Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Twitter Bookmark...

272

Electrical Safety - Monthly Analyses of Electrical Safety Occurrences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Analysis Office of Analysis Operating Experience Committee Safety Alerts Safety Bulletins Annual Reports Special Operations Reports Safety Advisories Special Reports Causal Analysis Reviews Contact Us HSS Logo Electrical Safety Monthly Analyses of Electrical Safety Occurrences 2013 September 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences August 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences July 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences June 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences May 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences April 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences March Electrical Safety Occurrence February Electrical Safety Occurrence January Electrical Safety Occurrence 2012 December Electrical Safety Occurrence November Electrical Safety Occurrence October Electrical Safety Occurrence September Electrical Safety Occurrence

273

Geostock's containment method reduces underground storage leakage  

SciTech Connect

Geostock's hydraulic containment method of safely containing liquid hydrocarbons in unlined underground storage caverns, so that there is no danger of leakage into the surrounding ground makes use of the surrounding ground water, whose static head is kept higher than the pressure of the stored product. For leakage prevention, the static head must be larger than the potential of the stored product plus a safety margin. The safety margin involves a shape factor, dependent on the size and shape of the cavity (examples are given), and a factor which allows for unforeseen conditions. The depth required for the ground water to possess a sufficiently large static head depends on the type and pressure of the stored product, the hydrogeological environment, and the geometry of the facility. Geostock has used the hydraulic containment method in a domestic heating oil facility at May sur Orne, Fr., and also in three propane storage facilities in France.

Not Available

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

Safety | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Safety Safety Data/Tools Apps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Safety Welcome to the Safety Community The Safety Community is where data and insight are combined to facilitate a discussion around and awareness of our Nation's public safety activities. Whether you are interested in crime, roadway safety, or safety in the workplace, we have something for you. Check out the data, browse and use the apps, and be part of the discussion. Check out talks from the White House Safety Datapalooza Previous Pause Next One year of public safety data at Safety.Data.gov! Safety NHTSA releases SaferCar APIs and mobile app NHTSA releases SaferCar APIs and mobile app View More Todd Park, U.S. Chief Technology Officer at the Safety Datapalooza View More New APIs New APIs FRA launches new safety data dashboard and APIs.

275

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

276

NREL: Energy Storage - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage News Below are news stories related to NREL's energy storage research. August 28, 2013 NREL Battery Calorimeters Win R&D 100 Award The award-wining Isothermal...

277

NETL: Carbon Storage Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-571KB has been posted. 08.27.2013 Publications August 2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-1.1MB has been posted. 08.15.2013 News Ancient...

278

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumped hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage areto other energy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro andenergy would be $50/MJ whereas the cost of the pumped hydro

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Storage & Delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage & Delivery. Summary: Schematic of Membrane Molecular Structure The goal of the project is to develop ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

Colley, D.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Laboratory Safety Certificate Course Completion Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Carcinogen Safety (2330) Centrifuge Safety (2335) Compressed Gas Safety (3835) Corrosive Safety (3055

Pawlowski, Wojtek

283

Regulators Experiences in Licensing and Inspection of Dry Cask Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the combination of a rigorous licensing and inspection program, ensures the safety and security of dry cask storage. NRC authorizes the storage of spent fuel at an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) under two licensing options: site-specific licensing and general licensing. In July 1986, the NRC issued the first site-specific license to the Surry Nuclear Power Plant in Virginia authorizing the interim storage of spent fuel in a dry storage cask configuration. Today, there are over 30 ISFSIs currently licensed by the NRC with over 700 loaded dry casks. Current projections identify over 50 ISFSIs by the year 2010. No releases of spent fuel dry storage cask contents or other significant safety problems from the storage systems in use today have been reported. This paper discusses the NRC licensing and inspection experiences. (authors)

Baggett, S.; Brach, E.W. [Spent Fuel Project Office, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hydrogen Storage Requirements for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GENERAL MOTORS GENERAL MOTORS HYDROGEN STORAGE REQUIREMENTS FOR FUEL CELL VEHICLES Brian G. Wicke GM R&D and Planning DOE Hydrogen Storage Workshop August 14-15, 2002 Argonne National Laboratory General Motors Fuel Cell Vehicles * GM fuel cell vehicle Goal - be the first to profitably sell one million fuel cell vehicles * Fuel cell powerplant must be suitable for a broad range of light-duty vehicles (not just niche) * UNCOMPROMISED performance & reliability are REQUIRED * SAFETY IS A GIVEN * Evolutionary and Revolutionary vehicle designs are included-GM AUTONOMY-as long as the customer is (more than) satisfied GENERAL MOTORS AUTONOMY GENERAL MOTORS AUTONOMY General Motors Fuel Cell Vehicles * Focus on PEM fuel cell technology * Must consider entire hydrogen storage & (unique) fuel delivery systems,

285

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

286

Nuclear data for criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

A brief overview is presented on emerging requirements for new criticality safety analyses arising from applications involving nuclear waste management, facility remediation, and the storage of nuclear weapons components. A derivation of criticality analyses from the specifications of national consensus standards is given. These analyses, both static and dynamic, define the needs for nuclear data. Integral data, used primarily for analytical validation, and differential data, used in performing the analyses, are listed, along with desirable margins of uncertainty. Examples are given of needs for additional data to address systems having intermediate neutron energy spectra and/or containing nuclides of intermediate mass number.

Westfall, R.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

288

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Storage Systems Analysis Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Storage Systems Analysis Working Group The Storage Systems Analysis Working Group, launched in March 2005, provides a forum to facilitate research and communication of hydrogen storage-related analysis activities among researchers actively engaged in hydrogen storage systems analyses. The working group includes members from DOE, the national laboratories, industry, and academia. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in transportation, stationary, and portable power applications. One of the most challenging technical barriers known is how to efficiently store hydrogen on-board a vehicle to meet customer expectations of a driving range greater than 300 miles-as well as performance, safety, and cost-without impacting passenger or cargo space. The Department of Energy's hydrogen storage activity is coordinated through the "National Hydrogen Storage Project," with multiple university, industry, and federal laboratory partners focused on research and development of on-board vehicular hydrogen storage technologies. This research also has components applicable to off-board storage of hydrogen for refueling infrastructure and the off-board regeneration of chemical hydrogen carriers applicable to hydrogen delivery.

289

Chemical Storage-Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

290

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

291

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Tag: Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/all en Red light, green light 8/all en Red light, green light http://www.y12.doe.gov/employees-retirees/y-12-times/red-light-green-light

Even in the face of a furlough, we were thorough, professional and kept an eye on safety and security.
  • NETL: Permanence and Safety of CCS FAQs  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    How is a CO2 storage site monitored? How is a CO2 storage site monitored? Monitoring will play an important role during the injection phase of a CO2 storage project, both for the purpose of assuring worker and public safety and confirming that the storage project is performing as expected. If the seal of a storage formation or the plug in an abandoned well is going to fail, this will mostly likely occur during the injection phase when the pressure in the storage formation is highest. After injection stops, monitoring is also likely to continue for observing the post-injection pressure decline and to monitor continued movement, if any, of the injected CO2. The frequency and intensity of monitoring will decrease over time as greater assurance of long-term storage integrity is obtained. If repeated measurements indicate that the CO2 is not moving and remains trapped in the storage formation, there may come a time when monitoring is no longer needed. The timeframe over which this occurs could be as short as a few years in a depleted gas reservoir with a well-defined geologic trap. For storage in a saline formation without a closed trap, more time may be needed before a combination of capillary trapping and solubility trapping (dissolution of CO2 in the salt water) eventually immobilize the CO2. Information from model studies and ongoing monitoring would be used to assess how much longer monitoring should continue. For storage in oil fields, which like gas reservoirs have time-tested geologic seals, the duration of post-injection monitoring is likely to be shorter than for saline formations. In December 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized rules for CO2 injections that require a 50-year post-closure monitoring period for CO2 injection projects.

    294

    2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

    SciTech Connect

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    295

    2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

    SciTech Connect

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Progra

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    296

    Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee Charter 1. Purpose The committee reviews functional changes to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) and Personnel Protection System (PSS) used to provide personnel protection and area exclusion related to APS accelerators, storage ring and other radiation handling areas. The RSPP Committee advises APS management on radiation safety matters. At the request of APS Management the committee reviews projects, recommends radiation safety policy, and evaluates accident investigation conclusions. 2. Membership Members are appointed by the APS Division Directors and APS Director for their knowledge and background in Interlock Systems, Radiation Safety, Accelerator Operations and Work on the Experiment Floor.

    297

    DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Safety  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    First Responder Training First Responder Training Bibliographic Database Newsletter Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Safety Printable Version Safety Safe practices in the production, storage, distribution, and use of hydrogen are an integral part of future plans. Like most fuels, hydrogen can be handled and used safely with appropriate sensing, handling, and engineering measures. The aim of this program activity is to verify the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen, outline the factors that must be considered to minimize the safety hazards related to the use of hydrogen as a fuel, and provide a comprehensive database on hydrogen and hydrogen safety. Photo of hydrogen fueling pump in Las Vegas, Nevada

    298

    APS Experiment Safety Review Board  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Meeting Minutes * Laser Safety Notifications Charter for the APS Laser Safety Committee 1. Purpose The Laser Safety Committee advises APS Management on laser safety matters,...

    299

    Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider West Virginia Department of Commerce Lays out guidelines for the conditions under which coal mining operations must notify state authorities of intentions to mine where underground gas

    300

    Safety for Users  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety for Users Safety for Users Print Tuesday, 01 September 2009 08:01 Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    301

    Office of Nuclear Safety  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home » Directives » Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules » Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program » Search » Approved Standards » Recently Approved » RevCom for TSP » Monthly Status Reports » Archive » Feedback DOE Nuclear Safety Research & Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design (HS-31) Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design - About Us » Nuclear Policy Technical Positions/Interpretations » Risk Assessment Working Group » Criticality Safety » DOE O 420.1C Facility Safety » Beyond Design Basis Events Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs (HS-32) Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs - About Us

    302

    H. UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    all safety basis documents submitted to DOE and (2) preparation of a safety evaluation report concerning the safety basis for a facility. 2. DOE will maintain a public list on the...

    303

    Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation Print NSLS users who have completed NSLS Safety Module must present a copy of one of the following documents to receive ALS 1001: Safety at the...

    304

    Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Laser Safety  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Laser Safety Home Whom to Call Analysis of Laser Safety Occurrences: 2005-2011 Laser Bio-effects Laser Classification Laser Disposal Guide Laser Forms Laser Newsletter Laser Lab...

    305

    Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

    Vail, T.S.

    1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    306

    Heat storage duration  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    307

    NanoFab Safety  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Safety in the NanoFab. ... Detailed guidance on working safely in the NanoFab can be found in the CNST NanoFab Safety Manual. ...

    2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    308

    Nuclear criticality safety guide  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    309

    Nuclear Safety Workshops  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program Search Approved Standards Recently Approved RevCom...

    310

    Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

    311

    NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

    312

    Other Innovative Storage Systems  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible Solid Oxide Cells: Scott Barnett1; Gareth Hughes1; Kyle Yakal-Kremski1; Zhan Gao1; 1 Northwestern...

    313

    NREL: Energy Storage - Webmaster  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Energy Storage Home About the Project Technology Basics Research & Development Awards &...

    314

    NREL: Energy Storage - Resources  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Resources The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Energy Storage team and partners work within a variety of programs that have created test manuals to establish standard...

    315

    Advanced Energy Storage Publications  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Advanced Energy Storage Publications Reports: Advanced Technology Development Program For Lithium-Ion Batteries: Gen 2 Performance Evaluation Final Report Advanced Technology...

    316

    Storage Sub-committee  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Gaps - Existing R&D and pilot programs - CAES - Controllable pumping - Off shore (energy island, etc) - Gravity systems - Thermal storage Confidential 3 Report to DOE ...

    317

    Carbon Storage Program  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    fuel power plants as viable, clean sources of electric power. The program is focused on developing technologies that can achieve 99 percent of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage...

    318

    HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

    SciTech Connect

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    319

    H 2 Storage Projects  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... 10. Titanium-decorated carbon nanotubes: a potential high-capacity hydrogen storage madium. ... 3. Exohydrogenated single-wall carbon nanotubes. ...

    320

    Natural Gas Storage Valuation .  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ??In this thesis, one methodology for natural gas storage valuation is developed and two methodologies are improved. Then all of the three methodologies are applied (more)

    Li, Yun

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    321

    NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Does CCS really make a difference for the environment? Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of several options, including the use of renewables, nuclear energy, alternative...

    322

    Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume V. Thermal storage subsystem. CDRL item 2  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Design, specifications, and diagrams for the thermal storage subsystem for the 10-MW pilot tower focus power plant are presented in detail. The Honeywell thermal storage subsystem design features a sensible heat storage arrangement using proven equipment and materials. The subsystem consists of a main storage containing oil and rock, two buried superheater tanks containing inorganic salts (Hitec), and the necessary piping, instrumentation, controls, and safety devices. The subsystem can provide 7 MW(e) for three hours after twenty hours of hold. It can be charged in approximately four hours. Storage for the commercial-scale plant consists of the same elements appropriately scaled up. Performance analysis and tradeoff studies are included.

    None

    1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    323

    Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

    324

    Molten salt safety study. Final report  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The considerations concerning safety in using molten salt (40% potassium nitrate, 60% sodium nitrate) in a solar central receiver plant are addressed. The considerations are of a general nature and do not cover any details of equipment or plant operation. The study includes salt chemical reaction, experiments with molten salt, dry storage and handling constraints, and includes data from the National Fire Protection Association. The contents of this report were evaluated by two utility companies and they concluded that no major safety problems exist in using a molten salt solar system.

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    325

    Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project (4/28/03)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    68 68 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 81 / Monday, April 28, 2003 / Notices ''Browse Pending Collections'' link and by clicking on link number 2270. When you access the information collection, click on ''Download Attachments'' to view. Written requests for information should be addressed to Vivian Reese, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4050, Regional Office Building 3, Washington, DC 20202-4651 or to the e-mail address vivan.reese@ed.gov. Requests may also be electronically mailed to the internet address OCIO_RIMG@ed.gov or faxed to 202-708-9346. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be directed to Joseph Schubart at

    326

    Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    68 68 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 81 / Monday, April 28, 2003 / Notices ''Browse Pending Collections'' link and by clicking on link number 2270. When you access the information collection, click on ''Download Attachments'' to view. Written requests for information should be addressed to Vivian Reese, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4050, Regional Office Building 3, Washington, DC 20202-4651 or to the e-mail address vivan.reese@ed.gov. Requests may also be electronically mailed to the internet address OCIO_RIMG@ed.gov or faxed to 202-708-9346. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be directed to Joseph Schubart at

    327

    Complete Safety Training  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

    328

    Complete Safety Training  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

    329

    Complete Safety Training  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Complete Safety Training Print Complete Safety Training Print All users are required to take safety training before they may begin work at the ALS. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator and the Experimental Lead to ensure that all members of the team receive proper safety training before an experiment begins. Special consideration is available for NSLS users who have completed, and are up-to-date with, their safety training, NSLS Safety Module; they may take a brief equivalency course ALS 1010: Site-Specific Safety at the ALS in lieu of the complete safety training in ALS 1001: Safety at the ALS. These users must present documentation upon arrival at the ALS showing that they have completed NSLS Safety Module; see Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation for examples.

    330

    NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

    331

    Actuarial risk assessment of expected fatalities attributable to carbon capture and storage in 2050  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    natural gas storage industry. But in Chemery, 17 halshs-00487175,version2-10Feb2011 #12;France, technical has occurred. According to Damen et al. (2006), nine natural gas storage reservoirs out of 900 to data on natural gas and hazardous liquids pipeline safety in USA and Europe. Finally, analogy

    332

    The public response to Monitored Retrievable Storage: An interim report  

    SciTech Connect

    This report describes public opinion concerning the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility to be located in the vicinity of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The majority of individuals who did express an opinion opposed the facility due to transport/safety concerns and environmental/health concerns. (CBS)

    1985-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    333

    Cool Storage Technology Guide  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    It is a fact that avoiding load growth is cheaper than constructing new power plants. Cool storage technologies offer one method for strategically stemming the impact of future peak demand growth. This guide provides a comprehensive resource for understanding and evaluating cool storage technologies.

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    334

    Energy storage capacitors  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The properties of capacitors are reviewed in general, including dielectrics, induced polarization, and permanent polarization. Then capacitance characteristics are discussed and modelled. These include temperature range, voltage, equivalent series resistance, capacitive reactance, impedance, dissipation factor, humidity and frequency effects, storage temperature and time, and lifetime. Applications of energy storage capacitors are then discussed. (LEW)

    Sarjeant, W.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    335

    Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

    Lata

    1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    336

    Warehouse and Storage Buildings  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and Storage Characteristics by Activity... Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and storage buildings are those used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise, raw materials, or personal belongings. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Warehouse and Storage Buildings... While the idea of a warehouse may bring to mind a large building, in reality most warehouses were relatively small. Forty-four percent were between 1,001 and 5,000 square feet, and seventy percent were less than 10,000 square feet. Many warehouses were newer buildings. Twenty-five percent were built in the 1990s and almost fifty percent were constructed since 1980. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

    337

    ,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

    338

    Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feb-13 Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 View History All Operators Natural Gas in Storage 6,482,603 6,102,063 6,235,751 6,653,184 7,027,708 7,302,556 1973-2013 Base Gas 4,379,494...

    339

    Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage - Energy ...  

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage ...

    340

    Safety Overview Committee (SOC)  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety Overview Committee (SOC) Charter Safety Overview Committee (SOC) Charter 1. Purpose The Safety Overview Committee establishes safety policies and ad hoc safety committees. 2. Membership Membership will include the following individuals: APS Director APS Division Directors PSC ESH/QA Coordinator - Chair 3. Method The Committee will: Establish safety policies for the management of business within the APS. Create short-term committees, as appropriate, to address safety problems not covered by the existing committee structure. The committee chairperson meets with relevant safety representatives to discuss safety questions. 4. Frequency of Meetings Safety topics and policies normally are discussed and resolved during meetings of the Operations Directorate or the PSC ALD Division Directors. Otherwise, any committee member may request that a meeting be held of the

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    341

    Integrated Safety Management Policy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    INTEGRATED SAFETY INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DESCRIPTION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Environmental Management Headquarters May 2008 Preparation: Braj K. sin& Occupational Safety and Health Manager Office of Safety Management Concurrence: Chuan-Fu wu Director, Offlce of Safety Management Deputy Assistant Secretary for safe& Management andoperations Operations Officer for 1 Environmental Management Approval: Date p/-g Date Environmental Management TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS................................................................................................................................................................v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .........................................................................................................................................1

    342

    BOOK: Safety Related Issues of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Sep 26, 2007... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ... Fifteen papers cover aluminum-clad fuel discharged from research...

    343

    DOE/EM Criticality Safety Needs Assessment  

    SciTech Connect

    The issue of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) in Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE/EM) fissionable material operations presents challenges because of the large quantities of material present in the facilities and equipment that are committed to storage and/or material conditioning and dispositioning processes. Given the uncertainty associated with the material and conditions for many DOE/EM fissionable material operations, ensuring safety while maintaining operational efficiency requires the application of the most-effective criticality safety practices. In turn, more-efficient implementation of these practices can be achieved if the best NCS technologies are utilized. In 2002, DOE/EM-1 commissioned a survey of criticality safety technical needs at the major EM sites. These needs were documented in the report Analysis of Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Supporting the Environmental Management Program, issued May 2002. Subsequent to this study, EM safety management personnel made a commitment to applying the best and latest criticality safety technology, as described by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). Over the past 7 years, this commitment has enabled the transfer of several new technologies to EM operations. In 2008, it was decided to broaden the basis of the EM NCS needs assessment to include not only current needs for technologies but also NCS operational areas with potential for improvements in controls, analysis, and regulations. A series of NCS workshops has been conducted over the past years, and needs have been identified and addressed by EM staff and contractor personnel. These workshops were organized and conducted by the EM Criticality Safety Program Manager with administrative and technical support by staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report records the progress made in identifying the needs, determining the approaches for addressing these needs, and assimilating new NCS technologies into EM fissionable material operations. In addition, the report includes projections of future EM needs and associted recommendations.

    Westfall, Robert Michael [ORNL; Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    344

    Subsurface safety valves: safety asset or safety liability  

    SciTech Connect

    This paper summarizes the methods used to compare the risk of a blowout for a well completed with a subsurface safety valve (SSSV) vs. a completion without an SSSV. These methods, which could be applied to any field, include a combination of SSSV reliability and conventional risk analyses. The Kuparuk River Unit Working Interest Owners recently formed a group to examine the risks associated with installing and maintaining SSSV's in the Kuparuk field. The group was charged with answering the question: ''Assuming Kuparuk field operating conditions, are SSSV's a safety asset, or do numerous operating and maintenance procedures make them a safety liability.'' The results indicate that for the Kuparuk River Unit, an SSSV becomes a safety liability when the mean time between SSSV failures is less than one year. Since current SSSV mean time to failure (MTTF) at Kuparuk is approximately 1000 days, they are considered a safety asset.

    Busch, J.M.; Llewelyn, D.C.G.; Policky, B.J.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    345

    Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

    2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    346

    SERI Solar Energy Storage Program  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The SERI Solar Energy Storage Program provides research on advanced technologies, system analyses, and assessments of thermal energy storage for solar applications in support of the Thermal and Chemical Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems. Currently, research is in progress on direct contact latent heat storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Systems analyses are being performed of thermal energy storage for solar thermal applications, and surveys and assessments are being prepared of thermal energy storage in solar applications.

    Copeland, R. J.; Wright, J. D.; Wyman, C. E.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    347

    NREL: Energy Storage - Industry Participants  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Industry Participants NREL's energy storage project is funded by the DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office. We work closely with automobile manufacturers, energy storage developers,...

    348

    Storage of burned PWR and BWR fuel  

    SciTech Connect

    In the last few years, credit for fuel burnup has been allowed in the design and criticality safety analysis of high-density spent-fuel storage racks. Design and operating philosophies, however, differ significantly between pressurized water reactor (PWR)- and boiling water reactor (BWR)-type plants because: (1) PWR storage pools generally use soluble boron, which provides backup criticality control under accident conditions; and (2) BWR fuel generally contains gadolinium burnable poison, which results in a characteristically peaked burnup-dependent reactivity variation. In PWR systems, the reactivity decreases monotonically with burnup in a nearly linear fashion (excluding xenon effects), and a two-region concept is feasible. In BWR systems, the reactivity is initially low, increases as fuel burnup progresses, and reaches a maximum at a burnup where the gadolinium is nearly depleted. In any spent-fuel storage rack design, uncertainties due to manufacturing tolerances and in calculational methods must be included to assure that the highest reactivity (k/sub eff/) is less than the 0.95 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission limit. In the absence of definitive critical experiment data with spent fuel, the uncertainty due to depletion calculations must be assumed on the basis of judgment. High-density spent-fuel storage racks may be designed for both PWR and BWR plants with credit for burnup. However, the design must be tailored to each plant with appropriate consideration of the preferences/specifications of the utility operating staff.

    Turner, S.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    349

    Hydrogen storage technology for metal hydrides  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The advantages of using hydrogen as a secondary energy carrier are stated, and numerous factors pertinent to the technology of hydrogen storage via metal hydrides are briefly described. The technology is centered on iron-titanium hydride, FeTiH/sub x/, as the most practical choice for the safe and compact storage of hydrogen. Uses of hydride hydrogen as a fuel or energy carrier are given. The features of hydride reservoir designs are explained, and some performance data are given for two reservoirs constructed at BNL. Results of tests on the long-term behavior of FeTiH/sub x/ are presented along with information on pressure drop in a hydride bed. Two methods of accommodating hydride expansion are described. Other topics include: container materials selection, safety testing of FeTiH/sub x/, hydride materials development, storage systems work at BNL, the proposed Hydrogen-Halogen Energy Storage System, a proposed technique of storing hydrogen in hollow glass microspheres at very high pressure, and information on the commercial availability of materials and equipment for hydride hydrogen. Current development needs are included in the various sections.

    Strickland, G

    1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    350

    Cooling thermal storage  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

    Gatley, D.P.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    351

    Collector: storage wall systems  

    SciTech Connect

    Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

    Boardman, H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    352

    Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Numbers & Contacts (PDF, PPT) Emergency Response Guide (PDF, PPT) Occurence Reporting (ORPS) (PDF, PPT) Reporting Hazardous Conditions (PDF, PPT) Reporting Safety Concerns (PDF,...

    353

    Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    at Home (PDF, PPT) Emergency Response - Tips for Home (PDF, PPT) Household Hazardous Waste (PDF, PPT) Preventing Fires at Home (PDF, PPT) Tire Safety (PDF, PPT) Vehicle Inspections...

    354

    Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Shop Area (PDF, PPT) Chemical Inventory (PDF, PPT) Chemical Management System - Consumer Products (PDF, PPT) Earthquake Restraints (PDF, PPT) Equipment Use (PDF, PPT) Ladder Safety...

    355

    Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Mistakes in Managing (PDF, PPT) Biohazardous Waste, Managing (PDF, PPT) Chemical Inventory (PDF, PPT) Chemical Management System - Consumer Products (PDF, PPT) Chemical Safety...

    356

    AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging Facility. As the ongoing design evolution remains fluid, the results from this design calculation should be evaluated for applicability to any new or modified design. Consequently, the results presented in this document are limited to the current design. The information contained in this document was developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering and is intended for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the various criticality related activities performed in the Aging Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before the use of the information for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    357

    SI Safety Information  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Information Information Policies and Procedures Radiation Safety Device List (full version)(compressed version) APS QA APS Safety Page DOE Orders DOE Order 420.2 (11/08/95) DOE Order 420.2A (01/08/01) Accelerator Safety Implementation Guide for DOE Order 420.2 DOE Order 420.2B (07/23/04) Expires (07/23/08) (html) (pdf) Accelerator Facility Safety Implementation Guide for DOE O 420.2B (html) (pdf) Safety of Accelerator Facilities (02/18/05) Accelerator Facility Safety Implementation Guide for DOE O 420.2B (pdf) Safety of Accelerator Facilities (7/1/05) ESH Manual Guidance 5480.25 Guidance for an Accelerator Facility Safety Program 5480.25 Guidance (09/01/93) Bases & Rationale for Guidance for an Accelerator Facitlity Safety Program (October 1994) NCRP Report No. 88 "Radiation Alarms and Access Control Systems" (1987) ISBN

    358

    Integrated Safety Management (ISM)  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Integrated Safety Management Integrated Safety Management Home ISM Policy ISM Champions ISM Workshops Resources Archives Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Integrated Safety Management (ISM) ism logo Welcome to the Department of Energy's Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Web Site. The Department and its contractors remain firmly committed to ISM as first defined in 1996. The objective of ISM is to perform work in a safe and environmentally sound manner. More specifically, as described in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy: "The Department and Contractors must systematically integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels so that missions are accomplished while protecting the public, the worker, and the environment. This is to be accomplished through effective integration of safety management into all facets of work planning and execution." "

    359

    Monitoring, safety systems for LNG and LPG operators  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Operators in Korea and Australia have chosen monitoring and control systems in recent contracts for LNG and LPG storage. Korea Gas Corp. (Kogas) has hired Whessoe Varec, Calais, to provide monitoring systems for four LNG storage tanks being built at Kogas` Inchon terminal. For Elgas Ltd., Port Botany, Australia, Whessoe Varec has already shipped a safety valve-shutdown system to a new LPG cavern-storage facility under construction. The paper describes the systems, terminal monitoring, dynamic approach to tank management, and meeting the growing demand for LPG.

    True, W.R.

    1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    360

    Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    - - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    361

    NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Where is CO2 storage happening today? Where is CO2 storage happening today? Sleipner Project (Norway) Sleipner Project (Norway) Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is currently happening across the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway, the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, and the In Salah project in Algeria, have been injecting CO2 for many years. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, too. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. Additionally, a multitude of pilot efforts are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future

    362

    storage technology barriers. The...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Summit Power to build a 400-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Britain. The companies will submit the Caledonia Clean Energy Project to...

    363

    Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    kWh100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 18 cost KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft Hub (which limits surface speed)...

    364

    Storage Ring Parameters  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Photon Source Parameters Storage Ring Parameters Print General Parameters Parameter Value Beam particle electron Beam energy 1.9 GeV (1.0-1.9 GeV possible) Injection energy 1.9 GeV...

    365

    FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: H2 Safety Snapshot Newsletter  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety, Codes & Standards Search Search Help Safety, Codes & Standards EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Safety, Codes & Standards Printable Version Share this...

    366

    Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting DOE Directives & Manuals DOE Standards Central Technical Authorities (CTA) Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) Line Management SSO/ FAC Reps 48 CFR 970 48 CFR 952 Federal Acquisition Regulations External Oversight *Defense Nuclear Facility

    367

    Thermal Energy Storage  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Ice Bear30 Hybrid Air Conditionerthermal energy storage system150uses smart integrated controls, ice storage, and a dedicated compressor for cooling. The system is designed to provide cooling to interior spaces by circulating refrigerant within an additional evaporator coil added to a standard unitary air conditioner. The Ice Bear 30 is a relatively small size (5 ton), intended for use in residential and light commercial applications. This report describes EPRI tests of the Ice Bear 30, which is manu...

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    368

    Analog storage integrated circuit  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

    Walker, J. T. (Palo Alto, CA); Larsen, R. S. (Menlo Park, CA); Shapiro, S. L. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    369

    Thermal Energy Storage  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    370

    Analog storage integrated circuit  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    371

    NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

    372

    Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Developing a Regulatory Framework Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 10-12, 2011 Denver, Colorado Earl Easton Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Outline * Current Regulatory Framework * Future Regulatory Needs * Technical Basis (with some examples) * Path Forward 2 Current NRC Regulatory Framework for Storage * Renewable Term Licenses * Aging Management Plan - Time-limited aging analyses - Design for prevention - Monitoring - how, how often, in-situ - Maintenance - what type - Corrective Actions - when 3 Dry Cask Storage * 63 licensed ISFSIs (8 more than 2010) * Expect 10 sites pursuing General License * Over 1400 loaded storage casks 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Number of ISFSIs Year Specific Licensees

    373

    Hydrogen storage-bed design for tritium systems test assembly  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed the design of a hydrogen storage bed for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). Our objective is to store hydrogen isotopes as uranium hydrides and recover them by dehydriding. The specific use of the storage bed is to store DT gas as U(D,T)/sub 3/ when it is required for the TSTA. The hydrogen storage bed consists of a primary container in which uranium powder is stored and a secondary container for a second level of safety in gas confinement. The primary container, inlet and outlet gas lines, cartridge heaters, and instrumentation are assembled in the secondary container. The design of the hydrogen storage bed is presented, along with the modeling and analysis of the bed behavior during hydriding-dehydriding cycles.

    Cullingford, H.S.; Wheeler, M.G.; McMullen, J.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    374

    FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    August 24, 2011 August 24, 2011 Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. July 6, 2011 Confirming CCS Security and Environmental Safety Aim of Newly Selected Field Projects The U.S. Department of Energy's portfolio of field projects aimed at confirming that long-term geologic carbon dioxide storage is safe and environmentally secure has been expanded by three projects selected to collectively receive $34.5 million over four years. June 28, 2011 Redesigned CCS Website Offers Wealth of Information on Worldwide Technology, Projects A wealth of information about worldwide carbon capture and storage technologies and projects is available on the newly launched, updated and

    375

    Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 The report is intended to help assess and establish the technical basis for extended long-term storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel. It provides: 1) an overview of the ISFSI license renewal process based on 10 CFR 72 and the guidance provided in NUREG-1927; 2) definitions and terms for structures and components in DCSSs, materials, environments, aging effects, and aging mechanisms; 3) TLAAs and AMPs, respectively, that have been developed for managing aging effects on the SSCs important to safety in the dry cask storage system designs; and 4) AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs

    376

    CCE CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    . Chemicals--Safety measures. 3. Hazardous wastes. I. National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Prudent) produced two major reports on laboratory safety and laboratory waste disposal: Prudent Practices Nanomaterials, 77 4.G Biohazards, 79 4.H Hazards from Radioactivity, 79 5 Management of Chemicals 83 5.A

    Tai, Yu-Chong

    377

    Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. (showing ...

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    378

    Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Programs ...

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    379

    Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials. Summary: ... Hydrogen is promoted as petroleum replacement in the Hydrogen Economy. ...

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    380

    Dry Cask Storage Characterization Project  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Nuclear utilities have developed independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) as a means of expanding their spent-fuel storage capacity on an interim basis until a geologic repository is available to accept the fuel for permanent storage. This report provides a technical basis for demonstrating the feasibility of extended spent-fuel storage in ISFSIs.

    2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    381

    Safety and Health Services Division  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    The Safety & Health Services Division (SHSD) provides subject matter expertise and services in industrial hygiene, safety engineering, and safety & health programs for the Lab....

    382

    Safety System Oversight: Steering Committee  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety Home Safety System Oversight Home Annual SSOFR Workshop DOE Safety Links ORPS Info Operating Experience Summary DOE Lessons Learned Accident...

    383

    Coal Mine Safety Act (Virginia)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    This Act is the primary legislation pertaining to coal mine safety in Virginia. It contains information on safety rules, safety standards and required certifications for mine workers, prohibited...

    384

    Safety posters | Argonne National Laboratory  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    34 Leaders in Safety: Electrical Safety Labels Inspect equipment for approved electrical safety labels before plugging in... "Before I plug in electric-powered equipment, I check...

    385

    Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility  

    SciTech Connect

    Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    386

    Documented Safety Analysis  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Documented Safety Analysis Documented Safety Analysis FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: A document that provides an adequate description of the hazards of a facility during its design, construction, operation, and eventual cleanup and the basis to prescribe operating and engineering controls through Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) or Administrative Controls (AC). REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830.204, Nuclear Safety Rule  DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization, 1992.  DOE-STD-1104-96, Change Notice 1, Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Documents (documented Safety Analyses and Technical Safety Requirements), dated May 2002.  DOE-STD-3009-2002, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, Change Notice No. 2, April 2002.

    387

    Technical Safety Requirements  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Safety Requirements Safety Requirements FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: Contractor has developed, maintained, and received DOE Field Office Approval for the necessary operating conditions of a facility. The facility has also maintained an inventory of safety class and safety significant systems and components. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830.205, Nuclear Safety Rule.  DOE-STD-3009-2002, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses.  DOE-STD-1186-2004, Specific Administrative Controls. Guidance:  DOE G 423.1-1, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Technical Safety Requirements.  NSTP 2003-1, Use of Administrative Controls for Specific Safety Functions. Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation

    388

    Aviation safety analysis  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Introduction: Just as the aviation system is complex and interrelated, so is aviation safety. Aviation safety involves design of aircraft and airports, training of ground personnel and flight crew members' maintenance of ...

    Ausrotas, Raymond A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    389

    Conceptual Safety Design RM  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The Conceptual Safety Design (CSD) Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the Conceptual Safety Design work, processes and...

    390

    Safety Design Strategy RM  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The SDS Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the conceptual safety design strategy documentation package (Conceptual Safety...

    391

    Preliminary Safety Design RM  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The Preliminary Safety Design (PSD) Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the Preliminary Safety Design work, processes and...

    392

    Argonne CNM: Safety Training  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety Training Before performing work at the CNM, you must take certain safety training courses. We encourage you to take these courses remotely before you arrive at Argonne. Go...

    393

    Dam Safety Program (Maryland)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

    394

    Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), an important agent for the nuclear industry and the U.S. Army, has been involved in several costly incidents. To prevent similar incidents, the study of HAN safe storage and handling boundary has become extremely important for industries. However, HAN decomposition involves complicated reaction pathways due to its autocatalytic behavior and therefore presents a challenge for definition of safe boundaries of HAN storage and handling. This research focused on HAN decomposition behavior under various conditions and proposed isothermal aging testing and kinetic-based simulation to determine safety boundaries for HAN storage and handling. Specifically, HAN decomposition in the presence of glass, titanium, stainless steel with titanium, or stainless steel was examined in an Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC). n-th order kinetics was used for initial reaction rate estimation. Because stainless steel is a commonly used material for HAN containers, isothermal aging tests were conducted in a stainless steel cell to determine the maximum safe storage time of HAN. Moreover, by changing thermal inertia, data for HAN decomposition in the stainless steel cell were examined and the experimental results were simulated by the Thermal Safety Software package. This work offers useful guidance for industries that manufacture, handle, and store HAN. The experimental data acquired not only can help with aspects of process safety design, including emergency relief systems, process control, and process equipment selection, but also is a useful reference for the associated theoretical study of autocatalytic decomposition behavior.

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    395

    FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Current Technology to someone Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Challenges Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology

    396

    Lisheng Safety Laboratory  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Lisheng Safety Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200882-0. Address and Contact Information: Electronic & Lighting (Xiamen) Co. Ltd. No. ...

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    397

    Generic safety documentation model  

    SciTech Connect

    This document is intended to be a resource for preparers of safety documentation for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico facilities. It provides standardized discussions of some topics that are generic to most, if not all, Sandia/NM facilities safety documents. The material provides a ``core`` upon which to develop facility-specific safety documentation. The use of the information in this document will reduce the cost of safety document preparation and improve consistency of information.

    Mahn, J.A.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    398

    Safety Basis Information System  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Analysis (SESA) SESA Home Mission & Functions Office of Sustainability, Environment, Safety and Anaylsis (SESA) Sustainability Support Environmental Policy & Assistance ...

    399

    Electrical safety guidelines  

    SciTech Connect

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    400

    DOE handbook electrical safety  

    SciTech Connect

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    401

    Safety and Security  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    *. Bookmark and Share. Safety and Security. ... National and International Standards for X-ray Security Screening Applications. ...

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    402

    FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: DOE Safety, Codes, and Standards...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety, Codes, and Standards Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Safety, Codes and Standards: DOE Safety, Codes, and Standards Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Safety,...

    403

    Universal software safety standard  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This paper identifies the minimum subset required for a truly universal safety-critical software standard. This universal software standard could be used in but is not limited to the following application domains: commercial, military and space ... Keywords: software safety, system safety, validation, verification

    P. V. Bhansali

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    404

    Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    405

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Long-time varying-daily, weekly, and seasonal-power demands require the electric utility industry to have installed generating capacity in excess of the average load. Energy storage can reduce the requirement for less efficient excess generating capacity used to meet peak load demands. Short-time fluctuations in electric power can occur as negatively damped oscillations in complex power systems with generators connected by long transmission lines. Superconducting inductors with their associated converter systems are under development for both load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is based upon the phenomenon of the nearly lossless behavior of superconductors. Application is, in principal, efficient since the electromagnetic energy can be transferred to and from the storage coils without any intermediate conversion to other energy forms. Results from a reference design for a 10-GWh SMES unit for load leveling are presented. The conceptual engineering design of a 30-MJ, 10-MW energy storage coil is discussed with regard to system stabilization, and tests of a small scale, 100-KJ SMES system are presented. Some results of experiments are provided from a related technology based program which uses superconducting inductive energy storage to drive fusion plasmas.

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Schermer, R.I.

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    406

    Safety Bulletin 2005-08: Safe Management of Mercury (Hg)  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    SAFETY & HEALTH SAFETY & HEALTH SAFETY & HEALTH BULLETIN Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety & Health * U.S. Department of Energy * Washington, DC 20585 Safe Management of Mercury (Hg) DOE/EH-0697 Issue No. 2005-08 June 2005 PURPOSE This Bulletin provides information on a safety concern that may impact operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Specifically, the concern is the safe handling of mercury and mercury compounds. BACKGROUND Mercury is found in small amounts in thermometers, manometers, and barometers and in larger quantities at DOE facilities - ranging from amounts found in scientific equipment to tons in remediation waste at burial sites and hundreds of tons at the DOE stockpile storage facility in Oak Ridge.

    407

    Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

    408

    Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

    409

    Mounded LPG storage - Experience and developments  

    SciTech Connect

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is stored after production, and for distribution and use, in pressure vessels which vary in size from a few kilogrammes to many thousands of tons. The types of LPG under consideration are commercial butane, commercial propane, or mixtures of the two gases in varying proportions. Mounded storage systems are becoming popular as an alternative to the better-known traditional systems. The most widely used and therefore best-known of the traditional systems are the above-ground pressure-vessel designs. These more commonly comprise factory-made cylinders which are installed horizontally, being supported on saddles at each end of the vessel. When such vessels are installed in an LPG terminal, depot, or filling plant, they are required in multiple units to facilitate the storage of more than one grade of product and to enable regular maintenance and inspection to be carried out. Today's safety regulations require such installations to be divided into sub-groups of six tanks, with all the tanks located at a safe distance from one another, and from other facilities in the immediate area. These safety distances are being increased as a result of experience, which means terminals now require large areas of land.

    Barber, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    410

    Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    411

    NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE LABORATORY SELF-AUDIT CHECKLIST Office of Environmental Health and Safety Title: Radiation Safety Self-Audit Checklist  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE LABORATORY SELF-AUDIT CHECKLIST Office of Environmental Health and Safety Title for Handling Packages Containing Nuclear Substances" posters posted. Storage area signed, included 24 hour contact information Nuclear Substance Permit and all attachments posted (eg. Conditions ­ general, special

    Beaumont, Christopher

    412

    CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Objective CS.1 - A criticality safety program is established, sufficient numbers of qualified personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure criticality safety support services are adequate for safe operations. (Core Requirements 1, 2, and 6) Criteria * Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented. * Operations support personnel for the criticality safety area are adequately staffed and trained. Approach Record Review: Review the documentation that establishes the Criticality Safety Requirements (CSRs) for appropriateness and completeness. Review for adequacy and completion the criticality safety personnel training records that indicate training on facility procedures and systems under

    413

    MTDC Safety Sensor Technology  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    MTDC Safety Sensor Technology MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Background Beyond the standard duty cycle data collection system used in the Department of Energy's Medium Truck Duty Cycle program, additional sensors were installed on three test vehicles to collect several safety-related signals of interest to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The real-time brake stroke, tire pressure, and weight information obtained from these sensors is expected to make possible a number of safety-related analyses such as determining the frequency and severity of braking events and tracking tire pressure changes over time. Because these signals are posted to the vehicle's databus, they also have the potential to be

    414

    Nuclear criticality safety  

    SciTech Connect

    Important facts of the nuclear criticality safety field are covered in this volume. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject are included, based on insights provided by criticality experts and published information from many sources. An overview of nuclear criticality safety theory and a variety of practical in-plant operation applications are presented. Underlying principles of nuclear criticality safety are introduced and the state of the art of this technical discipline is reviewed. Criticality safety theoretical concepts, accident experience, standards, experiments computer calculations, integration of safety methods into individual practices, and overall facility operations are all included.

    Knief, R.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    415

    NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Storage  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage On the one hand, hydrogen's great asset as a renewable energy carrier is that it is storable and transportable. On the other hand, its very low natural density requires storage volumes that are impractical for vehicles and many other uses. Current practice is to compress the gas in pressurized tanks, but this still provides only limited driving range for vehicles and is bulkier than desirable for other uses as well. Liquefying the hydrogen more than doubles the fuel density, but uses up substantial amounts of energy to lower the temperature sufficiently (-253°C at atmospheric pressure), requires expensive insulated tanks to maintain that temperature, and still falls short of desired driving range. One possible way to store hydrogen at higher density is in the spaces within the crystalline

    416

    Storage Ring Operation Modes  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in 24 singlets (single bunches) with a nominal current of 4.25 mA and a spacing of 153 nanoseconds between singlets. Lattice configuration: Low emittance lattice with effective emittance of 3.1 nm-rad and coupling of 1%. Bunch length (rms): 33.5 ps. Refill schedule: Continuous top-up with single injection pulses occurring at a minimum of two minute intervals, or a multiple of two minute intervals. Special Operating Mode - 324 bunches, non top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in 324 uniformly spaced singlets with a nominal single bunch current of 0.31 mA and a spacing of 11.37 nanoseconds between singlets.

    417

    Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    kWh/100 kW kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 1/8 cost / KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft / Hub (which limits surface speed) * Flexible Motor Magnets on Rim ID * Develop Touch-down System for Earthquake Flying Rim Eliminate Shaft and Hub Levitate on Passive Magnetic Bearings Increase Rim Tip Speed Larger Diameter Thinner Rim Stores More Energy 4 X increase in Stored Energy with only 60% Increase in Weight Development of a 100 kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module High Speed, Low Cost, Composite Ring with Bore-Mounted Magnetics Current State of the Art Flywheel Limitations of Existing Flywheel * 15 Minutes of storage * Limited to Frequency Regulation Application * Rim Speed (Stored Energy) Limited by Hub Strain and Shaft Dynamics

    418

    Inertial energy storage device  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The inertial energy storage device of the present invention comprises a composite ring formed of circumferentially wound resin-impregnated filament material, a flanged hollow metal hub concentrically disposed in the ring, and a plurality of discrete filament bandsets coupling the hub to the ring. Each bandset is formed of a pair of parallel bands affixed to the hub in a spaced apart relationship with the axis of rotation of the hub being disposed between the bands and with each band being in the configuration of a hoop extending about the ring along a chordal plane thereof. The bandsets are disposed in an angular relationship with one another so as to encircle the ring at spaced-apart circumferential locations while being disposed in an overlapping relationship on the flanges of the hub. The energy storage device of the present invention has the capability of substantial energy storage due to the relationship of the filament bands to the ring and the flanged hub.

    Knight, Jr., Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Kelly, James J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Pollard, Roy E. (Powell, TN)

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    419

    A New Technique for Troubleshooting Large Capacitive Energy Storage Banks  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Power Conditioning System (PCS) of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) like many pulse power systems relies on large numbers of inductively isolated high voltage capacitors configured in parallel for energy storage. When an energy storage capacitor fails in such a capacitor bank, there is often little or no external indication showing which capacitor failed. Identifying the failed component can be a time consuming and potentially hazardous operation. Conventional methods using capacitance meters require that each capacitor be disconnected and tested independently. They have developed a new non-invasive technique (i.e. no dismantling of the bank is required) that greatly improves personnel safety as well reducing troubleshooting time.

    Fulkerson, S E; Hammon, J

    2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    420

    Safety System Oversight  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety System Oversight Safety System Oversight Office of Nuclear Safety Home Safety System Oversight Home Annual SSO/FR Workshop DOE Safety Links › ORPS Info › Operating Experience Summary › DOE Lessons Learned › Accident Investigation Program Assessment Tools › SSO CRADS Subject Matter Links General Program Information › Program Mission Statement › SSO Program Description › SSO Annual Award Program › SSO Annual Award › SSO Steering Committee › SSO Program Assessment CRAD SSO Logo Items Site Leads and Steering Committee Archive Facility Representative Contact Us HSS Logo SSO SSO Program News Congratulations to Ronnie L. Alderson of Nevada Field Office, the Winner of the 2012 Safety System Oversight Annual Award! 2012 Safety System Oversight Annual Award Nominees SSO Staffing Analysis

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    421

    Nuclear Facility Safety Basis  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Safety Basis Safety Basis FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: A fully compliant Nuclear Facility Safety Basis. Program is implemented and maintained across the site. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830 Subpart B Guidance:  DOE STD 3009  DOE STD 1104  DOE STD  DOE G 421.1-2 Implementation Guide For Use in Developing Documented Safety Analyses To Meet Subpart B Of 10 CFR 830  DOE G 423.1-1 Implementation Guide For Use In Developing Technical Safety Requirements  DOE G 424.1-1 Implementation Guide For Use In Addressing Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation The site contractor has developed an up-to-date, comprehensive, compliant, documented nuclear facility safety basis and associated implementing mechanisms and procedures for all required nuclear facilities and activities (10 CFR

    422

    Chemical Safety Program  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Program Program Home Chemical Safety Topical Committee Library Program Contacts Related Links Site Map Tools 2013 Chemical Safety Workshop Archived Workshops Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Chemical Safety Program logo The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety web pages provide a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This page is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Noteworthy products are the Chemical Management Handbooks and the Chemical Lifecycle Cost Analysis Tool, found under the TOOLS menu. Chemical Management Handbook Vol (1) Chemical Management Handbook Vol (2)

    423

    Safety Management System Policy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    POLICY POLICY Washington, D.C. Approved: 4-25-11 SUBJECT: INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT POLICY PURPOSE AND SCOPE To establish the Department of Energy's (DOE) expectation for safety, 1 including integrated safety management that will enable the Department's mission goals to be accomplished efficiently while ensuring safe operations at all departmental facilities and activities. This Policy cancels and supersedes DOE Policy (P) 411.1, Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Policy, dated 1-28-97; DOE P 441.1, DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy, dated 4-26-96; DOE P 450.2A, Identifying, Implementing and Complying with Environment, Safety and Health Requirements, dated 5-15-96; DOE P 450.4, Safety Management

    424

    Safety and Technical Services  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety and Technical Services Safety and Technical Services Minimize The Safety and Technical Services (STS) organization is a component of the Office of Science's (SC's) Oak Ridge Integrated Support Center. The mission of STS is to provide excellent environmental, safety, health, quality, and engineering support to SC laboratories and other U.S. Department of Energy program offices. STS maintains a full range of technically qualified Subject Matter Experts, all of whom are associated with the Technical Qualifications Program. Examples of the services that we provide include: Integrated Safety Management Quality Assurance Planning and Metrics Document Review Tracking and trending analysis and reporting Assessments, Reviews, Surveillances and Inspections Safety Basis Support SharePoint/Dashboard Development for Safety Programs

    425

    Thermal energy storage material  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

    Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    426

    NETL: Carbon Storage Best Practices Manuals  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Best Practices Manuals Best Practices Manuals Developing best practices - or reliable and consistent standards and operational characteristics for CO2 collection, injection and storage - is essential for providing the basis for a legal and regulatory framework and encouraging widespread global CCS deployment. The lessons learned during the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Validation Phase small-scale field tests are being utilized to generate a series of Best Practices Manuals (BPMs) that serve as the basis for the design and implementation of both large-scale field tests and commercial carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects. NETL has released six BPMS: NETL's "Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations - 2012 Update" BPM provides an overview of MVA techniques that are currently in use or are being developed; summarizes DOE's MVA R&D program; and presents information that can be used by regulatory organizations, project developers, and policymakers to ensure the safety and efficacy of carbon storage projects.

    427

    Storage Business Model White Paper  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Storage Business Model White Paper Storage Business Model White Paper Summary June 11 2013 Storage Business Model White Paper - Purpose  Identify existing business models for investors/operators, utilities, end users  Discuss alignment of storage "value proposition" with existing market designs and regulatory paradigms  Difficulties in realizing wholesale market product revenue streams for distributed storage - the "bundled applications" problem  Discuss risks/barriers to storage adoption and where existing risk mitigation measures fall down  Recommendations for policy/research steps - Alternative business models - Accelerated research into life span and failure modes

    428

    Spent-fuel-storage alternatives  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    429

    Storage and regasification of liquefied natural gas (LNG)  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A discussion covers the historical background of LNG; a description of Columbia LNG Corp.'s LNG terminal at Cove Point, Maryland, including physical plant layout; LNG unloading facilities; the primary vaporization system, which uses submerged combustion to vaporize approximately 75% of the LNG; waste heat LNG vaporizers; four 375,000 bbl aluminum, double-wall storage tanks; the centrifugal, single-stage, pot-mounted LNG pumps; safety features including the large separation between units, and fire protection and monitoring; the construction, operating, and transportation costs; and the world-wide safety record of the LNG industry.

    Litchfield, A.B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    430

    Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    431

    Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    432

    Program on Technology Innovation: New York Power Authority Advanced Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Energy Storage System  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Electric utilities, energy service companies, and utility customers lack familiarity with distributed electric storage systems. Demonstration projects highlighting the benefits, safety, and effectiveness of such systems will promote their propagation. The benefits derived from the storage of electrical energy are well defined in the EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for Transmission and Distribution Applications (Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] report 1001834). This report documents system des...

    2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    433

    NGLW RCRA Storage Study  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    434

    Electrical Energy Storage  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Electrochemical Flow Storage System Typical Cell Power Density (Wcm 2 ) 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 UTRC Conventional Conventional flow battery cell UTRC flow battery...

    435

    Flash Storage Today  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Can flash memory become the foundation for a new tier in the storage hierarchy? The past few years have been an exciting time for flash memory. The cost has fallen dramatically as fabrication has become more efficient and the market has grown; the density ...

    Adam Leventhal

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    436

    Alkaline storage battery  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An alkaline storage battery having located in a battery container a battery element comprising a positive electrode, a negative electrode, a separator and a gas ionizing auxiliary electrode, in which the gas ionizing electrode is contained in a bag of microporous film, is described.

    Suzuki, S.

    1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    437

    Flywheel Energy Storage  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Flywheels are under consideration as an alternative for electrochemical batteries in a variety of applications This summary report provides a discussion of the mechanics of flywheels and magnetic bearings, the general characteristics of inertial energy storage systems, design considerations for flywheel systems, materials for advanced flywheels, and cost considerations.

    1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    438

    Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    439

    Cryptographic cloud storage  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We consider the problem of building a secure cloud storage service on top of a public cloud infrastructure where the service provider is not completely trusted by the customer. We describe, at a high level, several architectures that combine recent and ...

    Seny Kamara; Kristin Lauter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    440

    Pneumatic energy storage  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    An essential component to hybrid electric and electric vehicles is energy storage. A power assist device could also be important to many vehicle applications. This discussion focuses on the use of compressed gas as a system for energy storage and power in vehicle systems. Three possible vehicular applications for which these system could be used are discussed in this paper. These applications are pneumatically driven vehicles, series hybrid electric vehicles, and power boost for electric and conventional vehicles. One option for a compressed gas system is as a long duration power output device for purely pneumatic and hybrid cars. This system must provide enough power and energy to drive under normal conditions for a specified time or distance. The energy storage system for this use has the requirement that it will be highly efficient, compact, and have low mass. Use of a compressed gas energy storage as a short duration, high power output system for conventional motor vehicles could reduce engine size or reduce transient emissions. For electric vehicles this kind of system could lengthen battery life by providing battery load leveling during accelerations. The system requirements for this application are that it be compact and have low mass. The efficiency of the system is a secondary consideration in this application.

    Flowers, D.

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    441

    NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation  

    SciTech Connect

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    442

    Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Flexible, lightweight energy-storage devices are of greatstrategy to fabricate flexible energy-storage devices.Flexible, lightweight energy-storage devices (batteries and

    Rice, Lynn Margaret

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    443

    AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    444

    Storage/Handling | Department of Energy  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    StorageHandling StorageHandling Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer & Retrieval of Records from the Washington National Records Center (WNRC) or Legacy Management...

    445

    Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured Electrodesof Electrode Design for Energy Storage and Generation .batteries and their energy storage efficiency. vii Contents

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    446

    Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects...

    447

    THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withGeneration and Energy Storage," presented at Frontiers ofStudy of Underground Energy Storage Using High-Pressure,

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    448

    AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    449

    THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    450

    Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown...

    451

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Consumer Information Hydrogen Storage Search Search Help Hydrogen Storage EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Storage Printable Version Share this resource Send...

    452

    Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of electricity and natural gas DER No Heat Storage: therecovery and storage) utility electricity and natural gasbut no heat storage, a 200 kW natural gas reciprocating

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    453

    Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

    454

    Silo Storage Preconceptual Design  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage options primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argons design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

    Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    455

    Storage Ring | Advanced Photon Source  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    The Electron Storage Ring The 7-GeV electrons are injected into the 1104-m-circumference storage ring, a circle of more than 1,000 electromagnets and associated equipment, located...

    456

    Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, nonbinding, and nonlegal

    457

    Thermal energy storage application areas  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

    Not Available

    1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    458

    Safety at CERN  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    U.S. CMS Program U.S. CMS Program Last Updated: March 19, 2012 Safety at CERN Information for U. S. Personnel This information was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. It is provided to assist you in preparing for your visit to CERN and to help you work safely. As at any U.S. laboratory, you are also responsible for your own safety at CERN. If you are in doubt as to whether your working conditions meet safety standards, you must ask for clarification from your supervisor, the CMS GLIMOS, the PH Department Safety Officer or, if necessary, the CERN Safety Commission. If you regard yourself or others as clearly at risk, you must interrupt the work to take corrective action. Your primary points of contact for safety related questions or

    459

    Safety | Argonne National Laboratory  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety Safety Biosafety Safety Safety is integral to Argonne's scientific research and engineering technology mission. As a leading U.S. Department of Energy multi-program research laboratory, our obligation to the American people demands that we conduct our research and operations safely and responsibly. As a recognized leader in safety, we are committed to making ethical decisions that provide a safe and healthful workplace and a positive presence within the larger Chicagoland community. Argonne's Integrated Safety Management program is the foundation of the laboratory's ongoing effort to provide a safe and productive environment for employees, users, other site personnel, visitors and the public. Related Sites U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Featured Media

    460

    Safety for Users  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety for Users Safety for Users Safety for Users Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." All users and staff participate in creating a culture and environment where performing research using the proper safeguards and fulfilling all safety requirements result in the success of the facility and its scientific program. The documents and guidance below will assist users and staff to achieve these goals. How Do I...? A series of fact sheets that explain what users need to know and do when preparing to conduct experiments at the ALS. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation? Work with Biological Materials? Work with Chemicals? Work with Regulated Soil? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS?

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    461

    Combustion Safety Overview  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    March 1-2, 2012 March 1-2, 2012 Building America Stakeholders Meeting Austin, Texas Combustion Safety in the Codes Larry Brand Gas Technology Institute Acknowledgement to Paul Cabot - American Gas Association 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Combustion Safety in the Codes Widely adopted fuel gas codes: * National Fuel Gas Code - ANSI Z223.1/NFPA 54, published by AGA and NFPA (NFGC) * International Fuel Gas Code - published by the International Code Council (IFGC) * Uniform Plumbing Code published by IAPMO (UPC) Safety codes become requirements when adopted by the Authority Having Jurisdiction (governments or fire safety authorities) 3 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Combustion Safety in the Codes Formal Relationships Between these codes: - The IFGC extracts many safety

    462

    Thermal reactor safety  

    SciTech Connect

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    463

    Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term -...

    464

    Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    provides a new user interface to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) to easily identify, organize, and analyze nuclear safety-related events reported into...

    465

    Pipeline Safety (Maryland)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The Public Service Commission has the authority enact regulations pertaining to pipeline safety. These regulations address pipeline monitoring, inspections, enforcement, and penalties.

    466

    Lift truck safety review  

    SciTech Connect

    This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    467

    Coiled Tubing Safety Manual  

    SciTech Connect

    This document addresses safety concerns regarding the use of coiled tubing as it pertains to the preservation of personnel, environment and the wellbore.

    Crow, W.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    468

    Public Safety Network Requirements  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... Usage scenario. ... imposed by public safety applications and usage scenarios is key in ... requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used as ...

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    469

    NanoFab Safety  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... a multi-tiered safety training program; vigilant monitoring of all NanoFab laboratories and infrastructure, including daily inspections complemented ...

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    470

    SSRL Safety Office Memo  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety Office SSO 012406 Memo to SSRL staff concerning operation of Circuit Breakers and Disconnect Switches Recently SLAC has adopted new regulations (NFPA70E) which outline the...

    471

    Safety Reference Manual - TMS  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Jun 26, 2008 ... This 1.400-page manual provides a thorough overview of industry-relevant safety issues, including OSHA requirements and recommendations...

    472

    FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    - (Core Requirement 1) Line management has established a QA program to ensure safe accomplishment of work. Personnel exhibit an awareness of public and worker safety, health, and...

    473

    Safety Training - Cyclotron  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Safety Training GERT All experimenters at the 88-Inch Cyclotron are required to take the General Employee Radiation Training (GERT) course, which can be found here: GERT Building...

    474

    Dam Safety Program (Florida)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

    475

    Pipeline Safety (South Dakota)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The South Dakota Pipeline Safety Program, administered by the Public Utilities Commission, is responsible for regulating hazardous gas intrastate pipelines. Relevant legislation and regulations...

    476

    Mechanistic facility safety and source term analysis  

    SciTech Connect

    A PC-based computer program was created for facility safety and source term analysis at Hanford The program has been successfully applied to mechanistic prediction of source terms from chemical reactions in underground storage tanks, hydrogen combustion in double contained receiver tanks, and proccss evaluation including the potential for runaway reactions in spent nuclear fuel processing. Model features include user-defined facility room, flow path geometry, and heat conductors, user-defined non-ideal vapor and aerosol species, pressure- and density-driven gas flows, aerosol transport and deposition, and structure to accommodate facility-specific source terms. Example applications are presented here.

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    477

    Normal matter storage of antiprotons  

    SciTech Connect

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    478

    Transportable Energy Storage Systems Project  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This project will define the requirements and specification for a transportable energy storage system and then screen various energy storage options and assess their capability to meet that specification. The application will be designed to meet peak electrical loads (3-4 hours of storage) on the electrical distribution system.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    479

    COSBench: cloud object storage benchmark  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    With object storage systems being increasingly recognized as a preferred way to expose one's storage infrastructure to the web, the past few years have witnessed an explosion in the acceptance of these systems. Unfortunately, the proliferation of available ... Keywords: benchmark tool, object storage

    Qing Zheng; Haopeng Chen; Yaguang Wang; Jian Zhang; Jiangang Duan

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    480

    Hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Electrical energy is a high quality form of energy that can be easily converted to other forms of energy with high efficiency and, even more importantly, it can be used to control lower grades of energy quality with ease. However, building a cost-effective ... Keywords: charge, electrical storage, energy, energy storage, hybrid storage, management

    Massoud Pedram; Naehyuck Chang; Younghyun Kim; Yanzhi Wang

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duf6 storage safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    481

    Safety evaluation for packaging two plywood boxes  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This safety evaluation for packaging evaluates and documents the ability of the plywood boxes listed below to meet the packaging requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for the onsite transfer of Type B radioactive material. Onsite transfer is the transport of hazardous materials on controlled routes confined to established limited areas and to portions of federally owned roadways to which public access is prohibited during transfer. The plywood boxes being used for this transport are PIN number PNLD-95-322 and PNLD-95-385. The contents being transported are wood, plastic, piping, rubber, and gloves. The source term was determined by nondestructive analysis and obtained from the solid waste storage/disposal record. Before the nondestructive analysis, the intention was to transport the boxes under WHC-SD-TP-SEP-020, Safety Evaluation for Packaging (Onsite) Plywood Box (WHC 1994), but Type B shipments are not included.

    Flanagan, B.D.

    1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    482

    REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)  

    SciTech Connect

    Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The report also identified additional components and actions in Section 3.0 and Table 3 that require further evaluation. The purpose of this report is to evaluate another portion of the remaining inventory (i.e., delayed neutron signal fuel, blanket assemblies, highly enriched assemblies, newly loaded Ident-69 pin containers, and returned fuel) to ensure it can be safely off loaded to the FFTF spent fuel storage system.

    CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    483

    Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage and Power Electronics Program (ESPE) was held in Washington DC on Sept. 29-30, 2008. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. The 2008 agenda was composed of 28 projects that covered a broad range of new and ongoing, state-of-the-art, energy storage and power electronics technologies, including updates on the collaborations among DOE/ESPE, CEC in California, and NYSERDA in New York. Energy Storage Systems (ESS) presentations are available below. ESPE 2008 Peer Review - EAC Energy Storage Subcommittee - Brad Roberts, S&C

    484

    Highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage and disposition program plan  

    SciTech Connect

    Recent changes in international relations and other changes in national priorities have profoundly affected the management of weapons-usable fissile materials within the United States (US). The nuclear weapon stockpile reductions agreed to by the US and Russia have reduced the national security requirements for these fissile materials. National policies outlined by the US President seek to prevent the accumulation of nuclear weapon stockpiles of plutonium (Pu) and HEU, and to ensure that these materials are subjected to the highest standards of safety, security and international accountability. The purpose of the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Storage and Disposition Program Plan is to define and establish a planned approach for storage of all HEU and disposition of surplus HEU in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Material Disposition Program. Elements Of this Plan, which are specific to HEU storage and disposition, include program requirements, roles and responsibilities, program activities (action plans), milestone schedules, and deliverables.

    Arms, W.M.; Everitt, D.A.; O`Dell, C.L.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    485

    Stailization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    DOE-STD-3013-2012 MARCH 2012 DOE STANDARD STABILIZATION, PACKAGING, AND STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA PACK Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-3013-2012 iii ABSTRACT This Standard provides guidance for the stabilization, packaging, and safe storage of plutonium- bearing metals and oxides containing at least 30 wt% plutonium plus uranium. It supersedes DOE-STD-3013-2004, "Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials," and is approved for use by all DOE organizations and their contractors. Metals are stabilized by

    486

    FAQs about Storage Capacity  

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

    487

    gas cylinder storage guidelines  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines All cylinders must be stored vertical, top up across the upper half the cylinder but below the shoulder. Small cylinder stands or other methods may be appropriate to ensure that the cylinders are secured from movement. Boxes, cartons, and other items used to support small cylinders must not allow water to accumulate and possible cause corrosion. Avoid corrosive chemicals including salt and fumes - keep away from direct sunlight and keep objects away that could fall on them. Use Gas pressure regulators that have been inspected in the last 5 years. Cylinders that contain fuel gases whether full or empty must be stored away from oxidizer cylinders at a minimum of 20 feet. In the event they are stored together, they must be separated by a wall 5 feet high with

    488

    Carbon Storage Review 2012  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin - Phase III DE-FC26-05NT42588 Robert J. Finley and the MGSC Project Team Illinois State Geological Survey (University of Illinois) and Schlumberger Carbon Services U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 * The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) via the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program (contract number DE-FC26-05NT42588) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal

    489

    NSLS VUV Storage Ring  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    VUV Storage Ring VUV Storage Ring VUV Normal Operations Operating Parameters (pdf) Insertion Devices Flux & Brightness Orbit Stability Lattice Information (pdf) Lattice : MAD Dataset Mechanical Drawing (pdf) VUV Operating Schedule Introduction & History The VUV Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was one of the first of the 2nd generation light sources to operate in the world. Initially designed in 1976 the final lattice design was completed in 1978 shortly after funding was approved. Construction started at the beginning of FY 1979 and installation of the magnets was well underway by the end of FY 1980. The first stored beam was achieved in December of 1981 at 600 MeV and the first photons were delivered to beamlines in May 1982, with routine beam line operations underway by the start of FY 1983. The number of beam

    490

    Solar panel with storage  

    SciTech Connect

    A self contained, fully automatic, vertical wall panel, solar energy system characterized by having no moving parts in the panel. The panel is substantially a shallow rectangular box having a closed perimeter, an outer insulating chamber which is substantially a double glazed window, and an inner energy storage chamber which is provided with containers of phase change materials. The energy storage chamber is provided with air entrance and exit passages which communicate with the space to be heated. Thermostatically controlled blowers serve to move air from the space to be heated across the containers of phase change material and back to the space to be heated. Thermostatically controlled blowers also serve to move insulating material into and out of the insulating chamber at appropriate times.

    Zilisch, K.P.

    1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    491

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

    SciTech Connect

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    492

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Fusion power production requires energy storage and transfer on short time scales to create confining magnetic fields and for heating plasmas. The theta-pinch Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) requires 480 MJ of energy to drive the 5-T compression field with a 0.7-ms rise time. Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR) require 1 to 2 GJ of energy with a 1 to 2-s rise time for plasma ohmic heating. The design, development, and testing of four 300-kJ energy storage coils to satisfy the SFTR needs are described. Potential rotating machinery and homopolar energy systems for both the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) and tokamak ohmic-heating are presented.

    Rogers, J.D.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    493

    NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory Chapters Glossary Bibliography Biographical Sketch Summary Underground storage of natural gas

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    494

    Maui energy storage study.  

    SciTech Connect

    This report investigates strategies to mitigate anticipated wind energy curtailment on Maui, with a focus on grid-level energy storage technology. The study team developed an hourly production cost model of the Maui Electric Company (MECO) system, with an expected 72 MW of wind generation and 15 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in 2015, and used this model to investigate strategies that mitigate wind energy curtailment. It was found that storage projects can reduce both wind curtailment and the annual cost of producing power, and can do so in a cost-effective manner. Most of the savings achieved in these scenarios are not from replacing constant-cost diesel-fired generation with wind generation. Instead, the savings are achieved by the more efficient operation of the conventional units of the system. Using additional storage for spinning reserve enables the system to decrease the amount of spinning reserve provided by single-cycle units. This decreases the amount of generation from these units, which are often operated at their least efficient point (at minimum load). At the same time, the amount of spinning reserve from the efficient combined-cycle units also decreases, allowing these units to operate at higher, more efficient levels.

    Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Karlson, Benjamin

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    495

    Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) More Documents & Publications Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November...

    496

    Energy Storage Technologies Available for Licensing ...  

    Energy Storage Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy laboratories and participating research institutions have energy storage ...

    497

    Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of Welded Stainless Steel Canisters for Dry Cask Storage Systems  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Due to the delayed opening of a final geological repository for spent nuclear fuel, the lifespan of dry cask storage systems may be increased to 120 years or longer. To ensure safety over this extended period of interim storage, degradation mechanisms that have the potential to cause penetration of the canister confinement boundary must be evaluated and understood. To address this issue, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) performed a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify ...

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    498

    The color of safety  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The industry's workforce is getting grayer as veteran miners approach retirement, and greener as new hires come onboard. Will the changing complexion of the industry affect future safety technology? The article discusses problems of noise, vibration, and communication faced by coal miners and reports some developments by manufacturers of mining equipment to improve health and safety. 1 fig., 4 photos.