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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Evaluating and Avoiding Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Damage Caused by Duct Burners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), supplemental firing in duct burners introduces the potential for serious HRSG tube failure and damage. Duct burners that are specified, designed, and operated properly can produce a number of significant benefits. This report will assist operators in accruing these benefits.

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

3

Design and Evaluation of a High Temperature Burner Duct Recuperator System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) has completed a program to design, construct, install, and field test a ceramic-based high-temperature burner-duct-recuperator (HTBDR) in an industrial setting. The unit was capable of operating in corrosive, high temperature (2250oF) flue gas streams. The HTBDR was successfully tested in a steel soaking pit at B&W's Tubular Products Division in Koppel, Pennsylvania. The ceramic stage consisted of 50 bayonet style ceramic tube-in-tube assemblies supported by an insulated metallic tubesheet and sealed with a ceramic fiber product. The heat exchanger was designed to take maximum advantage of radiation heat transfer, minimize pressure drops on both the air and flue sides, and minimize thermal stresses and fouling. Modeling of the bayonet assemblies determined the outer-to-inner tube spacing to optimize the air-side pressure drop and heat transfer within the tubes. During the 1400 hour operation prior to plant closing, the ceramic stage performed well with no material related problems or air-to-flue leakage. Maximum preheat air produced was 1425°F with a flue gas temperature of 2250oF. Measured fuel savings of 17-24% were obtained over the previous recuperated (metallic heat exchanger) system. This projects a savings of 41% for an unrecuperated furnace. A simple payback analysis indicated acceptable payback for installation in unrecuperated furnaces but unacceptable payback for recuperated furnaces at today's low gas prices."

Parks, W. P.; DeBellis, C. L.; Kneidel, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Steam Generating Units (duct burners) 40 CFR Part 60 Subpart GG- Standards of Performance for Stationary Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For nitrogen oxides has been determined to be selective catalytic reduction. l As authorized by the Northwest Clean Air Agency Regulation Section 300, this order is issued subject to the following restrictions and conditions: 1) The gas turbines shall burn either pipeline natural gas, or number 2 distillate oil with a sulfur content not to exceed 0.05 weight percent. The HRSG duct burners shall burn only pipeline natural gas. 2) Pollutant concentrations for each gas turbinelheat recovery steam generator stack shall not exceed the following:

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Burner systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner system particularly useful for downhole deployment includes a tubular combustion chamber unit housed within a tubular coolant jacket assembly. The combustion chamber unit includes a monolithic tube of refractory material whose inner surface defines the combustion zone. A metal reinforcing sleeve surrounds and extends the length of the refractory tube. The inner surface of the coolant jacket assembly and outer surface of the combustion chamber unit are dimensioned so that those surfaces are close to one another in standby condition so that the combustion chamber unit has limited freedom to expand with that expansion being stabilized by the coolant jacket assembly so that compression forces in the refractory tube do not exceed about one-half the safe compressive stress of the material; and the materials of the combustion chamber unit are selected to establish thermal gradient parameters across the combustion chamber unit to maintain the refractory tube in compression during combustion system start up and cool down sequences.

Doherty, Brian J. (Marblehead, MA)

1984-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

Rotary Burner Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject technology, the Calcpos Rotary Burner (CRB), is a burner that is proposed to reduce energy consumption and emission levels in comparison to currently available technology. burners are used throughout industry to produce the heat that is required during the refining process. Refineries seek to minimize the use of energy in refining while still meeting EPA regulations for emissions.

Paul Flanagan

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Combustor burner vanelets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present application provides a burner for use with a combustor of a gas turbine engine. The burner may include a center hub, a shroud, a pair of fuel vanes extending from the center hub to the shroud, and a vanelet extending from the center hub and/or the shroud and positioned between the pair of fuel vanes.

Lacy, Benjamin (Greer, SC); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Loveland, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); Yilmaz, Ertan (Albany, NY); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner is described having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO{sub x} burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO{sub x} back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing. 8 figs.

Sivy, J.L.; Rodgers, L.W.; Koslosy, J.V.; LaRue, A.D.; Kaufman, K.C.; Sarv, H.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

9

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO.sub.x burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO.sub.x back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing.

Sivy, Jennifer L. (Alliance, OH); Rodgers, Larry W. (Canton, OH); Koslosy, John V. (Akron, OH); LaRue, Albert D. (Uniontown, OH); Kaufman, Keith C. (Canton, OH); Sarv, Hamid (Canton, OH)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

FLAT FLAME BURNER ANALYSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. C. , Combustion and Flame 34, pp. 85-98 (1979). Carrier.Effects on a One-Dimensional Flame," Combust. Sci. and Tech.Uniformity in Edge Cooled F1at Flame Burners," Combust. Sci.

Pagni, P.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Ultralean low swirl burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel burner and burner method has been invented which burns an ultra lean premixed fuel-air mixture with a stable flame. The inventive burning method results in efficient burning and much lower emissions of pollutants such as oxides of nitrogen than previous burners and burning methods. The inventive method imparts weak swirl (swirl numbers of between about 0.01 to 3.0) on a fuel-air flow stream. The swirl, too small to cause recirculation, causes an annulus region immediately inside the perimeter of the fuel-air flow to rotate in a plane normal to the axial flow. The rotation in turn causes the diameter of the fuel-air flow to increase with concomitant decrease in axial flow velocity. The flame stabilizes where the fuel-air mixture velocity equals the rate of burning resulting in a stable, turbulent flame.

Cheng, Robert K. (Kensington, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ultralean low swirl burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel burner and burner method has been invented which burns an ultra lean premixed fuel-air mixture with a stable flame. The inventive burning method results in efficient burning and much lower emissions of pollutants such as oxides of nitrogen than previous burners and burning methods. The inventive method imparts weak swirl (swirl numbers of between about 0.01 to 3.0) on a fuel-air flow stream. The swirl, too small to cause recirculation, causes an annulus region immediately inside the perimeter of the fuel-air flow to rotate in a plane normal to the axial flow. The rotation in turn causes the diameter of the fuel-air flow to increase with concomitant decrease in axial flow velocity. The flame stabilizes where the fuel-air mixture velocity equals the rate of burning resulting in a stable, turbulent flame. 11 figs.

Cheng, R.K.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

The effects of moisture and particle size of feedlot biomass on co-firing burner performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass (conventional and non-conventional) fuels co-fired with coal for power and steam generation are being tested and evaluated at several generation stations in the United States. The co-firing technology is expected to reduce landfill requirements for biomass wastes, and to provide a renewable, low pollution and zero net carbon dioxide fuel. The choice of the biomass depends upon local availability and cost of the transportation. The renewable biomass fuels range from agro to animal waste based fuels. For coal fired power plants located around feedlots where cattle are raised, the renewable biomass is the cattle manure, called feedlot biomass (FB). Thus coal could be mixed with feedlot biomass and then fired in existing boiler burners. A 30 KW (100,000 Btu/hr) boiler burner facility was built at Texas A&M University Boiler Burner Laboratory and the burner was fired with coal or coal-FB blends. Most of the previous data concerned with coal performance results from co-firing of low moisture FB (25%); so feeding at low flow rate becomes a problem. In order to test the effects of moisture on burner performance, the reactor was modified with external water injection through an atomizer in order to simulate higher moisture. The atomizer uses an airblast to atomize the water into finer droplets. At fixed equivalence ratio and swirl number for the secondary inlet air stream, the test variables selected were simulated moisture contents and particle sizes of feedlot biomass. Measurements of NO[], O?, CO and CO? along the furnace are reported. The summaries of results are as follows. With the atomized air only (i.e. without external water injection), the NO[] concentrations increased from 350 ppm to 650 ppm while CO decreased from 46,000 ppm to 18,000 ppm (data measured at the first probe, 6" from the burner). The external water injection used to simulate high moisture FB decreased the pollutant emissions (NO[]) from 570 ppm (zero external water with atomizing air injection) to 300 ppm (40% water in FB) but increased CO from 2,500 ppm (zero external water with atomizing air injection) to 10,500 ppm (40% water in FB) (data of moisture effect measured at the last probe, 36" from the burner) due to more incomplete burning. The small particles FB produced less NO[] but more CO than those from other sizes.

Chen, Chen-Jung

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Lensing duct  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding is described. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic. 3 figures.

Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Radial lean direct injection burner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

16

Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material  

SciTech Connect

Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Burner ignition system  

SciTech Connect

An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

Carignan, Forest J. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

RENEWABLES RESEARCH Boiler Burner Energy System Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLES RESEARCH Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) for Firetube Boilers PIER, industrial combined heat and power (CHP) boiler burner energy system technology ("BBEST"). Their research (unrecuperated) with an ultra- low nitrous oxide (NOx) boiler burner for firetube boilers. The project goals

19

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

CONTAM Overview - Ducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ducts. As an alternative to the simple air-handling system, CONTAM allows you to model HVAC systems using detailed duct systems. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Encapsulated and Buried Ducts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Encapsulated and Buried Ducts Robb Aldrich Steven Winter Associates, Inc. Why Buried Ducts?  Ductwork thermal losses can range from 10-45%  Interior ducts current solution, but may be impractical, expensive, or increase envelope loads Insulation & Air Barrier First Tests - Florida Early Buried Duct Tests (FL) Condensation? Master Bedroom Duct in Attic 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 Duct Top Temp Duct Side Temp Duct Bot. Temp Duct Side Dewpoint Duct Bot. Dewpoint Attic Temp 7/8/2000 7/8/2000 7/8/2000 7/8/2000 7/8/2000 7/8/2000 7/9/2000 0:00 4:00 8:00 12:00 16:00 20:00 0:00 Time California: Much drier, no Problem Implementation Getting it Right... in Florida A Solution for Humid Climates Encapsulated, then Buried Research Questions  What are the effective R-values?

22

Regenerative Burners Assessment in Holding Reverberatory Furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment showed that the regenerative burner furnaces are not profitable in saving energy in addition to the negative impact on the furnace life.

23

Anomalous recovery of damped radial modes in a circular?sector duct with locally heated flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is often desirable to predict acoustic propagation in a circular duct carrying a locally heated flow. Common examples include jet engines and certain industrial and commercial burners whose combustion?related noise can be an environmental problem if allowed to penetrate into the surroundings. In these cases axial gradients in the steady flow variables

J. R. Maham; S.?Y. Yeh

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Catalytic reactor with improved burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

Faitani, Joseph J. (Hartford, CT); Austin, George W. (Glastonbury, CT); Chase, Terry J. (Somers, CT); Suljak, George T. (Vernon, CT); Misage, Robert J. (Manchester,all of, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Reverberatory screen for a radiant burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to porous mat gas fired radiant burner panels utilizing improved reverberatory screens. The purpose of these screens is to boost the overall radiant output of the burner relative to a burner using no screen and the same fuel-air flow rates. In one embodiment, the reverberatory screen is fabricated from ceramic composite material, which can withstand higher operating temperatures than its metallic equivalent. In another embodiment the reverberatory screen is corrugated. The corrugations add stiffness which helps to resist creep and thermally induced distortions due to temperature or thermal expansion coefficient differences. As an added benefit, it has been unexpectedly discovered that the corrugations further increase the radiant efficiency of the burner. In a preferred embodiment, the reverberatory screen is both corrugated and made from ceramic composite material.

Gray, Paul E. (North East, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Advanced Burner Test Reactor - Preconceptual Design Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burner Test Reactor Preconceptual Design Report ANL-ABR-1 (ANL-AFCI-173) Nuclear Engineering Division Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an...

27

Silane-propane ignitor/burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

Hill, R.W.; Skinner, D.F. Jr.; Thorsness, C.B.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Silane-propane ignitor/burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

Hill, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Skinner, Dewey F. (Livermore, CA); Thorsness, Charles B. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

Alford, J. Michael (Lakewood, CO); Diener, Michael D. (Denver, CO); Nabity, James (Arvada, CO); Karpuk, Michael (Boulder, CO)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

31

CHP Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to engineer, design, fabricate, and field demonstrate a Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) that integrates a low-cost, clean burning, gas-fired simple-cycle (unrecuperated) 100 kWe (net) microturbine (SCMT) with a new ultra low-NOx gas-fired burner (ULNB) into one compact Combined Heat and Power (CHP) product that can be retrofit on new and existing industrial and commercial boilers in place of conventional burners. The Scope of Work for this project was segmented into two principal phases: (Phase I) Hardware development, assembly and pre-test and (Phase II) Field installation and demonstration testing. Phase I was divided into five technical tasks (Task 2 to 6). These tasks covered the engineering, design, fabrication, testing and optimization of each key component of the CHP system principally, ULNB, SCMT, assembly BBEST CHP package, and integrated controls. Phase I work culminated with the laboratory testing of the completed BBEST assembly prior to shipment for field installation and demonstration. Phase II consisted of two remaining technical tasks (Task 7 and 8), which focused on the installation, startup, and field verification tests at a pre-selected industrial plant to document performance and attainment of all project objectives. Technical direction and administration was under the management of CMCE, Inc. Altex Technologies Corporation lead the design, assembly and testing of the system. Field demonstration was supported by Leva Energy, the commercialization firm founded by executives at CMCE and Altex. Leva Energy has applied for patent protection on the BBEST process under the trade name of Power Burner and holds the license for the burner currently used in the product. The commercial term Power Burner is used throughout this report to refer to the BBEST technology proposed for this project. The project was co-funded by the California Energy Commission and the Southern California Gas Company (SCG), a division of Sempra Energy. These match funds were provided via concurrent contracts and investments available via CMCE, Altex, and Leva Energy The project attained all its objectives and is considered a success. CMCE secured the support of GI&E from Italy to supply 100 kW Turbec T-100 microturbines for the project. One was purchased by the project’s subcontractor, Altex, and a second spare was purchased by CMCE under this project. The microturbines were then modified to convert from their original recuperated design to a simple cycle configuration. Replacement low-NOx silo combustors were designed and bench tested in order to achieve compliance with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 emission limits for NOx and CO when in CHP operation. The converted microturbine was then mated with a low NOx burner provided by Altex via an integration section that allowed flow control and heat recovery to minimize combustion blower requirements; manage burner turndown; and recover waste heat. A new fully integrated control system was designed and developed that allowed one-touch system operation in all three available modes of operation: (1) CHP with both microturbine and burner firing for boiler heat input greater than 2 MMBtu/hr; (2) burner head only (BHO) when the microturbine is under service; and (3) microturbine only when boiler heat input requirements fall below 2 MMBtu/hr. This capability resulted in a burner turndown performance of nearly 10/1, a key advantage for this technology over conventional low NOx burners. Key components were then assembled into a cabinet with additional support systems for generator cooling and fuel supply. System checkout and performance tests were performed in the laboratory. The assembled system and its support equipment were then shipped and installed at a host facility where final performance tests were conducted following efforts to secure fabrication, air, and operating permits. The installed power burner is now in commercial operation and has achieved all the performance goals.

Castaldini, Carlo; Darby, Eric

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and...

33

Low NO.sub.x burner system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low NO.sub.x burner system for a furnace having spaced apart front and rear walls, comprises a double row of cell burners on each of the front and rear walls. Each cell burner is either of the inverted type with a secondary air nozzle spaced vertically below a coal nozzle, or the non-inverted type where the coal nozzle is below the secondary air port. The inverted and non-inverted cells alternate or are provided in other specified patterns at least in the lower row of cells. A small percentage of the total air can be also provided through the hopper or hopper throat forming the bottom of the furnace, or through the boiler hopper side walls. A shallow angle impeller design also advances the purpose of the invention which is to reduce CO and H.sub.2 S admissions while maintaining low NO.sub.x generation.

Kitto, Jr., John B. (North Canton, OH); Kleisley, Roger J. (Plain Twp., Stark County, OH); LaRue, Albert D. (Summit, OH); Latham, Chris E. (Knox Twp., Columbiana County, OH); Laursen, Thomas A. (Canton, OH)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Advanced Develop Advanced Burner Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors GNEP will develop and demonstrate Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) that consume transuranic elements (plutonium and other long-lived radioactive material) while extracting their energy. The development of ABRs will allow us to build an improved nuclear fuel cycle that recycles used fuel. Accordingly, the U.S. will work with participating international partners on the design, development, and demonstration of ABRs as part of the GNEP. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Advanced Burner Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Minimize Nuclear Waste

35

Dissolution of FB-Line Cabinet Sweepings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three FB-Line samples were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization and evaluation for suitability for HB-Line dissolution. These samples are part of a larger sampling/evaluation program in support of FB-Line deinventory efforts. The samples studied were identified as MC04-147- HBL, MC04-148-HBL, and FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N). The first sample, MC04-147-HBL, is a portion of FB-Line Packaging and Stabilization (P&S) materials. The second sample, MC04-148-HBL, is a sweeping from Cabinet 6-8, which is not representative of the mechanical line. The third sample, FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N), is an FB-Line North cabinet sweeping. The samples were described by FB-Line personnel as containing plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) which had not been high-fired. This description was generally confirmed by solids analysis and off gas measurements. All three samples were dissolved in 8 M HNO{sub 3}/0.1 M KF at 90-100 C leaving minor amounts of solid residue. During dissolution, sample MC04-147 did not generate hydrogen gas. Sample MC04-148 generated modest amounts of gas, which contained 4.0 to 4.7 volume percent (vol %) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at a ratio of up to 8.4 x 10{sup -5} mol H{sub 2}/g sample. Sample FBL-SWP-04-016-HBL (N) was nearly completely soluble in 8 M HNO{sub 3}and produced a very small amount of gas. Apparently, the CaF{sub 2} in that sample dissolves and provides sufficient fluoride to support the dissolution of other components.

Crowder, Mark L.

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

Leto, Anthony (Franklin Lakes, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Coal-water mixture fuel burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention represents an improvement over the prior art by providing a rotating cup burner arrangement for use with a coal-water mixture fuel which applies a thin, uniform sheet of fuel onto the inner surface of the rotating cup, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel on the inner surface of the cup, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge from the rotating cup, and further atomizes the fuel as it enters the combustion chamber by subjecting it to the high shear force of a high velocity air flow. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide for improved combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel. It is another object of the present invention to provide an arrangement for introducing a coal-water mixture fuel into a combustion chamber in a manner which provides improved flame control and stability, more efficient combustion of the hydrocarbon fuel, and continuous, reliable burner operation. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide for the continuous, sustained combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel without the need for a secondary combustion source such as natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a burner arrangement capable of accommodating a coal-water mixture fuel having a wide range of rheological and combustion characteristics in providing for its efficient combustion. 7 figs.

Brown, T.D.; Reehl, D.P.; Walbert, G.F.

1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evaluation of NASA Lean Premixed Hydrogen Burner  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stability characteristics of a prototype premixed, hydrogen-fueled burner were studied. The potential application is the use of hydrogen as a fuel for aircraft gas turbine operation. The burner configuration consisted of nine 6.72 mm (0.265 in) diameter channels through which the reactants entered the burner. Hydrogen was injected radially inward through two 0.906-mm (0.0357 in) diameter holes located on opposite sides of each air channel. In this way the region over which hydrogen and air were premixed was minimized to prevent potential flashback problems. All tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure. Flame stability was studied over a range of fuel-lean operating conditions since lean combustion is currently recognized as an effective approach to NOx emissions reduction. In addition to pure hydrogen and air, mixtures of hydrogen-blended methane and air were studied to evaluate the potential improvements in flame stability as hydrogen replaces methane as the primary fuel component.

Robert W. Schefer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Scaling and Development of Low-Swirl Burners for Low ...  

1305 Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 1305–1313 SCALING AND DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-SWIRL BURNERS FOR LOW-EMISSION FURNACES AND ...

42

Cornice Duct System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SYNERGETICS, INC., has designed, developed, and tested an air handling duct system that integrates the air duct with the cornice trim of interior spaces. The device has the advantage that the normal thermal losses from ducts into unconditioned attics and crawl spaces can be totally eliminated by bringing the ducts internal to the conditioned space. The following report details work conducted in the second budget period to develop the Cornice Duct System into a viable product for use in a variety of residential or small commercial building settings. A full-scale prototype has been fabricated and tested in a laboratory test building at the Daylighting Facility at North Carolina State University., Based on the results of that testing, the prototype design as been refined, fabricated, installed, and extensively tested in a residential laboratory house. The testing indicates that the device gives substantially superior performance to a standard air distribution system in terms of energy performance and thermal comfort. Patent Number US 6,511,373 B2 has been granted on the version of the device installed and tested in the laboratory house. (A copy of that patent is attached.) Refinements to the device have been carried through two additional design iterations, with a particular focus on reducing installation time and cost and refining the air control system. These new designs have been fabricated and tested and show substantial promise. Based on these design and testing iterations, a final design is proposed as part of this document. That final design is the basis for a continuation in part currently being filed with the U.5, Patent office.

Wayne Place; Chuck Ladd

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

FB EcoSolutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FB EcoSolutions LLC FB EcoSolutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name FB EcoSolutions, LLC Place Los Angeles, California Zip 90035 Sector Biomass Product They have developed a biodigester technology which they claim is more efficient than others and can use almost any sort of biomass to produce methane and dramatically reduce the rest of the waste. References FB EcoSolutions, LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. FB EcoSolutions, LLC is a company located in Los Angeles, California . References ↑ "FB EcoSolutions, LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=FB_EcoSolutions_LLC&oldid=345311" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

44

Burner Management System Maintenance Guide for Fossil Power Plant Personnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burner Management System Maintenance Guide for Fossil Power Plant Personnel provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This report will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability of and reducing the maintenance costs associated with the burner management system.

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

Residential oil burners with low input and two stages firing  

SciTech Connect

The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized, retention head burner. At low firing rates pressure atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low pressure air-atomized burner has been developed watch can operate at fining rates as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low fining rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space heating loads.

Butcher, T.; Krajewski, R.; Leigh, R. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Active Burner Balancing Technology Review: Interim Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to reduce NOx emissions and improve unit performance, EPRI has been investigating combustion optimization on large power plant boilers. Achieving proper balance among all burners in a furnace is one of the primary ways to improve the combustion process. Currently, burner balancing is performed only periodically and not continuously.

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

47

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Duct Burner Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides component-level information regarding the maintenance of major components associated with the compressor section of a combustion turbine typically installed at a combined-cycle facility. It combines recommendations offered by major equipment manufacturers with lessons learned from owner/operators of combined-cycle facilities.  BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Advanced oil burner for residential heating -- development report  

SciTech Connect

The development of advanced oil burner concepts has long been a part of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) oil heat research program. Generally, goals of this work include: increased system efficiency, reduced emissions of soot and NO{sub x}, and the practical extension of the firing rate range of current burners to lower input rates. The report describes the results of a project at BNL aimed at the development of air atomized burners. Two concepts are discussed. The first is an air atomizer which uses air supplied at pressures ranging from 10 to 20 psi and requiring the integration of an air compressor in the system. The second, more novel, approach involves the use of a low-pressure air atomizing nozzle which requires only 8-14 inches of water air pressure for fuel atomization. This second approach requires the use of a fan in the burner instead of a compressor although the fan pressure is higher than with conventional, pressure atomized retention head burners. In testing the first concept, high pressure air atomization, a conventional retention head burner was modified to accept the new nozzle. In addition, the burner head was modified to reduce the flow area to maintain roughly 1 inch of water pressure drop across the head at a firing rate of 0.25 gallons of oil per hour. The burner ignited easily and could be operated at low excess air levels without smoke. The major disadvantage of this burner approach is the need for the air compressor as part of the system. In evaluating options, a vane-type compressor was selected although the use of a compressor of this type will lead to increased burner maintenance requirements.

Butcher, T.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Tips: Air Ducts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Ducts Air Ducts Tips: Air Ducts June 24, 2013 - 7:23pm Addthis Air Ducts: Out of Sight, Out of Mind. The unsealed ducts in your attic and crawlspaces lose air, and uninsulated ducts lose heat -- wasting energy and money. Air Ducts: Out of Sight, Out of Mind. The unsealed ducts in your attic and crawlspaces lose air, and uninsulated ducts lose heat -- wasting energy and money. Your air ducts are one of the most important systems in your home, and if the ducts are poorly sealed or insulated they are likely contributing to higher energy bills. Your home's duct system is a branching network of tubes in the walls, floors, and ceilings; it carries the air from your home's furnace and central air conditioner to each room. Ducts are made of sheet metal, fiberglass, or other materials.

50

Duct Tape and Sealant Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were convinced that sealing air leaks in ducts was a costsealing approaches. Background UL has developed standards for closure systems for use with rigid air

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Increase Duct and Plenum Insulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

changes to the commercial provisions of the 2012 IECC: Increase Duct and Plenum Insulation R Hart Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2012 Proposal Description This...

52

Stopping duct quacks: Longevity of residential duct sealants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that these seals tend to fail over time periods ranging from days to years. We have used several test methods over the last few years to evaluate the longevity of duct sealants when subjected to temperatures and pressures representative of those found in the field. Traditional cloth duct tapes have been found to significantly under-perform other sealants and have been banned from receiving duct tightness credits in California's energy code (California Energy Commission 1998). Our accelerated testing apparatus has been redesigned since its first usage for improved performance. The methodology is currently under consideration by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as a potential new test method. This report will summarize the set of measurements to date, review the status of the test apparatus and test method, and summarize the applications of these results to codes and standards.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Duct Testing | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Testing This video offers tips and instruction for duct testing, and is a portion of the Duct Leakage Testing presentation given at Energy Codes 2009. Estimated Length: 12...

54

The Flame Doctor (TM) Burner Monitoring System: Demonstration Tests at AmerenUE's Meramec Unit 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of individual burner flame quality is essential to advanced boiler management. This is particularly important for advanced low-NOx burners, which are more sensitive to changes in operation and fuel quality than conventional burners. Global emissions monitoring is certainly important for boiler control, but such monitoring can only provide information that has been averaged over many burners and long time scales. Because individual burners can exhibit large differences in emissions and ...

2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

On HVAC duct acoustical end reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Duct end reflection (ER) is the apparent loss of sound power resulting from an abrupt change in a cross?sectional area of the duct. In most references

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's...

57

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Adv. Low-NOx Burner Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization The goal of this work is to develop a comprehensive, high-quality database characterizing PM2.5 emissions from utility plants firing high sulfur coals. The specific objectives are to: 1) develop and test an ultra low-NOx pulverized coal burner for plug-in retrofit applications without boiler wall tube modifications, 2) assess the impact of low-NOx PC burner operation on NOx and PM2.5 emissions, and 3) provide high-quality data to ensure that future PM2.5 regulations are based on good scientific information. The work will be performed in the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF), a 100 million Btu/hr near-full-scale facility located at the Alliance Research Center. Related Papers and Publications:

58

An Energy Analysis of the Catalytic Combustion Burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gas boilers of conventional flame always produce varying degrees of combustion products NOx and CO, which pollute the environment and waste energy. As a new way of combustion, catalytic combustion breaks the flammable limits of conventional flame combustion, and realizes the combustion of ultra-natural gas/air mixture under the flammable limits. Its combustion efficiency is higher, which improves the ratio of energy utilization. Applying the catalytic combustion to gas boilers could solve the gas boilers' lower combustion efficiency, and achieve energy savings. On the basis of the catalytic combustion burner, the catalytic combustion burner was designed according to the catalytic combustion and water heaters. In this paper, we analyzed the heat loss and thermal efficiency of the catalytic combustion burner, and compared it to that of flame combustion boilers. The results showed that catalytic combustion burner ?'s heat loss is not so high as originally considered, and its pollutant emissions are lower.

Dong, Q.; Zhang, S.; Duan, Z.; Zhou, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NETL: Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Project No.: DE-FE0002402 NETL has partnered with...

60

Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an advanced fuel cycle; (2) To qualify the transuranics-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR; and (3) To support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The ABTR should also address the following additional objectives: (1) To incorporate and demonstrate innovative design concepts and features that may lead to significant improvements in cost, safety, efficiency, reliability, or other favorable characteristics that could promote public acceptance and future private sector investment in ABRs; (2) To demonstrate improved technologies for safeguards and security; and (3) To support development of the U.S. infrastructure for design, fabrication and construction, testing and deployment of systems, structures and components for the ABRs. Based on these objectives, a pre-conceptual design of a 250 MWt ABTR has been developed; it is documented in this report. In addition to meeting the primary and additional objectives listed above, the lessons learned from fast reactor programs in the U.S. and worldwide and the operating experience of more than a dozen fast reactors around the world, in particular the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II have been incorporated into the design of the ABTR to the extent possible.

Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process. Computer simulations for coal: LB blends were performed by modifying an existing computer code to include the drying and phosphorus (P) oxidation models. The gasification studies revealed that there is bed agglomeration in the case of chicken litter biomass due to its higher alkaline oxide content in the ash. Finally, the results of the economic analysis show that considerable fuel cost savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings is reduced.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

Flow duct for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved liquid sodium flow ducts for nuclear reactors are described wherein the improvement comprises varying the wall thickness of each of the walls of a polygonal tubular duct structure so that each of the walls is of reduced cross-section along the longitudinal center line and of a greater cross-section along wall junctions with the other walls to form the polygonal tubular configuration.

Straalsund, Jerry L. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly documents the extensive evaluation which was performed on the anticipated environmental impacts of that plant. This source can be referenced in the open literature and is publicly available. The CRBRP design was also of a commercial demonstration plant size - 975 MWth - which falls in the middle of the range of ABR plant sizes being considered (250 MWth to 2000 MWth). At the time the project was cancelled, the CRBRP had progressed to the point of having completed the licensing application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and was in the process of receiving NRC approval. Therefore, it was felt that [CRBRP, 1977] provides some of the best available data and information as input to the GNEP PEIS work. CRBRP was not the source of all the information in this document. It is also expected that the CRBRP data will be bounding from the standpoint of commodity usage because fast reactor vendors will develop designs which will focus on commodity and footprint reduction to reduce the overall cost per kilowatt electric compared with the CRBR plant. Other sources used for this datacall information package are explained throughout this document and in Appendix A. In particular, see Table A.1 for a summary of the data sources used to generate the datacall information.

Briggs, L. L.; Cahalan, J. E.; Deitrich, L. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Grandy, C.; Kellogg, R.; Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Flame quality monitor system for fixed firing rate oil burners  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining and indicating the flame quality, or efficiency of the air-fuel ratio, in a fixed firing rate heating unit, such as an oil burning furnace, is provided. When the flame brightness falls outside a preset range, the flame quality, or excess air, has changed to the point that the unit should be serviced. The flame quality indicator output is in the form of lights mounted on the front of the unit. A green light indicates that the flame is about in the same condition as when the burner was last serviced. A red light indicates a flame which is either too rich or too lean, and that servicing of the burner is required. At the end of each firing cycle, the flame quality indicator goes into a hold mode which is in effect during the period that the burner remains off. A yellow or amber light indicates that the burner is in the hold mode. In this mode, the flame quality lights indicate the flame condition immediately before the burner turned off. Thus the unit can be viewed when it is off, and the flame condition at the end of the previous firing cycle can be observed.

Butcher, T.A.; Cerniglia, P.

1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS  

SciTech Connect

It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

Flame quality monitor system for fixed firing rate oil burners  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining and indicating the flame quality, or efficiency of the air-fuel ratio, in a fixed firing rate heating unit, such as an oil burning furnace, is provided. When the flame brightness falls outside a preset range, the flame quality, or excess air, has changed to the point that the unit should be serviced. The flame quality indicator output is in the form of lights mounted on the front of the unit. A green light indicates that the flame is about in the same condition as when the burner was last serviced. A red light indicates a flame which is either too rich or too lean, and that servicing of the burner is required. At the end of each firing cycle, the flame quality indicator goes into a hold mode which is in effect during the period that the burner remains off. A yellow or amber light indicates that the burner is in the hold mode. In this mode, the flame quality lights indicate the flame condition immediately before the burner turned off. Thus the unit can be viewed when it is off, and the flame condition at the end of the previous firing cycle can be observed.

Butcher, Thomas A. (Pt. Jefferson, NY); Cerniglia, Philip (Moriches, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of Washington DNR. Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of

68

User guide to the Burner Engineering Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Burner Engineering Research Laboratory (BERL) was established with the purpose of providing a facility where manufacturers and researchers can study industrial natural gas burners using conventional and laser-based diagnostics. To achieve this goal, an octagonal furnace enclosure with variable boundary conditions and optical access that can accommodate burners with firing rates up to 2.5 MMBtu per hour was built. In addition to conventional diagnostic capabilities like input/output measurements, exhaust gas monitoring, suction pyrometry and in-furnace gas sampling, laser-based diagnostics available at BERL include planar Mie scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence. This paper gives an overview of the operation of BERL and a description of the diagnostic capabilities and an estimate of the time required to complete each diagnostic for the potential user who is considering submitting a proposal.

Fornaciari, N.; Schefer, R.; Paul, P. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Lubeck, C. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Sanford, R.; Claytor, L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SMALL OIL BURNER CONCEPTS BASED ON LOW PRESSURE AIR ATOMIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of several novel oil burner applications based on low pressure air atomization is described. The atomizer used is a prefilming, airblast nozzle of the type commonly used in gas turbine combustion. The air pressure used can be as low as 1,300 Pa and such pressure can be easily achieved with a fan. Advantages over conventional, pressure-atomized nozzles include ability to operate at low input rates without very small passages and much lower fuel pressure requirements. The development of three specific applications is presented. The first two are domestic heating burners covering a capacity range 10 to 26 kW. The third application presented involves the use of this burner in an oil-fired thermophotovoltaic power generator system. Here the design firing rate is 2.9 kW and the system produces 500 watts of electric power.

BUTCHER,T.; CELEBI,Y.; WEI,G.; KAMATH,B.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste December 6, 2011 - 3:57pm Addthis Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of Washington DNR. Dale and Sharon Borgford, small business owners in Stevens County, WA, break ground with Peter Goldmark, Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo courtesy of

71

Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

1985-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

The FLAME DOCTOR Burner Monitoring System: Demonstration Tests at Alliant Energy's Edgewater 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of the quality of the flames of individual burners is essential to advanced boiler management, especially in low-NOx burners, which are more sensitive to changes in operation and fuel quality than conventional burners. New technology is needed that permits direct, continuous monitoring of each burner in a boiler. One promising technology that addresses these needs is the FLAME DOCTOR® system developed under EPRI sponsorship. This report summarizes the results from the second full-s...

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Duct/Air sealing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon DuctAir sealing Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of DuctAir sealing...

74

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Duct Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Calculator Duct Calculator Duct Calculator logo. Provides access to duct calculation and sizing capabilities either as a standalone Windows program or from within the Autodesk Building Mechanical, the new HVAC-oriented version of AutoCAD. Based on the engineering data and procedures outlined in the ASHRAE Fundamentals Handbook Calculation Methods, Duct Calculator features an advanced and fully interactive user interface. Slide controls for air flow, velocity, friction and duct size provide real-time, interactive feedback; as you spin one, the others dynamically respond in real time. When used with Autodesk Building Mechanical, Duct Calculator streamlines the design process by automatically re-sizing whole branches of ductwork. Screen Shots Keywords duct-sizing, design, engineering, calculation

75

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS FIRED COMBUSTORS-Mu¨nchen, Garching, Germany This article addresses the impact of syngas fuel composition on combustor blowout, flash flashback mechanisms are present in swirling flows, and the key thermophysical properties of a syngas

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

76

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Residential Duct Placement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Corporation, Bruce Wilcox of Berkeley Solar Group, Jamie Lyons of Energetics, Inc., Marshall Hunt improve the quality of life in California by bringing environmentally safe, affordable, and reliable shingles, energy credits, measurement issues, duct access, and equipment sizing issues. Commercial issues

77

Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

Clark Atlanta University

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Development of a Low NOx Burner System for Coal Fired Power Plants Using Coal and Biomass Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low NOx burner (LNB) is the most cost effective technology used in coal-fired power plants to reduce NOx. Conventional (unstaged) burners use primary air for transporting particles and swirling secondary air to create recirculation of hot gases. LNB uses staged air (dividing total air into primary, secondary and tertiary air) to control fuel bound nitrogen from mixing early and oxidizing to NOx; it can also limit thermal NOx by reducing peak flame temperatures. Previous research at Texas A&M University (TAMU) demonstrated that cofiring coal with feedlot biomass (FB) in conventional burners produced lower or similar levels of NOx but increased CO. The present research deals with i) construction of a small scale 29.31 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) LNB facility, ii) evaluation of firing Wyoming (WYO) coal as the base case coal and cofiring WYO and dairy biomass (DB) blends, and iii) evaluating the effects of staging on NOx and CO. Ultimate and Proximate analysis revealed that WYO and low ash, partially composted, dairy biomass (LA-PC-DB-SepS) had the following heat values and empirical formulas: CH0.6992N0.0122O0.1822S0.00217 and CH_1.2554N_0.0470O_0.3965S_0.00457. The WYO contained 3.10 kg of Ash/GJ, 15.66 kg of VM/GJ, 0.36 kg of N/GJ, and 6.21 kg of O/GJ while LA-PC-DB-SepS contained 11.57 kg of Ash/GJ, 36.50 kg of VM/GJ, 1.50 kg of N/GJ, and 14.48 kg of O/GJ. The construction of a LNB nozzle capable of providing primary, swirled secondary and swirled tertiary air for staging was completed. The reactor provides a maximum residence time of 1.8 seconds under hot flow conditions. WYO and DB were blended on a mass basis for the following blends: 95:5, 90:10, 85:15, and 80:20. Results from firing pure WYO showed that air staging caused a slight decrease of NOx in lean regions (equivalence ratio, greater than or equal to 1.0) but an increase of CO in rich regions (=1.2). For unstaged combustion, cofiring resulted in most fuel blends showing similar NOx emissions to WYO. Staged cofiring resulted in a 12% NOx increase in rich regions while producing similar to slightly lower amounts of NOx in lean regions. One conclusion is that there exists a strong inverse relationship between NOx and CO emissions.

Gomez, Patsky O.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Design of Flexible-Duct Junction Boxes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design of Flexible-duct Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes Robert Beach, IBACOS Duncan Prahl, IBACOS Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes Presentation Outline * Current Standards and Practice * Analysis Methods * Recommendations Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes * Detailed report is in peer review anticipated to be published T3 this year. - http://www1.eere.energy.gov/library/default.aspx?page=2&spi d=2. * Measure guide to be part of Building America Solutions Center - http://basc.pnnl.gov/ Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes Typical Installations As Plenum As Monster Design of Flexible-duct Junction Boxes Current Standards * ASHRAE 2012 HVAC Systems and Equipment, Box Plenum Systems Using Flexible Duct - Constrains Box Width to 2-3x Entrance Width - Constrains Box Length to 2 x Box Width

80

The zero age main sequence of WIMP burners  

SciTech Connect

We modify a stellar structure code to estimate the effect upon the main sequence of the accretion of weakly-interacting dark matter onto stars and its subsequent annihilation. The effect upon the stars depends upon whether the energy generation rate from dark matter annihilation is large enough to shut off the nuclear burning in the star. Main sequence weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMP) burners look much like proto-stars moving on the Hayashi track, although they are in principle completely stable. We make some brief comments about where such stars could be found, how they might be observed and more detailed simulations which are currently in progress. Finally we comment on whether or not it is possible to link the paradoxically hot, young stars found at the galactic center with WIMP burners.

Fairbairn, Malcolm; Scott, Pat; Edsjoe, Joakim [PH-TH, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland and King's College London, WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Cosmology, Particle Astrophysics and String Theory, Physics, Stockholm University and High Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology Centre (HEAC), AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study performance analysis results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this contract was to (1) test and evaluate two of the more important engineering aspects of designing and building thermionic cogeneration burners (TCB's); (2) make a cost and performance estimate of the TCB; and identify and evaluate industries where TCB's could be installed and where that the electrical power (dc) produced by the TCB's would be used directly in the process. The results of the performance analysis are detailed.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL: Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Project No.: DE-FE0002402 NETL has partnered with the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) to investigate the characteristics of oxy-fuel flames and assess their impact on the operability of oxy-fuel combustion systems. The examination of fundamental flame characteristics data and related burner operability parameters are essential for designing and developing oxy-fuel combustion systems for new power plants and retrofitting existing power generation units. In an oxy-fuel system, coal is combusted in an enriched oxygen environment using pure oxygen diluted with recycled CO2 or water vapor (H2O), resulting in a flue stream consisting only of CO2 and H2O (no other co-contaminants) (Figure 1). Oxy-fuel combustion is promising for CCUS applications because water can be condensed out of the CO2/H2O flue stream to produce a relatively pure CO2 end product for capture. Oxy-fuel combustion and subsequent CO2 capture is currently being considered by the DOE's Innovations for Existing Plants Program as having the potential to meet the goal of 90 percent CO2 capture without increasing the cost of electricity more than 35 percent.

84

Residential Duct Sealing Cost-Benefit Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential air duct leakage can account for as much as 15 percent of a utility bill. Research has shown that houses with supply leakage fractions of 10 percent or greater are viable candidates for air duct sealing or retrofit. This report details the development of a regional program designed to measure and improve residential heating system distribution efficiency via air duct sealing and retrofits. The program consolidates the efforts of several utilities and coordinates a region-wide assessment of th...

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Home test kit for duct leakage  

SciTech Connect

An inexpensive device whose purpose is to test for duct leakage in the home is described. This device is intended for use by homeowners and others untrained in the art of duct testing. While not as accurate as testing done by professionals, it should be able to give the homeowners enough information to justify a decision whether or not to call on professional assistance for further testing and possible remediation of their duct systems. The device has been reduced to practice.

Andrews, J.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Evaluation of PEGIT duct connection system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flex duct-to-sheet metal). Air sealing is separate from thisconcentrate on the air sealing. The connections designed byeffect of production tolerance on air sealing and assembly

Walker, Iain S.; Brenner, Douglas E.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mechanical swirler for a low-NO.sub.x, weak-swirl burner - Energy ...  

Disclosed is a mechanical swirler for generating diverging flow in lean premixed fuel burners. The swirler of the present invention includes a central passage with an ...

88

NETL: PPII - Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion - Project Brief PDF-72KB Sunflower Electric Power Corp., Garden City, Finney County, KS PROJECT...

89

EA-1472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox BurnerSeparated Over-Fire Air (LNBSOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power...

90

Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.Pressure Loss in Flexible HVAC Ducts Bass Abushakra, Ph.D.to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Observations of Strong Surface Radar Ducts over the Persian Gulf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ducting of microwave radiation is a common phenomenon over the oceans. The height and strength of the duct are controlling factors for radar propagation and must be determined accurately to assess propagation ranges. A surface evaporation duct ...

Ian M. Brooks; Andreas K. Goroch; David P. Rogers

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Measure Guideline: Sealing and Insulating of Ducts in Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect

This document begins with a discussion on potential cost and performance benefits of duct sealing and insulating. It continues with a review of typical duct materials and components and the overall procedures for assessing and improving the duct system.

Aldrich, R.; Puttagunta, S.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the DeltaQ duct Leakage Test”. ASHRAE Transactions (inof a new Duct Leakage Test: DeltaQ. LBNL 47308. Walker, I,Uncertainties in the DeltaQ test for Duct Leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Experimental evaluation of gas filled plenum (GFP) insulation for ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Filled Plenum (GFP) Insulation for Ducts LBNL 52084 Iaina flexible duct. Most duct insulation has an R-value of 4.2,used. With glass fiber insulation being about R4 per inch (

Walker, Iain S.; Guillot, Cyril

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Closing the Wedge with 300 fb^-1 and 3000 fb^-1 at the LHC: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of a Higgs boson at the LHC begins the era of directly measuring the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). Searching for extensions of the Standard Model (SM) EWSB sector at the LHC is of vital importance. An important extension of the SM with an extended EWSB sector is the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). In this white paper, we extend current ATLAS and CMS bounds on direct searches for the heavy MSSM neutral Higgs bosons to 300 fb^-1 and 3000 fb^-1 of data at the LHC. In particular we focus on the \\tau^+\\tau^- channel and the pseudoscalar decay to light Higgs boson and Z, with additional discussion on how to further close the wedge.

Ian M. Lewis

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

96

Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has-four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

Haaland, Carsten M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

Haaland, Carsten M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonaceous material-water slurry burner includes a high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer for directing a carbonaceous material-water slurry into a combustion chamber for burning therein without requiring a support fuel or oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Introduction of the carbonaceous material-water slurry under pressure forces it through a fixed atomizer wherein the slurry is reduced to small droplets by mixing with an atomizing air flow and directed into the combustion chamber. The atomizer includes a swirler located immediately adjacent to where the fuel slurry is introduced into the combustion chamber and which has a single center channel through which the carbonaceous material-water slurry flows into a plurality of diverging channels continuous with the center channel from which the slurry exits the swirler immediately adjacent to an aperture in the combustion chamber. The swirler includes a plurality of slots around its periphery extending the length thereof through which the atomizing air flows and by means of which the atomizing air is deflected so as to exert a maximum shear force upon the carbonaceous material-water slurry as it exits the swirler and enters the combustion chamber. A circulating coolant system or boiler feed water is provided around the periphery of the burner along the length thereof to regulate burner operating temperature, eliminate atomizer plugging, and inhibit the generation of sparklers, thus increasing combustion efficiency. A secondary air source directs heated air into the combustion chamber to promote recirculation of the hot combustion gases within the combustion chamber.

Nodd, Dennis G. (West Mifflin, PA); Walker, Richard J. (Bethel Park, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Aerosol-Based Duct Sealing Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Aerosol-Based Duct Sealing Technology During the past five years, research has quantified the impacts of residential duct system leakage on HVAC energy consumption and peak electricity demand. A typical house with ducts located in the attic or crawlspace wastes approximately 20% of heating and cooling energy through duct leaks and draws approximately 0.5 KW more electricity during peak cooling periods. A 1991 study indicated that sealing leaks could save close to one Quadrillion Btus per year. (see also Commercializing a New Technology) Because the major cost of sealing leaks in existing air distribution systems is the labor for the location and sealing process, reducing the labor could greatly improve the cost-effectiveness of such a retrofit. Field studies of duct sealing programs performed by HVAC contractors show

100

Success Stories: Duct Sealing - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Leaking ducts can be sealed in an average house in about a day. Start-Ups - Carrier Aeroseal, LLC. Aerosol-Based Duct Sealing Technology. Berkeley Lab has ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical characterization, air leakage and heat conduction gains Title Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical...

102

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors Background The Gasification Technologies Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supports research and development (R&D) in the area of gasification-a process whereby carbon-based materials (feedstocks) such as coal are converted into synthesis gas (syngas), which is separated into hydrogen (H 2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas streams in a combustion turbine-generator as a way to generate clean electricity while

103

Safety aspects of Particle Bed Reactor plutonium burner system  

SciTech Connect

An assessment is made of the safety aspects peculiar to using the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) as the burner in a plutonium disposal system. It is found that a combination of the graphitic fuel, high power density possible with the PBR and engineered design features results in an attractive concept. The high power density potentially makes it possible to complete the plutonium burning without requiring reprocessing and remanufacturing fuel. This possibility removes two hazardous steps from a plutonium burning complex. Finally, two backup cooling systems depending on thermo-electric converters and heat pipes act as ultimate heat removal sinks in the event of accident scenarios which result in loss of fuel cooling.

Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

NETL: PPII - Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion - Project Brief [PDF-72KB] Sunflower Electric Power Corp., Garden City, Finney County, KS PROJECT FACT SHEET Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion [PDF-260KB] (Oct 2008) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Achieving NSPS Emission Standards Through Integration of Low NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion [PDF-3.4MB] (June 2006) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion: A DOE Assessment [PDF-1.4MB] (Nov 2006)

105

Operational characteristics of a parallel jet MILD combustion burner system  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the performance and stability characteristics of a parallel jet MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion burner system in a laboratory-scale furnace, in which the reactants and exhaust ports are all mounted on the same wall. Thermal field measurements are presented for cases with and without combustion air preheat, in addition to global temperature and emission measurements for a range of equivalence ratio, heat extraction, air preheat and fuel dilution levels. The present furnace/burner configuration proved to operate without the need for external air preheating, and achieved a high degree of temperature uniformity. Based on an analysis of the temperature distribution and emissions, PSR model predictions, and equilibrium calculations, the CO formation was found to be related to the mixing patterns and furnace temperature rather than reaction quenching by the heat exchanger. The critical equivalence ratio, or excess air level, which maintains low CO emissions is reported for different heat exchanger positions, and an optimum operating condition is identified. Results of CO and NO{sub x} emissions, together with visual observations and a simplified two-dimensional analysis of the furnace aerodynamics, demonstrate that fuel jet momentum controls the stability of this multiple jet system. A stability diagram showing the threshold for stable operation is reported, which is not explained by previous stability criteria. (author)

Szegoe, G.G.; Dally, B.B.; Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia, 5005 (Australia)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Compressed supersymmetry after 1/fb at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the reach of the Large Hadron Collider with 1/fb of data at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV for several classes of supersymmetric models with compressed mass spectra, using jets and missing transverse energy cuts like those employed by ATLAS for Summer 2011 data. In the limit of extreme compression, the best limits come from signal regions that do not require more than 2 or 3 jets and that remove backgrounds by requiring more missing energy rather than higher effective mass.

Thomas J. LeCompte; Stephen P. Martin

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Ducts | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ducts The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on...

108

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation David M. Hess InnoSense LLC david.hess@innosense.us, 310-530-2011 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office...

109

Modeling Solid Propellant Strand Burner Experiments with Catalytic Additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation studies how nanoadditives influence burning rates through the development and use of a model to conduct parametric studies on nanoadditive interaction and to formulate theories. Decades of research have yet to determine the specific mechanisms for additive influence and the theories remain diverse and fragmented. It has been theorized that additives catalyze the combustion and thermal decomposition of AP, influence the condensed phases, and enhance the pyrolysis and regression of the binder. The main focus of the thesis was to approximate the enhanced boratory using spray-dried, spray-dried/heat-treated, and premixed TiO2 nanoadditives with ammonium perchlorate (AP) / hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) composite propellants. The model is based on the classic Beckstead-Derr-Price (BDP) and Cohen-Strand models and contains a component that determines the pressure changes within the strand burner during a test. The model accurately predicts measured burning rates for baseline propellants without additives over a range of 500 - 3000 psi within 10%. The strand burner component of the model predicts the experimental pressure trace accurately. Further, the strand burner component determines an average burning rate over time and predicts a transient burning rate if provided a pressure trace. A parametric study with the model parameters determined that the nanoadditives appear to be increasing the AP condensed phase reaction rate. This conclusion was drawn because only changes in AP condensed-phase reaction rate would adequately and realistically replicate burning rate enhancements seen in laboratory experiments. Parametric studies with binder kinetics, binder regression rate, AP surface kinetics, and primary flame kinetics produced burning rate behavior that did not match that seen in experiments with the additives. The model was further used to develop a theory for how the nanoadditive affects the AP condensed phase, and a new parameter, (Omega)c, that influences the AP condensed phase reaction rate was created that replicates spray-dried, spray-dried/heat-treated, and premixed TiO2 nanoadditive experimental burning rates. Finally, the model was used to develop a first approximation of predicting anomalous burning rate trends such as a negative pressure dependence and extinguishment. A new term, Mc, that modifies the ratio of binder mass flux to oxidizer mass flux is used in tandem with (Omega)c to develop a negative burning rate trend that is close to the experimental result.

Frazier, Corey

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Title Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Neil E. Klepeis, Agnes B. Lobscheid, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Date Published 11/2013 Abstract Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. Objective: Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO2 were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%.

111

Process and apparatus for igniting a burner in an inert atmosphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to this invention there is provided a process and apparatus for the ignition of a pilot burner in an inert atmosphere without substantially contaminating the inert atmosphere. The process includes the steps of providing a controlled amount of combustion air for a predetermined interval of time to the combustor then substantially simultaneously providing a controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and to a flame generator. The controlled mixture of fuel and air to the flame generator is then periodically energized to produce a secondary flame. With the secondary flame the controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and the combustion air is ignited to produce a pilot burner flame. The pilot burner flame is then used to ignited a mixture of main fuel and combustion air to produce a main burner flame. The main burner flame then is used to ignite a mixture of process derived fuel and combustion air to produce products of combustion for use as an inert gas in a heat treatment process.

Coolidge, Dennis W. (Katy, TX); Rinker, Franklin G. (Perrysburg, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

INTERIOR DUCT SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND PERFORMANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By removing air distribution and conditioning equipment from unconditioned spaces, homeowners stand to benefit substantially with respect to both energy savings and indoor air quality. Duct leakage introduces: Greater heating and cooling loads from air at extreme temperatures and humidity levels; Outside air and air from unconditioned spaces that may contain air borne contaminants, combustion gases, pollen, mold spores, and/or particles of building materials; and Higher whole-house infiltration/exfiltration rates. Exemplary studies conducted since 1990 have demonstrated the prevalence of duct leakage throughout the United States and measured energy savings of approximately 20% during both heating and cooling seasons from leakage reduction. These all dealt with duct leakage to and/or from unconditioned spaces. In the building science community, leakage within the conditioned space is generally presumed to eliminate the negative consequences of duct leakage with the exception of possibly creating pressure imbalances in the house which relates to higher infiltration and/or exfiltration. The practical challenges of isolating ducts and air handlers from unconditioned spaces require builders to construct an air-tight environment for the ducts. Florida Solar Energy Center researchers worked with four builders in Texas, North Carolina, and Florida who build a furred-down chase located either in a central hallway or at the edges of rooms as an architectural detail. Some comparison homes with duct systems in attics and crawl spaces were included in the test group of more than 20 homes. Test data reveals that all of the duct/AHU systems built inside the conditioned space had lower duct leakage to unconditioned spaces than their conventional counterparts; however, none of the homes was completely free of duct leakage to unconditioned spaces. Common problems included wiring and plumbing penetrations of the chase, failure to treat the chase as an air tight space, and misguided fresh air inlet design. Improvements were implemented by the Texas builder and retested in July. Results showed a 36% reduction in duct leakage, significant enough to warrant the builder adopting the new sealing procedure.

Janet E.R. Mcllvaine; David Beal; Philip Fairey

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation David M. Hess InnoSense LLC david.hess@innosense.us, 310-530-2011 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Develop an efficient insulation system that will adhere to housing duct work and pipe structures while conforming to complex geometries. New insulations must increase the R-value of existing materials and be easy to apply or retrofit to existing structures.

114

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Jenny tennant Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov David Rue Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plaines, IL 60018 847-768-0508 david.rue@gastechnology.org Real Time Flame moniToRing oF gasiFieR BuRneR and injecToRs Description Combustion scientists and engineers have studied radiant emissions of various flames for many years. For some time, technologists have understood the rich potential for

115

Data:1dfbc558-81fb-450f-b6c2-ef422f4bb34c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dfbc558-81fb-450f-b6c2-ef422f4bb34c dfbc558-81fb-450f-b6c2-ef422f4bb34c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2012/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Broken Bow Public Works Authority Sector: Commercial Description: * Avialable to the Broken Bow Public Works Authority for use or resale. Electric service shall be billed to and paid by Broken Bow Public Works Authority. Subject to all taxes, but not limited to gross receipts taxes. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

116

Data:C4311e31-07fb-463f-b088-a05eb6867164 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e31-07fb-463f-b088-a05eb6867164 e31-07fb-463f-b088-a05eb6867164 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Salt River Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cogeneration and small power production power purchase rate schedule over 100 kW Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: www.srelectric.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

117

Data:A98576f2-f705-4dcd-a6fb-cecf8fb8917f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f2-f705-4dcd-a6fb-cecf8fb8917f f2-f705-4dcd-a6fb-cecf8fb8917f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 1 of Okanogan County Effective date: 2011/12/01 End date if known: Rate name: Small Commercial General Service Schedule No. 3A Sector: Commercial Description: Minimum energy charge: $25.00 per month. KWh in minimum energy charge:500. Source or reference: https://www.okanoganpud.org/electric/rates/small-general-service Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

118

Data:A14f5840-19c2-47c6-9fb9-0ef49511a2fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f5840-19c2-47c6-9fb9-0ef49511a2fb f5840-19c2-47c6-9fb9-0ef49511a2fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Bay City, Michigan (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Commercial & Industrial High Load Factor Time-of-Use (Sub-transmission Service) Sector: Commercial Description: Subject to any restrictions, this rate is available to any customer desiring primary or secondary voltage service for general use where the billing demand is 100 kW or more. This rate is not available for street lighting service or for resale purposes.

119

Data:D21cd3bf-fb82-45f3-89c6-83790d1a95fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cd3bf-fb82-45f3-89c6-83790d1a95fb cd3bf-fb82-45f3-89c6-83790d1a95fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Gothenburg, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial General Service Primary Metering Sector: Commercial Description: *Applicable to any non-residential customer, and for master-metered commercial customers providing service to residential type customers for lighting, heating, and power purposes where the customer's electric demand does not exceed 100 kW for three consecutive months. Subject to production cost adjustment and power factor adjustment.

120

GER 4194 - The 7FB: The Next Evolution of the F Gas Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 7FB: The 7FB: The Next Evolution of the F Gas Turbine Roberta Eldrid Lynda Kaufman Paul Marks GE Power Systems Schenectady, NY GER-4194 g Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Critical Issues in the F Evolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Life-Cycle Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The F Series Gas Turbine Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Reliability and Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

v9fb: a remote framebuffer infrastructure of linux  

SciTech Connect

v9fb is a software infrastructure that allows extending framebufFer devices in Linux over the network by providing an abstraction to them in the form of a filesystem hierarchy. Framebuffer based graphic devices export a synthetic filesystem which offers a simple and easy-to-use interface for performing common framebuffer operations. Remote framebuffer devices could be accessed over the network using the 9P protocol support in Linux. We describe the infrastructure in detail and review some of the benefits it offers similar to Plan 9 distributed systems. We discuss the applications of this infrastructure to remotely display and run interactive applications on a terminal while ofFloading the computation to remote servers, and more importantly the flexibility it offers in driving tiled-display walls by aggregating graphic devices in the network.

Kulkarni, Abhishek [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ionkov, Latchesar [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Aerodynamic Experiments on a Ducted Fan in Hover and Edgewise Flight.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ducted fans and ducted rotors have been integrated into a wide range of aerospace vehicles, including manned and unmanned systems. Ducted fans offer many potential… (more)

Myers, Leighton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

EA-1472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated 472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Finnety County, Kansas EA-1472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Finnety County, Kansas SUMMARY The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower's Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas.

124

Establishing criteria for the design of a combination parallel and cross-flaming covered burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A burner was designed and constructed to combine weed control practices of parallel and cross-flaming with the technology of covers and insulation. It involved two covers designed to be placed on the sides of a crop row. The flame under the covers was directed parallel to the crop row. Using uniquely designed vanes to divert heated air, the apparatus was designed to re-circulate a portion of heat emitted from the burners for increased fuel efficiency. The apparatus was evaluated by comparing it with the two open flame practices. This evaluation was performed by moving the burners over an area that would monitor the temperatures at specified heights and locations. Temperatures were measured using thermocouples placed at heights 7-mm, 150-mm, and 300-mm in the crop row and height 7-mm in the left and right furrows. Burners traveled at a designated speed (2, 3.5, or 5 km/h) and burner operating pressure combination (207, 276, or 345 kPa). Time versus temperature curves were generated with the data for the temperatures observed. The areas under the curve, above 100 degrees C and within an exposure time boundary were used to compute utilization factors. The utilization factors provided a relative comparison of burner efficiency and performance. At 300-mm in the row, temperatures never exceeded 100 degrees C. At 150-mm in the row, temperatures rarely exceeded 100 degrees C. Sometimes temperatures exceeded 100 degrees C for a brief time. These results were evidence the covered burner re-circulated some heat and excessive amounts of heat were not escaping into the crop canopy. The thermocouples at height 7-mm provided a good indication of temperature activity with the burners. With areas under the curve in the row at 7-mm, open cross-flaming showed higher temperatures for than the covered burner. However, the covered burner had higher utilization factors than open cross-flaming. The covered burner utilization factors were greater than open cross or parallel-flaming in the furrows.

Stark, Christopher Charles

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Investigation of Sensitivity of Furnace Operational Conditions to Burner Flow Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As aggressive reductions in boiler emissions are mandated, the electric utility industry has been moving toward installation of improved methods of burner flow measurement and control to optimize combustion for reduced emissions. Development of cost effective controls requires an understanding of how variations in air and coal flows relate to emission rates. This project used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling to quantify the impacts of variations of burner air and fuel flows on furnace operating...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO VALVED DUCTING  

SciTech Connect

A coaxial valved ducting is designed for fluid flow to and from a heat exchanger. The ducting comprises an inner pipe for flow of hot fluid, an outer pipe providing an annular passage for the countercurrent flow of cool fluid, a butterfly valve in the inner pipe, peripherally spaced longitudinal ribs joining the two pipes in the region of the valve, an extension of the outer pipe, and a butterfly or poppet valve associated with the extension. the inner pipe communicates with the heat exchanger by means of an extension through the outer pipe wall. (D.L.C.)

Blackburn, G.; Long, E.

1962-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Minimizing Energy Losses in Ducts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimizing Energy Losses in Ducts Minimizing Energy Losses in Ducts Minimizing Energy Losses in Ducts June 24, 2012 - 5:45pm Addthis Placing ductwork in conditioned space can help reduce energy losses. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/SimplyCreativePhotography Placing ductwork in conditioned space can help reduce energy losses. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/SimplyCreativePhotography In new home construction or in retrofits, proper duct system design is critical. In recent years, energy-saving designs have sought to include ducts and heating systems in the conditioned space. Many existing duct systems lose a lot of energy from leakage and poor insulation, but you can reduce that loss by sealing and insulating your ducts. Existing ducts may also be blocked or may require simple upgrades.

128

On the Evaporation Duct for Inhomogeneous Conditions in Coastal Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporation ducts are ubiquitous phenomena over the oceans, and they are responsible for much of the over-the-horizon propagation occurring with millimeter and microwave radars. The height of the evaporation duct depends on meteorological ...

G. L. Geernaert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Potential Flow Calculations of Axisymmetric Ducted Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An incompressible potential-flow vortex method has been constructed to analyze the flow field of a ducted

Widnall, Sheila

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks A. E. Xhafa, P. Sonthikorn, and O in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts.e., new call blocking and handover dropping probabilities, of an IWN that uses HVAC ducts are up to 6

Stancil, Daniel D.

131

Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVITED P A P E R Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts To provide a potential communications channel, HVAC ducts can function as electromagnetic waveguides; a 30-m read range has been-conditioning (HVAC) ducts as a potential communication channel between passive ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) radio

Hochberg, Michael

132

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

SciTech Connect

The thermal distribution system couples the HVAC components to the building envelope, and shares many properties of the buildings envelope including moisture, conduction and most especially air leakage performance. Duct leakage has a strong influence on air flow rates through building envelopes (usually resulting in much greater flows than those due to natural infiltration) because unbalanced duct air flows and leaks result in building pressurization and depressurization. As a tool to estimate this effect, the DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed over the past several years as an improvement to existing duct pressurization tests. It focuses on measuring the air leakage flows to outside at operating conditions that are required for envelope infiltration impacts and energy loss calculations for duct systems. The DeltaQ test builds on the standard envelope tightness blower door measurement techniques by repeating the tests with the system air handler off and on. The DeltaQ test requires several assumptions to be made about duct leakage and its interaction with the duct system and building envelope in order to convert the blower door results into duct leakage at system operating conditions. This study examined improvements to the DeltaQ test that account for some of these assumptions using a duct system and building envelope in a test laboratory. The laboratory measurements used a purpose-built test chamber coupled to a duct system typical of forced air systems in US homes. Special duct leaks with controlled air-flow were designed and installed into an airtight duct system. This test apparatus allowed the systematic variation of the duct and envelope leakage and accurate measurement of the duct leakage flows for comparison to DeltaQ test results. This paper will discuss the laboratory test apparatus design, construction and operation, the various analysis techniques applied to the calculation procedure and present estimates of uncertainty in measured duct leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A quantitative analysis of the flame produced by a gas-fueled propellant simulating burner including: soot field characterization, temperature diagnostic techniques, spectral analysis, heat flux, and aluminum particle combustion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study details the characterization and implementation of a burner devised to simulate solid propellant fires. The burner is designed with the ability to introduce… (more)

Jackson, Matt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Dissolution of FB-Line Residues Containing Beryllium Metal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scrap materials containing plutonium (Pu) metal are currently being transferred from the FB Line vault to HB Line for dissolution and subsequent disposition through the H-Canyon facility. Some of the items scheduled for dissolution contain both Pu and beryllium (Be) metal as a composite material. The Pu and Be metals were physically separated to minimize the amount of Be associated with the Pu; however, the dissolution flowsheet was required to dissolve small amounts of Be combined with the Pu metal using a dissolving solution containing nitric acid (HNO3) and potassium fluoride (KF). Since the dissolution of Pu metal in HNO3/fluoride (F-) solutions is well understood, the primary focus of the experimental program was the dissolution of Be metal. Initially, small-scale experiments were used to measure the dissolution rate of Be metal foils using conditions effective for the dissolution of Pu metal. The experiments demonstrated that the dissolution rate was nearly independent of the HNO3 concentration over the limited range of investigation and only a moderate to weak function of the F- concentration. The effect of temperature was more pronounced, significantly increasing the dissolution rate between 40 and 105 degrees C. The offgas from three Be metal foil dissolutions was collected and characterized. The production of hydrogen (H2) was found to be sensitive to the HNO3 concentration, decreasing by a factor of approximately two when the HNO3 was increased from 4 to 8 M. This result is consistent with the dissolution mechanism shifting away from a typical metal/acid reaction toward increased production of nitrogen oxides by nitrate (NO3-) oxidation.

TRACY, RUDISILL

2005-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

Residential duct system leakage; Magnitude, impacts, and potential for reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues associated with leakage in residential air distribution systems, touching on the prevalence of duct leakage, the impacts of duct leakage, and on the techniques available for sealing duct systems. The issues examined in detail are: present techniques for measuring the leakage area of ducts existing data bases of duct leakage area measurements, the impacts of duct leakage on space-conditioning energy consumption and peak demand, and the ventilation impacts of duct leakage. The paper also includes a brief discussion of techniques for sealing duct systems in the field. The results derived from duct leakage are and driving pressure measurements indicate that in regions in which distribution systems pass through unconditioned spaces, air infiltration rates will typically double when the distribution fan is turned on, and that the average annual air infiltration rate is increased by 30% to 70% due to the existence of the distribution system. Estimates based upon a simplified analysis of leakage-induced energy losses also indicate the peak electricity demands due to duct leakage can be as high as 4 kW in Sacramento, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, and that peak loads on the order of 1 to 2 kW are highly likely in these locations. Both peak loads and annual energy impacts are found to be strongly dependent on the location of the return duct, and attic return costing approximately 1500 kWh more energy than a crawlspace return in the two climates examined.

Modera, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ Speaker(s): Iain Walker Date: February 21, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Cynthia Tast Duct leakage has been identified as a major contributor to HVAC energy use and building infiltration, particularly in residences. In order to make good estimates of HVAC system energy performance, we need to know how much air leaks between the ducts and outside the building during system operation. Existing methods for determining duct leakage do not perform well due to experimental procedures that produce imprecise results or they require many assumptions to convert measurements into the desired leakage flows. The DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL to determine duct leakage flows by

137

Development of lean premixed low-swirl burner for low NO{sub x} practical application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the performance of a premixed low-swirl burner (LSB) in configurations that simulate commercial heating appliances. Laser diagnostics were used to investigate changes in flame stabilization mechanism, flowfield, and flame stability when the LSB flame was confined within quartz cylinders of various diameters and end constrictions. The LSB adapted well to enclosures without generating flame oscillations and the stabilization mechanism remained unchanged. The feasibility of using the LSB as a low NO{sub x} commercial burner has also been verified in a laboratory test station that simulates the operation of a water heater. It was determined that the LSB can generate NO{sub x} emissions < 10 ppm (at 3% O{sub 2}) without significant effect on the thermal efficiency of the conventional system. The study has demonstrated that the lean premixed LSB has commercial potential for use as a simple economical and versatile burner for many low emission gas appliances.

Yegian, D.T.; Cheng, R.K.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO sub x Cell trademark Burner retrofit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objectives of the full-Scale Low-NOx Cell{trademark} Burner (LNCB{trademark}) Retrofit project is to demonstrate the cost-effective reduction of NOx generated by a large, base-loaded (70% capacity factor or greater), coal-fired utility boiler. Specific objectives include: (1) At least 50% NOx reduction over standard two-nozzle cell burners, without degradation of boiler performance or life; (2) acquire and evaluate emission and boiler performance data before and after the retrofit to determine NOx reduction and impact on overall boiler performance; (3) demonstrate that the LNCB{trademark} retrofits are the most cost-effective alternative to emerging, or commercially-available NOx control technology for units equipped with cell burners. The focus of this demonstration is to determine maximum NOx reduction capabilities without adversely impacting plant performance, operation and maintenance.

Not Available

1992-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Thermionic-cogeneration-burner assessment study. Second quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance analysis work continued with the completion of the programming of the mathematical model and with the start of a series of parametric analyses. Initial studies predict that approximately 25 to 30% of the heat contained in the flue gas can be passed through the thermionic converters (TEC) and then be converted at 12 to 15% efficiency into electrical power. This results in up to 17 kWe per 1 million Btu/h burner firing rate. This is a 4 to 10 percent energy saving over power produced at the utility. The thermal burner design and construction have been completed, as well as initial testing on the furnace and preheat systems. The following industries are still considered viable options for use of the thermionic cogeneration burner: chlor-alkali, alumina-aluminum, copper refining, steel and gray iron, industries using resistance heating, electrolytic industries and electrochemical industries. Information gathered on these industries is presented.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Data:8284631f-09d3-460f-b5fb-c6629e416325 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1f-09d3-460f-b5fb-c6629e416325 1f-09d3-460f-b5fb-c6629e416325 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Modesto Irrigation District Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule FL Flat Rate Service-In Excess of 50% Load Factor 801 - 1000 Watt Sector: Commercial Description: Applicability This Schedule is applicable to small, constant, non-metered incidental loads for utilities, communication agencies, state agencies, and applicable special districts where the customer owns and maintains the equipment. The customer must supply equipment wattage to the District. Such loads would include: Cathodic Protection Stations Motor Radial Gates Pressure Point Automatic Watering Systems Flashing Beacons Sign Illumination Communication Power Booster Devices Monthly Usage: 591kWh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Data:34204d6f-b546-4fb5-8016-b819b754c663 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d6f-b546-4fb5-8016-b819b754c663 d6f-b546-4fb5-8016-b819b754c663 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Edgecombe-Martin County E M C Effective date: 2006/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: SECURITY LIGHTING SERVICE Mercury Vapor 400 W Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY: Electric service is available under this schedule for lighting of outdoors areas when the Cooperative owns the fixtures. The Cooperative will install fixtures on its distribution system poles and provide illumination from dusk to dawn. Installation of any security light requires a deposit of $30. EXTRA FACILITIES: When additional poles are installed in order to provide service under this Schedule, member will be charged $1.25 per month for each additional pole.

142

Data:F762fb8f-7b7c-48a1-a618-280fb34250bc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62fb8f-7b7c-48a1-a618-280fb34250bc 62fb8f-7b7c-48a1-a618-280fb34250bc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cobb Electric Membership Corp Effective date: 2006/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Overhead Service HPS 400 W FL Pole Contribution Not Paid Sector: Lighting Description: Pole Contributions Wood 30' $246.00 Wood 35' $297.00 Wood 40' $382.00 Wood 45' $424.00 Source or reference: https://www.cobbemc.com/~/media/Files/CEMC/PDFs/2012%20PDF/233%20Lighting%20Rates%202012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

143

Data:19aa1226-d3eb-4d44-b3e4-f834fb278fb0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aa1226-d3eb-4d44-b3e4-f834fb278fb0 aa1226-d3eb-4d44-b3e4-f834fb278fb0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: South Central Indiana REMC Effective date: 2010/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: STREET LIGHTING:100w HPS Cobrahead Luminaire on 30' WOODED POLE. Sector: Lighting Description: Availability Available to any municipal, government agency, commercial account, or homeowners association for street lighting in and around public parking areas, public roads, and vehicle access roads. Applicant must be adjacent to an existing electric power line of the Corporation that is adequate and suitable for supplying the lighting service. Type of Service Dusk-to-dawn lighting service using photoelectric controlled equipment. All equipment, including fixtures, supporting structures and electrical apparatus shall be owned, installed, and maintained by the Corporation. Maintenance of the complete assembly and the cost of its electrical operation are included in this service. Any additional investment required for the extension of secondary service lines or the installation of a transformer, will be billed to the consumer.

144

Data:3925d4bd-78d7-45fb-a4af-e0459fb853b1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d4bd-78d7-45fb-a4af-e0459fb853b1 d4bd-78d7-45fb-a4af-e0459fb853b1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Miami-Cass County Rural E M C Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights Metered 400 watt mercury vapor (120 V) Sector: Lighting Description: The Miami-Cass County Rural Electric Membership Corporation (REMC) shall charge and collect for security lighting service on the following bases of availability, character of service, monthly rate, and tax adjustment. AVAILABILITY: Available to any member of the REMC for continuous year round service for outdoor lighting where 120 volt service exists ahead of the meter loop.

145

Data:D638d925-23fb-444a-a218-47fb6d7ee905 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d925-23fb-444a-a218-47fb6d7ee905 d925-23fb-444a-a218-47fb6d7ee905 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 1 of Chelan County Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service Residential Demand 40 kW and over Single Phase Sector: Residential Description: AVAILABILITY: 1. This Schedule is available throughout the area of Chelan County served by the District with the exception of the Stehekin area, and is applicable to commercial, small industrial, farm power and multiple-residential light, heat and power customers. 2. This rate is divided into two parts. Part A-2 is secondary metered services and Part B-23 is primary metered customers who own their own transformers and distribution service facilities and have a peak demand less than 800 KW. Part B-23 applies to existing customers as of April 15, 1994. No new customers will be furnished service under Part B-23.

146

Data:Da07d90f-b0fb-4a47-b62c-b7113f149f5f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0f-b0fb-4a47-b62c-b7113f149f5f 0f-b0fb-4a47-b62c-b7113f149f5f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Public Service Co of NH Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 200W HIGH PRESSURE SODIUM LAMP Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.nu.com/PSNHTariffPDFs/tariff070107.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

147

Data:Fb9fc6b5-fcde-47d1-9fb0-cb9d94923013 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fb9fc6b5-fcde-47d1-9fb0-cb9d94923013 Fb9fc6b5-fcde-47d1-9fb0-cb9d94923013 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 1500 W MH Sport Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

148

Polonium release from an ATW burner system with liquid lead-bismuth coolant  

SciTech Connect

The authors analyzed polonium release hazards in a conceptual pool-type ATW burner with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant. Simplified quantitative models are used based on experiments and real NPP experience. They found little Po contamination outside the burner under normal operating conditions with nominal leakage from the gas system. In sudden gas leak and/or coolant spill accidents, the P contamination level can reach above the regulation limit but short exposure would not lead to severe health consequences. They are evaluating and developing mitigation methods.

Li, N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yefimov, E.; Pankratov, D. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study. Third quarterly technical progress report, April-June, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific tasks of this study are to mathematically model the thermionic cogeneration burner, experimentally confirm the projected energy flows in a thermal mock-up, make a cost estimate of the burner, including manufacturing, installation and maintenance, review industries in general and determine what groups of industries would be able to use the electrical power generated in the process, select one or more industries out of those for an in-depth study, including determination of the performance required for a thermionic cogeneration system to be competitive in that industry. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2414 2414 1 Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles M. P. Modera, O. Brzozowski ** , F. R. Carrié * , D. J. Dickerhoff, W. W. Delp, W. J. Fisk, R. Levinson, D. Wang Abstract Electricity energy savings potential by eliminating air leakage from ducts in large commercial buildings is on the order of 10 kWh/m 2 per year (1 kWh/ft 2 ). We have tested, in two large commercial buildings, a new technology that simultaneously seals duct leaks and measures effective leakage area of ducts. The technology is based upon injecting a fog of aerosolized sealant particles into a pressurized duct system. In brief, this process involves blocking all of the intentional openings in a duct system (e.g., diffusers). Therefore, when the system is pressurized, the only place for the air carrying the aerosol

151

TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I -PRELIMINARY RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TURBULENT COMBUSTION MODELING OF COAL:BIOMASS BLENDS IN A SWIRL BURNER I - PRELIMINARY RESULTS of Mathematics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 ABSTRACT A combustion model using three mixture fractions has been developed for accurate simulation of coal:manure combustion. This model treats coal

Daripa, Prabir

152

Combustion chamber for gas turbines and the like having a fluidized burner bed  

SciTech Connect

A combustion chamber with a fluidized burner bed preferably for gas turbines is described. It contains means for controlling the supply of fuel, combustion air and a cooling medium for the fluidized bed to maintain a predetermined proportional relationship between combustion air and cooling air under varying load conditions.

Harboe, H.

1975-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

Control of flames by tangential jet actuators in oxy-fuel burners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The active control of oxy-fuel flames from burners with separated jets is investigated. The control system consists of four small jet actuators, placed tangential to the exit of the main jets to generate a swirling flow. These actuators are able to modify the flow structure and to act on mixing between the reactants and consequently on the flame behavior. The burner (25 kW) is composed of separated jets, one jet of natural gas and one or two jets of pure oxygen. Experiments are conducted with three burner configurations, according to the number of jets, the jet exit velocities, and the separation distance between the jets. OH chemiluminescence measurements, particle image velocimetry, and measurements of NO{sub x} emissions are used to characterize the flow and the flame structure. Results show that the small jet actuators have a significant influence on the behavior of jets and the flame characteristics, particularly in the stabilization zone. It is shown that the control leads to a decrease in lift-off heights and to better stability of the flame. The use of jet actuators induces high jet spreading and an increase in turbulence intensity, which improves the mixing between the reactants and the surrounding fluid. Pollutant measurements show important results in terms of NO{sub x} reductions (up to 60%), in particular for low swirl intensity. The burner parameters, such as the number of jets and the spacing between the jets, also impact the flame behavior and NO{sub x} formation. (author)

Boushaki, Toufik [CORIA UMR 6614 CNRS-Universite et INSA de ROUEN, Site Universitaire du Madrillet, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, Cedex (France); Universite de Toulouse-INPT-UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse, Cedex (France); Sautet, Jean-Charles [CORIA UMR 6614 CNRS-Universite et INSA de ROUEN, Site Universitaire du Madrillet, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, Cedex (France); Labegorre, Bernard [Air Liquide, Centre de Recherche Claude-Delorme, Les Loges-en-Josas, B.P. 126 78354 Jouy-en-Josas, Cedex (France)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Dissolution of FB-Line Residues Containing Beryllium Metal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scrap materials containing plutonium (Pu) metal were dissolved at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of a program to disposition nuclear materials during the deactivation of the FB-Line facility. Some of these items contained both Pu and beryllium (Be) metal as a composite material. The Pu and Be metals were physically separated to minimize the amount of Be associated with the Pu; however, a dissolution flowsheet was required to dissolve small amounts of Be combined with the Pu metal using a dissolving solution containing nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) and potassium fluoride (KF). Since the dissolution of Pu metal in HNO{sub 3}/fluoride (F{sup -}) solutions was well understood, the primary focus of the flowsheet development was the dissolution of Be metal. Initially, small-scale experiments were used to measure the dissolution rate of Be metal foils using conditions effective for the dissolution of Pu metal. The experiments demonstrated that the dissolution rate was nearly independent of the HNO{sub 3} concentration over the limited range of investigation and only a moderate to weak function of the F{sup -} concentration. The effect of temperature was more pronounced, significantly increasing the dissolution rate between 40 and 105 C. The offgas analysis from three Be metal foil dissolutions demonstrated that the production of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was sensitive to the HNO{sub 3} concentration, decreasing by a factor of approximately two when the concentration was increased from 4 to 8 M. In subsequent experiments, complete dissolution of Be samples from a Pu/Be composite material was achieved in a 4 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.1-0.2 M KF. Gas samples collected during each experiment showed that the maximum H{sub 2} generation rate occurred at temperatures below 70-80 C. A Pu metal dissolution experiment was performed using a 4 M HNO{sub 3}/0.1 M KF solution at 80 C to demonstrate flowsheet conditions developed for the dissolution of Be metal. As the reaction progressed, the rate of dissolution slowed. The decrease in rate was attributed to the complexation of F{sup -} by the dissolved Pu. The F{sup -} became unavailable to catalyze the dissolution of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) formed on the surface of the metal which inhibited the dissolution rate. To compensate for the complexation of F{sup -}, an increase in the concentration to 0.15-0.2 M was recommended. Dissolution of the PuO{sub 2} was addressed by recommending an 8-10 h dissolution time with an increase in the dissolving temperature (to near boiling) during the final 4-6 h to facilitate the digestion of the solids. Dilution of the H{sub 2} concentration below 25% of the lower flammability limit by purging the dissolver with air was also necessary to eliminate the flammability concern.

RUDISILL, TRACY S.; CROWDER, MARK L.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal performance of residential duct systems in basements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many unanswered questions about the typical effects of duct system operation on the infiltration rates and energy usage of single- family residences with HVAC systems in their basements. In this paper, results from preliminary field studies and computer simulations are used to examine the potential for improvements in efficiency of air distribution systems in such houses. The field studies comprise thermal and flow measurements on four houses in Maryland. The houses were found to have significant envelope leakage, duct leakage, and duct conduction losses. Simulations of a basement house, the characteristics of which were chosen from the measured houses, were performed to assess the energy savings potential for basement house. The simulations estimate that a nine percent reduction in space conditioning energy use is obtained by sealing eighty percent of the duct leaks and insulating ducts to an R-value of 0.88 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (5{degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) where they are exposed in the basement. To determine the maximum possible reduction m energy use, simulations were run with all ducts insulated to 17.6 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (100 {degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) and with no duct leakage. A reduction of energy use by 14% is obtained by using perfect ducts instead of nominal ducts.

Treidler, B.; Modera, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Buried and Encapsulated Ducts, Jacksonville, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Ductwork installed in unconditioned attics can significantly increase the overall heating and cooling costs of residential buildings. In fact, estimated duct thermal losses for single-family residential buildings with ductwork installed in unconditioned attics range from 10% to 45%. In a study of three single-story houses in Florida, the Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) investigated the strategy of using buried and/or encapsulated ducts (BED) to reduce duct thermal losses in existing homes. The BED strategy consists of burying ducts in loose-fill insulation and/or encapsulating them in closed cell polyurethane spray foam (ccSPF) insulation. There are three possible combinations of BED strategies: (1) buried ducts; (2) encapsulated ducts (with ccSPF); and (3) buried and encapsulated ducts. The best solution for each situation depends on the climate, age of the house, and the configuration of the HVAC system and attic. For new construction projects, the team recommends that ducts be both encapsulated and buried as the minimal planning and costs required for this will yield optimal energy savings. The encapsulated/buried duct strategy, which utilizes ccSPF to address condensation concerns, is an approach that was developed specifically for humid climates.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Aerosol Duct Sealing : Technologies : From the Lab to the Marketplace...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the California building code changes and increasing availability of the aerosol sealing technology, more homeowners and facilities managers will seal their duct systems and save...

158

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Varitrane Duct Designer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing NA Expertise Required Basic knowledge of duct systems, methodologies, and terms. Users Approximately 1000 users worldwide. Audience Mechanical engineers and system...

159

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Varitrane Duct Designer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this task and improves calculation precision, allowing you to optimize your designs from fan to diffuser and be more productive The program consists of three applications: Duct...

160

Economizer Applications in Dual-Duct Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides analytical tools and engineering methods to evaluate the feasibility of the economizer for dual-duct air-handling units. The results show that the economizer decreases cooling energy consumption without heating energy penalties for dual-fan, dual-duct air-handling units. The economizer has significant heating energy penalties for single-fan, dual-duct air-handling units. The penalties are higher than the cooling energy savings when the cold airflow is less than the hot airflow. Detailed engineering analyses are required to evaluate the feasibility of the economizer for single-fan, dual-duct systems.

Joo, I.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Duct injection technology prototype development: Evaluation of engineering data  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Duct Injection Technology Prototype Development Project is to develop a sound design basis for applying duct injection technology as a post-combustion SO{sub 2}emissions control method to existing coal-fired power plants. The necessary engineering design and scale-up criteria will be developed for the commercialization of duct injection technology for the control of SO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired boilers in the utility industry. The primary focus of the analyses summarized in this Topical Report is the review of the known technical and economic information associated with duct injection technology. (VC)

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Leaf seal for transition duct in turbine system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a leaf seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Duct Systems in Large Commercial Buildings: Physical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Systems in Large Commercial Buildings: Physical Characterization, Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains William 1. Fisk, Woody Delp, Rick Diamond, Darryl Dickerhoff, Ronnen Levinson, Mark Modera, Matty Nematollahi, Duo Wang Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 March 30, 1999 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology and Community Systems, of the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 and by the California Institute For Energy Efficiency. LBNL-42339

165

Data:A3e7d1e2-5415-4cd9-bc91-6fb9fb7fd076 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d1e2-5415-4cd9-bc91-6fb9fb7fd076 d1e2-5415-4cd9-bc91-6fb9fb7fd076 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 1 of Chelan County Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service Commercial Part B-23 Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY: 1. This Schedule is available throughout the area of Chelan County served by the District with the exception of the Stehekin area, and is applicable to commercial, small industrial, farm power and multiple-residential light, heat and power customers. 2. This rate is divided into two parts. Part A-2 is secondary metered services and Part B-23 is primary metered customers who own their own transformers and distribution service facilities and have a peak demand less than 800 KW. Part B-23 applies to existing customers as of April 15, 1994. No new customers will be furnished service under Part B-23. CHARACTER OF SERVICE: 1. Service to be furnished under this schedule may be either three phase, sixty hertz alternating current at primary voltage or secondary power single phase, three phase or four wire three phase, 60 cycle, alternating current at available phase and voltage. 2. Temporary service for commercial construction shall be supplied under Part A-2.

166

Data:2fb0f185-fe3e-4fb5-bdaa-5c647d5a18c5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb0f185-fe3e-4fb5-bdaa-5c647d5a18c5 fb0f185-fe3e-4fb5-bdaa-5c647d5a18c5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Indianapolis Power & Light Co Effective date: 2011/03/15 End date if known: Rate name: MU-1 - a1b - 250 watt HPS - Painted Bronze Column Sector: Lighting Description: Lamps in enclosed fixtures, mounted on metal or fiberglass columns and supplied from underground circuits. APPLICABILITY: For Street and Traffic Lighting of public streets, parkways, improved alleys, boulevards, drives, bridges, parking areas, or other public places by Cities or Towns or by individuals, groups of individuals, associations and other than incorporated municipalities; and lighting of public parks, drives, bridges, parking areas or other public places by only Cities or Towns where there is a prospect that the capital expenditure is warranted. The capital expenditure will be warranted if the amount of revenue received in sixty (60) months exceeds the estimated cost of installation for the lights as calculated by the Company. If the 60-month revenue does not exceed the cost of installation, the Customer must pay two and one-half (2½) times the difference of the cost of installation and the 60-month revenue prior to installation of the lighting. The terms, prices and provisions of this rate schedule shall be applicable to a consolidated city of the first class only to the extent not inconsistent with the specifications, terms, prices and provisions in contracts which may be entered into by such city pursuant to I.C. § 36-9-9-1, et. seq.

167

DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF NOVEL LOW-NOx BURNERS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Technology Institute (GTI), together with Hamworthy Peabody Combustion Incorporated (formerly Peabody Engineering Corporation), the University of Utah, and Far West Electrochemical have developed and demonstrated an innovative combustion system suitable for natural gas and coke-oven gas firing within the steel industry. The combustion system is a simple, low-cost, energy-efficient burner that can reduce NOx by more than 75%. The U.S. steel industry needs to address NOx control at its steelmaking facilities. A significant part of NOx emissions comes from gas-fired boilers. In steel plants, byproduct gases – blast furnace gas (BFG) and coke-oven gas (COG) – are widely used together with natural gas to fire furnaces and boilers. In steel plants, natural gas can be fired together with BFG and COG, but, typically, the addition of natural gas raises NOx emissions, which can already be high because of residual fuel-bound nitrogen in COG. The Project Team has applied its expertise in low-NOx burners to lower NOx levels for these applications by combining advanced burner geometry and combustion staging with control strategies tailored to mixtures of natural gas and byproduct fuel gases. These methods reduce all varieties of NOx – thermal NOx produced by high flame temperatures, prompt NOx produced by complex chain reactions involving radical hydrocarbon species and NOx from fuel-bound nitrogen compounds such as ammonia found in COG. The Project Team has expanded GTI’s highly successful low-NOx forced internal recirculation (FIR) burner, previously developed for natural gas-fired boilers, into facilities that utilize BFG and COG. For natural gas firing, these burners have been shown to reduce NOx emissions from typical uncontrolled levels of 80-100 vppm to single-digit levels (9 vppm). This is done without the energy efficiency penalties incurred by alternative NOx control methods, such as external flue gas recirculation (FGR), water injection, and selective non-catalytic reduction. The FIR burner was previously demonstrated on firetube and watertube boilers, and these units are still operating at several industrial and commercial boiler sites in sizes ranging from 2.5 to 60 million Btu/h. This report covers the development of an innovative combustion system suitable for natural gas or coke-oven gas firing within the steel industry. The prototype FIR burner was evaluated on a 20 million Btu/h watertube boiler. Acceptable burner performance was obtained when firing natural gas and simulated coke-oven gas doped with ammonia. The laboratory data reveals a direct relationship between NOx formation and the ammonia concentration in the fuel. In addition, NOx formation increases as the primary stoichiometric ratio (PSR) increases. Representative ammonia concentrations, as documented in the steel industry, ranged from 200 to 500 vppm. When the laboratory burner/boiler was operated with 500 vppm ammonia in the fuel, NOx emissions ranged from 50 to 75 vppm. This, conservatively, is 75% less than state-of-the-art burner performance. When the burner is operated with 200 vppm ammonia in the fuel, the corresponding NOx emissions would range from 30 to 45 vppm, 84% less than present burner technology. During field evaluation on a 174 million Btu/h industrial prototype burner both natural gas and actual COG from on-site generation were tested. Despite the elevated hydrogen cyanide and ammonia content in the COG throughout the test program, the FIR burner showed an improvement over baseline emissions. At full load; 167 million Btu/h, NOx emissions were relatively low at 169 vppm. This represents a 30% reduction compared to baseline emissions not accounting for the higher hydrogen cyanide content in the COG. CO emissions remained below 20 vppm and were stable across the firing range. This represents a 68% reduction compared to baseline CO emissions. When firing natural gas, emissions were stable as firing rate increased over the range. At low fire; 45 million Btu/h, NOx emissions where 33 vppm and increased at full load; 144 million Btu

Cygan, David

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of compression on pressure drop in flexible, spiral wire helix core ducts used in residential and light commercial applications. Ducts of 6 inches, 8 inches and 10 inches (150, 200 and 250 mm) nominal diameters were tested under different compression configurations following ASHRAE Standard 120-1999--Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings. The results showed that the available published references tend to underestimate the effects of compression. The study demonstrated that moderate compression in flexible ducts, typical of that often seen in field installations, could increase the pressure drop by a factor of four, while further compression could increase the pressure drop by factors close to ten. The results proved that the pressure drop correction factor for compressed ducts cannot be independent of the duct size, as suggested by ASHRAE Fundamentals, and therefore a new relationship was developed for better quantification of the pressure drop in flexible ducts. This study also suggests potential improvements to ASHRAE Standard 120-1999 and provides new data for duct design.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Comparison Between Predicted Duct Effectiveness from Proposed ASHRAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-50008 Comparison Between Predicted Duct Effectiveness from Proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P of California. #12;1 LBNL-50008 Comparison Between Predicted Duct Effectiveness from Proposed ASHRAE Standard. McWilliams Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. ASHRAE Student Member ASHRAE Member ABSTRACT The proposed ASHRAE

170

Guidelines for the Fluid Dynamic Design of Power Plant Ducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of air and flue gas duct systems for electric power plants is an important but often neglected part of the complete design. By following the procedures outline in this report the duct engineer can develop a cost-effective design that minimizes pressure drop losses and the related operating costs.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of duct system improvements in California large commercial buildings, over a range of building vintages and climates. This assessment will provide a solid foundation for future efforts that address the energy efficiency of large commercial duct systems in Title 24. This report describes our work to address Objective 1, which includes a review of past modeling efforts related to duct thermal performance, and recommends near- and long-term modeling approaches for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings.

Wray, Craig P.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

List of Duct/Air sealing Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Duct/Air sealing Incentives Duct/Air sealing Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 580 Duct/Air sealing Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-580) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Building Insulation Caulking/Weather-stripping Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Duct/Air sealing Unspecified technologies Yes AEP (Central and SWEPCO) - Coolsaver A/C Tune Up (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Installer/Contractor Residential Central Air conditioners Custom/Others pending approval Duct/Air sealing

173

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DD4M Air Duct Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

friction, constant velocity and or static regain procedures to design air ducts for air conditioning, heating, ventilation and materials handling. Allows 1000 duct sections...

174

Full-scale demonstration of low-NO{sub x} cell{trademark} burner retrofit. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark}Burner (LNCB{trademark}) demonstration is to evaluate the applicability of this technology for reducing NO{sub x} emissions in full-scale, cell burner-equipped boilers. More precisely, the program objectives are to: (1) Achieve at least a 50% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. (2) Reduce NO{sub x} with no degradation to boiler performance or life of the unit. (3) Demonstrate a technically and economically feasible retrofit technology. Cell burner equipped boilers comprise 13% of the Pre-New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) coal-fired generating capacity. This relates to 34 operating units generating 23,639 MWe, 29 of which are opposed wall fired with two rows of two-nozzle cell burners on each wall. The host site was one of these 29. Dayton Power & Light offered use of J.M. Stuart Station`s Unit No. 4 as the host site. It was equipped with 24, two-nozzle cell burners arranged in an opposed wall configuration. To reduce NO{sub x} emissions, the LNCB{trademark} has been designed to delay the mixing of the fuel and combustion air. The delayed mixing, or staged combustion, reduces the high temperatures normally generated in the flame of a standard cell burner. A key design criterion for the burner was accomplishing delayed fuel-air mixing with no pressure part modifications to facilitate a {open_quotes}plug-in{close_quotes} design. The plug-in design reduces material costs and outage time required to complete the retrofit, compared to installing conventional, internally staged low-NO{sub x} burners.

Eckhart, C.F.; Kitto, J.B.; Kleisley, R.J. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Performance test reports and comparison of emission characteristics of prototype liquid multifuel burners developed for US military field cooking applications  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to provide data to the U.S. Army Natick RD&E Center on the performance of three prototype burners, which have the capability of firing with multiple types of fuels (diesel and JP-8), and the conventional gasoline-fired M-2 burner. The prototype burners are intended to replace the M-2 unit currently used in food cooking appliances in the Army. The burners supplied to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the purpose of testing under this project included one M-2 unit, one M-3 prototype unit designed by Natick, one Babington prototype unit designed by Babington Engineering, and one ITR prototype designed by International Thermal Research Ltd. It should be noted, however, that after the project began, Babington Engineering provided an upgraded prototype unit for testing which replaced the unit initially provided by the Natick Center. The M-3 unit replaced the Karcher unit listed in the contract. The test procedures which were described in a Test Method Report allowed for the measurement of the concentrations of specific compounds emitted from the burners. These compounds included oxygen (O{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), formaldehyde, and particulate emissions. The level of smoke produced was also measured by using a Bacharach Smoke Number system (ASTM Standard D2156). A separate Performance Test Report for each burner was prepared as part of this project, and is attached as part of this report. In those reports details of the measurement techniques, instrumentation, test operating conditions, and data for each burner were included. This paper provides a summary and a comparison of the results for all burners. A brief discussion of emissions from other similar small oil combustion systems is also part of this document to provide perspective on the type of contaminants and levels expected from these systems.

Litzke, W.; Celebi, Y.; McDonald, R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NETL: News Release - Commercial Sales of Low-Polluting Clean Coal Burner  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 14, 2001 March 14, 2001 Commercial Sales of Low-Polluting Clean Coal Burner Top $1 Billion Abraham Says Commercial Success Shows Benefits of Clean Coal Investment WASHINGTON, DC - An advanced, low-polluting coal combustor is rapidly becoming one of the government's fastest growing clean coal technology success stories. The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that sales of the "low-NOx concentric firing system" (LNCFS?), first pioneered in 1992-92 as part of the federal Clean Coal Technology Program, now top $1 billion. Results show the system is reducing nitrogen oxides, NOx, by nearly 40 percent in older coal burning plants. NOx is one of the air pollutants that contributes to smog, ground-level ozone, and acid rain. According to data compiled by the Energy Department's National Energy Technology Laboratory, 56,000 megawatts of electricity are now being generated in the United States by power plants equipped with the high-tech burner.

177

Method for reducing NOx during combustion of coal in a burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organically complexed nanocatalyst composition is applied to or mixed with coal prior to or upon introducing the coal into a coal burner in order to catalyze the removal of coal nitrogen from the coal and its conversion into nitrogen gas prior to combustion of the coal. This process leads to reduced NOx production during coal combustion. The nanocatalyst compositions include a nanoparticle catalyst that is made using a dispersing agent that can bond with the catalyst atoms. The dispersing agent forms stable, dispersed, nano-sized catalyst particles. The catalyst composition can be formed as a stable suspension to facilitate storage, transportation and application of the catalyst nanoparticles to a coal material. The catalyst composition can be applied before or after pulverizing the coal material or it may be injected directly into the coal burner together with pulverized coal.

Zhou, Bing (Cranbury, NJ); Parasher, Sukesh (Lawrenceville, NJ); Hare, Jeffrey J. (Provo, UT); Harding, N. Stanley (North Salt Lake, UT); Black, Stephanie E. (Sandy, UT); Johnson, Kenneth R. (Highland, UT)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF NOVEL LOW-NOx BURNERS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During field evaluation on a 174 million Btu/h industrial prototype burner both natural gas and actual COG from on-site generation were tested. Despite the elevated hydrogen cyanide and ammonia content in the COG throughout the test program, the FIR burner showed an improvement over baseline emissions. At full load; 167 million Btu/h, NOx emissions were relatively low at 169 vppm. This represents a 30% reduction compared to baseline emissions not accounting for the higher hydrogen cyanide content in the COG. CO emissions remained below 20 vppm and were stable across the firing range. This represents a 68% reduction compared to baseline CO emissions. When firing natural gas, emissions were stable as firing rate increased over the range. At low fire; 45 million Btu/h, NOx emissions where 33 vppm and increased at full load; 144 million Btu

Cygan, David

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Direct contact low emission steam generating system and method utilizing a compact, multi-fuel burner  

SciTech Connect

A high output, high pressure direct contact steam generator for producing high quality steam particularly suited for use with low grade, low cost fuel. When used in a system incorporating heat recovery and conversion of carryover water enthalpy into shaft horsepower, the unit disclosed provides high quality, high pressure steam for ''steam drive'' or thermal stimulation of petroleum wells through injection of high pressure steam and combustion gas mixtures. A particular feature of the burner/system disclosed provides compression of a burner oxidant such as atmospheric air, and shaft horesepower for pumping high pressure feedwater, from a lowest cost energy source such as leased crude, or other locally available fuel.

Eisenhawer, S.; Donaldson, A. B.; Fox, R. L.; Mulac, A. J.

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Investigation of Sensitivity of Furnace Operational Conditions to Burner Flow Controls  

SciTech Connect

This is the Final Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-02NT41580. The goal of this project was to systematically assess the sensitivity of furnace operational conditions to burner air and fuel flows in coal fired utility boilers. The focus of this project was to quantify the potential impacts of ''fine level'' controls rather than that of ''coarse level'' controls (i.e. combustion tuning). Although it is well accepted that combustion tuning will generally improve efficiency and emissions of an ''out of tune'' boiler, it is not as well understood what benefits can be derived through active multiburner measurement and control systems in boiler that has coarse level controls. The approach used here was to utilize existing baseline furnace models that have been constructed using Reaction Engineering International's (REI) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Using CFD analyses provides the ability to carry out a carefully controlled virtual experiment to characterize the sensitivity of NOx emissions, unburned carbon (UBC), furnace exit CO (FECO), furnace exit temperature (FEGT), and waterwall deposition to burner air and fuel flow rates. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided co-funding for this program, and instrument and controls experts from EPRI's Instrument and Controls (I&C) Center have been active participants in this project. CFD simulations were completed for five coal fired boilers as planned: (1) 150 MW wall fired, (2) 500 MW opposed wall fired, (3) 600 MW T-Fired, (4) 330 MW cyclone-fired, and (5) 200 MW T-Fired Twin Furnace. In all cases, the unit selections were made in order to represent units that were descriptive of the utility industry as a whole. For each unit, between 25 and 44 furnace simulations were completed in order to evaluate impacts of burner to burner variations in: (1) coal and primary air flow rate, and (2) secondary air flow rate. The parametric matrices of cases that were completed were defined in order to accommodate sensitivity analyses of the results. The sensitivity analyses provide a strategy for quantifying the rate of change of NOx or unburned carbon in the fly ash to a rate of change in secondary air or fuel or stoichiometric ratio for individual burners or groups of burners in order to assess the value associated with individual burner flow control. In addition, the sensitivity coefficients that were produced provide a basis for quantifying the differences in sensitivities for the different boiler types. In a ranking of the sensitivity of NOx emissions to variations in secondary air flow between the burners at a fixed lower furnace stoichiometric ratio in order of least sensitive to most sensitive, the results were: (1) 600 MW T-Fired Unit; (2) 500 MW Opposed Wall-Fired Unit; (3) 150 MW Wall-Fired Unit; (4) 100 MW T-Fired Unit; and (5) 330 MW Cyclone-Fired Unit.

Marc Cremer; Dave Wang; Connie Senior; Andrew Chiodo; Steven Hardy; Paul Wolff

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development and validation of a combustion model for a fuel cell off-gas burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and environmentally clean power generation has never been so important. The increasing cost of fossil fuels and more stringent regulations on emissions (particularly CO2 and NOx), together with increasing demand for electricity, make the provision of cost... Development and Validation of a Combustion Model for a Fuel Cell Off-Gas Burner W. Tristan Collins Magdalene College University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy June 2008...

Collins, William Tristan

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Coal Particle Flow Patterns for O2 Enriched, Low NOx Burners  

SciTech Connect

This project involved a systematic investigation examining the effect of near-flame burner aerodynamics on standoff distance and stability of turbulent diffusion flames and the resultant NO{sub x} emissions from actual pulverized coal diffusion flames. Specifically, the scope of the project was to understand how changes in near-flame aerodynamics and transport air oxygen partial pressure can influence flame attachment and coal ignition, two properties essential to proper operation of low NO{sub x} burners. Results from this investigation utilized a new 2M tall, 0.5m in diameter combustor designed to evaluate near-flame combustion aerodynamics in terms of transport air oxygen partial pressure (Po{sub 2}), coal fines content, primary fuel and secondary air velocities, and furnace wall temperature furnish insight into fundamental processes that occur during combustion of pulverized coal in practical systems. Complementary cold flow studies were conducted in a geometrically similar chamber to analyze the detailed motion of the gas and particles using laser Doppler velocimetry. This final technical report summarizes the key findings from our investigation into coal particle flow patterns in burners. Specifically, we focused on the effects of oxygen enrichment, the effect of fines, and the effect of the nozzle velocity ratio on the resulting flow patterns. In the cold flow studies, detailed measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) were made to determine the details of the flow. In the hot flow studies, observations of flame stability and measurements of NO{sub x} were made to determine the effects of the flow patterns on burner operation.

Jennifer Sinclair Curtis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of a new duct leakage test: DeltaQ  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage is a key factor in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard.

Walker,I.S.; Sherman,M.H.; Wempen, J.; Wang, D.; McWilliams, J.A.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powdered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PER) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PER burners for satisfactory performance. During this past quarter, a porous radiant burner testing facility consisting of a commercial deep-fat fryer, an FTIR based spectral radiance measurement system, a set of flue gas analysis components, and a fuel gas mixing station was constructed. The measurement capabilities of the system were tested using methane and the test results were found to be consistent with the literature. Various gas mixtures were tested. Results indicated that the stability limits of the burner and emissions vary with fuel gas composition and air/fuel ratio. However, the maximum radiant efficiency of the burner remained constant. Results obtained from this study can be useful to develop optimum design guidelines for PER burner manufacturers.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Energy impacts of attic duct retrofits in Sacramento houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inefficiencies in air distribution systems have been identified as a major source of energy loss in US sunbelt homes. Research indicates that approximately 30--40% of the thermal energy delivered to the ducts passing through unconditioned spaces is lost through air leakage and conduction through the duct walls. Field experiments over the past several years have well documented the expected levels of air leakage and the extent to which that leakage can be reduced by retrofit. Energy savings have been documented to a more limited extent, based upon a few field studies and simulation model results. Simulations have also indicated energy loss through ducts during the off cycle caused by thermosiphon-induced flows, however this effect had not been confirmed experimentally. A field study has been initiated to separately measure the impacts of combined duct leak sealing and insulation retrofits, and to optimize a retrofit protocol for utility DSM programs. This paper describes preliminary results from 6 winter and 5 summer season houses. These retrofits cut overall duct leakage area approximately 64%, which translated to a reduction in envelope ELA of approximately 14%. Wrapping ducts and plenums with R-6 insulation translated to a reduction in average flow-weighted conduction losses of 33%. These experiments also confirmed the appropriateness of using duct ELA and operating pressures to estimate leakage flows for the population, but indicated significant variations between these estimates and measured flows on a house by house basis. In addition, these experiments provided a confirmation of the predicted thermosiphon flows, both under winter and summer conditions. Finally, average material costs were approximately 20% of the total retrofit costs, and estimates of labor required for retrofits based upon these experiments were: 0.04 person-hrs/cm{sup 2} of duct sealed and 0.21 person-hrs/m{sup 2} of duct insulated.

Jump, D.; Modera, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Title Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53605 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Nance Matson Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the air-handler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

187

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Title Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47308 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, J. Wempen, Duo Wang, Jennifer A. McWilliams, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Abstract Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard

188

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18%. The performance goal of 70/40 reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18%.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

COST-EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF NOx WITH INTEGRATED ULTRA LOW-NOx BURNERS AND SNCR  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired electric utilities are facing a serious challenge with regards to curbing their NO{sub x} emissions. At issue are the NO{sub x} contributions to the acid rain, ground level ozone, and particulate matter formation. Substantial NO{sub x} control requirements could be imposed under the proposed Ozone Transport Rule, National Ambient Air Quality Standards, and New Source Performance Standards. McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI), Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), and Fuel Tech are teaming to provide an integrated solution for NO{sub x} control. The system will be comprised of an ultra low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner technology plus a urea-based, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system. This system will be capable of meeting a target emission limit of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu and target ammonia (NH3) slip level targeted below 5 ppmV for commercial units. Our approach combines the best available combustion and post-combustion NO{sub x} control technologies. More specifically, B and W's DRB-4Z TM ultra low-NO{sub x} PC burner technology will be combined with Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT (SNCR) and NO{sub x}OUT Cascade (SNCR/SCR hybrid) systems and jointly evaluated and optimized in a state-of-the-art test facility at MTI. Although the NO{sub x}OUT Cascade (SNCR/SCR hybrid) system will not be tested directly in this program, its potential application for situations that require greater NO{sub x} reductions will be inferred from other measurements (i.e., SNCR NO{sub x} removal efficiency plus projected NO{sub x} reduction by the catalyst based on controlled ammonia slip). Our analysis shows that the integrated ultra low-NO{sub x} burner and SNCR system has the lowest cost when the burner emissions are 0.25 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu or less. At burner NO{sub x} emission level of 0.20 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu, the levelized cost per ton of NO{sub x} removed is 52% lower than the SCR cost.

Hamid Farzan

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A&M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Analysis of Aerosol-Based Duct Improvement Business in PEPCO's Service Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies in the last ten years have indicated potentially large energy savings with residential duct sealing. However, market penetration of duct sealing services has been very limited. This project analyzed the viability of selling duct sealing as part of a duct improvement service in PEPCO's Washington, D.C., service territory.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Data:1980fb12-686f-41a1-91fb-276aa0f033f4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-686f-41a1-91fb-276aa0f033f4 2-686f-41a1-91fb-276aa0f033f4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Holyoke, Massachusetts (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/08/12 End date if known: Rate name: GENERAL SERVICE ELECTRIC SCHEDULE (COMMERCIAL) Sector: Commercial Description: Additional Info: Following rate(s) apply: First 200 Hrs. Times Demand First 3,000 kWh at .1181 per kWh Next 12,000 kWh at .1096 per kWh Next 85,000 kWh at .1033 per kWh All over 100,000 kWh at .0949 per kWh Next 200 Hrs. Times Demand (100 KW Minimum) at .0878 per kWh All over 400 Hrs. Times Demand (100 KW Minimum) at .0728 per kWh

194

Method and apparatus for duct sealing using a clog-resistant insertable injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a duct access region through one side of a previously installed air duct, wherein the air duct has an air flow with an air flow direction by inserting an aerosol injector into a previously installed air duct through the access region. The aerosol injector includes a liquid tube having a liquid tube orifice for ejecting a liquid to be atomized; and a propellant cap. The method is accomplished by aligning the aerosol injector with the direction of air flow in the duct; activating an air flow within the duct; and spraying a sealant through the aerosol injector to seal the duct in the direction of the air flow.

Wang, Duo (Albany, CA); Modera, Mark P. (Piedmont, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Data:24693fb1-ceca-44ad-8554-dffceec04287 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb1-ceca-44ad-8554-dffceec04287 fb1-ceca-44ad-8554-dffceec04287 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cobb Electric Membership Corp Effective date: 2008/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: CS-14A Large General Service Sector: Description: Available to members located on or near the Corporation's multi-phase lines of adequate capacity, subject to the Corporation's Service Rules and Regulations. APPLICABILITY Applicable for all multi-phase service at one standard secondary voltage required on member's premises, delivered at one point and metered at or compensated to that voltage. The capacity of individual motors served under this schedule shall not exceed twenty (20) horsepower without consent from the Corporation

196

Data:A66ecbde-6930-450b-adde-9581403850fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ecbde-6930-450b-adde-9581403850fb ecbde-6930-450b-adde-9581403850fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cuming County Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2011/12/14 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting Unmetered Lights 250W HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: Ilinois State University Rate binder # 10 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2

197

Investigation of Surface Duct Conditions over Istanbul, Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive examination of 2 yr of radiosonde data to determine the surface duct conditions over Istanbul (4°N, 29°E), Turkey, was made. The refractivity of the atmosphere is a function of air temperature and water vapor pressure. Any ...

?Sibel Mentes; Zerefsan Kaymaz

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

New and Underutilized Technology: Duct Sealants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duct Sealants Duct Sealants New and Underutilized Technology: Duct Sealants October 8, 2013 - 3:01pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for duct sealants within the Federal sector. Benefits Aerosol sealant is injected into the ductwork to seal leaks. This can save energy and costs associated with heating, cooling, and fan operation depending on building type. Application Condensing boilers are appropriate for most building applications. Key Factors for Deployment Sealing ductwork should be a standard energy conservation measure evaluated during design, construction, major renovation, or other HVAC projects. Ranking Criteria Federal energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success are ranked 0-5 with 0 representing the lowest ranking and 5 representing the

199

Mesoscale Modeling of Boundary Layer Refractivity and Atmospheric Ducting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study four mesoscale forecasting systems were used to investigate the four-dimensional structure of atmospheric refractivity and ducting layers that occur within evolving synoptic conditions over the eastern seaboard of the United States. ...

Tracy Haack; Changgui Wang; Sally Garrett; Anna Glazer; Jocelyn Mailhot; Robert Marshall

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D Joints Speaker(s): Bass Abushakra Date: July 30, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

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201

BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.  

SciTech Connect

This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

ANDREWS,J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Search For The Sm Higgs Boson In The Process Zhllbb In 4.1/fb Of Cdf Ii Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation presents a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson in the associated production process ZH ? l+l- bb using 4.1fb-1 of Tevatron… (more)

Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Measure Guideline: Buried and/or Encapsulated Ducts  

SciTech Connect

Buried and/or encapsulated ducts (BEDs) are a class of advanced, energy-efficiency strategies intended to address the significant ductwork thermal losses associated with ducts installed in unconditioned attics. BEDs are ducts installed in unconditioned attics that are covered in loose-fill insulation and/or encapsulated in closed cell polyurethane spray foam insulation. This Measure Guideline covers the technical aspects of BEDs as well as the advantages, disadvantages, and risks of BEDs compared to other alternative strategies. This guideline also provides detailed guidance on installation of BEDs strategies in new and existing homes through step-by-step installation procedures. This Building America Measure Guideline synthesizes previously published research on BEDs and provides practical information to builders, contractors, homeowners, policy analysts, building professions, and building scientists. Some of the procedures presented here, however, require specialized equipment or expertise. In addition, some alterations to duct systems may require a specialized license. Persons implementing duct system improvements should not go beyond their expertise or qualifications. This guideline provides valuable information for a building industry that has struggled to address ductwork thermal losses in new and existing homes. As building codes strengthen requirements for duct air sealing and insulation, flexibility is needed to address energy efficiency goals. While ductwork in conditioned spaces has been promoted as the panacea for addressing ductwork thermal losses, BEDs installations approach - and sometimes exceed - the performance of ductwork in conditioned spaces.

Shapiro, C.; Zoeller, W.; Mantha, P.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles Title Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-42414 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Modera, Mark P., Olivier Brzozowski, François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William W. Delp, William J. Fisk, Ronnen M. Levinson, and Duo Wang Journal Energy & Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 705-714 Abstract Electricity energy savings potential by eliminating air leakage from ducts in large commercial buildings is on the order of 10 kWh/m2 per year (1 kWh/ft2). We have tested, in two large commercial buildings, a new technology that simultaneously seals duct leaks and measures effective leakage area of ducts. The technology is based upon injecting a fog of aerosolized sealant particles into a pressurized duct system. In brief, this process involves blocking all of the intentional openings in a duct system (e.g., diffusers). Therefore, when the system is pressurized, the only place for the air carrying the aerosol particles to exit the system is through the leaks. The key to the technology is to keep the particles suspended within the airstream until they reach the leaks, and then to have them leave the airstream and deposit on the leak sites. The principal finding from this field study was that the aerosol technology is capable of sealing the leaks in a large commercial building duct system within a reasonable time frame. In the first building, 66% of the leakage area was sealed within 2.5 hours of injection, and in the second building 86% of the leakage area was sealed within 5 hours. We also found that the aerosol could be blown through the VAV boxes in the second building without impacting their calibrations or performance. Some remaining questions are (1) how to achieve sealing rates comparable to those experienced in smaller residential systems; and (2) what tightness level these ducts systems can be brought to by means of aerosol sealing.

206

AN 80 MEGAWATT AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS BURNER REACTOR. Reactor Design and Feasibility Problem  

SciTech Connect

An 80 Mw aqueous homogeneous burner reactor suitable for producing 20 Mw of electricity at a remote location is described. The reactor fuel consists of a light water uranyl sulfate solution which acts as its own moderator and coolant. The uranium is highly enriched (93% U/sup 235/). The primary considerstions for the design were simplicity and reliability of the components, automatic demand control and safe for any load change, full xenon override not required, possibility of construction within the immediate future, and economic operation not the cortrolling factor. Reasonably complete studies are presented for the reactor physics, safety, stability, chemistry, hent transfer, and operation of the system. (auth)

Chapman, R.H.; Collins, H.L.; Dollard, W.J.; Fieno, D.; Hernandez- Fragoso, J.; Miller, J.W.; von Hollen, H.; Wheeler, C.V.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Investigation of Sensitivity of Furnace Operational Conditions to Burner Flow Controls  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Semiannual Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-02NT41580. The goal of this project is to systematically assess the sensitivity of furnace operational conditions to burner air and fuel flows in coal fired utility boilers. Our approach is to utilize existing baseline furnace models that have been constructed using Reaction Engineering International's (REI) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Using CFD analyses provides the ability to carry out a carefully controlled virtual experiment to characterize the sensitivity of NOx emissions, unburned carbon (UBC), furnace exit CO (FECO), furnace exit temperature (FEGT), and waterwall deposition to burner flow controls. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program, and instrument and controls experts from EPRI's Instrument and Controls (I&C) Center are active participants in this project. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. A project kickoff meeting was held in conjunction with NETL's 2002 Sensors and Control Program Portfolio Review and Roadmapping Workshop, in Pittsburgh, PA during October 15-16, 2002. Dr. Marc Cremer, REI, and Dr. Paul Wolff, EPRI I&C, both attended and met with the project COR, Susan Maley. Following the review of REI's database of wall-fired coal units, the project team selected a front wall fired 150 MW unit with a Riley Low NOx firing system including overfire air for evaluation. In addition, a test matrix outlining approximately 25 simulations involving variations in burner secondary air flows, and coal and primary air flows was constructed. During the reporting period, twenty-two simulations have been completed, summarized, and tabulated for sensitivity analysis. Based on these results, the team is developing a suitable approach for quantifying the sensitivity coefficients associated with the parametric tests. Some of the results of the CFD simulations of the single wall fired unit were presented in a technical paper entitled, ''CFD Investigation of the Sensitivity of Furnace Operational Conditions to Burner Flow Controls,'' presented at the 28th International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization and Fuel Systems in Clearwater, FL March 9-14, 2003. In addition to the work completed on the single wall fired unit, the project team made the selection of a 580 MW opposed wall fired unit to be the subject of evaluation in this program. Work is in progress to update the baseline model of this unit so that the parametric simulations can be initiated.

Marc Cremer; Kirsi St. Marie; Dave Wang

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Numerical simulation of the laminar diffusion flame in a simplified burner. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The laminar ethylene-air diffusion flame in a simple laboratory burner was simulated with the COYOTE reactive flow program. This program predicts the flow field, transport, and chemistry for the purposes of code validation and providing physical understanding of the processes occurring in the flame. The authors show the results of numerical experiments to test the importance of several physical phenomena, including gravity, radiation, and differential diffusion. The computational results compare favorably with the experimental measurements, and all three phenomena are important to accurate simulations.

Cloutman, L.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Data:70fb1a96-4bf7-4d99-8c11-bf6fb693232b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a96-4bf7-4d99-8c11-bf6fb693232b a96-4bf7-4d99-8c11-bf6fb693232b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern States Power Co - Minnesota Effective date: 2012/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: SMALL GENERAL SERVICE Water Heating (A11) Sector: Commercial Description: Standard service (i.e., alternating current) is available to any non-residential customer for single or three phase electric service. Direct Current service is only available in Minneapolis and St. Paul to the extent now used. Demand Charge (Direct Current Only) per Month per kW of Connected Load $3.03 DETERMINATION OF CUSTOMER BILLS Customer bills shall reflect energy charges (if applicable) based on customer's kWh usage, plus a customer charge (if applicable), plus demand charges (if applicable) based on customer's kW billing demand as defined. INTERIM RATE ADJUSTMENT A 4.49% Interim Rate Surcharge will be applied to rate components specified in the "Interim Rate Surcharge Rider." In addition, customer bills under this rate are subject to the following adjustments and/or charges. FUEL CLAUSE Bills are subject to the adjustments provided for in the Fuel Clause Rider. RESOURCE ADJUSTMENT Bills are subject to the adjustments provided for in the Conservation Improvement Program Adjustment Rider, the State Energy Policy Rate Rider, the Renewable Development Fund Rider, the Transmission Cost Recovery Rider, the Renewable Energy Standard Rider and the Mercury Cost Recovery Rider.

210

Combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of two kinds of swirl burners in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler. Enhanced ignition-dual register (EI-DR) burners and centrally fuel rich (CFR) swirl coal combustion burners were installed in the bottom row of the furnace during experiments. Local mean concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx gas species, gas temperatures, and char burnout were determined in the region of the two types of burners. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners, local mean CO concentrations, gas temperatures and the temperature gradient are higher and mean concentrations of O{sub 2} and NOx along the jet flow direction in the burner region are lower than for the enhanced ignition-dual register burners. Moreover, the mean O{sub 2} concentration is higher and the gas temperature and mean CO concentration are lower in the side wall region. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners in the bottom row, the combustion efficiency of the boiler increases from 96.73% to 97.09%, and NOx emission decreases from 411.5 to 355 ppm at 6% O{sub 2} compared to enhanced ignition-dual register burners and the boiler operates stably at 110 MWe without auxiliary fuel oil.

Li, Z.Q.; Jing, J.P.; Chen, Z.C.; Ren, F.; Xu, B.; Wei, H.D.; Ge, Z.H. [Harbin Institute for Technology, Harbin (China). School for Energy Science & Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Simplified Configuration for the Combustor of an oil Burner using a low Pressure, high flow air-atomizing Nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The inventors have devised a fuel burner that uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle. The improved fuel burner does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design.

Butcher, Thomas; Celebi, Yusuf; Fisher, Leonard

1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ducts in the Attic? What Were They Thinking? Preprint  

SciTech Connect

As energy-efficiency efforts focus increasingly on existing homes, we scratch our heads about construction decisions made 30, 40, 50-years ago and ask: 'What were they thinking?' A logical follow-on question is: 'What will folks think in 2050 about the homes we're building today?' This question can lead to a lively discussion, but the current practice that we find most alarming is placing ducts in the attic. In this paper, we explore through literature and analysis the impact duct location has on cooling load, peak demand, and energy cost in hot climates. For a typical new home in these climates, we estimate that locating ducts in attics rather than inside conditioned space increases the cooling load 0.5 to 1 ton, increases cooling costs 15% and increases demand by 0.75 kW. The aggregate demand to service duct loss in homes built in Houston, Las Vegas, and Phoenix during the period 2000 through 2009 is estimated to be 700 MW. We present options for building homes with ducts in conditioned space and demonstrate that these options compare favorably with other common approaches to achieving electricity peak demand and consumption savings in homes.

Roberts, D.; Winkler, J.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a physics-based data-supported model to investigate indoor pollutant exposure distributions resulting from use of natural gas cooking appliances across households in California. The model was applied to calculate time-resolved indoor concentrations of CO, NO2 and formaldehyde resulting from cooking burners and entry with outdoor air. Exposure metrics include 1-week average concentrations and frequency of exceeding ambient air quality standards. We present model results for Southern California (SoCal) using two air-exchange scenarios in winter: (1) infiltration-only, and (2) air exchange rate (AER) sampled from lognormal distributions derived from measurements. In roughly 40percent of homes in the SoCal cohort (N=6634) the 1-hour USEPA NO2 standard (190 ?g/m3) was exceeded at least once. The frequency of exceeding this standard was largely independent of AER assumption, and related primarily to building volume, emission rate and amount of burner use. As expected, AER had a more substantial impact on one-week average concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes; Singer, Brett C.; Klepeis, Neil E.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A laboratory-scale burner seeded with potassium for calibration of potassium emission/absorption instruments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power systems, potassium may be used to enhance the electrical conductivity of the high temperature products of combustion. In order to better evaluate the performance of MHD generators, it is desirable to be able to measure the distribution of the electrical conductivity of the gases throughout the channel through which the hot gases are passing. One such system is based on the emission/absorption spectra of potassium as a function of temperature. Diagnostic instruments, based on the emission/absorption characteristics of potassium in a flame or plasma require calibration in known temperature and potassium concentration conditions. A laboratory-scale hydrogen/oxygen burner which is seeded with gaseous potassium has been designed, fabricated, and operated for the purpose of providing a calibration facility for the potassium emission/absorption spectrographic (PE/AS) instrument. A nickel block was machined appropriately to provide separate flows of oxygen, hydrogen, and potassium vapor in a hot nitrogen stream mixed with hydrogen. A potassium evaporator was designed and fabricated to allow hot nitrogen gas to bubble through hot molten potassium to provide a known mass fraction of potassium to the resultant flame. The vapor pressure variation of the potassium with temperature was used to predict the amount of potassium carried to the flame by assuming that the hot nitrogen stream resulted in a saturated mixture as it bubbled through the heated molten potassium. Operational aspects as well as safety considerations in the operation of this burner are described. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Bouchillon, C.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effects of inclined jets on turbulent oxy-flame characteristics in a triple jet burner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactants are generally injected into the industrial furnaces by jets. An effective method to act on combustion in such systems is to control the way injection jets. The present study concerns the control of turbulent flames by the jets deflection in a natural gas-oxygen burner with separated jets. The burner of 25 kW power is constituted with three aligned jets, one central natural gas jet surrounded by two oxygen jets. The principal idea is to confine the fuel jet by oxygen jets to favour the mixing in order to improve the flame stability and consequently to reduce the pollutant emissions like NO{sub x}. The flame stability and its structural properties are analyzed by the OH chemiluminescence. The Particle Image Velocimetry technique has been used to characterize the dynamic field. Results show that the control by inclined jets has a considerable effect on the dynamic behaviour and flame topology. Indeed, the control by incline of oxygen jets towards fuel jet showed a double interest: a better stabilization of flame and a significant reduction of nitrogen oxides. Measurements showed that the deflection favours the mixing and accelerates the fusion of jets allowing the flame stabilization. (author)

Boushaki, T.; Mergheni, M.A.; Sautet, J.C. [CORIA UMR 6614 CNRS-Universite et INSA de ROUEN, Avenue de l'Universite, 76 801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, Cedex (France); Labegorre, B. [Air Liquide CRCD, Les Loges en Josas, BP 126, 78350 Jouy en Josas (France)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Multi-ported, internally recuperated burners for direct flame impingement heating applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A direct flame impingement method and apparatus employing at least one multi-ported, internally recuperated burner. The burner includes an innermost coaxial conduit having a first fluid inlet end and a first fluid outlet end, an outermost coaxial conduit disposed around the innermost coaxial conduit and having a combustion products outlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a combustion products inlet end proximate the first fluid outlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit, and a coaxial intermediate conduit disposed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit, whereby a second fluid annular region is formed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the intermediate coaxial conduit and a combustion products annular region is formed between the intermediate coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit. The intermediate coaxial conduit has a second fluid inlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a second fluid outlet end proximate the combustion products inlet end of the outermost coaxial conduit.

Abbasi, Hamid A. (Naperville, IL); Kurek, Harry (Dyer, IN); Chudnovsky, Yaroslav (Skokie, IL); Lisienko, Vladimir G. (Ekaterinburg, RU); Malikov, German K. (Ekaterinburg, RU)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

218

Duct Chase Sprinkler Replacement Project (4594), 5/31/2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duct Chase Sprinkler Replacement Project (4594) Duct Chase Sprinkler Replacement Project (4594) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (Citv/County/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The proposed action is provide replacement of corroded and aged sprinkler heads in the plenum duct chases. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 81.3- Routine maintenance Submit by E-mail For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each categorical exclusion, see Subpart D of I 0 CFR Part 1021. Regulatory Requirements in 10 CFR 1021.410(b): (See full text in regulation) [{Jrhe proposal fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A orB to 10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D.

219

Our Dog Discovered Our Ducts Have Cats | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dog Discovered Our Ducts Have Cats Our Dog Discovered Our Ducts Have Cats Our Dog Discovered Our Ducts Have Cats January 18, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Amy Foster Parish Our Australian Shepherd, Matilda, is not the fiercest of protectors. In fact, she's a total coward. She flees in horror from strangers and is terrorized by the vacuum cleaner; even a pair of shoes left in an unaccustomed place can strike fear in her heart. But let her see a cat in the back yard, or even catch the scent of one on a walk, and my cowardly Matilda becomes a superhero ready to save me from the feline menace. So when Matilda started pulling her superhero routine in the house a few weeks ago, running from room to room and growling at the air registers in the floor, I was immediately suspicious. We don't own a cat, and Matilda's

220

CASE STUDY OF DUCT RETROFIT OF A 1985 HOME AND GUIDELINES FOR ATTIC AND CRAWL SPACE DUCT SEALING  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is fully committed to research for developing the information and capabilities necessary to provide cost-effective residential retrofits yielding 50% energy savings within the next several years. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the biggest energy end use in the residential sector, and a significant amount of energy can be wasted through leaky ductwork in unconditioned spaces such as attics and crawl spaces. A detailed duct sealing case study is presented for one house along with nine brief descriptions of other duct retrofits completed in the mixed-humid climate. Costs and estimated energy savings are reported for most of the ten houses. Costs for the retrofits ranged from $0.92/ft2 to $1.80/ft2 of living space and estimated yearly energy cost savings due to the duct retrofits range from 1.8% to 18.5%. Lessons learned and duct sealing guidelines based on these ten houses, as well as close work with the HVAC industry in the mixed-humid climate of East Tennessee, northern Georgia, and south-central Kentucky are presented. It is hoped that the lessons learned and guidelines will influence local HVAC contractors, energy auditors, and homeowners when diagnosing or repairing HVAC duct leakage and will be useful for steering DOE s future research in this area.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Advanced Strategy Guideline: Air Distribution Basics and Duct Design  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses considerations for designing an air distribution system for an energy efficient house that requires less air volume to condition the space. Considering the HVAC system early in the design process will allow adequate space for equipment and ductwork and can result in cost savings. Principles discussed that will maximize occupant comfort include delivery of the proper amount of conditioned air for appropriate temperature mixing and uniformity without drafts, minimization of system noise, the impacts of pressure loss, efficient return air duct design, and supply air outlet placement, as well as duct layout, materials, and sizing.

Burdick, A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study: Volume 3, Burner tests and combustion modeling: Final report, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen enriched combustion (OEC) has been shown to have significant energy savings potential in industrial furnace applications. High temperature industrial furnaces, such as glass melting furnaces, appear to be the most promising applications for oxygen enriched combustion. In these applications, the principal energy savings result from minimizing the fuel energy required to heat the diluent nitrogen in air. The results of technical and economic assessment of OEC and market assessment were reported in Volume 1 and 2 of the current study. This report describes the results of burner evaluation tests over a range of oxygen enrichment and a numerical simulation study. The first part refers to the experimental results of both conventional air-fired burners and specially designed oxygen-fuel burners, evaluated at two scales. Part 2 of this report is concerned with the application of a computer code to extrapolate the results from small scale combustion tests to industrial furnaces. The experiments were designed as a comparative evaluation to: determine the operating range of different burner designs with oxygen enrichment; measure detailed flame characteristics for both air and enriched oxygen conditions; and estimate expected performance from research furnace results to actual industrial applications. 14 refs., 76 figs., 20 tabs.

Kwan, Y.; Abele, A.R.; Richter, W.; Chen, S.L.; Payne, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Silver, S.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements Studies show that duct air leakage results in major energy losses. A ll versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) require ducts, air handlers, filter boxes, and air cavities used as ducts to be sealed, and reference Chapter 16 of the International Residential Code for details on air sealing. This sealing is required on all ducts and other air distribution components regardless of whether they are located inside or outside the conditioned living space. For single-family homes and other low-rise residential buildings, the 2009 and 2012 IECC have duct insulation and sealing requirements in Section 403.2. Both codes require insulation

224

Comparative Testing of the Combined Radiant Barrier and Duct Models in the ESL's Code-Compliant Simulation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents a study of the application of the radiant barrier / duct models to the DOE-2.1e simulation program based on the previous methods (eQuest version 3.55 and EnergyGauge version 2.42) and the comparison of the results of the ESL’s model and the EnergyGauge program by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). Sensitivity analyses were performed by varying duct insulation level, supply duct area, return duct area, supply duct leakage, return duct leakage, and ceiling insulation levels. The results of sensitivity analyses show acceptable agreement versus the EnergyGauge program for duct insulation level, supply duct area, return duct area, supply duct leakage, and ceiling insulation level. Significant differences in the return duct leakage calculations were observed. These comparisons show the ESL model is more sensitive to return duct leakage than the EnergyGauge model Comparison of the results of the duct model for two cases (with radiant barrier and without radiant barrier) show acceptable agreements for the parameters of duct insulation, supply duct surface area, return duct surface area, supply duct leakage and ceiling insulation. The results of savings (with and without radiant barriers) indicate that the ESL model shows slightly more savings for all parameters. In terms of the sensitivity of the results, the ESL model also shows more sensitivity for all parameters except supply duct leakage.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Measure Guideline: Summary of Interior Ducts in New Construction, Including an Efficient, Affordable Method to Install Fur-Down Interior Ducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing, including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing. Interior ducts result from bringing the duct work inside a home's thermal and air barrier. Architects, designers, builders, and new home buyers should thoroughly investigate any opportunity for energy savings that is as easy to implement during construction, such as the opportunity to construct interior duct work. In addition to enhanced energy efficiency, interior ductwork results in other important advantages, such as improved indoor air quality, increased system durability and increased homeowner comfort. While the advantages of well-designed and constructed interior duct systems are recognized, the implementation of this approach has not gained a significant market acceptance. This guideline describes a variety of methods to create interior ducts including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. As communication of the intent of an interior duct system, and collaboration on its construction are paramount to success, this guideline details the critical design, planning, construction, inspection, and verification steps that must be taken. Involved in this process are individuals from the design team; sales/marketing team; and mechanical, insulation, plumbing, electrical, framing, drywall and solar contractors.

Beal, D.; McIlvaine , J.; Fonorow, K.; Martin, E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

RF propagation in an HVAC duct system: impulse response characteristics of the channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RF propagation in an HVAC duct system: impulse response characteristics of the channel Pavel V, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) duct system in buildings is a complex network of hollow at RF and microwave frequencies of com- mon interest. HVAC ducts can be used as a wireless communication

Stancil, Daniel D.

227

Theoretical Estimates of HVAC Duct Channel Capacity for High-Speed Internet Access  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical Estimates of HVAC Duct Channel Capacity for High-Speed Internet Access Ariton E. Xhafa-conditioning (HVAC) ducts based on multi-carrier transmission that uses M-QAM mod- ulation and measured channel- flections in HVAC ducts). Our work also shows that data rates in excess of 300 Mbps are possible over

Stancil, Daniel D.

228

Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method  

SciTech Connect

A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

Cromer, Robert Harold (Johnstown, NY); Bechtel, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Sutcu, Maz (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NO x Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler A DOE Assessment February 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

230

Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of combustion flames in four-burner impinging entrained-flow gasifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a laboratory-scale testing platform of impinging entrained-flow gasifier with four opposed burners, the flame images for diesel combustion and gasification process were measured with a single charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The two-dimensional multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis was employed to investigate the multifractal nature of the flame images. Sound power-law scaling in the annealed average of detrended fluctuations was unveiled when the order $q>0$ and the multifractal feature of flame images were confirmed. Further analyses identified two multifractal parameters, the minimum and maximum singularity $\\alpha_{\\min}$ and $\\alpha_{\\max}$, serving as characteristic parameters of the multifractal flames. These two characteristic multifractal parameters vary with respect to different experimental conditions.

Niu, Miao-Ren; Yan, Zhuo-Yong; Guo, Qing-Hua; Liang, Qin-Feng; Wang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Zun-Hong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Annular linear induction pump with an externally supported duct  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several embodiments of an annular linear induction pump for pumping liquid metals are disclosed having the features of generally one pass flow of the liquid metal through the pump and an increased efficiency resulting from the use of thin duct walls to enclose the stator. The stator components of this pump are removable for repair and replacement.

Craig, Edwin R. (San Jose, CA); Semken, Robert S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996 - June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A porous radiant burner testing facility consisting of a commercial deep-fat fryer, an FTIR based spectral radiance measurement system, a set of flue gas analysis components, and a fuel gas mixing station was constructed. The measurement capabilities of the system were tested using methane and the test results were found to be consistent with the literature. Following the validation of the measurement system, various gas mixtures were tested to study the effect of gas compositions have on burner performance. Results indicated that the emissions vary with fuel gas composition and air/fuel ratio. The maximum radiant efficiency of the burner was obtained close to air/fuel ratio of 1.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. Khericha

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development of an ASHRAE 152-2004 Duct Model for the Single-Family Residential House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the development of the duct model based on ASHRAE standard 152-2004 (ASHRAE, 2004) using the DOE-2.1e building energy simulation program. To accomplish this, FUNCTION commands for DOE-2 were used to develop the duct model and provide the improved predictions of the duct heat loss or gain from the unconditioned space as well as supply or return duct leakage. After applying the duct model to the DOE-2 base-case simulation model, simulation results were compared with the measurement from the case-study house for verification.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Modeling The NOx Emissions In A Low NOx Burner While Fired With Pulverized Coal And Dairy Biomass Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New regulations like the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) will pose greater challenges for Coal fired power plants with regards to pollution reduction. These new regulations plan to impose stricter limits on NOX reduction. The current regulations by themselves already require cleanup technology; newer regulations will require development of new and economical technologies. Using a blend of traditional fuels & biomass is a promising technology to reduce NOX emissions. Experiments conducted previously at the Coal and Biomass energy lab at Texas A&M reported that dairy biomass can be an effective Reburn fuel with NOX reduction of up to 95%; however little work has been done to model such a process with Feedlot Biomass as a blend with the main burner fuel. The present work concerns with development of a zero dimensional for a low NOx burner (LNB) model in order to predict NOX emissions while firing a blend of Coal and dairy biomass. Two models were developed. Model I assumes that the main burner fuel is completely oxidized to CO,CO2,H20 and fuel bound nitrogen is released as HCN, NH3, N2; these partially burnt product mixes with tertiary air, undergoes chemical reactions specified by kinetics and burns to complete combustion. Model II assumes that the main burner solid fuel along with primary and secondary air mixes gradually with recirculated gases, burn partially and the products from the main burner include partially burnt solid particles and fuel bound nitrogen partially converted to N2, HCN and NH3. These products mix gradually with tertiary air, undergo further oxidation-reduction reactions in order to complete the combustion. The results are based on model I. Results from the model were compared with experimental findings to validate it. Results from the model recommend the following conditions for optimal reduction of NOx: Equivalence Ratio should be above 0.95; mixing time should be below 100ms. Based on Model I, results indicate that increasing percentage of dairy biomass in the blend increases the NOx formation due to the assumption that fuel N compounds ( HCN, NH3) do not undergo oxidation in the main burner zone. Thus it is suggested that model II must be adopted in the future work.

Uggini, Hari

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Data:25528407-a10c-425a-81fb-47749b2360ae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8407-a10c-425a-81fb-47749b2360ae 8407-a10c-425a-81fb-47749b2360ae No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Roanoke Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2010/07/26 End date if known: Rate name: Rider for Small Renewable Generation Systems Sector: Description: AVAILABILITY Service under this Rider is available only to consumers located in the Cooperative's service territory who own a small renewable generator (wind, photovoltaic, biomass-fueled, hydro) that is interconnected directly with and operated in parallel with the Cooperative's distribution system with a capacity of 25 kW or less and contract with the Cooperative to sell all generating capacity and energy to the Cooperative. Service necessary for the delivery of the consumer's power into the Cooperative's system under this Rider shall be furnished solely to the individual contracting consumer in a single enterprise, located entirely on a single, contiguous premise, and owned by the consumer installing the small renewable generator. Service hereunder shall be restricted to the capacity of the consumer's generating facilities. Power delivered to the Cooperative under this Rider shall not offset or be substituted for power contracted for under any other schedule of the Cooperative. The obligations of the Cooperative in regards to service under this Rider are dependent upon its securing and retaining all necessary rights-of-way, privileges, franchises, and permits for such service. The Cooperative shall not be liable to any consumer or applicant for power in the event it is delayed in, or is prevented from purchasing power by its failure to secure and retain such rights-of-way, rights, privileges, franchises, and permits.

238

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement Improvement Initiative (PPII) CONTACTS Brad Tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PARTNER Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Garden City, KS Sunflower's 360 MWe Wall-fired Holcomb Station Achieving new Source PerformAnce StAndArdS (nSPS) through integrAtion of Low-no X BurnerS with An oPtimizAtion PLAn for BoiLer comBuStion (comPLeted) A unique combination of high-tech combustion modifications and sophisticated control systems was planned to be tested on a coal-fired boiler at Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Power Station in Finney County, Kansas, to demonstrate how new technology can reduce air emissions and save costs for ratepayers. However, due to larger than anticipated costs

239

Simplified configuration for the combustor of an oil burner using a low pressure, high flow air-atomizing nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion of oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The improved fuel burner uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle that does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design. Inventors:

Butcher, Thomas A. (Port Jefferson, NY); Celebi, Yusuf (Middle Island, NY); Fisher, Leonard (Colrain, MA)

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Flow control optimization in a jet engine serpentine inlet duct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational investigations were carried out on an advanced serpentine jet engine inlet duct to understand the development and propagation of secondary flow structures. Computational analysis which went in tandem with experimental investigation was required to aid secondary flow control required for enhanced pressure recovery and decreased distortion at the engine face. In the wake of earlier attempts with modular fluidic actuators used for this study, efforts were directed towards optimizing the actuator configurations. Backed by both computational and experimental resources, many variations in the interaction of fluidic actuators with the mainstream flow were attempted in the hope of best controlling secondary flow formation. Over the length of the studies, better understanding of the flow physics governing flow control for 3D curved ducts was developed. Blowing tangentially, to the wall at the bends of the S-duct, proved extremely effective in enforcing active flow control. At practical jet momentum coefficients, significant improvements characterized by an improved pressure recove ry of 37% and a decrease in distortion close to 90% were seen.

Kumar, Abhinav

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

COST-EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF NOX WITH INTEGRATED ULTRA LOW-NOX BURNERS AND SNCR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an environmentally acceptable and cost-effective NO{sub x} control system that can achieve less than 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu for a wide range of coal-burning commercial boilers. The system will be comprised of an ultra low-NO{sub x} PC burner technology plus a urea-based, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system. In addition to the above stated NO{sub x} limit of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip levels will be targeted below 5 ppmV for commercial units. Testing will be performed in the 100 million Btu/hr Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) in Alliance, Ohio. Finally, by amendment action, a limited mercury measurement campaign was conducted to determine if the partitioning and speciation of mercury in the flue gas from a Powder River Basin coal is affected by the addition of Chlorides to the combustion zone.

Hamid Farzan

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A PROPOSED TRANSPORT CASK FOR THREE ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR USED FUEL ASSEMBLIES  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary studies of used fuel generated in the US Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative have indicated that current used fuel transport casks may be insufficient for the transportation of said fuel. This work considers transport of three 5-year-cooled oxide Advanced Burner Reactor used fuel assemblies with a burn-up of 160 MWD/kg. A transport cask designed to carry these assemblies is proposed. This design employs a 7-cm-thick lead gamma shield and a 20-cm-thick NS-4-FR composite neutron shield. The temperature profile within the cask, from its center to its exterior surface, is determined by two dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of conduction, convection, and radiation within the cask. Simulations are performed for a cask with a smooth external surface and various neutron shield thicknesses. Separate simulations are performed for a cask with a corrugated external surface and a neutron shield thickness that satisfies shielding constraints. Resulting temperature profiles indicate that a three-assembly cask with a smooth external surface will meet fuel cladding temperature requirements but will cause outer surface temperatures to exceed the regulatory limit. A cask with a corrugated external surface will not exceed the limits for both the fuel cladding and outer surface temperatures.

T. Bullard; M. Greiner; M. Dennis; S. Bays; R. Weiner

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Ducts in Conditioned Space  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A duct chase in a dropped hallway ceiling A duct chase in a dropped hallway ceiling provides an affordable way to put ducts in conditioned space, a technique that saves energy and improves indoor air quality. Moving ductwork into the home's conditioned space can save 8%-15% on homeowner air-conditioning bills. Thousands of homes are now applying this important best practice promoted by Building America research. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.1 Building Science Solutions: Thermal Enclosure Ducts in Conditioned Space Putting ducts in vented, unconditioned crawlspaces and attics makes almost no sense from a building science standpoint. Building America research has provided proven solutions for locating ducts in conditioned space that are being adopted by

245

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Buried and Encapsulated Ducts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

match the performance of ducts in conditioned space. match the performance of ducts in conditioned space. For years builders have designed their homes with the HVAC ducts in the attic. There is plenty of space up there to run the ducts, and if the air handler is located in the attic as well, it is not taking up valuable square footage inside the home. The only problem is vented attics can be very hot in the summer and very cold in the winter. Estimated thermal losses through ducts installed in unconditioned attics range from 10% to 45%, contributing significantly to homeowners' heating and cooling costs. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a Building America research team led by Steven Winter Associates, has done extensive research on the feasibility of insulating ducts that are located in the attic and has

246

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Buried and Encapsulated Ducts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

meet the code requirements for ducts in conditioned space. meet the code requirements for ducts in conditioned space. For years builders have designed their homes with the HVAC ducts in the attic. There is plenty of space up there to run the ducts and if the air handler is located in the attic as well, it's not taking up valuable square footage inside the home. The only problem is uninsulated attics can be very hot in the summer and very cold in the winter. Estimated thermal losses through ducts installed in unconditioned attics range from 10% to 45%, contributing significantly to homeowners' heating and cooling costs. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a Building America research team led by Steven Winter Associates, has done extensive research on the feasibility of insulating ducts that are located in the attic and has

247

Performance Analysis of Dual-Fan, Dual-Duct Constant Volume Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dual-fan, dual-duct air-handling units introduce outside air directly into the cooling duct and use two variable speed devices to independently maintain the static pressure of the hot and the cold air ducts. Analytical models have been developed to compare fan power and thermal energy consumption of dualfan, dual-duct constant volume air-handling units with single-fan, dual-duct constant volume airhandling units. This study shows that the dual-fan, dual-duct system uses less fan power and less thermal energy during winter, and uses more thermal energy during summer. Thermal energy performance can be significantly improved if the thermal energy penalty can be decreased or eliminated.

Joo, I. S.; Liu, M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume II. Combustion tests of blends in burners and appliances. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31% hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emerging ''hydrogen economy'' is a strong contender as one method to supplement or extend the domestic natural gas supply. This volume of the subject study ''Blending Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes combustion studies to determine the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be blended in natural gas and utilized satisfactorily in typical appliances with no adjustment or conversion. Eleven pilot burners and twenty-three main burners typical of those in current use were operated on hydrogen-natural gas mixtures containing approximately 8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31 percent, by volume, hydrogen. The eleven pilot burners and thirteen main burners were tested outside the appliance they were a part of. Ten main burners were tested in their respective appliances. Performance of the various burners tested are as follows: (1) Gas blends containing more than 6 to 11% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for target type pilot burners. (2) Gas blends containing more than 20 to 22% hyrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners operating in the open. (3) Gas blends containing more than 22 to 25% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners tested in appliances. (4) Modification of the orifice in target pilots or increasing the supply pressure to a minimum of 7 inches water column will permit the use of gas blends with 20% hydrogen.

None

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thermionic nuclear reactor with internal heat distribution and multiple duct cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Thermionic Nuclear Reactor is described having multiple ribbon-like coolant ducts passing through the core, intertwined among the thermionic fuel elements to provide independent cooling paths. Heat pipes are disposed in the core between and adjacent to the thermionic fuel elements and the ribbon ducting, for the purpose of more uniformly distributing the heat of fission among the thermionic fuel elements and the ducts.

Fisher, C.R.; Perry, L.W. Jr.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Data:45336b19-797e-45fb-ae04-6814eb992795 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

797e-45fb-ae04-6814eb992795 797e-45fb-ae04-6814eb992795 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tecumseh, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: 2013/09/30 Rate name: Dusk-To-Dawn Lighting- UnMetered 250 W Luminaires Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to any customer for private or public outdoor lighting service, whether unmetered and provided by the city, or metered. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

251

Data:1ff143fb-92f7-4639-b337-67d027720178 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43fb-92f7-4639-b337-67d027720178 43fb-92f7-4639-b337-67d027720178 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Taylor County Rural E C C Effective date: 2012/05/31 End date if known: Rate name: Button-Up Weatherization Program Sector: Commercial Description: The Button-Up Weatherization Program offers an incentive for reducing the heat loss of a home. The retail member of Taylor County Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation may qualify for this incentive by improving insulation, installing higher efficiency windows and doors, or by reducing the air leakage of their home. This program is available to residential members in all service territory served by Taylor County Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation.

252

Data:2494afb4-a8fc-41fb-8785-dea45b4905e3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

afb4-a8fc-41fb-8785-dea45b4905e3 afb4-a8fc-41fb-8785-dea45b4905e3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn Effective date: 2012/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: 70 OL-8 150 HPS, Post-Top Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all Consumer's subject to Association's established rules and regulations. Association's standard outdoor lighting facilities. Service includes Association furnishing, operating, and maintaining lighting fixture, control equipment and lamp. When Association is required to alter its normal facilities to furnish a special outdoor lighting service, there will be an additional monthly charge.

253

Data:Ec12962e-09fb-4ff6-8234-7ecbca5b0251 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2962e-09fb-4ff6-8234-7ecbca5b0251 2962e-09fb-4ff6-8234-7ecbca5b0251 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Jasper, Indiana (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Street Light (150 W HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only for street, alley and park lighting and traffic signals of the City of Jasper. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

254

Data:Be9cacfd-9f68-4947-900f-b06033eca661 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cacfd-9f68-4947-900f-b06033eca661 cacfd-9f68-4947-900f-b06033eca661 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: McCook Public Power District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Idel Fee 3 Phase 5-32 HP Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: Ilinois State University Rate binder # 10 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

255

Data:59ecc3fb-5aba-4306-bc41-d7291ac7a061 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb-5aba-4306-bc41-d7291ac7a061 fb-5aba-4306-bc41-d7291ac7a061 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbus Southern Power Co Effective date: 2012/03/09 End date if known: Rate name: Cogeneration and/or Small Power Production -T.O.D-Polyphase Sector: Commercial Description: This schedule is available to customers with cogeneration and/or small power production (COGEN/SPP) facilities which qualify under Section 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, and which have a total design capacity of 100 KW or less. Such facilities shall be designed to operate properly in parallel with the Company's system without adversely affecting the operation of

256

Data:B2bbe605-fb40-412b-9654-252950cd91df | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bbe605-fb40-412b-9654-252950cd91df bbe605-fb40-412b-9654-252950cd91df No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Texas-New Mexico Power Co Effective date: 2009/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Non-Roadway Outdoor Lighting Service (Closed) - Lamp-Flood Light, - 400W, HA Sector: Lighting Description: The service provided pursuant to this Tariff is for any end-use customer for non-roadway outdoor lighting service where existing facilities have adequate capacity and suitable voltage. Lighting service under this schedule applies to non-roadway lighting facilities requested by the Retail Energy Provider (REP) on behalf of a customer connected to Company's distribution system.

257

Data:12819b61-8fb8-4289-afae-af2425c7504d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-8fb8-4289-afae-af2425c7504d -8fb8-4289-afae-af2425c7504d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Heartland Rural Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: METERED SECURITY LIGHTING: 175 Watt Mercury Vapor Light Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available for metered outdoor lighting service to any Customer. New or replacement light installations shall be limited to high pressure sodium and metal-halide lights. Source or reference: http://www.heartland-rec.com/documents/HRECTarriffsAug09web.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability

258

Data:4611fb33-8efb-420a-8c72-05164bdf389f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb33-8efb-420a-8c72-05164bdf389f fb33-8efb-420a-8c72-05164bdf389f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Carroll Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Underground Wiring Wood Pole MH 1000 W Sector: Lighting Description: *IDC Rider Charges included in Fixed Monthly Charge $275 one time charge for instillation Source or reference: http://www.cemc.com/Files/OL-2%20Outdoor%20Lighting%20final%202012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

259

Data:6943388f-b933-4d62-b208-156017236c8f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f-b933-4d62-b208-156017236c8f f-b933-4d62-b208-156017236c8f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Electrical Dist No2 Pinal Cnty Effective date: 2010/04/07 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Rate Schedule No. 8-Owned By District-Standard Roadway Pole - Steel - 38 Ft-100 Watt Sector: Lighting Description: Applicability: Applicable to any type of photocell operated fixtures, either individual or multiple, operated from dusk to dawn. Source or reference: http://www.ed2.com/Docs/Rates/Security%20and%20Street%20Lighting%20Schedule%20No.%208.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability

260

Data:9265705a-a580-45fb-908a-06742edb21c8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-a580-45fb-908a-06742edb21c8 a-a580-45fb-908a-06742edb21c8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lawrenceburg, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting- M 400W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Data:Cdab57fb-302b-4f08-a699-a817a421ebbe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cdab57fb-302b-4f08-a699-a817a421ebbe Cdab57fb-302b-4f08-a699-a817a421ebbe No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Bonners Ferry, Idaho (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Pumping & Drainage: B1PI Sector: Industrial Description: Note: $10.00 added to Fixed monthly charge if Remote Read Device is used. Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

262

Data:23094a41-b5ae-46fb-953a-8559db175625 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

94a41-b5ae-46fb-953a-8559db175625 94a41-b5ae-46fb-953a-8559db175625 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Mt Carmel Public Utility Co Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Rider F- Economic Development Sector: Description: Applicable to Large Light and Power service and Light and Power service AVAILABILITY Available upon application for any customer served under Large Light and Power Service or Light and Power service rate of this schedule who demonstrates an incremental load which meets the requirements *of this Rider. This Rider will be available to approved applicants prior to July 1, 2002.

263

Data:7409de41-6fca-4834-804e-bb883239fb67 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

de41-6fca-4834-804e-bb883239fb67 de41-6fca-4834-804e-bb883239fb67 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Williams - AZ, Arizona (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Dusk to Dawn Lighting Service(250 W HPS)-pole Sector: Lighting Description: Where city installs, owns, and operates and maintains lighting facilities. Source or reference: Rate Binder#4 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

264

Data:4471b83c-f3ab-4488-b486-fb4bbb915272 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c-f3ab-4488-b486-fb4bbb915272 c-f3ab-4488-b486-fb4bbb915272 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lincoln Electric System Effective date: 2011/05/23 End date if known: Rate name: Cogeneration & Small Power Production Purchase Sector: Commercial Description: To cogeneration and small power production facilities with production capacity of 100 kW and less that qualify under the guidelines for implementing PURPA Sections 201 and 210 as adopted by the LES Administrative Board. ACCOUNTING CHARGE: The owner of the Qualifying Facility will pay to LES the following monthly charges for additional energy accounting expenses incurred by LES: Cogeneration & Small Power Production Accounting Charge kWh Meter $/meter $3.90

265

Data:168205dc-74ba-4356-b981-f2fb2f90f84e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

74ba-4356-b981-f2fb2f90f84e 74ba-4356-b981-f2fb2f90f84e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Stanton County Public Pwr Dist Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Public Authority Large Power Services Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: ISU Archives Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

266

Data:78062989-ece5-4fb0-b12e-00705fde3611 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ece5-4fb0-b12e-00705fde3611 -ece5-4fb0-b12e-00705fde3611 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southeast Colorado Power Assn Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Time of Day (Electric Thermal Storage) Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://secpa.com/sites/rate-schedules.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

267

Data:08343154-f48b-4fb7-b094-26eee1338164 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-f48b-4fb7-b094-26eee1338164 -f48b-4fb7-b094-26eee1338164 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Middle Georgia El Member Corp Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Parking and Street 175 W Wood Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.mgemc.com/rates.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

268

Data:6f605d2f-1405-4026-9205-4fb2612dc576 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f-1405-4026-9205-4fb2612dc576 f-1405-4026-9205-4fb2612dc576 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Schuyler, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate Schedule 12- Residential Heat Service Sector: Residential Description: To single-family residences and individually metered apartments for all domestic purposes when all service is supplied through a single meter and residences using electricity as the principal source of heat. Source or reference: http://schuylerdevelopment.net/storage/Electric_Rates_2013.pdf Source Parent:

269

Data:66473143-8227-471f-b739-a58ea02758d3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

143-8227-471f-b739-a58ea02758d3 143-8227-471f-b739-a58ea02758d3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Mascoutah, Illinois (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Street Lighting Service- Rate 6: Sodium Vapor, 23000 Lumen, 250 watts, Class B Sector: Lighting Description: Class B: Mercury Vapor Lamps or Sodium Vapor Lamps on standard overhead wood pole construction, owned and operated by utility. Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

270

Data:282e831b-44a2-4619-88fb-7184dbe654cf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

44a2-4619-88fb-7184dbe654cf 44a2-4619-88fb-7184dbe654cf No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Farmers Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2006/08/08 End date if known: Rate name: Rate MSL- Municiple Street Lighting (250 W 1st pole $/Fix) Sector: Lighting Description: To lighting service required by the municipality for streets, alleys and other public ways. Not applicable to temporally, resale, shared or seasonal service. Source or reference: https://cas.sharepoint.illinoisstate.edu/grants/Sunshot/Lists/DATA%20ENTRY%20Rates%20Collected/Attachments/283/Farmers%20Electric%20Coop%20Corp%20AR%20Rates.PDF

271

Data:29ce8116-fb00-4144-b529-88169a033f8f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-fb00-4144-b529-88169a033f8f -fb00-4144-b529-88169a033f8f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Jackson Electric Member Corp Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Directional Flood MH 250 W Wood Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.jacksonemc.com/business-manage-my-account-commercial-rates-options/schedules/outdoor-lighting-service Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

272

Data:7720700d-783d-4c93-b509-fb3110ecea58 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-783d-4c93-b509-fb3110ecea58 d-783d-4c93-b509-fb3110ecea58 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Itta Bena, Mississippi (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Residential Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Seasonal/Monthly Demand Charge Structures

273

Data:8691041a-7fb4-4275-8835-4d820f317ac4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

41a-7fb4-4275-8835-4d820f317ac4 41a-7fb4-4275-8835-4d820f317ac4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Murray, Kentucky (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial- Demand Sector: Commercial Description: This rate shall apply to the firm power requirements (where a customer's contract demand is 5,000 kW or less) for electric service to commercial, industrial, and governmental customers, and to institutional customers including, without limitation, churches, clubs, fraternities, orphanages, nursing home, rooming or boarding houses, and like customers. This rate shall also apply to customers to whom service in not available under any other resale rate schedule.

274

Data:258ea179-fb89-4dad-91bd-99951d480c8f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ea179-fb89-4dad-91bd-99951d480c8f ea179-fb89-4dad-91bd-99951d480c8f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pennyrile Rural Electric Coop Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 175 Watt Metal Halide Without Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.precc.com/precc/res_rates.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

275

Data:819b3468-5298-4681-96f5-29fb728fa786 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5298-4681-96f5-29fb728fa786 5298-4681-96f5-29fb728fa786 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Davenport, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/11/15 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial General Service Demand One Phase Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to commercial and industrial Customers with peak demands of 100 kW or more in any two summer months or 200 kW or more in any two months of a 123 consecutive month period, whose entire requirements are taken though a single meter at one location through one transformation. Source or reference: http://www.nppd.com/my-account/rates-2/

276

Data:356282ca-87f0-4fb6-a57c-3fc9389866ff | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

282ca-87f0-4fb6-a57c-3fc9389866ff 282ca-87f0-4fb6-a57c-3fc9389866ff No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Slinger Utilities Effective date: 2007/01/05 End date if known: Rate name: Overhead Street Lighting- 150W HPS with Fiberglass Pole Sector: Lighting Description: This schedule will be applied to municipal street lighting and private yard lighting. The utility will furnish, install, and maintain street lighting units. This rate is subject to a Power Cost Adjustment charge per all kWh, that varies on a monthly basis. Source or reference: http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/tariffs/viewfile.aspx?type=electric&id=5510

277

Data:5e3bea60-0083-4179-9d9b-1aaaa65860fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bea60-0083-4179-9d9b-1aaaa65860fb bea60-0083-4179-9d9b-1aaaa65860fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 1 GS General Service Sector: Description: Available to residential Consumers, or to other Consumers requiring single phase, 25 kVA or less of transformer capacity, subject to Association's established rules and regulations. This rate applies to electric service measured by one meter used exclusively by one Consumer in a single establishment on one premise utilizing a single delivery point, and not resold or shared with others.

278

Data:3a7061f1-2412-4796-8565-fb5101c21c4f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a7061f1-2412-4796-8565-fb5101c21c4f a7061f1-2412-4796-8565-fb5101c21c4f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lower Yellowstone R E A, Inc Effective date: 2010/09/14 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule YL - 250 Watt Mercury Vapor light Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: Illinois State University Archive Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

279

Data:Bdb221cd-fb79-4897-8480-360655c07f1d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cd-fb79-4897-8480-360655c07f1d cd-fb79-4897-8480-360655c07f1d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Athens Utility Board Effective date: 2011/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting: High Pressure Sodium 400W Sector: Lighting Description: Installations charge per light: $50.00 Pole charge per month: $2.00(included in the fixed monthly charge) Source or reference: http://www.aub.org/rate_power_ol.php Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

280

Data:9ccf0221-1236-40d7-8565-f39fb2142964 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ccf0221-1236-40d7-8565-f39fb2142964 ccf0221-1236-40d7-8565-f39fb2142964 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Valley Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cotton Gin Rate Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.cvecoop.org/content/rates Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Data:22ffdca8-6297-43fb-9ff3-9f9aeacf1894 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ffdca8-6297-43fb-9ff3-9f9aeacf1894 ffdca8-6297-43fb-9ff3-9f9aeacf1894 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bristol Virginia Utilities Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Power Rate - Schedule GSA3(>2,500 kW and <5,000 kW)-demand charge Sector: Industrial Description: tiered demand charge for summer, winter and transition months Source or reference: http://www.bvu-optinet.com/data_elements/Electric_Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

282

Data:A364fb58-2cdf-4759-84a6-b65024454dce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4fb58-2cdf-4759-84a6-b65024454dce 4fb58-2cdf-4759-84a6-b65024454dce No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Modesto Irrigation District Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule SL - Lamp and Fixture on Existing Pole - 100 Watt SV Sector: Lighting Description: This section of this Schedule is applicable to all night lighting on the public streets, alleys, highways and parks for cities, lighting districts or other public bodies. Public outdoor area lighting for other than all night lighting is supplied under Rate Schedule GS. Source or reference: www.mid.org/tariffs/rates/SL_STREET_LIGHTING.pdf

283

Data:1016aa32-74fb-41b3-b77a-09552347c844 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-74fb-41b3-b77a-09552347c844 2-74fb-41b3-b77a-09552347c844 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Town of Winnsboro, South Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Service- (1000W on 40' Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #12 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

284

Data:Fab41fb6-3627-41bd-a467-cb8543bcd983 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fab41fb6-3627-41bd-a467-cb8543bcd983 Fab41fb6-3627-41bd-a467-cb8543bcd983 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Concord, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential- Energy Star- All- Electric Sector: Description: Available only to customers dwelling in residences, condominiums, mobile homes, or individually-metered apartments which provide independent and permanent facilities complete for living, sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation, and which are certified to meet the standards of the Energy Star program of the United States Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Agency.

285

Data:F3164fcd-c53a-47ee-9427-b84467fb5833 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c53a-47ee-9427-b84467fb5833 c53a-47ee-9427-b84467fb5833 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Dover, Delaware (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Private Outdoor Lighting: Roadway/Area Lighting, Metered, 400 watt MV Sector: Lighting Description: "METERED- This classification will be available at the City's discretion and only when it is not feasible to install the lighting service from an unmetered source. These lights will have the energy supplied through the customers meter and the monthly rental fee shall be reduced to reflect this customers expense."

286

Data:73264511-18c3-4579-a03b-538f3fb74535 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-18c3-4579-a03b-538f3fb74535 -18c3-4579-a03b-538f3fb74535 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delta Electric Power Assn Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: 22 High Pressure Sodium Yardlight Sector: Lighting Description: Available to consumers for overhead lighting service from lighting equipment provided by the Association, subject to the established rules and regulations of the Association. Installation, operation, and maintenance of a 100 watt high pressure sodium lighting unit by the Association on a a suitable pole at a location agreeable both to the consumer and the Association.

287

Data:49660549-4f71-4596-bc72-5fb4511f5541 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

49-4f71-4596-bc72-5fb4511f5541 49-4f71-4596-bc72-5fb4511f5541 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Town of Readsboro, Vermont (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Rate 18- Floodlights (400 W Sodium Vapor) Sector: Lighting Description: Street, area and flood lighting, traffic signal and specialty lighting equipment, energy and maintenance service is available within Green Mountain Power Corporation's ("GMP") service territory under this rate for GMP-owned or Customer-owned equipment to any city, village, town, fire district, political subdivision, Customer association or individual Customer in accordance with the specifications hereinafter set forth.

288

Data:358219e4-7e97-4fb9-9087-74ede2725772 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8219e4-7e97-4fb9-9087-74ede2725772 8219e4-7e97-4fb9-9087-74ede2725772 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Canoochee Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting Service- SL (1000W HPS Flood) Sector: Lighting Description: To individual consumers for dusk to dawn out door lighting service in close proximity to existing overhead distribution lines. Service will be rendered only at locations that, solely in the opinion of the Cooperative, are readily accessible for maintenance. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent:

289

Data:37420df7-d5fd-4523-b896-fb28840c42e2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df7-d5fd-4523-b896-fb28840c42e2 df7-d5fd-4523-b896-fb28840c42e2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Columbus, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial (KW22) Sector: Commercial Description: General commercial rate for commercial customers with monthly demand usage between 10 and 49 KWD or flat rate unmetered commercial accounts. Source or reference: http://publicutilities.columbus.gov/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=45273 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

290

Data:8fa56be7-cd3c-4384-ae40-815057fb723b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

be7-cd3c-4384-ae40-815057fb723b be7-cd3c-4384-ae40-815057fb723b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Prairie Land Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2010/01/14 End date if known: Rate name: Monthly Unmetered Investment Facility(MULT GLOBE 70W HPS-Option E) Sector: Lighting Description: Customer-100% Cooperative-0% Source or reference: http://www.prairielandelectric.com/Rates_PDF/MKEC%20Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

291

Data:Dbbad124-17fa-4463-8227-4736a78fb6b5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dbbad124-17fa-4463-8227-4736a78fb6b5 Dbbad124-17fa-4463-8227-4736a78fb6b5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Avista Corp Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting - MV-GSS (30ft) 10000L Sector: Lighting Description: Public Purposes Rider = base rate x %2.85. Source or reference: http://www.avistautilities.com/services/energypricing/wa/elect/Pages/default.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

292

Data:81fb99fe-5292-4a00-bfbb-2635adf907b7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb99fe-5292-4a00-bfbb-2635adf907b7 fb99fe-5292-4a00-bfbb-2635adf907b7 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbus Southern Power Co Effective date: 2012/03/09 End date if known: Rate name: General Service - Small(Load Management Time-of-Day) Sector: Commercial Description: Available to customers who use energy storage devices with time-differentiated load characteristics approved by the Company, such as electric thermal storage space heating and/or cooling systems and water heaters which consume electrical energy only during off-peak hours specified by the Company and store energy

293

Data:16852873-60df-4517-b1fb-0c4dc84af95c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60df-4517-b1fb-0c4dc84af95c 60df-4517-b1fb-0c4dc84af95c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Altamaha Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2011/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Small Power Service- Three Phase SP-8 Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable for commercial and farm use for use incidental thereto supplied through one meter at one standard secondary voltage for service up to 50 kVA required transformer capacity. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

294

Data:7ebeffe5-fb88-45f8-8376-6ba307047cb9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ebeffe5-fb88-45f8-8376-6ba307047cb9 ebeffe5-fb88-45f8-8376-6ba307047cb9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Monroe County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights(400 W Mercury Vapor) Sector: Commercial Description: Unmetered automatic Mercury Vapor Lighting and High Pressure Lighting, shall be available to consumers of the cooperative at the following rates and conditions. Source or reference: http://www.mcec.org/Documents/2013%20Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

295

Data:3e7657b1-b459-4695-a166-fb91cdcc28ff | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b1-b459-4695-a166-fb91cdcc28ff b1-b459-4695-a166-fb91cdcc28ff No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern Wasco County PUD Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Sector: Residential Description: SINGLE PHASE SERVICE - Schedule 100 APPLICABLE: Electric service to all single phase customers with a total demand of less than 50 kW. Except that all 480-volt single phase services existing prior to September 30, 2001 with a total demand of less than 50 kW will be billed on this rate schedule. 480-volt single phase services installed after September 30, 2001 will be served under Schedule 250.

296

Data:2036720f-b669-4718-9a5f-53aa850de158 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f-b669-4718-9a5f-53aa850de158 f-b669-4718-9a5f-53aa850de158 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Caddo Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 1 Generator -Rate 19 Sector: Industrial Description: - Available to industrial power customers using service under term contract for lighting,motive and heating purposes. - Subject to Power cost adjustment, Tax adjustment and Rate revisions. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

297

Data:88184f56-1045-4197-9e0c-fb42fdcd247f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f56-1045-4197-9e0c-fb42fdcd247f f56-1045-4197-9e0c-fb42fdcd247f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Painesville, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: 1990/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting-High Pressure Sodium-400 watts-Within Corporate Limits Sector: Lighting Description: For the purpose of paying the expenses of conducting and managing the Electric Division, Utilities Department of the City, the City Manager is hereby authorized and directed to charge the following rates for furnishing electric current for outdoor lights, which rates are hereby adopted, for all utility bills issued on and after July 1, 1990

298

Data:316f8438-001c-41fb-9898-f07f38825451 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

001c-41fb-9898-f07f38825451 001c-41fb-9898-f07f38825451 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lexington, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Commercial Service Sector: Commercial Description: Available to the non-residential customer whose monthly demand is 250 kW or greater in any three months of the preceding twelve months. Service under this Schedule shall be used solely by the contracting Customer in a single enterprise, located entirely on a single site. Source or reference: http://www.lexingtonnc.net/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=413

299

Data:4f52fcae-c056-4998-9815-277fb8047aa8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f52fcae-c056-4998-9815-277fb8047aa8 f52fcae-c056-4998-9815-277fb8047aa8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Swisher Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Service Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

300

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of methods of sealing supply-air registers wereand sealing practices when leakage at connections to duct-mounted equipment is not considered. The measured air-

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Field Measurements of Efficiency and Duct Effectiveness in Residential Forced Air Distributions Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sealing and insulating the duct system. ABSTRACT Forced airair conditioning, gas furnaces, electric furnaces and heat pumps. The retrofits consisted of sealing

Jump, D.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

DUCTED FAN INLET/EXIT AND ROTOR TIP FLOWIMPROVEMENTS FOR VERTICAL LIFT SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ducted fan based vertical lift systems are excellent candidates to be in the group of the next generation vertical lift vehicles, with many potential applications… (more)

Akturk, Ali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

FLIGHT CONTROL DESIGN OF TANDEM DUCTED FAN AIRCRAFT USING REDUNDANT CONTROL EFFECTORS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Controllability and stability of ducted fan air vehicles is a challenging problem due to their complex nonlinear aerodynamics and dynamic behavior. At the same time,… (more)

Ozdemir, Gurbuz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Characteristics of multimode heat transfer in a differentially-heated horizontal rectangular duct.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study presents the numerical analysis of steady laminar flow heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct with differential heating on the vertical walls. Three… (more)

Wangdhamkoom, Panitan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Pages that link to "Data:12d196bd-c312-4adb-adf9-ee288fb27b9c...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

db-adf9-ee288fb27b9c: View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) City of Seattle, Washington (Utility Company) ( links) View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 |...

306

Pages that link to "Data:25b183f4-754b-4046-b3e5-fb3cb5cf5995...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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307

Pages that link to "Data:94ce39e9-ec7c-433d-a1a8-b910fb8f1fe8...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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308

Performance of a small scale boiler burner in the firing of fuel blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power plants spend nearly 50 billion dollars a year on fuel cost. Presently coal accounts for over 75% of the electricity generated in this country. Due to increasingly harsh environmental regulations, the demand for low sulfur (S) coal has dramatically increased. This increase in demand is expected to cause the price of coal to rise. Such a senario has caused the utilities to explore the possibilities of supplementing coal with fuel alternatives such as the byproducts of process industries. The supplemental fuel for utilities located near feedlots (e.g. Northwest Texas) happens to be feedlot manure. Feedlot manure is attractive because it is nearly ten times cheaper than coal and is relatively inexpensive to transport. There exists nearly six million head of cattle in Northwest Texas which produce 25,000 tons of manure each day. Feedlot manure presents water and air pollution concerns if not disposed of properly. As such, the feedlot operators are eager to find methods of safely disposing of the feedlot manure. A small scale boiler burner facility has been constructed to simulate a utility class boiler. Experiments were conducted with coal only and then for coal/feedlot manure. Three types of feedlot manure are examined; raw feedlot manure, partially composted feedlot manure, and finished composted feedlot manure. Performance characteristics and emission data were taken for each case. A summary of the results is as follows: (I) sulfur Wyoming coal was fired and a gasification efficiency of 66% was measured. (i I) Emissions measurements were recorded and it was seen that emissions of NO,, and S02 increased as the burnt mass fraction increased. However, all emissions were within NSPS guidelines. (iii) The successful firing of coal and feedlot manure was achieved, a gasification efficiency in the range of 86% was measured, which is higher than 66% obtained when firing coal alone. (iv) When the fuel blend is fully burnt, the NO,, emissions with the blend firing was lower than the firing of coal alone.

Frazzitta, Stephen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. T. Khericha

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was performed in order to find suitable efficiency and leakage specifications for Energy Star duct systems and provide recommendations on duct insulation specifications. This analysis looks at a typical house, with a selection of duct locations, climates, duct insulation (R-value), and duct leakage. A set of calculations were performed with reduced capacity and airflow to look at the effect of variable capacity systems. This was done to address concerns regarding the increased efficiency of multi-capacity equipment due to good part load performance and how these efficiency gains may be offset by increased duct losses. The duct system efficiencies were calculated using the procedures in proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P ''Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems'' (ASHRAE 1999). This proposed ASHRAE Standard can be used to calculate duct efficiency for both design and seasonal weather conditions. In this report, the seasonal efficiencies are used for most of the analysis because they are the most appropriate for estimating energy consumption in buildings. The effects at peak conditions are examined for changing duct insulation in order to provide preliminary estimates of the potential responses to time of use pricing. The study was performed in two parts. The first part focused on duct leakage and the second part on duct insulation. The HVAC systems in the two parts share many attributes, however, they differ in detail and so are treated separately here. All the calculation results are summarized in tables in the Appendix, and specific results are given in the text.

Walker, Iain

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

DISSOLUTION OF FB-LINE METAL RESIDUES CONTAINING BERYLLIUM IN H-CANYON  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scrap materials containing plutonium (Pu) metal from FB-Line vaults are currently being dissolved in HB-Line for subsequent disposition through the H-Canyon facility. However, milestone and schedule commitments may require the dissolution of material containing Pu and beryllium (Be) metals in H-Canyon. To support this option, a flowsheet for dissolving Pu and Be metals in H-Canyon was demonstrated using a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.3 M fluoride (F{sup -}). The F{sup -} was added as calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The dissolving solution also contained 2.5 g/L boron (B), a nuclear safety contingency for the H-Canyon dissolver, and 3.9 g/L iron (Fe) to represent the dissolution of carbon steel cans. The solution was heated to 90-95 C during the 8 h dissolution cycle. Dissolution of the Be metal appeared to begin as soon as the samples were added to the dissolver. Clear, colorless bubbles generated on the surface were observed and were attributed primarily to the generation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas. The generation of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas was also evident from the color of the solution. Essentially all of the Pu and Be dissolved during the first hour of the dissolution as the solution was heated to 90-95 C. The amount of residual solids collected following the dissolution was < 2% of the total metal charged to the dissolver. Examination of residual solids by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the largest dimension of the particles was less than 50 {micro}m with particles of smaller dimensions being more abundant. Energy dispersive spectra from spots on some of the particles showed the solids consisted of a small amount of undissolved material, corrosion products from the glassware, and dried salts from the dissolving solution.

Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner retrofit. Quarterly report No. 4, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the full-Scale Low-NOx Cell{trademark} Burner (LNCB{trademark}) Retrofit project is to demonstrate the cost-effective reduction of NOx generated by a large, base-loaded (70% capacity factor or greater), coal-fired utility boiler. Specific objectives include: (1) At least 50% NOx reduction over standard two-nozzle cell burners, without degradation of boiler performance or life; (2) acquire and evaluate emission and boiler performance data before and after the retrofit to determine NOx reduction and impact on overall boiler performance; (3) demonstrate that the LNCB{trademark} retrofits are the most cost-effective alternative to emerging, or commercially-available NOx control technology for units equipped with cell burners. The focus of this demonstration is to determine maximum NOx reduction capabilities without adversely impacting plant performance, operation and maintenance.

Not Available

1992-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Experimental and theoretical investigations on the dynamic response of EBR- II ducts under pressure pulse loading  

SciTech Connect

In order to assess the potential damage to hexagonal subassembly ducts (cans) that may result from rapid gas release from a failed element the EBR-II project has conducted experiments and analyses. Additional experimental and analytical investigations are now being conducted to assure fail-safety of the ducts. Fail-safety is defined as the ability of a duct to withstand pressure pulses from failed elements during all reactor conditions without damage to adjacent ducts or any other problems in fuel handling. The results of 93 EBR-II duct tests conducted primarily by Koenig have been reported previously. The results of empirical correlations of some of these tests to determine the influence of several variables on the pressure pulse experienced by a duct and on the duct deformation are presented. The variables include the type of gas contained in the simulated element (tube), the element and duct materials, the presence or absence of flow restrictors in the element, and the way gas was released. 8 references. (auth)

Chopra, P.S.; Srinivas, S.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Multi-carrier Signal Transmission through HVAC Ducts: Experimental Results for Channel Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-carrier Signal Transmission through HVAC Ducts: Experimental Results for Channel Capacity, for the first time, experimental results on channel capacity of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC through a building HVAC duct system demonstrate the ability to transmit with a spectral efficiency of 3

Stancil, Daniel D.

316

Seamless Handover in Buildings Using HVAC Ducts: A New System Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seamless Handover in Buildings Using HVAC Ducts: A New System Architecture Ariton E. Xhafa, Paisarn-- In this paper, we present an innovative solution to the handover problem in multi-story buildings using HVAC of the indoor wireless networks that use the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts

Stancil, Daniel D.

317

Simulation of water hammer phenomenon in a pumping discharge duct protected by air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air chamber and free air dispersed throughout the water are two efficient means of protection of a discharge duct from water hammer damages. The paper presents the results regarding the extreme pressures in the discharge duct of a pumping installation, ... Keywords: air chamber, dissolution, free air, pumping installation, water hammer

Anca Constantin; Claudiu Stefan Nitescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Static Pressure Loss in 12”, 14”, and 16” Non-metallic Flexible Duct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the effects of compression on pressure drops in non-metallic flexible duct. Duct sizes of 12”, 14” and 16” diameters were tested at a five different compression ratios (maximum stretch, 4%, 15%, 30% and 45%) following the draw through methodology in ASHRAE Standard 120 -1999 – Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of Air Ducts and Fittings. With the pressure drop data gathered, equations were developed to approximate the pressure loss at a given air flow rate for a given duct size. The data gathered showed general agreement with previous studies showing an increase in compression ratio leads to an increase in static pressure loss through the duct. It was determined that pressure losses for compression ratios greater than 4% were over four times greater than maximum stretched flexible duct of corresponding duct size. The increased static pressure losses can lead to decreased performance in HVAC systems. The findings of this study add to the existing ASHRAE and industry data for flexible duct with varying compression ratios.

Cantrill, David Lee

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

ASHRAE Transactions: Research 105 Current duct design methods for variable air volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Transactions: Research 105 ABSTRACT Current duct design methods for variable air volume (VAV for different design conditions are sought using a duct fitting database program as described in ASHRAE (1993 Jeffrey D. Spitler, Ph.D., P.E. Ronald D. Delahoussaye, Ph.D. Member ASHRAE Taecheol Kim is a Ph

320

Design Analysis Report for 244-AR Interim Stabilization Exhaust Ventilation Ducting  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the design analysis performed for the exhaust ducting associated with the 244-AR Interim Stabilization Project. The exhaust ducting connects portable exhausters PORO5 and PORO6 to the existing east dog house of the 291-AR filter vault and the vessel ventilation system. This analysis examines loads on the ductwork and ductwork supports.

RUTHERFORD, J.

2002-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile – Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Building America Innovations profile describes work by Building America research teams who field tested simplified duct designs in hundreds of homes, confirming the performance of short compact duct runs, with supply registers near interior walls.

322

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Speaker(s): Clifford Federspiel Date: December 3, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Nance Matson Fans for moving air in buildings use a significant amount of energy. It is well known that fan energy use in variable-air-volume (VAV) systems can be reduced by resetting the supply duct pressure. The standard way to reset duct pressure is by controlling the most-open terminal damper to a nearly open position. Most systems can't measure terminal damper positions, so pressures are either not reset at all or use ad hoc resetting strategies that are configured sub-optimally. In this seminar I will describe a new method of determining the critical supply duct pressure for VAV systems.

323

Improving Control of a Dual-Duct Single-Fan Variable Air Volume Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses improved control strategies for dual-duct single-fan variable air volume (VAV) systems. Common control strategy for supply air volume modulation is evaluated, and an improved air volume control strategy that maintains separate cold and hot air duct static pressure set points is presented. The paper also explores the interactions between the cold and hot deck temperatures and duct static pressures, and discusses the impact of non-ideal deck temperature settings on duct static pressures and overall system energy consumption. To compensate the negative impact of non-ideal cold and hot deck temperature set points, the authors propose using real-time duct static pressure readings as feedback signals to fine-tune the deck temperature set points. These new control schemes can reduce simultaneous cooling and heating while reducing fan power consumption.

Wei, G.; Martinez, J.; Minihan, T.; Brundidge, T.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage, and cleaning stations-have accumulated satisfactory construction and operation experiences. In addition, two special issues for future development are described in this report: large capacity interim storage and transuranic-bearing fuel handling.

Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

7/11/00-draft copy: do not quote 1 of 30 New Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7/11/00-draft copy: do not quote 1 of 30 New Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts Burke Treidler is not evaluated and HVAC contractors overcome duct system shortcomings by installing oversized equipment Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts fittings with some use of ductboard. Fittings that snap together were

327

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 53, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2005 335 On the Capacity Limits of HVAC Duct Channel for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of HVAC Duct Channel for High-Speed Internet Access Ariton E. Xhafa, Member, IEEE, Ozan K. Tonguz, Member and experimental channel-capacity estimates of heating, ventilation, and air condi- tioning (HVAC) ducts based suppressed. Our experimental results also show that even in the case of more complex HVAC duct networks (i

Stancil, Daniel D.

328

Acetic Acid Sclerotherapy for Treatment of a Bile Leak from an Isolated Bile Duct After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bile leak after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not uncommon, and it mainly occurs from the cystic duct stump and can be easily treated by endoscopic techniques. However, treatment for leakage from an isolated bile duct can be troublesome. We report a successful case of acetic acid sclerotherapy for bile leak from an isolated bile duct after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Choi, Gibok, E-mail: choigibok@yahoo.co.kr; Eun, Choong Ki, E-mail: ilovegod@chollian.net [Inje University, Department of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Choi, HyunWook, E-mail: gdkid92@daum.net [Maryknoll Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

DURABILITY OF VERY LOW CAPACITY PRESSURE ATOMIZED FUEL NOZZLES USED WITH LOW FIRING RATE RESIDENTIAL OIL BURNERS.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), working for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has conducted a preliminary evaluation of the potential of very low fuel input capacity Simplex type pressure atomizing nozzles for use with oil burners designed for residential boilers, furnaces and water heaters. These nozzles under suitable conditions can be sufficiently reliable to enable new heating system designs. This would allow for the design of heating appliances that match the smaller load demands of energy efficient homes built with modern components and architectural systems designed to minimize energy use. When heating systems are installed with excessive capacity, oversized by three to four times the load, the result is a loss of up to ten percent as compared to the rated appliance efficiency. The use of low capacity nozzles in systems designed to closely match the load can thereby result in significant energy savings. BNL investigated the limitations of low flow rate nozzles and designed long-term experiments to see if ways could be determined that would be beneficial to long-term operation at low input capacities without failures. In order to maximize the potential for success the best possible industry practices available were employed. Low flow rate nozzles primarily fail by blockage or partial blockage of internal fuel flow passages inside the nozzle. To prevent any contaminants from entering the nozzle BNL investigated the geometry and critical dimensions and the current sate of the art of fuel filter design. Based on this investigation it was concluded that the best available filters should be more than capable of filtering contaminants from the fuel prior to entering the oil burner itself. This position was indeed validated based on the long-term trials conducted under this study no evidence resulted to change our position. It is highly recommended that these filters rated at 10 microns and with large filter capacity (surface area), should be used with all oil burner installations. The other possible failure mode had been attributed to fuel degradation and this became the main focus of the evaluation. The degradation of fuel usually occurs faster under higher temperature conditions. To preclude this as much as possible controls that provided for a post-purge of combustion airflow after burner shut down were selected. This provided a short period of time where the burner's combustion air blower continues to operate after the flame has gone out. This tends to cool the nozzle and in turn the fuel inside the small flow pathways inside the nozzle components. This study concludes that the use of low capacity nozzles is possible but only when the temperature and thermal mass environment of the combustion chamber result in a relatively ''cool'' condition. This was accomplished in one long-term experiment that essentially operated for a full heating season equivalent with no evidence of nozzle plugging or failure. The nozzle body surface temperature was kept at or below 150 F during the duration of the trial. On the other hand, a second system was studied that ended in a partial nozzle blockage and a system failure. In this ''hot environment'' system the nozzle body temperature reached 210 F. This occurred at close to a full heating season equivalent, yet it still would have resulted in a no-heat complaint by the homeowner.

MCDONALD,R.J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DOE Challenge Home Technical Training - Ducts in Conditioned Space  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T T h i l T i i 1 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov Design Options for Locating Ducts within Conditioned Space DOE Challenge Home Bill Zoeller, RA Steven Winter Associates Technical Training Congratulations By designing, constructing, and verifying DOE Challenge Homes, y you are: * in a select group Only the top one percent of builders in the country meets the extraordinary energy efficiency, comfort, health, safety, durability and quality levels associated with the DOE Challenge Home. * providing unprecedented value Your customers receive immediate energy savings of 40-50% easy to adapt to net-zero performance with a small renewable energy system. * differentiated from the competition About 12 in 13 homes sales nationwide are 'used' homes. In addition, the majority of new

332

Device for temporarily closing duct-formers in well completion apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A duct-forming device is disclosed for use in a well completion apparatus of the kind, wherein a bore hole casing is positioned in a bore hole and duct-forming devices of alkali- and acid resistant metal-such as steel-are secured at spaced levels to the casing in alignment with holes machined in the casing wall. In accordance with the invention, a closure device is arranged within the duct-forming device which permits flow of predetermined amounts of liquid, such as acid, from the interior of the casing through the duct-forming device and into the producing formation, while gradually being moved by the liquid into a position in which such fluid flow is prevented. After the fluid flow has been stopped by the closure device and when the formation pressure exceeds the pressure within the duct-forming device and the casing, fluid from the formation then forces the closure device toward and into the casing space to permit thereafter free flow of formation fluid into the duct-forming device and the casing or of pressurized treatment liquid from the casing into the formation. The inventive arrangement permits inter alia the establishment of a sufficient and substantially uniform feeding rate of treatment liquid, such as acid, from the casing into the producing formation through all the duct-formers in preparation for subsequent acidification or other treatments, such as sand fracking.

Zandmer, H.M.; Zandmer, S.M.

1981-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

The simulation with the finite element method of the velocity and temperature fields for a nonturbionar jet burner of 35MW feeding with pulverized coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the analysis of coal particle combustion in nonturbionar jet burner of 35MW used the Finite Element Method made with aid of the FLUENT programme. The pulverized coal combustion simulation involves modeling a continuous gas phase flow ... Keywords: FLUENT, coal-air mixture, combustion, finite element method, injection coal, nonturbionar jet

Mihai D. L. Talu; Stefan D. L. Talu; Mihai Negru

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The effect of jet velocity ratio on aerodynamics of a rectangular slot-burner in the presence of cross-flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a typical coal-fired power station boiler the ignition and the combustion of the fuel is largely controlled by burner aerodynamics. An experimental and numerical study of the rectangular slot-burners widely used on power stations in Victoria, Australia has been conducted to improve understanding of jet development within the boiler. The 1:15 scale model burner consisted of a central (primary) rectangular fuel nozzle with two (secondary) rectangular air jets positioned above and below it. The burner jets entered the measurement vessel at an angle of 60 deg to the wall. A cross-flow jet was attached to the wall of the vessel to simulate the recirculation prevalent in power station boilers. Experiments were conducted using a primary to cross-flow jet velocity ratio ({phi}) of 1.0 and secondary to primary jet velocity ratios ({phi}) of 1.0 and 3.0. Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) was used to measure mean and turbulent velocity components in the near field and downstream regions of the jets. Cross-flow significantly influenced the near field flow development from the slot-burner by deviating both primary and secondary jets from their geometric axes towards the wall. The degree of deviation was greater for {phi} = 1.0 since the higher velocity secondary jets increased the overall momentum of the primary jet for {phi} = 3.0. A numerical investigation of the rectangular slot-burner was also performed. First, the numerical results were validated against the experimental results and then visualization of the developing flow field was used to reveal the finer details of the cross-flow/burner jet interaction. Agreement between numerical and experimental jet features was good, although the numerical results predicted a primary jet that was marginally too narrow. Also the predicted downstream behaviour for {phi} = 3.0 deviated more significantly from experimental observation. Using the SST turbulence model, the numerical results suggested that a twin vortex was generated behind the initial region of the primary jet and this would aid in mixing of gas and fuel between primary and secondary jets. (author)

Ahmed, S. [CSIRO Manufacturing and Materials Technology, Highett VIC-3190 (Australia); Hart, J.; Naser, J. [School of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn VIC-3122 (Australia); Nikolov, J.; Solnordal, C.; Yang, W. [CSIRO Minerals, Clayton, VIC-3169 (Australia)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Data:0319959a-9ac8-4e99-b765-faaa9877fb54 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9ac8-4e99-b765-faaa9877fb54 9ac8-4e99-b765-faaa9877fb54 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of New Holstein, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Gs-2 General Service Single Phase Optional Time-of-Day 7am-7pm with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0860 per kilowatt-hour.

336

Data:28430969-c005-40ae-b536-3803ebcf4fb0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c005-40ae-b536-3803ebcf4fb0 c005-40ae-b536-3803ebcf4fb0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Weiser, Idaho (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: Industrial Source or reference: http://weiser.govoffice.com/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={87ED382C-E2A0-45BB-8A46-E7EE24EC0A9E}&DE={0C4DDA24-4664-4D82-9C26-A271718C9810} Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

337

Data:5b265ee0-8121-419f-b80b-178707742576 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5ee0-8121-419f-b80b-178707742576 5ee0-8121-419f-b80b-178707742576 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Kaukauna, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand 8am-8pm Primary Metering Discount (above 15,000 volts) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0605 per kilowatt-hour.

338

Data:4a81ff34-3411-46a7-9415-4007405fb196 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ff34-3411-46a7-9415-4007405fb196 ff34-3411-46a7-9415-4007405fb196 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Town of Readsboro, Vermont (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting- Ornamental Lighting and Poles (40 LED 92 System W) Sector: Lighting Description: GMP shall own, supply and maintain all ornamental lighting and poles, with energy supplied by underground facilities at the rates set forth below. Installation of ornamental poles, luminaries and wires will be paid for by the Customer as a line extension under GMP's line extension tariff and Public Service Board ("PSB") Rule 5.600. The Customer will be required to purchase and install 2" Sch. 40 electrical grade EPVC conduit and install pre-cast concrete bases for mounting the light poles. Customers should contact GMP's engineering department for details and assistance.

339

Data:7728375b-7334-4249-b98f-b1c14094403c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

334-4249-b98f-b1c14094403c 334-4249-b98f-b1c14094403c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Sauk City, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/08/18 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-2 Large Power Time-of-Day Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0756 per kilowatt-hour.

340

Data:F156fb0f-f305-4023-bccc-648d55498def | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

56fb0f-f305-4023-bccc-648d55498def 56fb0f-f305-4023-bccc-648d55498def No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Sauk Centre, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial service(Three Phase) Sector: Commercial Description: Three Phase Energy adjustment base average = $0.054/kwh (E.A. base would vary each month based on projected power costs. Source or reference: http://www.saukcentre.govoffice2.com/vertical/sites/%7BD28FAE32-EDE3-421C-BD2D-FA8E76EA5F8C%7D/uploads/Operational_Policy_Rate_Schedule_2012_final.pdf Source Parent:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Data:976d8aaa-7818-4307-a39b-fb64841728b6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d8aaa-7818-4307-a39b-fb64841728b6 d8aaa-7818-4307-a39b-fb64841728b6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of New Glarus, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: Ms-1 Street Lighting Service Overhead 175 W MV Sector: Lighting Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0721 per kilowatt-hour.

342

Data:902905fb-8cbb-457d-9db5-352834999c90 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

905fb-8cbb-457d-9db5-352834999c90 905fb-8cbb-457d-9db5-352834999c90 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Cuba City, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/10/14 End date if known: Rate name: Rg-1 Residential Service Three Phase With Parallel Generation(20kW or less)-Net Energy Billing Sector: Residential Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0765 per kilowatt-hour.

343

Data:764960a6-c576-432f-b6bf-21b862270742 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0a6-c576-432f-b6bf-21b862270742 0a6-c576-432f-b6bf-21b862270742 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bartholomew County Rural E M C Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Public Street Lighting Service, Sodium Lamps, 27,000 Lumens, 250W (New Wood Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: The above rates for Standard Public Street Lighting Service are based on the costs of standard overhead service and standard wood poles. The Customer will be required to pay a one-time contribution-in-aide-of construction (CIAC) to cover the additional costs of any non-standard lighting service requested by the Customer. Non-standard public street lighting service consists of installations requiring more than one wood pole and special poles, transformers, line extensions, non-standard fixtures and lamps, or underground service. The CIAC shall be based on the difference between the cost to provide standard service and the actual cost of the non-standard service as per current standard cost .

344

Data:63642545-fb6b-4dfc-baa8-db1c60ddb7ed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

545-fb6b-4dfc-baa8-db1c60ddb7ed 545-fb6b-4dfc-baa8-db1c60ddb7ed No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CUSTOMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING 70 W SV Sector: Lighting Description: Availability: Available for year-round illumination of public streets, parkways, and highways by electric lamps mounted on standards where the customer owns and maintains an Ornamental Street Lighting system complete with standards, luminaires with refractors, lamps and other appurtenances, together with all necessary cables extending between standards and to points of connection to Company's facilities as designated by Company. Mercury Vapor street lighting service under this schedule is limited to the luminaires being served as of December 31, 1987.

345

Data:Cbf37130-69fb-49a9-912f-55271be96525 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cbf37130-69fb-49a9-912f-55271be96525 Cbf37130-69fb-49a9-912f-55271be96525 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 2 of Grant County Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: RATE SCHEDULE No. 2 GENERAL SERVICE Single-phase Sector: Commercial Description: To accounts with loads not exceeding 500 kW (as measured by Billing Demand) for general service lighting, heating and power (excepting irrigation service) requirements. Minimum Charge: $4.05 per kW of Billing Demand, applicable to loads of 100 kW and above, but not less than 50 cents per day for single-phase service or 75 cents per day for three-phase service.

346

Data:35ba748d-2a52-4aea-8f27-af02790671fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2a52-4aea-8f27-af02790671fb 2a52-4aea-8f27-af02790671fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kenergy Corp Effective date: 2011/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Light - 400 watt HPS - Contemporary Sector: Lighting Description: APPLICABLE In all territory served. AVAILABILITY OF SERVICE Service under this schedule is offered, under the conditions set out hereinafter, for lighting applications on private property such as, but not Limited to, residential, commercial and industrial plant site or parking lot, other commercial area lighting, etc. to customers now receiving electric service from Kenergy at the same location. Service will be provided under written contract signed by customer prior to service commencing, when facilities are required other than fixture(s).

347

Data:3030e093-3748-4fb8-81ac-256dffcf65a1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-3748-4fb8-81ac-256dffcf65a1 3-3748-4fb8-81ac-256dffcf65a1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Jefferson Utilities Effective date: 2009/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-2 Large Power Time-of-Day Service between 200kW and 1,000kW Demand Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0686 per kilowatt-hour.

348

Data:A652b212-5891-4580-a594-fb75bfede709 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b212-5891-4580-a594-fb75bfede709 b212-5891-4580-a594-fb75bfede709 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/04/11 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-2 Large Power Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0662 per kilowatt-hour.

349

Data:76b2882b-371a-4d14-8829-f6fb76711237 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

882b-371a-4d14-8829-f6fb76711237 882b-371a-4d14-8829-f6fb76711237 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Maui Electric Co Ltd Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Lanai-SCHEDULE TOU-G SMALL COMMERCIAL TIME-OF-USE SERVICE - Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY: Applicable to general light and/or power loads less than or equal to 5,000 kilowatthours per month, and less than or equal to 25 kilowatts, and supplied through a single meter. Customers served under this Schedule who exceed 5,000 kilowatthours per month or 25 kilowatts will be automatically transferred to Schedule TOU-J at the beginning of the next billing period.

350

Data:2404fb0c-9501-4897-bc5f-82eecc3f975e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb0c-9501-4897-bc5f-82eecc3f975e fb0c-9501-4897-bc5f-82eecc3f975e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Burt County Public Power Dist Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation and Grain Dryer Service 6-11 Anyday Control Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: 1.fixed monthly charge = $49.50 per hp or $210 per year whichever is higher. 2.In the event that Consumer notifies the Sellers in writing on or before April 1 of any year that service will not be used for the current year and requests that the service be disconnected, then and in that event the Consumer will be charged only for the investment charge per h.p as determined by the Seller for that year as follows: Single Phase $12.50 per h.p

351

Data:2741fd13-da31-4733-b0fb-58e1a3924216 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fd13-da31-4733-b0fb-58e1a3924216 fd13-da31-4733-b0fb-58e1a3924216 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Marshfield, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Ms-1 Street Lighting Service Ornamental 150 W HPS (utility owned and maintained) Sector: Lighting Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0515 per kilowatt-hour.

352

Data:530d348e-064e-48d6-bafd-ca60296fb528 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8e-064e-48d6-bafd-ca60296fb528 8e-064e-48d6-bafd-ca60296fb528 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Fennimore, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/08/15 End date if known: Rate name: Rg-1 Residential Service Single-Phase with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Residential Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0508 per kilowatt-hour.

353

Data:496962fb-014c-4b38-971f-16851a5fac14 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb-014c-4b38-971f-16851a5fac14 fb-014c-4b38-971f-16851a5fac14 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Kaukauna, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-2 Large Power Time-of-Day Service between 200kW and 5,000kW Demand 8am-8pm Primary Metering Discount (2,300-15,000 volts)with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0605 per kilowatt-hour.

354

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, June--September 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-TUNING RESIDENTIAL OIL/BURNER - OXYGEN SENSOR ASSESSMENT AND EARLY PROTOTYPE SYSTEM OPERATING EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available.

MCDONALD,R.J.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KRAJEWSKI,R.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

On the capacity limits of hvac duct channel for high-speed internet access  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—In this paper, we report theoretical and experimental channel-capacity estimates of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts based on multicarrier transmission that uses-ary quadrature amplitude modulation and measured channel responses at the 2.4-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical band. It is shown theoretically that data rates in excess of 1 Gb/s are possible over distances up to 500 m in straight ducts in which reflections have been suppressed. Our experimental results also show that even in the case of more complex HVAC duct networks (i.e., HVAC duct networks that include bends, tees, etc.) data rates over 2 Gb/s are possible. Our estimations in this case are valid for distances of up to 22 m, which was the maximum distance of our experimental setup. These experimental results, measured with a large-scale testbed set

Ariton E. Xhafa; Ozan K. Tonguz; Ahmet G. Cepni; Student Member; Daniel D. Stancil; Pavel V. Nikitin; Dagfin Brodtkorb

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains William 1. Fisk,0.75 to 0.90; thus, heat conduction decreased the coolingby air leakage or heat conduction, because these ducts are

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Experimental Verification of Thermo-Mechanical Models for XLPE Cable in Pipes and Ducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2002 EPRI began investigations of the thermo-mechanical (T-M) behavior of transmission-class cable systems with extruded insulation in duct-manhole and pipe systems and began work on a design guide. The project consisted primarily of two efforts: experimental measurement of cable parameters and development of a mathematical simulation of the thermal and mechanical behavior of transmission-class cable with extruded cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulation when installed in ducts and pipes. ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Duct injection technology prototype development: Scale-up methodology and engineering design criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Duct Injection Technology Prototype Development project is to develop a sound design basis for applying duct injection technology as a post-combustion SO{sub 2} emissions control method to existing, pre-NSPS, coal-fired power plants. This report is divided into five major topics: (1) design criteria; (2) engineering drawings; (3) equipment sizing and design; (4) plant and equipment arrangement considerations; and (5) equipment bid specification guidelines.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Residential Duct Leakage Case Study on 'Good Cents' Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The “Good Cents” program has been adopted by many cities across the United States and has encouraged builders to employ aggressive energy conservation building techniques in residential applications. The program is well established and has been recognized for the added value it brings to homeowners. The primary energy using system in a residence is the heating and cooling system and in the hot and humid Southeast Texas climate, cooling is the predominant mode of operation for the HVAC system. This makes the system particularly susceptible to degraded performance if there are leaks in the air distribution system. Nine Good Cents homes in the College Station, Texas area were chosen for a study to determine the extent of HVAC air distribution leakage in the HVAC system. It was found that all the homes had significant measured leakage for the return-air side of the system. Houses with vertical sheet-rock lined plenums had significantly higher rates of return air leakage than homes with ducted returns.

Bryant, J. A.; Perez, R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Field measurement of the interactions between heat pumps and attic duct systems in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts to improve residential heat-pump performance have tended to focus on laboratory and theoretical studies of the machine itself, with some limited field research having been focused on in-situ performance and installation issues. One issue that has received surprisingly little attention is the interaction between the heat pump and the duct system to which it is connected. This paper presents the results of a field study that addresses this interaction. Field performance measurements before and after sealing and insulating the duct systems were made on three heat pumps. From the pre-retrofit data it was found that reductions in heat-pump capacity due to low outdoor temperatures and/or coil frosting are accompanied by lower duct-system energy delivery efficiencies. The conduction loss reductions, and thus the delivery temperature improvements, due to adding duct insulation were found to vary widely depending on the length of the particular duct section, the thermal mass of that duct section, and the cycling characteristics of the heat-pump. In addition, it was found that the use of strip-heat back-up decreased after the retrofits, and that heat-pump cycling increased dramatically after the retrofits, which respectively increase and decrease savings due to the retrofits. Finally, normalized energy use for the three systems which were operated consistently pre- and post-retrofit showed an average reduction of 19% after retrofit, which corresponds to a chance in overall distribution-system efficiency of 24%.

Modera, M.P.; Jump, D.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from  

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Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM Title Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3525E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Max H. Sherman Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords airflow, building, duct, energy, energy performance of buildings group, fan, hvac, indoor environment department, other, power, retrofits, simulation, system Abstract This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology.A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10% upstream and 10% downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30% on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5% upstream and 2.5% downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that "ceiling regain" issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30%). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

363

Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays using 5.4 fb^-1 of ppbar collision data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the helicity of the W boson produced in top quark decays using ttbar decays in the l+jets and dilepton final states selected from a sample of 5.4 fb^-1 of collisions recorded using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron ppbar collider. We measure the fractions of longitudinal and right-handed W bosons to be f_0 = 0.669 +- 0.102 [ +- 0.078 (stat.) +- 0.065 (syst.)] and f_+ = 0.023 +- 0.053 [+- 0.041 (stat.) +- 0.034 (syst.)], respectively. This result is consistent at the 98% level with the standard model. A measurement with f_0 fixed to the value from the standard model yields f_+ = 0.010 +- 0.037 [+- 0.022 (stat.) +- 0.030 (syst.) ].

V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Altona; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; L. S. Ancu; M. Aoki; Y. Arnoud; M. Arov; A. Askew; B. Asman; O. Atramentov; C. Avila; J. BackusMayes; F. Badaud; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Baringer; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; V. Bazterra; S. Beale; A. Bean; M. Begalli; M. Begel; C. Belanger-Champagne; L. Bellantoni; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besancon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; K. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; D. Boline; T. A. Bolton; E. E. Boos; G. Borissov; T. Bose; A. Brandt; O. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; J. Brown; X. B. Bu; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; V. Bunichev; S. Burdinb; T. H. Burnett; C. P. Buszello; B. Calpas; E. Camacho-Perez; M. A. Carrasco-Lizarraga; B. C. K. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; G. Chen; S. Chevalier-Thery; D. K. Cho; S. W. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; T. Christoudias; S. Cihangir; D. Claes; J. Clutter; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; F. Couderc; M. -C. Cousinou; A. Croc; D. Cutts; M. Cwiok; A. Das; G. Davies; K. De; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; F. Deliot; M. Demarteau; R. Demina; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; K. DeVaughan; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; A. Dominguez; T. Dorland; A. Dubey; L. V. Dudko; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; S. Dutt; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; Y. Enari; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; G. Facini; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fuess; T. Gadfort; A. Garcia-Bellido; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; W. Geist; W. Geng; D. Gerbaudo; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; G. Golovanov; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J. -F. Grivaz; A. Grohsjean; S. Grunendahl; M. W. Grunewald; F. Guo; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haasc; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; L. Han; K. Harder; A. Harel; J. M. Hauptman; J. Hays; T. Head; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; H. Hegab; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; I. Heredia-De La Cruz; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; T. Hoang; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; S. Hossain; Z. Hubacek; N. Huske; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffre; S. Jain; D. Jamin; R. Jesik; K. Johns; M. Johnson; D. Johnston; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; J. Joshi; A. Juste; K. Kaadze; E. Kajfasz; D. Karmanov; P. A. Kasper; I. Katsanos; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. N. Kharzheev; D. Khatidze; M. H. Kirby; J. M. Kohli; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kraus; A. Kumar; A. Kupco; T. Kurca; V. A. Kuzmin; J. Kvita; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; P. Lebrun; H. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; J. Lellouch; L. Li; Q. Z. Li; S. M. Lietti; J. K. Lim; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; Y. Liu; Z. Liu; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; P. Love; H. J. Lubatti; R. Luna-Garciae; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; D. Mackin; R. Madar; R. Magana-Villalba; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; Y. Maravin; J. Martinez-Ortega; R. McCarthy; C. L. McGivern; M. M. Meijer; A. Melnitchouk; D. Menezes; P. G. Mercadante; M. Merkin; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; N. K. Mondal; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulhearn; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; R. Nayyar; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; G. Obrant; J. Orduna; N. Osman; J. Osta; G. J. Otero y Garzon; M. Owen; M. Padilla; M. Pangilinan; N. Parashar; V. Parihar; S. K. Park; J. Parsons; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; B. Penning; M. Perfilov; K. Peters; Y. Peters; G. Petrillo; P. Petroff; R. Piegaia; J. Piper; M. -A. Pleier; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; M. -E. Pol; P. Polozov; A. V. Popov; M. Prewitt; D. Price; S. Protopopescu; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; M. S. Rangel; K. Ranjan; P. N. Ratoff; I. Razumov; P. Renkel; P. Rich; M. Rijssenbeek; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; M. Rominsky; C. Royon; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; G. Safronov; G. Sajot; A. Sanchez-Hernandez; M. P. Sanders; B. Sanghi; A. S. Santos; G. Savage; L. Sawyer; T. Scanlon; R. D. Schamberger; Y. Scheglov; H. Schellman; T. Schliephake; S. Schlobohm; C. Schwanenberger; R. Schwienhorst; J. Sekaric; H. Severini; E. Shabalina; V. Shary; A. A. Shchukin; R. K. Shivpuri; V. Simak; V. Sirotenko; P. Skubic; P. Slattery; D. Smirnov; K. J. Smith; G. R. Snow; J. Snow; S. Snyder; S. Soldner-Rembold; L. Sonnenschein; A. Sopczak; M. Sosebee; K. Soustruznik; B. Spurlock; J. Stark; V. Stolin; D. A. Stoyanova; M. Strauss; D. Strom; L. Stutte; L. Suter; P. Svoisky; M. Takahashi; A. Tanasijczuk; W. Taylor; M. Titov; V. V. Tokmenin; Y. -T. Tsai; D. Tsybychev; B. Tuchming; C. Tully; P. M. Tuts; L. Uvarov; S. Uvarov; S. Uzunyan; R. Van Kooten; W. M. van Leeuwen; N. Varelas

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Data:0a5c0020-89d5-4813-aa27-9973172504fb | Open Energy Information  

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Data Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:0a5c0020-89d5-4813-aa27-9973172504fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: TXU Energy Retail Co LP Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Small Non-Residential Secondary Average 1500 kWh Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is for a Secondary Service that is less than or equal to 10kW. Each month you will also be billed all taxes, including sales tax, and reimbursement for the state miscellaneous gross receipts tax as applicable. See Terms of Service Agreement for a full listing of fees, deposit policy, and other terms.

365

Data:5229a254-3130-4a5f-b711-b573615348db | Open Energy Information  

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4-3130-4a5f-b711-b573615348db 4-3130-4a5f-b711-b573615348db No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Firelands Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/05/23 End date if known: Rate name: SINGLE-PHASE DISTRIBUTED GENERATION RATE (recent) Sector: Commercial Description: Available to Members of Firelands Electric Cooperative, Inc. contracting for electric service from the Cooperative who, through the operation of qualifying single-phase cogeneration or small power production facilities as defined in the Cooperative's Operational Policy relating thereto, with a design capacity of 25 kilowatts or less, have available electric energy and the associated capacity which they desire to sell to the Cooperative in accordance with the requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), as amended, and all governmental regulations lawfully promulgated thereunder and the Cooperative's applicable rules, regulations, policies and rate schedules, in circumstances where the output of such facility is not reasonably anticipated to exceed the annual electric energy requirements of the Member and provided that the total aggregate electric generating capacity of all qualifying facilities interconnected to the electric distribution systems of the members of Buckeye Power, Inc. (Buckeye) and net metered does not exceed 1% of Buckeye's aggregate peak electric demand of all of the Buckeye members.

366

Data:6491176f-b6ca-4556-9866-f6392e04dc44 | Open Energy Information  

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76f-b6ca-4556-9866-f6392e04dc44 76f-b6ca-4556-9866-f6392e04dc44 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Western Massachusetts Elec Co Effective date: 2013/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate S-1 Street and Security Lighting-HP Sodium 311watts - basic service Sector: Lighting Description: This rate is applicable to street, highway, and off-street lighting for "Dusk to Dawn" or the "Midnight" lighting service http://nuwnotes1.nu.com/apps/wmeco/webcontent.nsf/AR/SummaryOfElectricRates/$File/Summary%20of%20Electric%20Rates.pdf 2) LUMINAIRE CHARGE: a) Standard Street Lighting Luminaire No additional charge b) Luminaire furnished, installed and maintained by and at the expense of the customer No additional charge c) Decorative Luminaire installed after December 24, 1972: 4,000, 6,300, 8,000, 9,500, and 16,000 lumen sizes $ 3.09 27,500 and 50,000 lumen sizes $ 4.82 d) Flood Light or Spot Light Luminaire installed after December 24, 1972: 22,000, 22,500, 27,500, 36,000, 50,000, 60,000, 110,000, and 140,000 lumen sizes $ 2.63 e) Premium Decorative Luminaire Standard $ 8.06 Deluxe $11.50

367

Data:1d0ba4e5-fb8e-4fa3-b892-507d04d5054a | Open Energy Information  

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Login | Sign Up Search Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Data:1d0ba4e5-fb8e-4fa3-b892-507d04d5054a No revision has been approved for this page. It...

368

ENERGY ECONOMY CII5fB 81 (R3) (L2) (M2) UDC 728.3 (489) Low-energy houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY ECONOMY CII5fB 81 (R3) (L2) (M2) UDC 728.3 (489) Low-energy houses: insulation and air north of Copenhagen has become renowned. Here, the authors, from the Thermal Insulation Laboratory. In general, therefore, the change in building methods has caused an increase in air change by infiltration

369

Laboratory and field testing of an aerosol-based duct-sealing technology  

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Laboratory and field testing of an aerosol-based duct-sealing technology Laboratory and field testing of an aerosol-based duct-sealing technology for large commercial buildings. Title Laboratory and field testing of an aerosol-based duct-sealing technology for large commercial buildings. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44220 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Carrié, François Rémi, Ronnen M. Levinson, Tengfang T. Xu, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Mark P. Modera, and Duo Wang Journal ASHRAE Transactions Start Page Chapter Date Published January 2002 Abstract Laboratory and field experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of sealing leaks in commercial duct systems with an aerosol sealant. The method involves blowing an aerosol through the duct system to seal the leaks from the inside, the principle being that the aerosol particles deposit in the cracks as they try to escape under pressure. It was shown that the seals created with the current sealant material can withstand pressures far in excess of what is found in commercial-building duct systems. We also performed two field experiments in two large-commercial buildings. The ASHRAE leakage classes of the systems were reduced from 653 down to 103, and from 40 down to 3. Methods and devices specifically devised for this application proved to be very efficient at (a) increasing the sealing rate and (b) attaining state-of-the-art duct leakage classes. Additional research is needed to improve the aerosol injection and delivery processes.

370

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner retrofit. Quarterly report No. 8, 1 July, 1992--30 September, 1992: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Full Scale Demonstration Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner (LNCB{trademark}) project involves retrofitting the two-nozzle cell burners at Dayton Power and Light`s, 605 MW(e) J.M. Stuart Unit No. 4 boiler near Aberdeen, Ohio with LNCB{trademark} (a burner and integral No{sub x} port). Previous pilot-scale tests have shown such an arrangement to achieve 50% reduction in NO{sub x} emission levels. This full-scale project will determine the commercial applicability of this technology. Long-term testing via a Continuous Emission Monitor (CEM) began in August, 1992. CEM testing will continue until Spring of 1993 when Unit No. 4 comes off line for its annual outage which at this time is scheduled for April 4, 1993. A key item remaining to be evaluated as part of the long term testing is furnace tube wall corrosion. H{sub 2}S probing similar to optimized test probing was repeated during the week of August 17, 1992. During the Spring `93 outage, ultrasonic testing of the furnace wall tubes as well as destructive examination of samples from the corrosion test panel will be accomplished.

Not Available

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Duct Leakage Impacts on Airtightness, Infiltration, and Peak Electrical Demand in Florida Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for duct leakage was done in 155 homes. Tracer gas tests found that infiltration rates were three times greater when the air handler was operating than when it was off. Infiltration averaged 0.85 air changes per hour (ach) with the air handler (AH) operating continuously and 0.29 ach with the AH off. Return leaks were found to average 10.3% of AH total flow. House airtightness, in 90 of these homes, determined by blower door testing, averaged 12.58 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACHSO). When the duct registers were sealed, ACHSO decreased to 11.04, indicating that 12.2% of the house leaks were in the duct system. Duct leaks have a dramatic impact upon peak electrical demand. Based on theoretical analysis, a fifteen percent return leak from the attic can increase cooling electrical demand by 100%. Duct repairs in a typical. electrically heated Florida home reduce winter peak demand by about 1.6 kW per house at about one-sixth the cost of building new electrical generation capacity.

Cummings, J. B.; Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

What are the requirements for duct leakage testing? | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requirements for duct leakage testing? requirements for duct leakage testing? Both the 2009 and 2012 IECC require duct tightness to be verified. Verification can take place via either a post-construction test or a rough-in test. For the post-construction test, leakage measurement must be made across the entire system, including the manufacturer's air handler enclosure, with all register boots taped or sealed at a test pressure of 0.1 inches w.g. (25 Pa). The 2009 IECC limits the leakage to outdoors to less than or equal to 8 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area or total leakage less than or equal to 12 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area. The 2012 IECC only contains a requirement for total leakage of less than or equal to 4 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area. For the rough-in test, leakage measurement is made across the system, with

373

Dimensional changes in FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) austenitic cladding and ducts  

SciTech Connect

As the standard cladding and duct material for the Fast Flux Test Facility driver fuel, 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel has provided good service up to a fast fluence of 16 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} in extreme cases. The titanium-stabilized variant of 316 SS, called D9, has extended the useful life of the austenitic alloys by increasing the incubation fluence necessary for the onset of volumetric swelling. Duct flat-to-flat, length and bow, pin bundle distortion, fuel pin diameter and length, as well as cladding volumetric swelling have been examined for high fluence components representing both alloys. These data emphasize the importance of the swelling process, the superiority of D9, and the interrelation between deformations in the duct, bundle, and individual pins. 8 refs., 10 figs.

Makenas, B.J.; Chastain, S.A.; Gneiting, B.C.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nucleonic analysis of a preliminary design for the ETF neutral-beam-injector duct shielding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nucleonic analysis of the Engineering Test Facility Neutral-Beam-Injector duct shielding has been made using a hybrid Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates method. This method used Monte Carlo to determine internal and external boundary surface sources for a subsequent discrete-ordinates calculation of the neutron and gamma-ray transport through the shield. The analysis also included determination of the energy and angular distribution of neutrons and gamma rays entering the duct from the torus plasma chamber. Confidence in the hybrid method and the results obtained were provided through a comparison with three-dimensional Monte Carlo results.

Urban, W.T.; Seed, T.J.; Dudziak, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology  

SciTech Connect

Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

1736 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 51, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 Impulse Response of the HVAC Duct as a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the HVAC Duct as a Communication Channel Pavel V. Nikitin, Member, IEEE, Daniel D. Stancil, Senior Member (HVAC) ducts in buildings behave as multimode waveguides when excited at radio frequencies and thus, can of a usual indoor propagation channel. In this paper, we describe physical mechanisms which affect the HVAC

Hochberg, Michael

377

Evaluation of mixing downstream of tees in duct systems with respect to single point representative air sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air duct systems in nuclear facilities must meet the requirements of ANSI N13.1-1999 and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that the exhaust airflow be monitored with continuous sampling in case of an accidental release of airborne radionuclides. The continuous air sampling in a duct system is based on the concept of single point representative sampling at the sampling location where the velocity and contaminant profiles are nearly uniform. Sampling must be at a location where there is a uniform distribution via mixing in accordance with ANSI N13.1-1999. The purpose of this work is to identify the sampling locations where the velocity, momentum and contaminant concentrations fall below the 20% coefficient of variation (COV) requirements of ANSI N13.1-1999. Four sets of experiments were conducted on a generic 'T' mixing system. Measurements were made of the velocity, tracer gas concentration, ten micrometer particles and average flow swirl angle. The generic 'T' mixing system included three different combinations of sub duct sizes (6"x6", 9"x9" and 12"x12"), one main duct size (12"x12") and five air velocities (0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 fpm). An air blender was also introduced in some of the tests to promote mixing of the air streams from the main duct and sub duct. The experimental results suggested a turbulent mixing provided the accepted velocity COVs by 6 hydraulic diameters downstream. For similar velocity in the main duct and sub duct, an air blender provided the substantial improvement in 3 hydraulic diameters needed to achieve COVs below 10%. Without an air blender, the distance downstream of the T-junction for the COVs below 20% increased as the velocity of the sub duct airflow increased. About 95% of the cases achieved COVs below 10%. With the air blender, most of the cases with the air blender had the lower COVs than without the blender. However, at an area ratio (sub duct area / main duct area) of 0.25 and above a velocity ratio (velocity in the sub duct / velocity in the main duct) of 3, the air blender proved to be less beneficial for mixing. These results can apply to other duct systems with similar geometries and, ultimately, be a basis for selecting a proper sampling location under the requirements of the single point representative sampling.

Kim, Taehong

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Data:2f31aa69-c39e-462f-92fb-3b5c7475b93c | Open Energy Information  

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aa69-c39e-462f-92fb-3b5c7475b93c aa69-c39e-462f-92fb-3b5c7475b93c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Chicopee, Massachusetts (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Service - Primary Service Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable: To any manufacturing customer having a consistent demand of 1000 kW or more for all purposes.A discount of 4% of the monthly bill will be allowed for customer owning high voltage equipment and taking energy with a demand of 100 kW or more. The following Rates apply (after 4% discount): Delivery Services Customer Charge: $129.6 / Month

379

Data:5a348398-aaa8-480f-b4b5-3bddc1433e84 | Open Energy Information  

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8398-aaa8-480f-b4b5-3bddc1433e84 8398-aaa8-480f-b4b5-3bddc1433e84 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Waupun Utilities Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Energy Sector: Description: To participate in the Renewable Energy Program, a customer purchases blocks of renewable energy; each block is equivalent to 300 kWh of renewable energy and costs $3.00. Source or reference: http://www.waupunutilities.com/environment/renewableorder.asp?CategoryNumber=1 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

380

Data:5870f139-a2b5-4dce-90fb-aa727c9ff358 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

39-a2b5-4dce-90fb-aa727c9ff358 39-a2b5-4dce-90fb-aa727c9ff358 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Adams Electric Coop Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate Schedule SL (Security Lighting) (Standard Fixtures 400 Watt MV) Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all cooperative members. Standard fixtures 400 watt MV Source or reference: Rate Binder #7 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Data:Ace42910-c4fb-4a61-acc0-b7286ac83c57 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ace42910-c4fb-4a61-acc0-b7286ac83c57 Ace42910-c4fb-4a61-acc0-b7286ac83c57 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kit Carson Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2011/09/22 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Service - Unmetered Wooden Pole - 175W M.V or 100 W HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all consumers and within the Utility's service area, unless otherwise noted. Source or reference: www.kitcarson.com Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

382

Data:13f05143-5fef-4866-a16f-b75ca999f5cd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5fef-4866-a16f-b75ca999f5cd 5fef-4866-a16f-b75ca999f5cd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Public Service Elec & Gas Co Effective date: 2010/06/07 End date if known: Rate name: 150 SIGNATURE GREEN-TYPE V Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.pseg.com/family/pseandg/tariffs/electric/pdf/electric_tariff.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

383

Data:4274d259-63cd-47ef-9ab5-7ee7fb30ef7e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

59-63cd-47ef-9ab5-7ee7fb30ef7e 59-63cd-47ef-9ab5-7ee7fb30ef7e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lexington, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting service(400 Watt Metal Halide) Sector: Lighting Description: Available to the individual Customer at locations on the City's distribution system. Source or reference: http://www.lexingtonnc.net/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=414 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

384

Data:B69b24ec-279b-4d7c-9b89-72515fb421a8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b24ec-279b-4d7c-9b89-72515fb421a8 b24ec-279b-4d7c-9b89-72515fb421a8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Leavenworth-Jefferson E C, Inc Effective date: 2010/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Light Rate (MV 400 W) Sector: Lighting Description: Available for municipal outdoor lighting service on public thoroughfares, city housing development, and in public parks where service can be supplied from a breaker box installed by the cooperative on existing facilities of the cooperative. Street Light Rate (MV 400 W) Source or reference: Rate Binder #7 (Illinois State University)

385

Data:17e6438f-b0d1-4fef-a329-a7b308aa4fd6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

38f-b0d1-4fef-a329-a7b308aa4fd6 38f-b0d1-4fef-a329-a7b308aa4fd6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Williams - AZ, Arizona (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: General Service (Extra Large) Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable for customers whose monthly demand is 3,000 KW or more for three consecutive month in any continuous 12 month period ending with the current month. Source or reference: Rate Binder#4 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

386

Data:9e0e1325-d6ca-456f-b199-1a1783c1fce2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25-d6ca-456f-b199-1a1783c1fce2 25-d6ca-456f-b199-1a1783c1fce2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rochester Public Utilities Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SECURITY LIGHTING(100 Watt HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: At all locations whenever the service can be provided with overhead wiring on an existing RPU owned pole. Source or reference: http://www.rpu.org/documents/2012_rate_schedule.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

387

Data:B69ad4fb-04ad-4a62-913c-f6ec38ceac48 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb-04ad-4a62-913c-f6ec38ceac48 fb-04ad-4a62-913c-f6ec38ceac48 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Butler Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation Services Rate 41 Wheels only Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.butlerppd.com/common/New%20Customer%20Packet%20_1.2013.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

388

Data:5276e5ae-2759-4a8f-b7aa-b2cb352dd958 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2759-4a8f-b7aa-b2cb352dd958 2759-4a8f-b7aa-b2cb352dd958 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Three Notch Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2012/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400W Overhead Wiring (Non Mercury vapor fixtures) - (Type - 'HPS-Cobra',Wood Pole (1)) Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only for dusk to dawn lighting by means of photo-electric controlled, ballast operated vapor lamp luminaries and poles conforming to the Cooperative's specifications. Service will be rendered only at locations that, solely in the opinion of the Cooperative, are readily accessible for installation and maintenance.

389

Data:Bb9e6478-6cdc-4da2-8838-45259fb897e5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e6478-6cdc-4da2-8838-45259fb897e5 e6478-6cdc-4da2-8838-45259fb897e5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Entergy Arkansas Inc (Arkansas) Effective date: 2010/06/30 End date if known: Rate name: R2 Nightwatchers - HPS unshielded - 1000W Shoebox Sector: Lighting Description: To un-metered automatically controlled outdoor lightning service burning all night. Source or reference: http://www.entergy-arkansas.com/content/price/tariffs/eai_l4.pdf Source Parent: Comments Not available for new costumers Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

390

Data:Ea032fa6-9b01-44fb-8715-95df24e91552 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

32fa6-9b01-44fb-8715-95df24e91552 32fa6-9b01-44fb-8715-95df24e91552 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Washington Elec Member Corp Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Rate-01 (RS) Sector: Residential Description: To all residential consumers for electric service supplied through one meter, and for incidental use thereto where such incidental load does not exceed 15 horsepower. Source or reference: http://facts.psc.state.ga.us/Public/GetDocument.aspx?ID=129296 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

391

Data:8d9ce4df-fb8d-4769-adaa-0848b0de0d80 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df-fb8d-4769-adaa-0848b0de0d80 df-fb8d-4769-adaa-0848b0de0d80 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2010/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: STREET AND HIGHWAY H.P.S. 150w Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to lighting for public streets and highways and public grounds and areas, supplied to municipalities or agencies of federal, state or local government where funds for payment for electrical service are provided through taxation or assessment. Source or reference: http://www.cec-co.com/custserv/energy_info/rates/sch_e.pdf Source Parent:

392

Data:81930a2a-1314-492d-ad38-74fb1077ffc0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30a2a-1314-492d-ad38-74fb1077ffc0 30a2a-1314-492d-ad38-74fb1077ffc0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Gastonia, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE CO1I - Coincident Peak Rate 08-1I Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: Rates Binder A Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

393

Data:1f0f7e16-6037-433f-b200-b50d8cbc82fc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e16-6037-433f-b200-b50d8cbc82fc e16-6037-433f-b200-b50d8cbc82fc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Arrowhead Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/07/17 End date if known: Rate name: Off Peak Heat Sector: Description: This rate is applicable for customers who have General Service. Usage under this rate would be tracked by a 2nd meter. Source or reference: Illinois State University Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

394

Data:D34e5741-8f14-44fb-bc01-7ce68420818b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

41-8f14-44fb-bc01-7ce68420818b 41-8f14-44fb-bc01-7ce68420818b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Eugene, Oregon (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule L-3 - Private Property Lighting Service 200 Watt HPS High Pressure Sodium Sector: Lighting Description: To overhead outdoor lighting from dusk-to-dawn each day throughout the year for lighting private property with facilities supplied by EWEB. The 100-, 200- and 400-watt applications are no longer available for new installations, in accordance with Eugene City Code 9.6725. Existing fixtures will be replaced as part of a maintenance program.

395

Data:957a5662-0876-46fb-979c-4f0b6f4cf266 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62-0876-46fb-979c-4f0b6f4cf266 62-0876-46fb-979c-4f0b6f4cf266 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Danville, Virginia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/08/28 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting Service- 250W HPS Decorative Underground Existing Sector: Lighting Description: Available for lighting streets and roadways, whether public or private, which are thoroughfares for normal flow of vehicular traffic. This rate is generally available to governmental agencies. Source or reference: http://www.danville-va.gov/DocumentCenter/View/8181 Source Parent: Comments

396

Data:E6b4437d-c551-4fb1-b6d4-550d69cea570 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c551-4fb1-b6d4-550d69cea570 c551-4fb1-b6d4-550d69cea570 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (South Carolina) Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: OPT-TOU (Optional Time-Of-Use) Sector: Commercial Description: Available to the individual customer. Service under this Schedule shall be used solely by the contracting Customer in a single enterprise, located entirely on a single, contiguous premise. Source or reference: http://www.duke-energy.com/pdfs/scscheduleopt.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicable to 0-Infinity Commercial Customers Only

397

Data:1dbd68fb-e59e-4440-8351-ae9e39765f94 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dbd68fb-e59e-4440-8351-ae9e39765f94 dbd68fb-e59e-4440-8351-ae9e39765f94 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lompoc, California (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Customer Owned Street and Highway Lighting- (200W HPS) Sector: Lighting Description: This schedule applies to Customer-owned and maintained lighting installations which illuminate private streets and highways. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

398

Data:5d6091d1-3976-40b6-b529-635fb9cbdd87 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d1-3976-40b6-b529-635fb9cbdd87 d1-3976-40b6-b529-635fb9cbdd87 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting HPS 100 W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntepa.com/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Seasonal/Monthly Demand Charge Structures

399

Data:5b943e77-c817-4ba9-aee3-dfd4bbbdd0fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3e77-c817-4ba9-aee3-dfd4bbbdd0fb 3e77-c817-4ba9-aee3-dfd4bbbdd0fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Blue Earth, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Light: 100w Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.belw.org/Rate Source Parent: Comments cost is per fixture per month Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

400

Data:1f06c3a9-fb2c-4234-a83b-c527755c7472 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c3a9-fb2c-4234-a83b-c527755c7472 c3a9-fb2c-4234-a83b-c527755c7472 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tri-County Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Church Service Electric NonDemand Sector: Description: Three-phase service is available to churches with prior approval of the Cooperative. Members receiving three-phase service will be billed a monthly charge of $12.50 in addition to all other charges. Source or reference: http://www.tri-countyemc.com/skins/userfiles/file/Church%20Elec%20Nondemand%20C-1E%202012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "duct burner fb" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Data:1810aa17-15fb-490d-97fd-2e49a5d2f227 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aa17-15fb-490d-97fd-2e49a5d2f227 aa17-15fb-490d-97fd-2e49a5d2f227 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southwestern Electric Power Co (Louisiana) Effective date: 2013/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: MVS - Closed Offerings - 250 Watt MV Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: https://www.swepco.com/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

402

Data:683c972d-06f9-4151-8c5e-0e9fb0661268 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2d-06f9-4151-8c5e-0e9fb0661268 2d-06f9-4151-8c5e-0e9fb0661268 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (400W MH Directional Flood Lighting on existing 40 ft. wood pole- Overhead Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

403

Data:F0c83419-8a64-42bb-8780-adf1d0d2fb09 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-8a64-42bb-8780-adf1d0d2fb09 19-8a64-42bb-8780-adf1d0d2fb09 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/01/06 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power- GS-2: Elim Village Sector: Industrial Description: Note: The Adjustments entered here is the sum of the "Cost of Fuel" and the "RCC". Source or reference: Rates Binder B Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

404

Data:85cfbd33-bef5-4bdc-b995-d9fd9fb85e4d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cfbd33-bef5-4bdc-b995-d9fd9fb85e4d cfbd33-bef5-4bdc-b995-d9fd9fb85e4d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Heartland Rural Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: METERED SECURITY LIGHTING: 250 Watt Mercury Vapor Light Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY This schedule is available for metered outdoor lighting service to any Customer. New or replacement light installations shall be limited to high pressure sodium and metal-halide lights. Source or reference: http://www.heartland-rec.com/documents/HRECTarriffsAug09web.pdf Source Parent: Comments

405

Data:210a8b77-fa65-4709-951d-75d9dc5fb370 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-fa65-4709-951d-75d9dc5fb370 7-fa65-4709-951d-75d9dc5fb370 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Public Service Elec & Gas Co Effective date: 2010/06/07 End date if known: Rate name: 150 CORA HEAD CUT OFF TYPE II H.P Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.pseg.com/family/pseandg/tariffs/electric/pdf/electric_tariff.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

406

Data:204c9fb6-b741-4ca4-b432-a986aaba0d87 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb6-b741-4ca4-b432-a986aaba0d87 fb6-b741-4ca4-b432-a986aaba0d87 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Electric Membership Corporation Effective date: 2009/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE Mercury Vapor, Open 400 W Sector: Lighting Description: 20,000 Lumens, 400 W Availability - Available to individual consumers, in all territory served by the Cooperative, for purposes of lighting private outdoor areas or residential subdivision streets from dusk to dawn. Service under this schedule is subject to the Cooperative's established Service Rules and Regulations.

407

Data:992a6bfc-6ac4-4018-8d70-5940c457f2fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bfc-6ac4-4018-8d70-5940c457f2fb bfc-6ac4-4018-8d70-5940c457f2fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Hemingford, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: 2013/09/30 Rate name: Municipal Water Pumping Sector: Commercial Description: To municipally-owned electric for the purpose of water pumping. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

408

Data:6cdd16a1-15fe-4965-9d72-7409fb1785f5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cdd16a1-15fe-4965-9d72-7409fb1785f5 cdd16a1-15fe-4965-9d72-7409fb1785f5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: La Plata Electric Assn, Inc Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: TOU Small Commercial Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.lpea.com/services/rates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

409

Data:984448eb-d434-4f0f-b130-f054bdc2fea6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

48eb-d434-4f0f-b130-f054bdc2fea6 48eb-d434-4f0f-b130-f054bdc2fea6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 lumen 173 watt SV (Pt) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

410

Data:A82d0205-ff2c-4904-bf62-7e541fb88897 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d0205-ff2c-4904-bf62-7e541fb88897 d0205-ff2c-4904-bf62-7e541fb88897 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Carroll Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Underground Wiring Wood Pole HPS 100 W Sector: Lighting Description: *IDC Rider Charges included in Fixed Monthly Charge $275 one time charge for instillation Source or reference: http://www.cemc.com/Files/OL-2%20Outdoor%20Lighting%20final%202012.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

411

Data:C2f657fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 7fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Delmarva Power (Maryland) Effective date: 2012/07/08 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR LIGHTING "OL" Mercury Vapor 175W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.delmarva.com/_res/documents/DPLMdMasterTariff.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

412

Data:Cf4df18d-588e-46e5-82ad-31a59ea826fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cf4df18d-588e-46e5-82ad-31a59ea826fb Cf4df18d-588e-46e5-82ad-31a59ea826fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bloomer Electric & Water Co Effective date: 1999/09/15 End date if known: Rate name: Ms-1 Siren and Lighting Service: Street Lighting 100 W HPS Sector: Lighting Description: This schedule will be applied to municipal street lighting, siren units, field lighting, and yard lighting Fixed Monthly Charge includes Commitment to Community Rider: $1.33 per customer per month. Power Cost Adjustment varies monthly. Source or reference: http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/tariffs/viewfile.aspx?type=electric&id=580

413

Data:C73b6762-f909-4fb6-a5be-18a09cf4415e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62-f909-4fb6-a5be-18a09cf4415e 62-f909-4fb6-a5be-18a09cf4415e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Caddo Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2007/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Standard-1-Rate 11 Sector: Industrial Description: - Available to industrial power customers using service under term contract for lighting,motive and heating purposes. - Subject to Power cost adjustment, Tax adjustment and Rate revisions. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

414

Data:03a75c2a-280f-488f-b1b4-c56c82016502 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c2a-280f-488f-b1b4-c56c82016502 c2a-280f-488f-b1b4-c56c82016502 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Anaheim, California (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/09/12 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting- City-Owned System- 7,000 Lumen Mercury Vapor Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to outdoor area lighting service, other than street and highway lighting service, supplied from overhead lines where the Utility owns and maintains the area lighting equipment. Source or reference: http://www.anaheim.net/utilities/ElectricRules/SCHD-LO.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability

415

Data:9ec54f0f-fb2a-4458-bac0-a61e0eb32981 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f-fb2a-4458-bac0-a61e0eb32981 f-fb2a-4458-bac0-a61e0eb32981 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Dalton Utilities Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Non-Demand Sector: Commercial Description: Available throughout the service area from existing lines of adequate capacity as determined by the Board. Applicable for all commercial uses by Industrial and Commercial Customers in a separately metered unit as determined by the Board. Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 2 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

416

Data:C5fd413d-52fb-4021-87e0-ae203505e66b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

13d-52fb-4021-87e0-ae203505e66b 13d-52fb-4021-87e0-ae203505e66b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KEM Electric Coop Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Sub-metered EH-1 RC-1 Sector: Residential Description: Available to all members under RC-1, SE-1, and GS-1 where electric heat is the primary source of heating. Type of Service The sub-metering of electric heat. The Cooperative will provide sub-meter, meter socket, and C.T. equipment necessary to measure electric usage. Source or reference: http://www.kemelectric.com/Customer_Service/Rate_Schedules/Schedule%20EH-1/index.html

417

Data:485c6619-0388-4e95-a380-fb922d2f9bf6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0388-4e95-a380-fb922d2f9bf6 0388-4e95-a380-fb922d2f9bf6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC (MKEC) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: General Service Small V2 Sector: Commercial Description: To all electric service of a single character supplied at one point of delivery and used for general business or commercial purposes, institutions, public or private, and purpose for which no specific rate schedule is provided. Source or reference: Kelly Call List #6 (V2) (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

418

Data:3c4b0554-ceb7-4d2a-a4a1-9fb9bfd76073 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

54-ceb7-4d2a-a4a1-9fb9bfd76073 54-ceb7-4d2a-a4a1-9fb9bfd76073 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Perennial Public Power Dist Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Street Lighting 250w HPS - Wood Pole - Muni. Rider Sector: Lighting Description: Municipal Street Lighting (Rate Code 64): For service supplied municipalities (or customers within the municipality) in the operation of the municipality's street lighting system, the following rates shall apply. These rates shall also apply to security lights in a municipality that are billed under other rate codes (i.e., 20, 57, etc.).

419

Data:D7c6cf5b-1e31-4b62-a00c-fb5126171f68 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cf5b-1e31-4b62-a00c-fb5126171f68 cf5b-1e31-4b62-a00c-fb5126171f68 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: MC3 - Medium Commercial Service Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to all secondary services supplied by the Cooperative for commercial use which does not qualify for any other commercial rate with an actual demand which requires over 100 kVA but less than 500 kVA of transformer capacity installed. Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 11, ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments

420

Data:9ee239f4-43fb-448d-8b29-8cebd4b3d091 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-43fb-448d-8b29-8cebd4b3d091 -43fb-448d-8b29-8cebd4b3d091 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lexington, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting Service(100 Watt High Pressure Sodium) Sector: Lighting Description: Available to the individual Customer at locations on the City's distribution system. Source or reference: http://www.lexingtonnc.net/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=414 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

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421

Data:A261eecb-4857-446e-b4ff-5f58bb2fb08d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eecb-4857-446e-b4ff-5f58bb2fb08d eecb-4857-446e-b4ff-5f58bb2fb08d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rochester Public Utilities Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SECURITY LIGHTING(400 Watt Mercury Vapor) Sector: Lighting Description: At all locations whenever the service can be provided with overhead wiring on an existing RPU owned pole. Source or reference: http://www.rpu.org/documents/2012_rate_schedule.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

422

Data:11e29083-ec13-4e5b-b136-6c50e0bd1fb2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ec13-4e5b-b136-6c50e0bd1fb2 -ec13-4e5b-b136-6c50e0bd1fb2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Hemingford, Nebraska (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting (High Pressure Sodium) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

423

Data:Ae5e3f25-20fb-491b-a945-798709d9eb25 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20fb-491b-a945-798709d9eb25 20fb-491b-a945-798709d9eb25 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Ruston, Louisiana (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: COMMERCIAL Sector: Commercial Description: this rate has 9 tiered categories Source or reference: Rate Binder #10A, Illinois State University. Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

424

Data:9d9a26ea-bee1-4f27-ab71-531dc43d06fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ea-bee1-4f27-ab71-531dc43d06fb ea-bee1-4f27-ab71-531dc43d06fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Salmon River Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2005/01/21 End date if known: Rate name: Single Phase Residential (200 or less Amperage) Sector: Residential Description: The type of service provided under this schedule is single phase, at the standard voltage available for the premises to be served, supplied through one meter at one point of delivery. Source or reference: http://www.srec.org/MembInfo/Rates/spres.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

425

Data:Ed495bde-91e5-416f-b491-ea26ac6bc0ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ed495bde-91e5-416f-b491-ea26ac6bc0ad Ed495bde-91e5-416f-b491-ea26ac6bc0ad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Western Area Power Administration (Arizona) Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Regulation and Frequency Response Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: www.wapa.gov/dsw/pwrmkt/CRS/Current/Fy2012/RateSched.doc Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

426

Data:5f4549bb-4fb4-416b-9932-23a820738a99 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bb-4fb4-416b-9932-23a820738a99 bb-4fb4-416b-9932-23a820738a99 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Prescott, Arkansas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rental Lights-Night water-300 Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: Rate Binder#4 (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2

427

Data:47ac97ba-36a4-4213-b938-7b554a6a8fb2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7ba-36a4-4213-b938-7b554a6a8fb2 7ba-36a4-4213-b938-7b554a6a8fb2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Inter County Energy Coop Corp Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 50,000 Lumen - Directional Floodlight Sector: Lighting Description: per lamp per month Source or reference: http://www.intercountyenergy.net/content/energy-rates-net-metering Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

428

Data:C9ac7352-a048-4ef0-9943-5450467fb1d0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ac7352-a048-4ef0-9943-5450467fb1d0 ac7352-a048-4ef0-9943-5450467fb1d0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern Virginia Elec Coop Effective date: 2010/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule SC-TOU, Small Commercial Time of Use Service Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to consumers otherwise served under Schedule SCJ. Net Metering consumers are not eligible for this rate. This rate is limited to the first 300 consumers for and receiving service. Source or reference: Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

429

Data:80360d01-3f4d-418f-b6ff-9ee26559094f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d01-3f4d-418f-b6ff-9ee26559094f d01-3f4d-418f-b6ff-9ee26559094f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tri-County Rural Elec Coop Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: 3 Phase Demand Sector: Commercial Description: * 3Phase demand. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4(Illinios State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

430

Data:E70650df-5370-41fb-a364-699a373e3c1c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

E70650df-5370-41fb-a364-699a373e3c1c E70650df-5370-41fb-a364-699a373e3c1c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Whitehall Electric Utility Effective date: 2010/02/15 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting- 250W HPS- Overhead Sector: Lighting Description: This schedule will be applied to municipal street lighting. The utility will furnish,install, and maintain street lighting units. This rate is subject to the Power Cost Adjustment Clause. Source or reference: http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/tariffs/viewfile.aspx?type=electric&id=6490 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

431

Data:Ab2fb3cd-6a21-47cc-86e0-c4d640f44d86 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb3cd-6a21-47cc-86e0-c4d640f44d86 fb3cd-6a21-47cc-86e0-c4d640f44d86 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Arizona Public Service Co Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT SURCHARGE - ADJUSTMENT SCHEDULE EIS Sector: Commercial Description: The Environmental Improvement Surcharge ("EIS") shall apply to all retail Standard Offer service, excluding kWh served in accordance with rate schedules Solar-2, Solar-3, GPS-1, GPS-2 and GPS-3. All provisions of the customer's current applicable rate schedule shall apply in addition to charges under this Adjustment Schedule EIS.

432

Data:4aef1fb6-f088-4162-b0ed-ded8e2596267 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fb6-f088-4162-b0ed-ded8e2596267 fb6-f088-4162-b0ed-ded8e2596267 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting HPS-23 250 W Sector: Lighting Description: RULES AND REGULATIONS: Terms and conditions of this electric rate schedule and the General Rules and Regulations govern use of this service. APPLICATION OF SCHEDULE: This schedule is applicable to any Customer for automatically operated dusk to dawn outdoor lighting supplied and operated by the Company. Source or reference: https://www.otpco.com/RatesPricing/Documents/PDF/MN/MN_11.04.pdf

433

Data:Ca686e26-dc3c-439c-9f46-fb741a0a1ff5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dc3c-439c-9f46-fb741a0a1ff5 dc3c-439c-9f46-fb741a0a1ff5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Gastonia, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE CO2I - Coincident Peak Rate 08-2I Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: Rates Binder A Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

434

Data:3dc51ed5-91c8-464f-b50e-8af7ff5ccb32 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ed5-91c8-464f-b50e-8af7ff5ccb32 ed5-91c8-464f-b50e-8af7ff5ccb32 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Thomaston, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Service Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to all electric service of one standard voltage required on the customer's premises,delivered at one point and metered at or compensated to that voltage for any customer who meets the following criteria: 1.An existing customer must have been served under schedule I-1 or schedule LMSS-1, prior to taking service under this schedule I-2.

435

Data:998a6b93-6a40-4406-b626-f3af149dc8fb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b93-6a40-4406-b626-f3af149dc8fb b93-6a40-4406-b626-f3af149dc8fb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Monroe County Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B- Rate 0003 (Single-Phase) Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is available to members for commercial, industrial and three-phase farm service for all uses, including lighting, heating etc.., subject to established rules of the cooperative. Source or reference: http://www.mcec.org/Documents/2013%20Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

436

Data:75eb207d-fcda-4727-8431-2f6fb480d0eb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

07d-fcda-4727-8431-2f6fb480d0eb 07d-fcda-4727-8431-2f6fb480d0eb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Dover, Delaware (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Private Outdoor Lighting: Decorative Lighting, Metered, 150 watt HPS w/o ladder rest Sect