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1

DSM pocket guidebook  

SciTech Connect

It has been estimated that if electricity were used more efficiently with commercially available end-use technologies, 24%--44% of the nation's current demand for electricity could be eliminated. Almost all major electric utilities in the west are investigated such demand-side management (DSM) opportunities. In some service territories, for example, improved efficiency could soon produce as much power as that from new coal-fired plants and produce it at a lower cost. Even utilities that currently have excess capacity are finding that DSM offers an opportunity to build efficient end-use stock to help them meet their future load shape objectives. Utility DSM programs typically consist of several measures designed to modify the utility's load shape (for example, innovative rate structures, direct utility control of loads, promotion of energy-efficient technologies, and customer education). The coordinated implementation of such measures requires planning, analysis of options, engineering, marketing, monitoring, and other coordination activities. This guidebook addresses one facet of an overall DSM program: selection of end-use technologies within the electrical utilities. This guidebook is intended to be a quick reference source both for utility field representatives in their customer interactions and for utility planners in the early stages of developing a DSM program. Finally, this guidebook is directed primarily at small municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives within the Western Area Power Administration (Western) service area.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options Speaker(s): Osman Sezgen Date: August 1, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare As some end-users of energy and aggregators are choosing to be exposed to real-time prices and energy price volatility, they are coming across new DSM opportunities that would not be feasible under typical utility rate structures. Effective evaluation of such opportunities requires a good understanding of the wholesale energy markets and the use of models based on recent financial techniques for option pricing. The speaker will give examples of such modeling approaches based on his experience in the retail-energy industry. Specific examples will include evaluation of distributed generation, load curtailment, dual-fuel cooling, and energy

3

The DSM debate  

SciTech Connect

As efficiency and conservation measures gain favor in energy resource planning, the independent power producers industry considers a host of issues related to demand side management (DSM) implementation. An increasing number of state regulators consider DSM preferable to new generation, both on economic and environmental grounds.

Hocker, C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Designing Industrial DSM Programs that Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many reasons why industrial customers do not implement all cost-effective efficiency measures on their own. Utility demand side management (DSM) programs can help overcome some of these barriers. DSM programs provide an opportunity for utilities to reduce the cost of providing energy services while helping customers to reduce their energy bills and thereby increase profit margins and competitiveness. A review of utility experience with industrial DSM programs shows that some types of programs work much better than other types. Successful efforts include both custom and prescriptive components that show an understanding of the customers perspective, use marketing that is personal and user-friendly, provide flexibility, and include financial incentives. Among the less successful programs are programs that do not address customer needs, including information-only, loan, and shared savings programs. A number of other program approaches are largely untested and merit further experimentation. Based on these findings, we recommend that utilities and industrial customers work together to design DSM programs that serve the needs of industrial customers.

Nadel, S. M.; Jordan, J. A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

International DSM and DSM program evaluation: An INDEEP assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the current level of demand-side management (DSM) occurring in selected European countries and reviews the availability of information on DSM programs and program evaluation. Next, thirteen European DSM programs are compared by examining such factors as: motivations for program implementation, marketing methods, participation rates, total energy savings, and program costs. The transfer of DSM program results and experiences found in these case studies is also discussed, as well as the lessons learned during the design, implementation, and evaluation of these programs. This paper represents a preliminary assessment of the state of DSM and DSM program evaluation in Europe. The findings from this work also represent the first steps in a joint international effort to compile and analyze the measured results of energy efficiency programs in a consistent and comprehensive fashion. The authors find that these programs represent cost-effective resources: the cost of energy saved by the programs ranged from a low of 0.0005 ECUs/kWh (0.01 {cents}/kWh) to a high of 0.077 ECUs/kWh (9.7 {cents}/kWh), with an average cost of 0.027 ECUs/kWh (3.3 {cents}/kWh). Weighted by energy savings, the average cost of energy saved by the programs was 0.014 ECUs/kWh (1.8 {cents}/kWh).

Vine, E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Application of DSM evaluation studies to utility forecasting and planning  

SciTech Connect

Utilities and their customers have made substantial investments in utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. These DSM programs also represent a substantial electricity resource. DSM program performance has been studied more systematically in recent years than over any previous period. DSM program evaluations are traditionally targeted to meet the program manager`s need for information on program costs and performance and, more recently, to verify savings to regulators for incentive awards and lost revenue recovery. Yet evaluations may also be used to produce results relevant to utility forecasting and planning. Applying evaluation results is especially important for utilities with substantial current and future commitments to acquiring demand-side resources. This report discusses the application of evaluation results to utility forecasting and planning. The report has three objectives. First, we identify what demand forecasters, DSM forecasters, and resource planners want to learn from evaluations. Second, we identify and describe the major obstacles and problems associated with applying evaluation results and illustrate many of these issues through a specific evaluation application exercise. Finally, we suggest approaches for addressing these major problems. The report summarizes results from interviews with utilities, regulators, and consultants to determine how the industry currently applies evaluation results in forecasting and planning. The report also includes results from case studies of Sacramento Municipal Utility District and Southern California Edison Company, utilities with large DSM programs and active evaluation efforts. Finally, we draw on a specific application exercise in which we used a set of impact evaluations to revise a utility DSM forecast.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Applying DSM evaluation results to utility planning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a study to assess the application of DSM evaluation results to utility forecasting and planning. The paper has three objectives: (1) identify forecasting and planning applications of evaluation studies, (2) identify major obstacles and problems associated with applying evaluation results to forecasting and planning, and (3) suggest approaches to address the major problems. The paper summarizes results from interviews with utilities, regulators, and consultants to determine how the utility industry currently applies evaluation results in forecasting and planning. The paper also includes results from a detailed case study of Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and Southern California Edison Company (SCE), two utilities with large DSM programs and active evaluation efforts.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DSM shareholder incentives: Current designs and economic theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews recent DSM shareholder incentive designs and performance at 10 US utilities identifies opportunities for regulators to improve the design of DSM shareholder incentive mechanisms to increase the procurement of cost-effective DSM resources. We develop six recommendations: (1) apply shared-savings incentives to DSM resource programs; (2) use markup incentives for individual programs only when net benefits are difficult to measure, but are known to be positive; (3) set expected incentive payments based on covering a utility`s {open_quotes}hidden costs,{close_quotes} which include some transitional management and risk-adjusted opportunity costs; (4) use higher marginal incentives rates than are currently found in practice, but limit total incentive payments by adding a fixed charge; (5) mitigate risks to regulators and utilities by lowering marginal incentive rates at high and low performance levels; and (6) use an aggregate incentive mechanism for all DSM resource programs, with limited exceptions (e.g., information programs where markups are more appropriate).

Stoft, S.; Eto, J.; Kito, S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fusion of imprecise, uncertain, and conflicting beliefs with DSm rules of combination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper one studies, within Dezert-Smarandache Theory (DSmT), the case when the sources of information provide imprecise belief functions/masses, and we generalize the DSm rules of combination (classic or hybrid rules) from scalar fusion to sub-unitary interval fusion and, more general, to any set of sub-unitary interval fusion. This work generalizes previous works available in literature which appear limited to IBS (Interval-valued belief structures) in the Transferable Belief Model framework. Numerical didactic examples of these new DSm fusion rules for dealing with imprecise information are also presented.

Jean Dezert; Florentin Smarandache

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

10

Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs  

SciTech Connect

Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

Hirst, E.; Reed, J. [eds.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries Title DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries Publication Type Report...

12

Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility's gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this non-traditional'' market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

1992-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

MEMORANDUM TO: SPSC DSM WORK GROUP PARTICIPANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPSC’s 20-year High DSM/DG study case is intended to be based on a load forecast that reflects significantly higher energy efficiency levels than in the reference case. LBNL and Itron have developed a preliminary SPSC High DSM load forecast using Itron’s statistically adjusted enduse (SAE) load forecasting framework, which allows the specification of end use efficiency levels for 30 individual residential and commercial end-use categories. The stock efficiency levels selected for the High DSM/DG case are intended to represent the highest efficiency levels that are commercially available today. Accompanying this memorandum are two Excel workbooks containing the residential and commercial stock efficiency assumptions proposed for the High DSM case. We are seeking feedback from SPSC DSM Work Group participants on whether the stock efficiency assumptions in those workbooks are appropriate (i.e., reflective of the highest efficiency levels commercially available today). Please focus your attention, in particular, on the information contained in Columns F and H in each of the state-labeled worksheets, which identify the proposed average stock efficiency levels for the High DSM case and the corresponding energy savings relative to

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Summary of California DSM impact evaluation studies  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, four of the largest investor-owned California utilities have completed more than 50 evaluation studies designed to measure the energy and demand impacts of their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These four are: Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E), Southern California Edison (SCE), Southern California Gas (SoCalGas), and San diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E). These studies covered residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural DSM programs and provided a wealth of information on program impacts. The objective of this report is to summarize the results of these DSM evaluation studies in order to describe what DSM has achieved in California, to assess how well these achievements were forecast, and to compare the effectiveness of different types of DSM programs. This report documents the sizable investment made by the California utilities in their 1990--92 DSM programs. Between 1990 and 1992, the four utilities spent $772 million on energy-efficiency/conservation programs. This report also summarizes the realization rates estimated by the 50+ evaluation studies. Realization rates are defined as ex-post net savings estimates divided by ex-ante net savings estimates. Realization rates are summarized for 158 programs and program segments.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Evaluating the DSM Potential for Industrial Electrotechnologies and Management Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to help balance load requirements and generating capacity, Houston Lighting & Power Company (HL&P) contracted with SRI International (SRI) to identify existing and emerging electrotechnologies and management practices (technologies) for possible inclusion in an industrial demand side management (DSM) program. This paper outlines the procedures used to evaluate technologies that may impact oil refining, pulp & paper production, and 26 major chemical processes of industrial customers within HL&P's service area. Each technology was reviewed with regard to its electricity requirements and applicability to various industries. In addition, each technology's basic principles, existing industrial applications, possible new applications, product or process limitations, and representative economics were investigated. Where applicable, concerns other than economic attractiveness such as environmental issues, worker safety, and product quality were identified. Additional information was also obtained from preliminary efforts to project the commercial penetration of each of these technologies. Factors affecting commercial penetration include the existing level of market penetration, fuel prices, electricity prices, capital investment requirements, perceived risk, and internal hurdles rates for investment. In order to fully determine which of these technologies should be included in an industrial DSM program, various HL&P industrial customers were interviewed with regard to their knowledge and/or acceptance levels of selected electrotechnologies and management practices. This enabled HL&P to better understand the specific needs of industrial customers within their service area. This survey data, along with the information provided by SRI and other sources, formed the basis for initial selection of technologies to include in an industrial DSM program. The value of encouraging HL&P's industrial customers to use any of these technologies will be compared to DSM programs for other customer classes, as well as more traditional generating resource options, before the final selection of electrotechnologies and management practices is made.

Harrell, P. J.; Pavone, A.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs. [Demand-Side Management (DSM)  

SciTech Connect

Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility's portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to triangulate'' an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

Hirst, E.; Reed, J. (eds.); Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Examples of management applications that include ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes timing of discharge-related lifecycle, changes food availability, alters sediment and organic 3 0 2 3 Blackfoot (BFT) 2 3 3 2 3 3 Goose (GSE) 3 3 3 0 3 3 Idaho Falls (IFA) 3 3 3 0 3 3 Lower was restricted to Idaho, so the watersheds that cross state boundaries are assessed only for the Idaho portion

19

Actual vs anticipated savings from DSM programs: An assessment of the California experience  

SciTech Connect

Since the late 1980`s, utilities in California have used demand-side management (DSM) extensively to achieve a variety of corporate and public policy goals. This commitment to ene efficiency was encouraged by the establishment of financial incentives for the utilities to acquire demand-side resources. With restructuring of electric and gas markets underway in California, including recent cutbacks by the California utilities in their DSM program efforts, it is timely to review retrospectively the accomplishments of California`s DSM investments. This paper summarizes the results of 50 evaluation studies that assess California DSM programs operating between 1990 and 1992. On average, the programs delivered 112% of the energy savings that were planned, and the typical program realized approximately 86% of the energy savings it was expected to deliver. Thus, the California DSM programs outperformed DSM programs from the 1980s, in terms of more accurately forecasting energy impacts. Among the 50 impact studies, lower realization rates are associated with residential-sector programs, relatively high ex-ante estimates of savings, and significant levels of free ridership.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Research opportunities to improve DSM impact estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was commissioned by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) as part of its research mission to advance the energy efficiency and productivity of all end-use sectors in California. Our specific goal in this effort has been to identify viable research and development (R D) opportunities that can improve capabilities to determine the energy-use and demand reductions achieved through demand-side management (DSM) programs and measures. We surveyed numerous practitioners in California and elsewhere to identify the major obstacles to effective impact evaluation, drawing on their collective experience. As a separate effort, we have also profiled the status of regulatory practices in leading states with respect to DSM impact evaluation. We have synthesized this information, adding our own perspective and experience to those of our survey-respondent colleagues, to characterize today's state of the art in impact-evaluation practices. This scoping study takes a comprehensive look at the problems and issues involved in DSM impact estimates at the customer-facility or site level. The major portion of our study investigates three broad topic areas of interest to CIEE: Data analysis issues, field-monitoring issues, issues in evaluating DSM measures. Across these three topic areas, we have identified 22 potential R D opportunities, to which we have assigned priority levels. These R D opportunities are listed by topic area and priority.

Misuriello, H.; Hopkins, M.E.F. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Research opportunities to improve DSM impact estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was commissioned by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) as part of its research mission to advance the energy efficiency and productivity of all end-use sectors in California. Our specific goal in this effort has been to identify viable research and development (R&D) opportunities that can improve capabilities to determine the energy-use and demand reductions achieved through demand-side management (DSM) programs and measures. We surveyed numerous practitioners in California and elsewhere to identify the major obstacles to effective impact evaluation, drawing on their collective experience. As a separate effort, we have also profiled the status of regulatory practices in leading states with respect to DSM impact evaluation. We have synthesized this information, adding our own perspective and experience to those of our survey-respondent colleagues, to characterize today`s state of the art in impact-evaluation practices. This scoping study takes a comprehensive look at the problems and issues involved in DSM impact estimates at the customer-facility or site level. The major portion of our study investigates three broad topic areas of interest to CIEE: Data analysis issues, field-monitoring issues, issues in evaluating DSM measures. Across these three topic areas, we have identified 22 potential R&D opportunities, to which we have assigned priority levels. These R&D opportunities are listed by topic area and priority.

Misuriello, H.; Hopkins, M.E.F. [Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

PCBs may spell trouble for utility DSM  

SciTech Connect

Utilities that promote lighting retrofit programs as part of a demand-side management (DSM) program any run into trouble disposing of lighting system ballasts. That's because ballast made before 1979 used polychlorinated biphenyls-better know as PCBs-as dielectric fluids in their capacitors. Because PCBs were found to be toxic, federal regulations banned their use in manufacturing after 1979. With the typical life of a lighting system ballast ranging between 10 to 25 years, many PCB-containing ballasts are ready for replacement. What's more, the growth of electric utility DSM programs over the past decade has accelerated the replacement of ballasts containing PCBs. The result is that large quantities of such ballasts are being discarded at a rate greater than if disposal were the result of ballast burnout of failure alone. Federal regulations banning PCB production also require the cleanup and disposal of existing PCB materials. The process of removing existing low-efficiency ballasts as part of DSM program is complicated by a variety of special handling, labeling, transportation, and disposal requirements and options. Of course, these complications and their associated costs affect the economics of DSM lighting retrofit programs.

Manwell, S.; Epstein, G.

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

DSM Load Growth Through Electrotechnology Application Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will discuss how a new "win-win" approach is emerging that improves both customer competitiveness and utility energy sales as both DSM and the utility's relationship with its customers mature. While most DSM resources have been invested in conservation efforts, the efficient load building aspects must no longer be ignored. As DSM "returns to its roots," electrotechnology applications assistance programs are beginning to provide measured results that are a key part of utility efforts to manage demand. Several innovative electrotechnology application programs exist but most share a combination of the following key attributes: 1) Immediate results-oriented electrotechnology applications assistance and implementation is provided to key customers, 2) Market research is conducted on a broad category of customers to determine appropriate electrotechnology applications and assistance, 3) An advertising and promotional campaign development/ implementation plan is created, 4) Technology transfer training is provided for customers and utility staff, and 5) An assessment is made for the development of a regional technology application center.

Merchant, D. G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Utility DSM: off the coasts and into the heartland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility demand-side management efforts began on the coasts but have recently spread to the ''heartland.'' The authors review efforts to develop DSM programs and policies in states that are now ramping up programs, identifying key practices that are often linked with progress in states that are new to DSM and discussing the implications for the 18 states that currently lack significant DSM programs. (author)

Nadel, Steven; Gold, Rachel

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Building Retrofit and DSM Study in Jiangsu | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NRDC will coordinate Chinese and foreign experts and pay for the project. Demand-Side Management (DSM) refers to utility policies or incentives for customers (residential,...

26

Price impacts of electric-utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As competition in the electricity industry increases, utilities (and others) worry more about the upward pressure on electricity prices that demand-side management (DSM) programs often impose. Because of these concerns, several utilities have recently reduced the scope of their DSM programs or focused these programs more on customer service and peak-demand reductions and less on improving energy efficiency. This study uses the Oak Ridge Financial Model (ORFIN) to calculate the rate impacts of DSM. The authors use ORFIN to examine the two factors that contribute to DSM`s upward pressure on prices: the cost of the programs themselves and the loss of revenue associated with fixed-cost recovery. This second factor reflects the reduction in revenues caused by the DSM-induced energy and demand savings that exceed the reduction in utility costs. This analysis examines DSM price impacts as functions of the following factors: the DSM program itself (cost, conservation load factor, geographic focus on deferral of transmission and distribution investments, and mix across customer classes); the utility`s cost and pricing structures (factors at least partly under the utility`s control, such as retail tariffs, fixed vs variable operating costs, and capital costs not related to kW or kWh growth); and external economic and regulatory factors (the level and temporal pattern of avoided energy and capacity costs; ratebasing vs expensing of DSM-program costs; shareholder incentives for DSM programs; load growth; and the rates for income, property, and revenue taxes).

Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Proceedings: International Workshop on Innovative DSM [Demand Side Management] Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is becoming more important in the utility environment characterized by increasing competition and major uncertainties in demand and supply. EPRI and CIGRE, a leading international organization for the electric power industry, cosponsored this workshop to discuss strategies for designing and implementing DSM programs.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility`s gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this ``non-traditional`` market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

1992-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

DSM as an economic development strategy  

SciTech Connect

Models capable of reflecting price adjustments and capital flows can estimate the longer-term impacts of energy choices on the net gain and distribution of employment. But without a common basis in the types of models used, research on the employment effects of energy efficiency cannot be integrated in a way that is useful. A sluggish economic recovery, lagging consumer confidence and concerns about the U.S.`s international competitiveness have pushed the jobs issue to the forefront of almost all economic policies. Energy efficiency and demand-side management (DSM) advocates are actively raising the issue in energy policy and regulatory forums around the country. Recent policy level discussions within the Department of Energy have strengthened this momentum. At the heart of the DOE work is an emphasis on the use of `Quality Metrics` to guide the development of its programs and budgets. Employment and income benefits are part of this new calculus. Several new studies have elevated this issue to new levels of policy consideration. Even municipal utilities have begun to explore this issue, with the release of a software package called the OPTIONS model. But with all this activity a good deal of confusion remains about how to understand the job creation process. To help clear some of the confusion, this article explains the basic tools used to measure employment gains or losses. It also reviews some of the basic lessons learned in the application of these tools.

Laitner, S.; Goodman, I.; Krier, B.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

DSM-Communities in the World-Wide Web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed shared memory is an interesting alternative to message-based construction of distributed systems. We contemplate extending the applicability of our current implementation of a DSM operating system from the locally connected PC cluster to ...

Peter Schulthess; Oliver Schirpf; Michael Schöttner; Moritz Wende

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization Examples Organization Examples Example 8 4.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION Chapter 4.0 describes the principle project organizations, including their responsibilities and relationships. Other organizations, that have an interest in the project, also are described. 4.1 Principal Project Organizations and Responsibilities The management organization for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project represents a partnership between four principal project organizations responsible for the project. The four project organizations and their associated summary responsibilities are described in the following paragraphs. 4.1.1 U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters (HQ) The DOE-HQ Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) is primarily responsible for policy and budget decisions

32

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Execution Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Execution Example Project Execution Example Example 73 6.3 Project Approach The overall schedule strategy for the PFP project includes ongoing minimum safe activities, combined with stabilization of materials followed by materials disposition, and subsequent transition of the PFP complex to a decommissioned state. The PFP material stabilization baseline was developed using a functionally-based work WBS. The WBS defines all activities required to take each material stream from their current location/conditions through stabilization (as required), and disposition the stabilized material as solid waste for shipment to WIPP or as product material for shipment to SRS. Initially, workshops were held with subject matter experts, project managers, schedulers, and support personnel (experts in the

33

C Example MUMPS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MUMPS MUMPS C Example MUMPS /* * file c_example.c * This file is part of MUMPS 4.10.0 * To run: aprun -n 2 ./dsimpletest < input_simpletest_real */ /* Example program using the C interface to the * double real arithmetic version of MUMPS, dmumps_c. * We solve the system A x = RHS with * A = diag(1 2) and RHS = [1 4]^T * Solution is [1 2]^T */ #include #include #include "mpi.h" #include "dmumps_c.h" #define JOB_INIT -1 #define JOB_END -2 #define USE_COMM_WORLD -987654 int main(int argc, char ** argv) { DMUMPS_STRUC_C id; int n = 2; int nz = 2; int irn[] = {1,2}; int jcn[] = {1,2}; double a[2]; double rhs[2]; int myid, ierr; ierr = MPI_Init(&argc, &argv); ierr = MPI_Comm_rank(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &myid); /* Define A and rhs */

34

Re DSM: Here comes demand-side marketing  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management (DSM) programs where utilities pay large rebates for energy efficient equipment are being declared dead. The popular view of DSM in the past was to encourage conservation of energy with significant rebates, credits and other incentives offered by electric and also natural gas utilities. After years of increase in utility DSM expenditures, the first decline took place last year of about 6% for the electric industry. Although still spending more than $2 billion in 1994, utilities have continued this year to reduce the number of DSM programs. For some utilities there has been a dramatic abandonment of energy efficiency incentive programs. Where programs remain, utilities are placing increased emphasis on the most cost-effective ones which are usually directed toward commercial and industrial facilities. At the same time utilities have been transforming their programs from demand-side management to demand-side marketing. The objectives have shifted to retaining existing customers, developing new accounts, and increasing profitable sales. Incentives are justified in this new cost-driven competitive environment when they result in decreased rates for all customers. Whereas, in the past, DSM program participants were the primary beneficiaries with reduced bills, in the new marketing environment all customers can benefit from reduced bills.

Barrett, L.B. [Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electric-utility DSM programs: Terminology and reporting formats  

SciTech Connect

The number, scope, effects, and costs of electric-utility demand-site management programs are growing rapidly in the United States. Utilities, their regulators, and energy policy makers need reliable information on the costs of, participation in, and energy and load effects of these programs to make informed decisions. In particular, information is needed on the ability of these programs to cost-effectively provide energy and capacity resources that are alternatives to power plants. This handbook addresses the need for additional and better information in two ways. First, it discusses the key concepts associated with DSM-program types, participation, energy and load effects, and costs. Second, the handbook offers definitions and a sample reporting form for utility DSM programs. The primary purpose in developing these definitions and this form is to encourage consistency in the collection and reporting of data on DSM programs. To ensure that the discussions, reporting formats, and definitions will be useful and used, development of this handbook was managed by a committee, with membership from electric utilities, state regulatory commissions, and the US Department of Energy. Also, this data-collection form was pretested by seven people from six utilities, who completed the form for nine DSM programs.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Sabo, C. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The role of DSM in a competitive market  

SciTech Connect

The author appreciates the opportunity to participate in this NARUC conference and to offer some thoughts on the implications for demand side management (DSM) resulting from increased competition in the electricity and gas businesses. The dominant theme of almost every professional conference in both gas and electricity is that the markets are becoming increasingly competitive and furthermore that increased competition benefits customers and affords opportunities to providers of energy services. However, only part of the effects of increased competition occur through utility DSM programs. A competitive marketplace for electricity and gas would indeed have an effect on utility conservation programs and on utility customers. The following are some of the implications of a competitive market. My presentation is an explanation and defense of these five propositions. (1) Economic efficiency will be enhanced - which increases the level of economic well being of customers and increases the productivity of the U. S. economy. (2) Energy efficiency will decrease, which may also increase our level of economic well-being and economic productivity. (3) Some DSM conservation programs will end, because they fail to pass the market test of competition. Those DSM programs that contribute to the efficient use of energy resources will prosper under competition. (4) The economic well-being of lower and middle income customers will be enhanced, first, by abolishing the DSM based subsidies to high income customers and second by pricing separately the reliability of electric services. (5) Policy goals will have to be justified on their merits - which is the worst fear of some, but the best outcome as viewed by others.

Sutherland, R.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Price and cost impacts of utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. In particular, should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity Most of the debates about the appropriate economic tests to use in assessing utility programs do not address the magnitude of the impacts. As a result, questions remain about the relationships among utility DSM programs and acquisition of supply resources and the effects of these choices on electricity prices and costs. This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. A dynamic model is used to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios for three utilities: a base that is typical of US utilities; a surplus utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. Model results show that DSM programs generally reduce electricity costs and increase electricity prices. However, the percentage reduction in costs is usually greater than the percentage increase in prices. On the other hand, most of the cost benefits of DSM programs can be obtained without raising electricity prices.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Safety Management Examples Integrated Safety Management Examples Example 10 8.2 PFP INTEGRATED SAFETY STRATEGY The following discussion identifies the process that will be used by the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project to ensure that the safety of the worker, public, and the environment are adequately addressed during the project. The primary activities involved in the process include the following:  Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS),  Identification, control, or mitigation of worker safety-related issues for stabilization and deactivation/dismantlement activities,  Facility/chemical vulnerability assessment and management,  Use of the DOE-approved authorization basis and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process to determine if the PFP

40

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approach to Meeting Requirements Examples Approach to Meeting Requirements Examples Example 26 9.2 HEALTH AND SAFETY STRATEGY B Plant has integrated safety into its management, planning and work practices in order to protect the public, the environment and facility workers against nuclear and non-nuclear hazards associated with facility transition. Based upon the principles of DNFSB Recommendation 95-2, the Plant's approach to safety management includes:  Applicable. standards and requirements specifically identified and implemented  Safety integrated into baseline and detailed planning  Workers and trained safety professionals use a team approach in hazard identification, analysis and control  Graded approach used to tailor controls based upon hazard type and severity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ORION: An Adaptive Home-based Software DSM School of Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORION: An Adaptive Home-based Software DSM M.C. Ng School of Computing National University. Orion implements home-based consistency model, which is a recent development in the DSM field that has schemes for home-based DSM systems: home migration and dynamic adaptation between write

Wong, Weng Fai

42

Efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant biomass without pretreatment by the 9 thermophilic anaerobe, Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6725  

SciTech Connect

Very few cultivated microorganisms can degrade lignocellulosic biomass without chemical pretreatment. We show here that 'Anaerocellum thermophilum' DSM 6725, an anaerobic bacterium that grows optimally at 75 C, efficiently utilizes various types of untreated plant biomass, as well as crystalline cellulose and xylan. These include hardwoods such as poplar, low-lignin grasses such as napier and Bermuda grasses, and high-lignin grasses such as switchgrass. The organism did not utilize only the soluble fraction of the untreated biomass, since insoluble plant biomass (as well as cellulose and xylan) obtained after washing at 75 C for 18 h also served as a growth substrate. The predominant end products from all growth substrates were hydrogen, acetate, and lactate. Glucose and cellobiose (on crystalline cellulose) and xylose and xylobiose (on xylan) also accumulated in the growth media during growth on the defined substrates but not during growth on the plant biomass. A. thermophilum DSM 6725 grew well on first- and second-spent biomass derived from poplar and switchgrass, where spent biomass is defined as the insoluble growth substrate recovered after the organism has reached late stationary phase. No evidence was found for the direct attachment of A. thermophilum DSM 6725 to the plant biomass. This organism differs from the closely related strain A. thermophilum Z-1320 in its ability to grow on xylose and pectin. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 (optimum growth temperature, 70 C), a close relative of A. thermophilum DSM 6725, grew well on switchgrass but not on poplar, indicating a significant difference in the biomass-degrading abilities of these two otherwise very similar organisms.

Yang, Sung-Jae [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irina [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Doeppke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Title Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2012 Authors Borgeson, Merrian Keywords demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, self direct programs, technical assistance Full Text LBNL recently provided technical assistance funded by DOE to the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio to inform their decision-making about changes to their existing self-direct program for commercial and industrial customers. Self-direct programs are usually targeted at large industrial customers with specialized needs or strong in-house energy engineering capacity. These programs are found in at least 24 states, and there is significant variety in how these programs are structured - with important implications for the additionality and reliability of the energy savings that result. LBNL reviewed existing programs and compared key elements of self-direct program design. For additional questions about this work, please contact Merrian Borgeson.

44

High DSM Scenario Request for the 2011 TEPPC Transmission Expansion Plan (and Treatment of DSM in Reference Case/Other Scenarios) Recommendation of the State/Provincial Steering Committee DSM Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the November 6, 2009 meeting of the State-Provincial Steering Committee (SPSC), the SPSC agreed that it would submit a high DSM scenario to TEPPC and requested that the DSM Working Group prepare the request, for review and approval by the SPSC. This document outlines the approach recommended by the DSM Work Group for developing a high DSM scenario, to be modeled in the 2011 TEPPC 10-Year Transmission Expansion Plan. 1 In addition, the DSM Working Group has developed recommendations for the treatment of DSM in the reference case and two scenarios (Carbon Reduction and Breakthrough Technology) proposed by the Scenario Working Group. Table 1 sets for the recommended approach for these items, for energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), combined heat and power (CHP) and distribution system efficiency upgrades. These recommendations have been informed by the technical assistance of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the non-state officials participating in the DSM Working Group, as well as the state official/commissioner members of the Group.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Dynamic system monitoring (DSM) for HVDC modulation control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a part of an EPRI-sponsored development on advanced power modulation control system for HVDC lines, dynamic system monitors (DSM) were installed at the dc terminals of the Square Butte system. The monitors were used to validate the computer models used for the controller design and will be used to validate the performance of the controllers after installation. The paper describes the use of Prony analysis and Fourier techniques to analyze system disturbances and to validate the computer models. As described in the paper, excellent results have been achieved at least for parts of the system for some well defined disturbances.

Grund, C.E. (Power Systems Engineering Dept., Schenectady, NY (United States). Power Systems Engineering Dept.); Sweezy, G. (Minnesota Power, Duluth, MN (United States)); Hauer, J.F. (Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)); Balser, S.J. (Power Technology, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)); Nilsson, S. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Where did the money go? The cost and performance of the largest commercial sector DSM program  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the total resource cost (TRC) of energy savings for 40 of the largest 1992 commercial sector DSM programs. The calculation includes the participating customer`s cost contribution to energy saving measures and all utility costs, including incentives received by customers, program administrative and overhead costs, measurement and evaluation costs, and shareholder incentives paid to the utility. All savings are based on post-program savings evaluations. We find that, on a savings-weighted basis, the programs have saved energy at a cost of 3.2 {cents}/kWh. Taken as a whole, the programs have been highly cost effective when compared to the avoided costs faced by the utilities when the programs were developed. We investigate reasons for differences in program costs and examine uncertainties in current utility practices for reporting costs and evaluating savings.

Eto, J.; Kito, S.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Demand-side-management: DSM must create a future as a profit center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities prepare for more direct competition, demand-side management (DSM) must also become competitive to survive. DSM has traditionally been a loss leader for utilities - good public relations but expensive. In the coming years, DSM must turn that around and become a source of revenue to continue to flourish. DSm must become a profit center, contributing not only to a positive public image for the utility and appeasing government mandates, but assisting in keeping the utility on the black side of the ledger books. This article examines Central Vermont Public Service`s SmartEnergy subsidiary and it`s GreenPlugs program.

Chambers, A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DSM (demand-side management) commercial customer acceptance: Volume 2, Survey and database documentation: Final report. [Demand-side management  

SciTech Connect

A survey was conducted among utility DSM (demand-side management) program managers to gather information on the characteristics of commercial sector programs. The survey data were used in part to identify the important factors that influence customer participation in such programs. Information was gathered in the following general areas of interest: (1) program characteristics (e.g., program type, objectives, status, etc.); (2) marketing characteristics (e.g., promotional mechanisms, budget, goals, etc.); (3) customer eligibility and participation (e.g., characteristics of the eligible population, participation by customer category, etc.); and (4) market research information (e.g., the data that pertain to the effectiveness of the progress). The survey obtained information on 108 DSM programs covering a broad range of options, including audits, non-audit information, financial incentive, direct load control, distributed local control, thermal energy storage, time-of-use rates, and other rate programs. Program planners can use the survey database, presented in its entirety in this report, to identify utilities that have already implemented DSM programs of interest and to learn from their experience.

George, S.S.; Kirksey, W.E.; Skelton, J.C.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Strategy for Designing DSM Program after the Restructuring in Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To maintain supply adequacy and mitigate price volatility in electricity market, the necessity for obtaining demandside resource is increasing and obtaining demand-side resource is set as a priority of electricity policy. For this purpose, we introduce a new DSM mechanism and program development strategies based on customer response and electricity industry efficiency. Especially we introduced DLC(Direct Load Control) technology via two-way communication scheme for large customer. This DLC program targets interruptible load that covers large customer in commercial and industrial sector. This program can retain demand reserve that does not interrupt process in plant or business along with real-time monitoring load condition of end-use and interrupt load by pre-determined procedures, if necessary. This analysis shows that electricity boiler, pump, blower, HVAC can save energy during some time. In addition, developing system to monitor end-use load and interconnecting it with MOS(Market Operation System) should be established as infrastructure in DSM.

Rhee, C.; Lee, K.; Jo, I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Closeout - Final Report Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Example Final Report Example Example 79 4.6.2.2.4.2 Closeout Reports Completion documentation will be compiled for each of the identified worksets. A final Closeout Report will be prepared for the 771/774 Closure Project when work is completed and the analytical data has been received. The report will consist of a brief description of the work that was completed, including any modifications or variations from the original decision document. The report will also include analytical results, including the results of any confirmatory sampling taken to verify completion of the action to the specific performance standards. A discussion of the quantity and characteristics of the actual wastes produced and how the wastes were stored or disposed will also be provided.

52

Example Hopper Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Sample Batch Scripts One of the most noted differences between the Hopper system and other NERSC systems is the number of cores per node...

53

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts The default number of cores per node on Edison is 16, and the default "mppnppn" setting is 16. However, if you run with hyperthreading...

54

Adaptive Schemes for Home-based DSM Systems School of Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Schemes for Home-based DSM Systems M.C. Ng School of Computing National University Home-based consistency model, a variant of lazy release consistency model (LRC), is a recent, we present 2 adaptive schemes for home-based DSM systems: home migration and dynamic adaptation

Wong, Weng Fai

55

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Management Plan Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plan Examples Management Plan Examples The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The elements table below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Elements of Deactivation Project Planning Deactivation Project Key Planning Elements Reference DOE O 430.1A Reference DOE G 430.1-3 DOE G 430.1- 3 Fig. 1 Link to Examples Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Sect. 6.e.7.a Sect. 4.1.1 Step 1 1. Example 1

56

Electric-utility DSM programs: 1990 data and forecasts to 2000  

SciTech Connect

In April 1992, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data on 1989 and 1990 electric-utility demand-site management (DMS) programs. These data represent a census of US utility DSM programs, with reports of utility expenditures, energy savings, and load reductions caused by these programs. In addition, EIA published utility estimates of the costs and effects of these programs from 1991 to 2000. These data provide the first comprehensive picture of what utilities are spending and accomplishing by utility, state, and region. This report presents, summarizes, and interprets the 1990 data and the utility forecasts of their DSM-program expenditures and impacts to the year 2000. Only utilities with annual sales greater than 120 GWh were required to report data on their DSM programs to EIA. Of the 1194 such utilities, 363 reported having a DSM program that year. These 363 electric utilities spent $1.2 billion on their DSM programs in 1990, up from $0.9 billion in 1989. Estimates of energy savings (17,100 GWh in 1990 and 14,800 GWh in 1989) and potential reductions in peak demand (24,400 MW in 1990 and about 19,400 MW in 1989) also showed substantial increases. Overall, utility DSM expenditures accounted for 0.7% of total US electric revenues, while the reductions in energy and demand accounted for 0.6% and 4.9% of their respective 1990 national totals. The investor-owned utilities accounted for 70 to 90% of the totals for DSM costs, energy savings, and demand reductions. The public utilities reported larger percentage reductions in peak demand and energy smaller percentage DSM expenditures. These averages hide tremendous variations across utilities. Utility forecasts of DSM expenditures and effects show substantial growth in both absolute and relative terms.

Hirst, E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Electric Utility Industrial DSM and M&V Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Hydro is an electric utility with a service area covering over 95% of the province of British Columbia in Canada. Power Smart is BC Hydro’s demand-side-management (DSM) division. Power Smart develops, operates and manages various DSM programs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. The Power Smart Partners Program (PSP) is the premier demand-side management program for BC Hydro’s large commercial and industrial non-transmission class customers. It is a direct energy acquisition program that is based on a partnering approach with BC Hydro’s business customers. A customer that commits to being a Power Smart Partner gains access to financial support and assistance with the identification and implementation of electricity savings projects. A direct financial incentive is provided to lower customers’ funding requirements and to improve the payback and/or investment criteria for energy efficiency projects. Projects are evaluated against established criteria set forth by BC Hydro. Projects which prove to be the most cost-effective on a $/kWh basis receive funds. For transmission-voltage customers, BC Hydro has recently implemented a new tariff designed to encourage energy reduction. The new tariff is an inclining block tariff and is known as the Stepped Rate. The customer’s consumption is compared against their Customer Baseline Load (CBL). The first 90% of the customer’s consumption is billed at a Tier 1 rate. The remaining consumption is billed at a Tier 2 rate, approximately two times the Tier 1 rate. There are mechanisms in place to adjust the customer’s CBL to account for activities such as customer-funded demand-side-management projects and customer plant expansion projects. This paper will discuss BC Hydro’s M&V program in terms of the process, operations and M&V results to date for the PSP. In addition, the paper will discuss the new Stepped Rate tariff intricacies in terms of CBL setting, CBL adjustments and transmission customer Impact Study guideline requirements.

Lau, K. P. K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Designing with interactive example galleries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designers often use examples for inspiration; examples offer contextualized instances of how form and content integrate. Can interactive example galleries bring this practice to everyday users doing design work, and does working with examples help the ... Keywords: design thinking, examples

Brian Lee; Savil Srivastava; Ranjitha Kumar; Ronen Brafman; Scott R. Klemmer

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Batch Script Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples My First Script This is a simple example that you can use to make sure that your settings are correct before submitting more complicated jobs. First, copy the contents of hello.sh into a file. genepool% cat hello.sh #!/bin/bash sleep 120 echo "Hello World" Then submit your job with the qsub command genepool% qsub hello.sh Monitor your job with the qstat command: genepool% qstat -u You can also get more detailed information about your job using: genepool% qstat -j The job id can be found using the qstat -u command. Basic Batch Script Here is an example of a basic script that specifies the working directory, the shell and the queue. The #$ must be used to specify the grid engine

60

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prioritization of Facility Hazards Examples Prioritization of Facility Hazards Examples Example 20 7.7 PRELIMINARY HAZARD ANALYSIS Table 7-1 Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA) Overview for 779 Cluster's Decommissioning and Dismantlement Major Work Task Hazard Cause Preventive Measures Perform building walkdowns to identify Integrated Work Control Package (IWCP) work steps. Tripping, falling, exposure to chemicals, hazardous substances and / or radioactive materials. Also exposure to noise hazards. No planning, lack of communicating between work groups, improper use of Radiological Work Permits (RWPs), not following room or building instructions.  Develop Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA).  Conduct effective pre-evolution briefings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Case studies in DSM : utilizing the Design Structure Matrix to improve New Product Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a project that applies the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) in support of the Manufacturing Excellence (MX) program at Cisco Systems, Inc to reduce the cycle time of new product development initiatives ...

Go, Julie W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

PDSF Batch Job Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example On this page we show an example of how to run a simple batch job, monitor it, check its output, and look at the SGE accounting information about it. We start with a simple script named hello.csh, which just sleeps a bit and then writes some output: pdsf4 72% cat hello.csh #!/bin/csh sleep 600 echo "Hello, World" The simplest way to submit it is to just use qsub without any options: pdsf4 74% qsub hello.csh Your job 1787239 ("hello.csh") has been submitted We can check on its status with qstat. Use the -u option to get only your jobs: pdsf4 75% qstat -u hjort job-ID prior name user state submit/start at queue slots ja-task-ID -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

63

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts The default number of cores per node on Edison is 16, and the default "mppnppn" setting is 16. However, if you run with hyperthreading (HT), Edison compute nodes have 32 cores per node, and the mppnppn value needs to be set to 32. In addition, the "-j 2" option needs to be added to the "aprun" command. In most of the following example batch scripts, the default number of 16 cores per node is used. Basic Scripts Sample Job script This script uses the default 16 cores per node. This job will run on 64 nodes, with 1024 cores. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=1024 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 #PBS -N my_job #PBS -j oe #PBS -V cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 1024 ./my_executable Sample job script to run with Hyperthreading (HT)

64

A Test Example - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 10, 2000 ... A Test Example. Consider A:=21/6+31/5. The advantage of picking a simple algebraic number for our test is that we can easily precompute the ...

65

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Edison has 24 cores (physical cores) per node, so the default "mppnppn" value is set to 24 for all queues. If you run with hyperthreading (HT), Edison has 48 logical cores per node, and the mppnppn value can be set to 48. However, this is not required. The "-j 2" option of the "aprun" command allows you to use all 48 logical cores on the nodes. In most of the following example batch scripts, we assume that jobs are run without Hyperthreading unless explicitly mentioned, therefore the default mppnppn value, 24, is used. Basic Scripts Sample Job script This script uses the default 24 cores per node. This job will run on 64 nodes, with 1536 cores. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=1536 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00

66

Data Transfer Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Data Transfer Examples » Data Transfer Examples Data Transfer Examples Moving data to Projectb Projectb is where data should be written from jobs running on the cluster or Gpints. There are intermediate files or bad results from a run that didn't work out that don't need to be saved. By running these jobs in the SCRATCH areas, these files will be deleted for you by the puge. If you run in the SANDBOX, you will have to clean up after yourselves. Batch Scheduled Transfers Use any queues to schedule jobs that move data to Projectb. A basic transfer script is here: kmfagnan@genepool12 ~ $ cat data_to_projb.sh #!/bin/bash -l #$ -N data2projb /projectb/scratch// kmfagnan@genepool12 ~ $ qsub data_to_projb.sh

67

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Authorization Basis Evaluation Examples Authorization Basis Evaluation Examples Example 15 9.0 AUTHORIZATION BASIS 9.1 CURRENT STATUS The 9206 Complex (Buildings 9206, 9616-4, 9720-17, 9767-2, 9768, 9723-23, 9770-6 and -7, 9770-07, and 9510-02) is categorized as Hazard Classification; Moderate Hazard/Category 11 Facility with sponsorship of Y-12 Defense Programs. DOE communicates the approved authorization basis to LMES Y-12 Site and approves all modifications to the basis set. LMES submits modifications to the authorization basis through the Y-12 DOE Site Office. The following documents comprise the approved authorization basis for 9206 Complex in its current status of warm standby, in- process storage: Y/MA-6290 Final Safety Analysis Report for Y-12 Chemical Processing Systems, Building

68

LibSci Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LibSci » LibSci Example LibSci » LibSci Example LibSci Example ! Matrix-Matrix Multiply, AB = C using LibSci ScaLAPACK ! filename: test_scalapack.f90 ! compile: ftn -fast -o test_scalapack test_scalapack.f90 ! input: ABCp.dat ! prow number of rows in proc grid ! pcol number of columns in proc grid ! n number of rows/columns in matrix A ! nb matrix distribution block size ! oputput: fort.u, where u=10+processor number, and stdout implicit none integer :: n, nb ! problem size and block size integer :: myunit ! local output unit number integer :: myArows, myAcols ! size of local subset of global array integer :: i,j, igrid,jgrid, iproc,jproc, myi,myj, p real*8, dimension(:,:), allocatable :: myA,myB,myC

69

Utility DSM Programs from 1989 through 1998: Continuation or cross roads?  

SciTech Connect

Over the past five years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has been collecting data annually from U.S. electric utilities on their demand-side management (DSM) programs, both current and projected. The latest data cover activities for 1993 and projections for 1994 and 1998. In 1993, 991 utilities operated DSM programs. That year, they spent $2.8 billion, a 13% increase over 1992 expenditures. These and earlier DSM programs saved 44,000 GWh of energy and reduced potential peak demand by 40,000 MW, 30% and 22% increases over the 1992 values, respectively. While some people predict the demise of electric-utility DSM programs, the data do not paint so bleak a picture. In most parts of the country, DSM programs grew in 1993 and utilities (as of Spring 1994) projected continued growth through 1998. Expenditures grew from 1.3% of revenues in 1992 to 1.5% in 1993, and are expected to grow 2.5% per year faster than inflation, which is equivalent to revenue growth. Thus, DSM spending is expected to stay constant at 1.5% of revenues through 1998. Because of the cumulative effect of DSM programs, energy savings are expected to grow from 1.2% of sales in 1992 to 1.6% in 1993 and 3.0% in 1998. Potential-peak reductions are expected to increase from 5.9% of peak demand in 1992 to 6.8% in 1993 and 8.9% in 1998. However, the growth in spending is not as rapid as the 8% annual real growth projected a year earlier. Actual expenditures in 1993 were 6.5% lower than projected early that year. Energy savings, on the other hand, were the same as projected earlier. Potential peak reductions were actually 9% higher than previously projected.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Product Application Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Partial morphological matrix (Batter Up! example)...bearings Pipe, volume deformation Wires, volt potential energy Magnetic field Initiate vibration Button, lever, string, switch, key Laser, Control vibration Shaker, unbalanced motor, virotube, centrifuge Pneumatic, wave machine, water pulse, bubbles Sound waves (Bass) Magnets Terminate...

71

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Detailed End Points - Development of Detailed End Points - End Point Document Examples Example 28 7.0 ENDPOINTS Chapter 7.0 describes the endpoint development principles and methodology, administration, closure, and turnover package for the 324 and 327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project. 7.1 Background The endpoint method for the 324 and 327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project will follow the EM-60 guidance, published in DOE/EM-0318, Rev. 0, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management Facility Deactivation, Methods and Practice Handbook, Emphasizing End Points (sic) Implementation . The methods of defining endpoints for facility stabilization and deactivation were proven extremely effective at the PUREX and B-Plant facilities for planning work and interacting with the

72

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baselines - Baselines - Performance Baseline Examples Example 34 6.0 PROJECT BASELINE This section presents a summary of the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project baseline, which was prepared by an inter- contractor team to support an accelerated planning case for the project. The project schedules and associated cost profiles presented in this section are compared to the currently approved project baseline, as contained in the Facility Stabilization Project Fiscal Year 1999 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) for WBS 1.4 (FDH 1998). These cost and schedule details will provide the basis for a baseline change request that will be processed to revise the MYWP, consistent with the accelerated project plan presented below. 6.1 Project Baseline Overview This section of the IPMP presents the PFP baseline cost and schedule summary. The currently approved PFP Stabilization and

73

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Radioactive Material Hazardous and Radioactive Material Evaluations Examples Example 18 6.03.08 Removal of Chemicals Bulk chemicals that are usable in other facilities will be relocated. Transportation of chemicals to other facilities will be performed in accordance with applicable administrative requirements. Chemicals in good condition that have not been in radiological areas or that can be cleared by RCO will be listed on OSR 1-118. The form will be signed by the Lead Environmental Coordinator and the Chemical Coordinator and submitted to the Site Chemical Commodity Center (CCMC). Usable chemicals from radiological areas that are not needed at other SFSD facilities will be advertised to other divisions. Unusable chemicals will be reviewed by waste Subject

74

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

End Point Closeout Examples Example 77 7.5 Endpoint Closure The endpoint documents have grouped the building spaces and systems into a number of manageable areas. The areas are closely related to the engineering work plans that guide completion of many of the endpoints. Endpoint closure methods and practices are provided in the attachment of this PMP. On completion of an endpoint, a BWHC field representative will initial complete on the field copy of the endpoint document. A BHI field representative will verify acceptable completion of the applicable activity. Verification may be performed by reviewing documents, letters, photos, work packages, or work plans, or by visual inspection. When all the endpoints for a specific area of the building have been completed and verified, designated BWHC and BHI management will sign for completion and acceptance of that

75

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification and Management of Standards Identification and Management of Standards and Requirements Examples Example 22 8.1 STANDARDS / REQUIREMENT IDENTIFICATION DOCUMENT Current Status Present 9206 operations are governed by the Y-12 Site Standards/Requirement Identification Document (S/RID), Y-12 Site-level Standards/Requirements Identification Document. (NOTE: The engineering design and construction work is governed by a set of Work Smart Standards, whose maintenance is handled in a similar manner as the Y-12 S/RIDs.) The Y-12 S/RID lists the necessary and sufficient set of ES&H standards and requirements to be implemented at the Y-12 Site. The Y-12 S/RID is a living document. The Standards Management Information System (SMIS) contains the official set of S/RIDs. Deactivation Strategy

76

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Integration - Safety Integration - Implementation of Controls Examples Example 24 5 Health & Safety This section describes the work controls associated with the 771/774 Closure Project. As prescribed in DOE Order 440.1, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, the project must comply with the OSHA construction standards for Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1926. Under these standards, a Building 771/774 Closure Project-Specific HASP has been prepared to address the safety and health hazards of each phase of operations. In addition, the DOE Order for Construction Project Safety and Health Management, 5480.9A, applies to this project. This order requires the preparation of JHAs to identify each task, the hazards associated with each task, and the precautions necessary to mitigate the

77

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identify and Evaluate Alternatives and End- Identify and Evaluate Alternatives and End- Points Examples Example 31 3.01 Deactivation Alternatives Evaluation Summary There are four alternatives for deactivation of the 400-D excess facilities: 1. Shut down systems and turn over the facilities "as-is" 2. Prepare the facility for an alternate use 3. Proceed immediately with final decommissioning 4. Place the facility into a passively safe, minimal S&M condition Option 1 was not chosen due to (1) An increased level of risk, primarily associated with maintaining and controlling the heavy water inventory and (2) The high cost of maintaining the facilities as-is. Option 2 was rejected because no alternative use for these facilities has been identified. Finally, no funding has been identified which would support final decommissioning, option 3.

78

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazard Identification and Characterization Hazard Identification and Characterization Examples Example 13 2.02.04 Hazard Baseline Documentation The following is a listing of the hazard baseline documentation for the facility:  DPSTSA-300-3A, Addendum 1, Revision 1.a, Justification for Continued Operation, April 1997.  Procedure 322-M of Manual 2Q2-4-M, 322-M Fire Control Preplan, April 30, 1995.  SSD-ALW-94-0609, Depleted Uranium Holdup in MBA M22, September 30, 1994.  RRD-RMT-940037, Final Report - Nuclear De-Inventory of 300-M Area Laboratories, October 31, 1994.  IOM C. J. Bearden to R. H. Ross, Building 322-M Exhaust Duct Inspection, July 11, 1990.  NMP-RMT-920299, Revision 0, Investigation of Uranium in M-Area Process Sewer, December 30, 1992. 6.01.01 Characterization and Hazards Identification

79

Utility DSM Rebates for electronic ballasts: National estimates and assessment of market impact (1992 - 1997)  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present national estimates of utility Demand-Side Management (DSM) rebates for electronic fluorescent lamp ballasts during the period of 1992 - 1997. We then compare these trends with developments in the fluorescent ballast market from 1993 - 1998. The analysis indicates that DSM rebates for electronic ballasts peaked in the mid-1990s and declined sharply in 1996 and 1997. In a parallel trend, electronic ballast sales and market share both increased significantly during 1993 - 1994 and increased more slowly in 1996 -1997.

Busch, C.B.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

HPSS Usage Examples at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examples Advanced Usage Examples Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Once you have set up your automatic HPSS authentication you can access HPSS within batch scripts. Read More ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A scoping study on energy-efficiency market transformation by California Utility DSM Programs  

SciTech Connect

Market transformation has emerged as a central policy objective for future publicly-funded energy-efficiency programs in California. California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) Decision 95-12-063 calls for public funding to shift to activities designed to transform the energy-efficiency market. The CPUC envisions that funding {open_quotes}would only be needed for specific and limited periods of time to cause the market to be transformed{close_quotes}. At the same time, the CPUC also acknowledges that {open_quotes}there are many definitions of market transformation{close_quotes} ... and does {open_quotes}not attempt to refine those definitions today{close_quotes}. We argue that a definition of market transformation is essential. The literature is now replete with definitions, and an operational definition is needed for the CPUC to decide on which programs should be supported with public funds. The CPUC decision initially indicated a preference for programs that do not provide financial assistance 4-efficiency programs that rely on financial assistance to customers. However, energy customers have traditionally accounted for a substantial portion of California utility`s DSM programs, so the CPUC`s direction to use ratepayer funds to support programs that will transform the market raises critical questions about how to analyze what has happened in order to plan effectively for the future: Which utility energy-efficiency programs, including those that provide financial assistance to customers, have had market transforming effects? To what extent do current regulatory rules and practices encourage or discourage utilities from running programs that are designed to transform the market? Should the rules and programs be modified, and, if so, how, to promote market transformation?

Eto, J.; Prahl, R.; Schlegel, J.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A framework for improving the cost-effectiveness of DSM program evaluations  

SciTech Connect

The prudence of utility demand-side management (DSM) investments hinges on their performance, yet evaluating performance is complicated because the energy saved by DSM programs can never be observed directly but only inferred. This study frames and begins to answer the following questions: (1) how well do current evaluation methods perform in improving confidence in the measurement of energy savings produced by DSM programs; (2) in view of this performance, how can limited evaluation resources be best allocated to maximize the value of the information they provide? The authors review three major classes of methods for estimating annual energy savings: tracking database (sometimes called engineering estimates), end-use metering, and billing analysis and examine them in light of the uncertainties in current estimates of DSM program measure lifetimes. The authors assess the accuracy and precision of each method and construct trade-off curves to examine the costs of increases in accuracy or precision. Several approaches for improving evaluations for the purpose of assessing program cost effectiveness are demonstrated. The methods can be easily generalized to other evaluation objectives, such as shared savings incentive payments.

Sonnenblick, R.; Eto, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

BRENNAN --DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRENNAN -- DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail Electricity · An automotive analogy Not marketing of fuel-efficient cars Not exactly CAFE standards or EPA mileage stickers More like getting a check from oil companies if one buys a high mileage car · Conservation

California at Berkeley. University of

84

Low-income DSM Programs: Methodological approach to determining the cost-effectiveness of coordinated partnerships  

SciTech Connect

As governments at all levels become increasingly budget-conscious, expenditures on low-income, demand-side management (DSM) programs are being evaluated more on the basis of efficiency at the expense of equity considerations. Budgetary pressures have also caused government agencies to emphasize resource leveraging and coordination with electric and gas utilities as a means of sharing the expenses of low-income programs. The increased involvement of electric and gas utilities in coordinated low-income DSM programs, in turn, has resulted in greater emphasis on estimating program cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study is to develop a methodological approach to estimate the cost- effectiveness of coordinated low-income DSM programs, given the special features that distinguish these programs from other utility-operated DSM programs. The general approach used in this study was to (1) select six coordinated low-income DSM programs from among those currently operating across the United States, (2) examine the main features of these programs, and (3) determine the conceptual and pragmatic problems associated with estimating their cost-effectiveness. Three types of coordination between government and utility cosponsors were identified. At one extreme, local agencies operate {open_quotes}parallel{close_quotes} programs, each of which is fully funded by a single sponsor (e.g., one funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the other by a utility). At the other extreme are highly {open_quotes}coupled{close_quotes} programs that capitalize on the unique capabilities and resources offered by each cosponsor. In these programs, agencies employ a combination of utility and government funds to deliver weatherization services as part of an integrated effort. In between are {open_quotes}supplemental{close_quotes} programs that utilize resources to supplement the agency`s government-funded weatherization, with no changes to the operation of that program.

Brown, M.A.; Hill, L.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Federal Agencies Leading by Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Article on Federal agencies leading by example with water efficiency and conservation efforts. Prepared for Colorado WaterWise Newsletter.

McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Examples of Smart Grid Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Examples of Smart Grid Standards. Hundreds of standards will be required for an efficient and effective smart grid. Historically ...

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

Performance Assessment Scoping - Hanford Example  

Performance Assessment Scoping - Hanford Example Linda Suttora Office of Environmental Compliance DOE-HQ Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010

88

Issue Development sheet Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

89

Proj. Plan Example SEM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Plan Project Plan December 1997 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of the Chief Information Officer and Headquarters Collaboration Group Change Control Page The change control page will be used to record information for controlling and tracking modifications made to this document. Revision Date: 12/15/97 Author: Brian Field a. Section(s): 2.3 Page Number(s): 2-2 through 2-4 Summary of Change(s): Updated roles and responsibilities chart to include known resources. b. Section(s): 3.6 & 3.7 Page Number(s): 3-8 through 3-10 Summary of Change(s): Modified Resource Loading Chart to reflect current estimates. Modified Project/Deliverable Schedule to reflect current status of project. c. Section(s): Page Number(s): Summary of Change(s):

90

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Supplementary design details for conventional forging...Weight of finished part 10 kg (22 lb) (a) Plan area 600 cm 2 (93 in. 2 ) (d) Parting line Straight; along center plane of web Draft angle 1° (+1°, - °) Minimum rib width 9 mm (0.35 in.) Maximum rib height-to-width ratio 4.5:1 Minimum and typical fillet radius 9.7 mm (0.38 in.) Minimum corner radius...

93

Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description This package uses the source code of zlib-1.2.5 to create libraries for systems that do not have these available via other means (most Linux and Mac users should have system-level access to zlib, and no direct need for this package). See the vignette for instructions on use.

Martin Morgan; Lazyload Yes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

EXAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of times # of photon grid pts.) 2 2 (photon energy pts) 3.09695E ... evolve td history crecom nt time 0. 0.2 41 end, ... a file and a plasma that is cooling as it ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...T.C. Fowler, Value Analysis in Materials Selection and Design, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

96

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading By Example Leading By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently, including the Federal Energy and Water Management Award and the Energy Department Energy Management Award for Exceptional Service for his efforts to make the Department's headquarter buildings models of sustainability. Every day, employees across the Energy Department work to make America more

98

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading By Example Leading By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently, including the Federal Energy and Water Management Award and the Energy Department Energy Management Award for Exceptional Service for his efforts to make the Department's headquarter buildings models of sustainability. Every day, employees across the Energy Department work to make America more

99

Bridging the gap: Designing DSM programs based on the difference between utility and consumer economic perspectives  

SciTech Connect

As utilities investigate ways to implement demand-side management (DSM) programs, the differences between customer and utility economic perspectives can play an important role in assessing the economic benefits of the programs. Because utilities directly bear the cost of new energy sources, energy-efficiency investments that are cost-effective to a utility may not be cost-effective to its customers who usually pay average energy prices and have different economic parameters. This paper discusses the relationship between life-cycle costs and the energy efficiency decisions of home buyers and utilities. It discusses the key factors in a life-cycle cost analysis and how they affect the optimum energy efficiency choice. In addition to discount rates, fuel prices, and fuel price escalation rates, risk adjustments influence the selection of an optimum efficiency level. This paper highlights differences between household and utility perspectives and the reasons why a gap often exists between the home owner`s and utility`s optimum efficiency choice. A case study of an innovative Pacific Northwest manufactured (mobile) home DSM program illustrates the role of consumer and utility perspectives. Prior research showed that regional utilities long-term perspective and economics justified higher energy-efficiency investments than most manufactured home buyers were making. This recent DSM program has addressed both market imperfections and basic economic differences between consumers and utilities by employing a conservation acquisition approach, which had led to a significant market transformation. This program has been very successful at closing the gap between the economic interests of the home buyer and utility.

Lee, A.D.; Chin, R.; Onisko, S.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

DSM strikes again. [Demand-side management of gas and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses and explains demand-side management (DSM) of the gas and electric utility companies. It contrasts the advantages that electric utilities offering economic incentives (with any cost passed on to rate payers) to increase demand while such offerings are rarely available from the gas utilities. It then discusses the cause and cost of pollution from conventional electrical facilities compared to gas-operated equipment and facilities. The paper goes on to discuss fuel switching and other incentives to get individuals and facilities to switch to natural gas.

Katz, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Automatically locating framework extension examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using and extending a framework is a challenging task whose difficulty is exacerbated by the poor documentation that generally comes with the framework. Even in the presence of documentation, developers often desire implementation examples for concrete ...

Barthélémy Dagenais; Harold Ossher

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

End Point Implementation Examples | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Examples End Point Implementation Examples More Documents & Publications Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80...

103

Impact of the Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program structure on the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency projects  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) analyzed the cost-effective energy efficiency potential of Fort Drum, a customer of the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) in Watertown, New York. Significant cost-effective investments were identified, even without any demand-side management (DSM) incentives from NMPC. Three NMPC DSM programs were then examined to determine the impact of participation on the cost-effective efficiency potential at the Fort. The following three utility programs were analyzed: (1) utility rebates to be paid back through surcharges, (2) a demand reduction program offered in conjunction with an energy services company, and (3) utility financing. Ultimately, utility rebates and financing were found to be the best programs for the Fort. This paper examines the influence that specific characteristics of the DSM programs had on the decision-making process of one customer. Fort Drum represents a significant demand-side resource, whose decisions regarding energy efficiency investments are based on life-cycle cost analysis subject to stringent capital constraints. The structures of the DSM programs offered by NMPC affect the cost-effectiveness of potential efficiency investments and the ability of the Fort to obtain sufficient capital to implement the projects. This paper compares the magnitude of the cost-effective resource available under each program, and the resulting level of energy and demand savings. The results of this analysis can be used to examine how DSM program structures impact the decision-making process of federal and large commercial customers.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Dixon, D.R.; Elliott, D.B.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Facility End State Decisions Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility End State Decisions Examples Facility End State Decisions Examples Example 3 3.0 POST DEACTIVATION END STATE VISION The Heavy Water Facility is scheduled to cease moderator operations and commence final shutdown of moderator processing and processing support systems. The Heavy Water Facility and supporting facilities will be declared excess. Deactivation will place the facilities into a passively safe, minimal cost, long term S&M mode. At the end of the deactivation period, the facilities will be categorized "Radiological" and "Other Industrial Use". The following deactivation end state is envisioned: Moderator Processing and Moderator Storage Buildings The deactivation of the moderator processing and storage buildings will remove the moderator storage drums

105

Example Retro-Commissioning Statement of Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.3 11.3 Example Retro-Cx Scope of Work Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work To Include Services As Part of Super ESPC Detailed Energy Survey Background Agency requests that ESCo perform retro-commissioning services 1 , as detailed herein, as a part of performing the Detailed Energy Survey (DES) for site. The incremental cost for these services will be covered as a part of the project development cost for the Super ESPC project, whether or not viable measures are identified and ultimately implemented. It is the intent of the Agency to expand the work that will be performed during the DES. Leveraging the DES to complete a thorough scoping of retro-commissioning opportunities will substantially enhance the value of the ESCO services by ensuring that

106

Example Queries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Example Queries Example Queries Jump to: navigation, search Example Queries SEP Funding SEP Funding Alabama 55,570,000 Alaska 28,232,000 Arizona 55,447,000 Arkansas 39,416,000 California 226,093,000 Colorado 49,222,000 Connecticut 38,542,000 Delaware 24,231,000 Florida 126,089,000 Georgia 82,495,000 Hawaii 25,930,000 Idaho 28,572,000 Illinois 101,321,000 Indiana 68,621,000 Iowa 40,546,000 Kansas 38,284,000 Kentucky 52,533,000 Louisiana 71,694,000 Maine 27,305,000 Maryland 51,772,000 Massachusetts 54,911,000 Michigan 82,035,000 Minnesota 54,172,000 Mississippi 40,418,000 Missouri 57,393,000 Montana 25,855,000 Nebraska 30,910,000 Nevada 34,714,000 New Hampshire 25,827,000 New Jersey 73,643,000 New Mexico 31,821,000 New York 123,110,000 North Carolina 75,989,000 North Dakota 24,585,000

107

Interactive efforts to address DSM and IRP issues: Findings from the first year of a two-year study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents findings from the first year of a two-year study of interactive efforts involving utilities and non-utility parties (NUPS) working together to prepare plans, develop Demand-Side Management (DSM) programs, or otherwise promote integrated planning and the use of cost-effective DSM measures. Of the ten cases covered in the current study, seven involved the collaborative approach to NUP involvement, which generally is marked by intensive utility-NUP interactions designed to reach consensus on a broad range of important issues; in collaboratives, outside consultants often are provided to enhance the technical capabilities of the NUPS. Another of the cases in this study involved a cooperative arrangement,'' whereby a utility and a NLT worked together in a focused short-term effort to develop a single DSM program. The intense interaction involved in this approach makes it very similar to a collaborative, except that both the scope and the duration of the effort were much more limited than in a normal collaborative. The ninth case concerned a task force run by state regulatory staff that was charged with the limited job of studying various cost-effectiveness tests available for assessing prospective DSM measures. All of these approaches (collaborative, cooperative arrangement, and task force) are types of interactive effort, as that term is used in this report. The final case concerned NUPs' attempts to encourage greater utility use of DSM in Florida but, to date, no interactive effort has been initiated there. Three main features of interactive efforts are described in this report: (1) the participants involved; (2) the context in which the efforts took place; and (3) key characteristics of the interactive process. This report also examines the outcomes achieved by the interactive efforts. These outcomes can be divided into two general categories: Product-related and participant-related.

Schweitzer, M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); English, M.; Altman, J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Yourstone, E. (Consultant, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Interactive efforts to address DSM and IRP issues: Findings from the first year of a two-year study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents findings from the first year of a two-year study of interactive efforts involving utilities and non-utility parties (NUPS) working together to prepare plans, develop Demand-Side Management (DSM) programs, or otherwise promote integrated planning and the use of cost-effective DSM measures. Of the ten cases covered in the current study, seven involved the collaborative approach to NUP involvement, which generally is marked by intensive utility-NUP interactions designed to reach consensus on a broad range of important issues; in collaboratives, outside consultants often are provided to enhance the technical capabilities of the NUPS. Another of the cases in this study involved a ``cooperative arrangement,`` whereby a utility and a NLT worked together in a focused short-term effort to develop a single DSM program. The intense interaction involved in this approach makes it very similar to a collaborative, except that both the scope and the duration of the effort were much more limited than in a normal collaborative. The ninth case concerned a task force run by state regulatory staff that was charged with the limited job of studying various cost-effectiveness tests available for assessing prospective DSM measures. All of these approaches (collaborative, cooperative arrangement, and task force) are types of interactive effort, as that term is used in this report. The final case concerned NUPs` attempts to encourage greater utility use of DSM in Florida but, to date, no interactive effort has been initiated there. Three main features of interactive efforts are described in this report: (1) the participants involved; (2) the context in which the efforts took place; and (3) key characteristics of the interactive process. This report also examines the outcomes achieved by the interactive efforts. These outcomes can be divided into two general categories: Product-related and participant-related.

Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); English, M.; Altman, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Yourstone, E. [Consultant, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Example BCP Template | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Example BCP Template Example BCP Template ExampleBCPTemplate02-14-12.docx More Documents & Publications Critical Decision 2 (CD-2) Approval Template Critical Decision 4 (CD-4)...

110

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies - Examples 1 & 2 - Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Facility End State Decisions - Examples 3, 4 & 5 - Includes expected conditions at completion of the deactivation, DOE mission use, extended S&M, decommissioned and/or dismantled, etc.

111

Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Examples 1 - 80 Examples 1 - 80 Project Management Plan Examples 1 - 80 The following material has been extracted from several project management plans. The order in which it is presented is arbitrary. The descriptions below should be used to navigate to the subject of interest. Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies - Examples 1 & 2 - Includes organizational responsibilities and structure, disposition path, future use of facility, S&S Reqs and plan, hazard elimination or mitigation, NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, HVAC/lighting service reqs, structural integrity reqs, etc. Facility End State Decisions - Examples 3, 4 & 5 - Includes expected conditions at completion of the deactivation, DOE mission use, extended S&M, decommissioned and/or dismantled, etc.

112

Federal Government: Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government: Leading by Example Government: Leading by Example Federal Government: Leading by Example October 16, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Photo of the outside of a building with large horizontal balconies on a sandy xeriscape landscape Renovations to Camp Pendleton barracks extend its life 30 years. The project was certified to meet LEED Silver certification and included a dryscape, a bio swell to collect water runoff before entering the storm drain, and solar-powered parking lot lights. The Federal government plays a vital role in leading by example in environmental, energy, and economic performance. President Obama stressed this importance on October 5, 2009, by stating: "As the largest consumer of energy in the U.S. economy, the Federal government can and should lead by example when it comes to creating

113

Production and Handling Slide 34: For Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents For Example The minimum specified volume of a 48G cylinder is 139 ft3...

114

Some Examples in Hydrogen Storage, Thermoelectrics and  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Computational Phase-stability Research and Education in Energy Materials: Some Examples in Hydrogen Storage, Thermoelectrics and ...

115

IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example An example budget proposal for NEUP Integrated Research Project. Example Budget spreadsheet...

116

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

117

Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management  

SciTech Connect

The Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management brochure describes FEMP's services, namely financing and acquisition support, technical assistance and policy, and outreach and coordination.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Examples of Analyses [Engineering and Structural Mechanics] ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyses Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Overview Areas of Application Examples of Analyses SystemsComponent Design,...

119

Type: Annotation Subject: Example 2 - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annotation. Subject: Example 2. Author: Isaac Newton (issac@heaven.com) Date : Friday, January 19 at 09:26 PM PST. Annotation Text: Why not consider the ...

120

A 0-1 String Example - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

help · annotate · Contents Next: Solution Up: No Title Previous: Initializing the Software. A 0-1 String Example. [Annotate] · [Shownotes]. Find the generating ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management  

SciTech Connect

The Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management brochure describes FEMP's services, namely financing and acquisition support, technical assistance and policy, and outreach and coordination.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

123

Energy Conservation Through Demand-Side Management (DSM): A Methodology to Characterize Energy Use Among commercial Market Segments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing energy demand can be beneficial for both the energy consumer and the energy supplier. By reducing energy use, the consumer reduces operating costs and improves production efficiency and competitiveness. Similarly, the supplier may reduce the need for costly capacity expansion and wholesale power purchasing, especially if energy reductions occur during peak loading conditions. Energy reductions may also lessen global climate change and reduce many other consequences of fossil-fuel energy use. The following research highlights a methodology to characterize energy use and optimize a DSM program for different types of commercial buildings. Utilizing publicly available records, such as utility billing data and property tax records, the diverse commercial building market was characterized. The commercial building types were matched to relevant submarkets of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). These sources were combined to prioritize building type submarket energy use intensity (kWh/sf/yr), load factor and many other energy use characteristics for each market segment. From this information, lower tier performers in each NAICS submarket can be identified and appropriate DSM alternatives selected specific to each.

Grosskopf, K. R.; Oppenheim, P.; Barclay, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

H&S Plan Examples H&S Plan Examples Example 46 9.2 HEALTH AND SAFETY STRATEGY B Plant has integrated safety into its management, planning and work practices in order to protect the public, the environment and facility workers against nuclear and non-nuclear hazards associated with facility transition. Based upon the principles of DNFSB Recommendation 95-2, the Plant's approach to safety management includes:  Applicable. standards and requirements specifically identified and implemented  Safety integrated into baseline and detailed planning  Workers and trained safety professionals use a team approach in hazard identification, analysis and control  Graded approach used to tailor controls based upon hazard type and severity  Hazard control integrated into work processes

125

Category:LEDS Example | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Example Example Jump to: navigation, search This page displays examples of country-scale low emission development strategies Pages in category "LEDS Example" The following 12 pages are in this category, out of 12 total. B Bangladesh Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan Brazil National Plan on Climate Change (PNMC) C China's National Climate Change Programme E ESMAP-South Africa-Low Carbon Growth Strategy G Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy I India National Action Plan on Climate Change Indonesia National Action Plan Addressing Climate Change J Japan-Action Plan for Achieving a Low-Carbon Society M Mexico's Special Program on Climate Change S Singapore National Climate Change Strategy T Thailand-National Energy Policy and Development Plan U United Kingdom Low Carbon Transition Plan

126

Public Private R&D Partnerships Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public-Private R&D Partnerships Examples Pete Devlin DOE Hydrogen Program Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy July 14, 2005 Washington, DC 2 PublicPrivate R&D...

127

Finding counter examples in induction proofs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses a problem arising in automated proof of invariants of transition systems, for example transition systems modelling distributed programs. Most of the time, the actual properties we want to prove are too weak to hold inductively, and ...

Koen Claessen; Hans Svensson

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation to Decommissioning Transition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Decommissioning Transition to Decommissioning Transition Example Example 80 1.5 OPERATIONAL TRANSITION AND DEACTIVATION STRATEGY According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), the life cycle of a facility makes several transitions over the course of it's existence. The typical stages or phases include operation, (standby), deactivation, S&M, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The life cycle phases may occur as a straight through process or with long interim periods. In Fig. 1.4, "Facility Disposition Scenarios and Associated Hazard Profiles" (Ref. DOE-STD-1120-98), Scenario 2 demonstrates the life cycle phasing that most closely represents that of the 9206 Complex. Since the ultimate disposition of Building 9206 (and associated buildings and operations) is not known, a decision was made to

129

Compactification and Fluxes: An AdS{sub 4} Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss explicit examples of compactifications on AdS{sub 4} with fluxes turned on. We show that a class of type IIA vacua recently found within the D = 4 effective approach corresponds to compactification on AdS{sub 4}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 3}/Z{sub 2}{sup 3}. The results obtained using the effective method completely match the general ten-dimensional analysis for the existence of N = 1 warped compactifications on AdS{sub 4}xM{sub 6}. In particular, we verify that the internal metric is nearly-Kaehler and that for specific values of the parameters the Bianchi identity of the RR 2-form is fulfilled without sources. For another range of parameters, including the massless case, the Bianchi identity is satisfied when D6-branes are introduced. Solving the tadpole cancellation conditions in D = 4 we are able to find examples of appropriate sets of branes.

Aldazabal, Gerardo [Instituto Balseiro-Centro Atomico Bariloche, CNEA and CONICET 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Font, Anamaria [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela A.P. 20513, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example  

SciTech Connect

This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Tutorial Examples in the book Solar Magnetohydrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the resulting equilibrium. EXAMPLE 12.4. Current Sheet below an Erupting Flux Rope. (i) Find the magnetic field-free toroidal flux rope of current I and radius a, whose axial flux is constant and whose axial field vanishes of an isolated line-tied flux rope of radius a with a purely poloidal field Bp at its surface. Show that the flux

Priest, Eric

132

Fourth international symposium on distribution automation and demand side management (DA/DSM 94)  

SciTech Connect

This document is the conference proceedings from the 1994 Distribution Automation/Demand Side Management meeting in Orlando, Florida. There are 87 papers presented, and topics include: (1) improved feeder efficiency, (2) automation of older substations, (3) modeling tools for distribution, planning, and operations, (4) sensing and fault detection, (5) outage monitoring, (6) cost and benefits of distribution automation, (7) communications, (8) optimization of feeder systems operations, (9) information technology, (10) demand-side management applications in the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors, (11) pricing and regulation, and (12) applications to the natural gas industry.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia Science Accelerator has expanded its suite of collections to include ScienceCinema, which contains videos produced by the U.S....

134

Fortran MPI/OpenMP example output  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Getting Started Getting Started Configuration Programming Running Jobs Overview Interactive Jobs Batch Jobs Example Batch Scripts Using aprun Queues and Policies Monitoring Jobs Using OpenMP with MPI Memory Considerations Runtime Tuning Options Running Large Scale Jobs Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Completed Jobs How Usage Is Charged File Storage and I/O Software and Tools Debugging and profiling Performance and Optimization Cray XE Documentation Cluster Compatibility Mode Carver PDSF Genepool Testbeds Retired Systems Data & File Systems Network Connections Queues and Scheduling Job Logs & Analytics Training & Tutorials Software Accounts & Allocations Policies Data Analytics & Visualization Data Management Policies Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements

135

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Detailed Work Packages...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Packages Examples Example 71 8.2.5 Work Processes Work associated with nuclear safety functions will be planned, authorized, and performed following approved technical...

136

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ...

137

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts

138

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about photovoltaic arrays and RETscreen's photovoltaic module, which can be used to project the cost and production of an array. An example case study was

139

Example Program and Makefile for BG/P | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Introducing Challenger Quick Reference Guide System Overview Data Transfer Data Storage & File Systems Compiling and Linking Example Program and Makefile for BG/P FAQs Compiling and Linking Queueing and Running Jobs Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Example Program and Makefile for BG/P Program Example Here's an example of compiling a simple MPI program on ALCF Blue Gene/P systems: > cat pi.c #include "mpi.h" #include #include int main(int argc, char** argv)

140

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecofys.com/com/publications/brochures_newsletters/documents/Report National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Screenshot References: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development[1] "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report summarizes the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DataONE Example NSF Data Management Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DataONE Example NSF Data Management Plan www.dataone.org Example Data Management Plan, based on the work of C.D. Keeling and Colleagues, Scripps Institution of Oceanography...

142

Multiple Example Queries in Content-Based Image Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Content-Based Image Retrieval (cbir) is the practical class of techniques used for information retrieval from large image collections. Many CBIR systems allow users to specify their information need by providing an example image. This query-by-example ...

Seyed M. M. Tahaghoghi; James A. Thom; Hugh E. Williams

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

144

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ACGME website with information relating to the ACGME response to the disaster. 3. The University-specific Program Requirements. Defined Responsibilities Following the Declaration of a Disaster or Extreme EmergentPage 123 DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES) The University of Connecticut

Oliver, Douglas L.

146

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

147

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Specific Examples of Global Activities Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific Examples of Global Activities · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad entrepreneurship internship with the Tsinghua University

152

Examples of successful energy programs | ENERGY STAR Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examples of successful energy programs Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new...

153

Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

155

Oracle PL/SQL by Example, 4th edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This integrated learning solution teaches all the Oracle PL/SQL skills you need, hands-on, through real-world labs, extensive examples, exercises, and projects! Completely updated for Oracle 11g, Oracle PL/SQL by Example, Fourth Edition covers all the ...

Benjamin Rosenzweig; Elena Silvestrova Rakhimov

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Technical Section: Procedural isotropic stochastic textures by example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image textures can easily be created using texture synthesis by example. However, creating procedural textures is much more difficult. This is unfortunate, since procedural textures have significant advantages over image textures. In this paper we address ... Keywords: Isotropic stochastic texture, Noise, Procedural noise, Procedural texture, Solid texture, Stochastic modeling, Texture synthesis by example, Texture synthesis/analysis, Wavelet noise

Ares Lagae; Peter Vangorp; Toon Lenaerts; Philip Dutré

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A colorful approach to text processing by example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Text processing, tedious and error-prone even for programmers, remains one of the most alluring targets of Programming by Example. An examination of real-world text processing tasks found on help forums reveals that many such tasks, beyond simple string ... Keywords: programming by example, text processing

Kuat Yessenov, Shubham Tulsiani, Aditya Menon, Robert C. Miller, Sumit Gulwani, Butler Lampson, Adam Kalai

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Some examples of simulation model validation using hypothesis testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of hypothesis testing with cost-risk analysis is illustrated for simulation model validation by two examples. In the first example, Hotelling's two-sample T2 test with cost-risk analysis is used for illustrating the validation ...

Osman Balci; Robert G. Sargent

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Appearance-guided synthesis of element arrangements by example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a technique for the analysis and re-synthesis of 2D arrangements of stroke-based vector elements. The capture of an artist's style by the sole posterior analysis of his/her achieved drawing poses a formidable challenge. Such by-example techniques ... Keywords: NPR, by-example synthesis, vector texture synthesis

T. Hurtut; P.-E. Landes; J. Thollot; Y. Gousseau; R. Drouillhet; J.-F. Coeurjolly

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy January 9, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis A Shining Example of Dr. King’s legacy Kathy Chambers Senior Science and Technical Information Specialist, OSTI Editor's Note: This blog was originally posted on OSTI's blog. As America celebrates Martin Luther King's birthday and focuses on how far this nation has come for all people, the Energy Department's .EDUconnections is pleased to honor Delaware State University (DSU). DSU is a shining example of Dr. King's extraordinary legacy of progress and education. Founded in 1891, DSU became one of the country's first land-grant educational institutions and is now a Historically Black College and University. DSU has a proud heritage of research, and today focuses on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metrics Examples Metrics Examples Example 42 5.1.4 Performance Measurement and Reporting The subproject manager will communicate subproject technical issues and accomplishments, schedule performance, cost and schedule issues, and corrective action plans, as appropriate, in the Project Directors' weekly 'Path Forward' meeting. However, the primary performance measurement for reporting subproject performance is provided by the performance measurement system. Within the new common database containing core information on Project Hanford, called HANDI 2000, the performance measurement system compares the resource-loaded schedules (budgeted cost of work scheduled [BCWS]), the actual cost of work

162

Lead by example | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead by example Lead by example Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Policies that specify the use of ENERGY STAR tools Campaigns and incentive programs that incorporate ENERGY STAR Lead by example Gather support Develop programs and policies Host a competition Use financing vehicles Promote energy efficiency Lead by example Are you encouraging your community to improve the energy efficiency of

163

Microsoft Word - Appendix B - Example Contact Record.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Example Contact Record This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide July 2013 Doc. No. S03037-6.0 Page B-1 Rocky Flats Site...

164

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

165

Making a difference: Ten case studies of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the activities of organizations that seek to promote integrated resource planning and aggressive, cost-effective demand-side management by utilities. The activities of such groups -- here called energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) -- are examined in ten detailed am studies. Nine of the cases involve some form of interactive effort between investor-owned electric utilities and non-utility to develop policies, plans, or programs cooperatively. Many but not all of the interactive efforts examined are formal collaboratives. In addition, all ten cases include discussion of other EEAG activities, such as coalition-building, research, participation in statewide energy planning, and intervention in regulatory proceedings.

English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Use |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Use Leading by Example: Better Buildings Challenge Partners Cut Energy Use May 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis New infographic breaks down the data companies submitted for the first year of the Better Buildings Challenge. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. New infographic breaks down the data companies submitted for the first year of the Better Buildings Challenge. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Maria Tikoff Vargas Director, Department of Energy Better Buildings Challenge What are the key facts? New data that Better Buildings Challenge partners submitted shows they improved their energy intensity by more than 2.5 percent a year on average. Those improvements equal about a savings of $58 million and 8.5

167

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Management Plan Examples Property Management Plan Examples Example 68 6.03.11 Property Management Facility maintenance and E&I personnel tools located in 717-D will be redeployed in other facilities. Heavy water facility process and support system spare parts located in the 717-D tool crib will be redeployed or returned to Stores. Machines located in the 717-D machine shop are already registered with Property Management and will be left in place. The 501-D diesel generator, spare refrigeration system compressor, and Aeroflow breathing air systems will be registered with Property Management for potential reuse. Other remaining facility equipment will be abandoned in place. Personnel computers will be redeployed and responsibility for office furniture will be turned over to the Subcontract Services Department furniture warehouse for redistribution.

168

Club's Chairman Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Club's Chairman Leading by Example Club's Chairman Leading by Example Club's Chairman Leading by Example May 14, 2010 - 2:31pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Sierra Club was founded almost 120 years ago with the mission of protecting wildlife and habitats by advocating clean energy use and encouraging Americans to live eco-friendly lifestyles. Sierra Club Oregon Chairman Wes Kempfer is doing his part to further those goals by trying to make his home energy-efficient and wants to spread the word to his fellow members and all Oregonians. Clean Energy Works Portland provides the city's residents with energy assessments that will help them identify what changes in their homes could make the biggest impact toward saving energy and money. Through the program, people like Wes receive financing for energy-efficiency upgrades

169

Earth Day: Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Day: Leading by Example Earth Day: Leading by Example Earth Day: Leading by Example April 20, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis Michael Dunn, Deputy Director of Facilities Management at Argonne National Laboratory, setup a program that encouraged employees to cut their energy use during peak summer months and resulted in more than $475,000 in savings. Here he stands next to an electrical vehicle fueling station that charges cars with solar energy. | Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Michael Dunn, Deputy Director of Facilities Management at Argonne National Laboratory, setup a program that encouraged employees to cut their energy use during peak summer months and resulted in more than $475,000 in savings. Here he stands next to an electrical vehicle fueling station that charges cars with solar energy. | Image courtesy of Argonne National

170

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Application of thermochronological techniques to major normal fault systems can resolve the timing of initiation and duration of extension, rates of motion on detachment faults, timing of ductile mylonite formation and passage of rocks through the crystal-plastic to brittle transition, and multiple events of extensional unroofing. Here we determine

171

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Examples Waste Management Examples Example 59 6.03.12 Environmental and Waste Management Deactivation activities will be performed in compliance with the requirements of WSRC 3Q, Environmental Compliance Manual. The deactivation of the 400-D excess facilities will not adversely affect the environment. An Environmental Evaluation Checklist (EEC) has been initiated to ensure that the general deactivation work scope receives the proper environmental review and approval. Certain deactivation activities, such as the discontinuation of building stack monitoring, requires additional (EPD and SCDHEC in this case) environmental approvals. Regulatory required records for the 420-D refrigeration system and the 772-D chiller will be transferred to FDD. The amount of waste generated by the facility is expected to increase during the deactivation period while the process and support

172

Earth Day: Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Day: Leading by Example Earth Day: Leading by Example Earth Day: Leading by Example April 20, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis Michael Dunn, Deputy Director of Facilities Management at Argonne National Laboratory, setup a program that encouraged employees to cut their energy use during peak summer months and resulted in more than $475,000 in savings. Here he stands next to an electrical vehicle fueling station that charges cars with solar energy. | Image courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory. Michael Dunn, Deputy Director of Facilities Management at Argonne National Laboratory, setup a program that encouraged employees to cut their energy use during peak summer months and resulted in more than $475,000 in savings. Here he stands next to an electrical vehicle fueling station that charges cars with solar energy. | Image courtesy of Argonne National

173

Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6.1 6.1 Example M&V Plan Example Measurement & Verification Plan for a Super ESPC Project February 2007 Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy This document was developed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program by Nexant, Inc., and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This document is posted on FEMP's web site at www.eere.energy.gov/femp/financing/superespcs_mvresources.cfm. Comments should be sent to lwebster@nexant.com. 6.1 Example M&V Plan Contents 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY / M&V OVERVIEW AND PROPOSED SAVINGS CALCULATIONS ................................................................................................... 2 1.1

174

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Closure Plan Examples System Closure Plan Examples Example 61 7.5 Endpoint Closure The endpoint documents have grouped the building spaces and systems into a number of manageable areas. The areas are closely related to the engineering work plans that guide completion of many of the endpoints. Endpoint closure methods and practices are provided in the attachment of this PMP. On completion of an endpoint, a BWHC field representative will initial complete on the field copy of the endpoint document. A BHI field representative will verify acceptable completion of the applicable activity. Verification may be performed by reviewing documents, letters, photos, work packages, or work plans, or by visual inspection. When all the endpoints for a specific area of the building have been completed and verified, designated BWHC and BHI management will sign for completion and acceptance of that

175

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Control Examples Configuration Control Examples Example 38 7.05 Configuration Management Plan Configuration Management activities for this project will be carried out using a graded approach, consistent with the guidance in Reference #20. The CM Actions listed in Appendix B of Reference #20 will be carried out as follows: Action 1 - Develop System Boundaries This action will not be performed because the intended End State of 322-M is that all systems will be deactivated and all utility services that were connected to the systems in the facility will be disconnected by isolation at the facility boundary. This isolation will be reflected in Action 2. Action 2 - Develop and Update Drawings Revisions will be made only to those essential drawings that show the modifications made to the facility as part of executing the

176

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S&M Plan Examples S&M Plan Examples Example 44 5.0 SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE 5.01 Current S&M Requirements Currently, the heavy water facility is performing operational maintenance and surveillances as dictated by outside and inside facility operating rounds, facility operating procedures, facility maintenance procedures, facility alarm response procedures, and any additional surveillance and maintenance required by SFSD and SRS administrative programs and policies. As the facility progresses through deactivation, the operational S&M requirements will be retired. 5.02 Post Deactivation S&M Plan (Summary) An S&M plan, required by Ref. 1, will be developed and approved following deactivation of the 400-D excess facilities. Three types of S&M activities are envisioned. On a monthly basis, the outside of the excess facilities will be inspected for safety, security, and

177

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance Plan Examples Quality Assurance Plan Examples Example 64 8.3 QUALITY ASSURANCE This section describes policies and procedures that will be used to meet QA program objectives. This section also develops the strategies PFP will use to ensure the S&M of the PFP inventory, the material stabilization project, the deactivation project, and the dismantlement of the PFP Complex buildings and are completed in a high quality manner. 8.3.1 QA Program The QA program for the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project is implemented in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, (QA Rule) and HNF-PRO-260, Quality Assurance Program . The manner in which the requirements are implemented is specified in QA program plans and implementing procedures for the PFP Complex. The QA

178

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Controls/ALARA Examples Radiological Controls/ALARA Examples Example 57 8.4 RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL This section describes policies and procedures that will be used to meet radiological control program objectives. It also describes the key actions PFP will take to ensure the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project activities are completed safely, and that radioactive materials at the PFP are managed in a controlled and safe manner. 8.4.1 Radiological Control Program The Radiological Control program for the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project will be implemented in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection, and HSRCM-1, Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual . Implementing procedures are administrated as Hanford Procedures in accordance with the implementation strategy outlined in HNF-

179

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Assessment Examples Risk Assessment Examples Example 54 10.0 PROJECT RISK This section outlines a methodology which will be used to qualitatively/subjectively assess the project risk. The approach is modeled after project risk assessment processes outlined in standard project management texts and training courses but tailored to the unique risks encountered in the DOE projects. In the context of this section, project risk means risk to one of the project baselines (technical, cost, or schedule) and should not be confused with health and safety risks. However, health and safety issues are considered to the extent that they impact the risk to the project baselines. 10.1 RISK ASSESSMENT TOOLS The two primary tools that will be used to conduct the risk assessment are listed below.

180

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Management Examples Work Management Examples Example 36 8.2.5 Work Processes Work associated with nuclear safety functions will be planned, authorized, and performed following approved technical standards, instructions, procedures, and other control documentation commensurate with the complexity and risk posed by the task. The calibration program governs the process that ensures quality of the calibration and maintenance of process monitoring equipment. Equipment found to be out of calibration is tagged and not used until re-calibrated. HNF-PRO that implement DOE-Order 5480.19, and HNF-PRO-233, -298, and others determined applicable, will be evaluated and necessary facility specific procedures developed to complement them for implementation. 10.2 Personnel Safety

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Plan Examples Environmental Plan Examples Example 51 8.1 ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY A significant part of the strategy for maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements during the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project is to apply the process described in the Tri-Party Agreement, Section 8.0, "Facility Decommissioning Process." The Section 8.0 process will allow the DOE to develop agreements with the State and Federal regulatory agencies facilitating timely stabilization of the PFP inventory of plutonium-bearing materials, deactivation of the PFP Complex, and perhaps elimination of all above ground hazards at the PFP Complex through dismantlement of the buildings and structures. The Section 8.0 process also provides the means for DOE to ensure the public and stakeholders get an opportunity

182

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training and Qualification Plan Examples Training and Qualification Plan Examples Example 66 8.2.2 Personnel Training and Qualification The Personnel Training and Qualification program is being established as defined by laws, DOE Orders, and company directives to ensure that personnel are trained and qualified to perform assigned tasks. The training and qualification program develops personnel proficiency commensurate with the scope, complexity, and nature of an assigned activity. Management is responsible for developing staff position requirements based on education and experience necessary to perform tasks. Building managers and suppliers that provide personnel to support building operations are responsible for ensuring that personnel are sufficiently trained to perform assigned tasks in a manner that minimizes risk to personnel performing a task, co-workers, and

183

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication and Stakeholder Involvement Communication and Stakeholder Involvement Plan Examples Example 49 10.0 COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT The transition of B Plant is a critical element in Hanford's mission of environmental management. The B Plant Transition Project Management Team have made a commitment to open communications throughout transition because effective communications and public involvement are critical success factors for the project. Communications must be living and dynamic, responding to accomplishments and emerging issues or activities. A communications plan will be developed to define specific actions for disseminating information regarding project objectives, strategies, problems/issues, and status, and for developing strategies for soliciting input/involvement throughout the deactivation

184

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare Project Support Plans and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Baseline Development and Control Technical Baseline Development and Control Examples Example 40 5.0 PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL The Project Management and Control section provides an overview of the project management and control systems that will be used to manage the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project, addressing the following key elements of project management and control:  Project Management Control System (PMCS) - Work breakdown structure - Baseline development/update - Scheduling - Performance measurement and reporting - Change control  Information and reporting - Project status report - Project manager's monthly report - FDH/RL project status review - DOE-HQ project management reviews - Special reviews

185

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS...

186

One-to-many: example-based mesh animation synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an example-based approach for synthesizing diverse mesh animations. Provided a short clip of deformable mesh animation, our method synthesizes a large number of different animations of arbitrary length. Combining an automatically inferred ... Keywords: animation, bone graph, cut node, synthesis, transition

Changxi Zheng

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Independence of events (with example) Math 30530, Fall 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will work for one year with probability p. To light my basement, I install n bulbs, all operating with probability p. To light my basement, I install n bulbs, all operating independently. What is the probability, 2013 4 / 4 #12;Example A bulb will work for one year with probability p. To light my basement, I

Galvin, David

188

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation Plan Project Scope and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan Project Scope and Plan Project Scope and Objectives Examples Example 6 2.3 MISSION OBJECTIVES Stabilization of plutonium-bearing materials and deactivation/dismantlement of the PFP Complex will result in the virtual elimination of the hazards and risks associated with the facility and will greatly reduce the costs of safe, secure S&M. Using the lessons learned from deactivation projects across the DOE Complex, further improvement on previously applied deactivation methods is anticipated. The major mission objectives for the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project are as follows:  Maintain inventory of plutonium-bearing material in safe and highly secure storage pending shipment offsite;  Maintain the PFP facilities, systems, and residual radioactive and chemical contamination in a safe,

189

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions Policy & Operational Decisions, Assumptions and Strategies Examples 1 & 2 Example 1 1.0 Summary The 322-M Metallurgical Laboratory is currently categorized as a Radiological Facility. It is inactive with no future DOE mission. In May of 1998 it was ranked Number 45 in the Inactive Facilities Risk Ranking database which the Facilities Decommissioning Division maintains. A short-term surveillance and maintenance program is in-place while the facility awaits final deactivation. Completion of the end points described in this deactivation project plan will place the 322-M facility into an End State that can be described as "cold and dark". The facility will be made passively safe requiring minimal surveillance and no scheduled maintenance.

190

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Prepare and Issue Project Plan Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Issue Project Plan Documents and Issue Project Plan Documents Example Example 70 5.2 Information and Reporting Management reporting provides timely and accurate data to apprise BWHC, FDH, and DOE management of current and projected project conditions. Information contained in these reports is obtained from the same database that supports day-to-day management by BWHC. 5.2.1 Project Status Report Reporting for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project is incorporated in the monthly PSR, prepared by BWHC for FDH and RL. The PSR summarizes performance and compares it with the technical, schedule, and cost baselines contained in the MYWP. The report provides the data required by the DOE-HQ process. 5.2.2 Project Manager's Monthly Report

191

Economics of Transmission Planning: Methods, Examples, and Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an economic planning methodology that can be applied to regional and interregional transmission planning. It is modeled after long-distilled practices at the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) and a newer, proposed analysis for identifying the potential interregional developments of greatest mutual benefit to the energy trading regions. Existing and new examples of transmission planning exercises conducted by MISO facilitate the description. MISO background studies introduce...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

ROME Example: Single Product Multi-Period Inventory Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This example is adapted from See and Sim [1]. Instead of using the decision rules described in the paper, we formulate the stochastic inventory control problem directly and obtain the solutions via ROME. In general, ROME’s solutions are not the same as See and Sim’s [1]. We believe that ROME’s solutions are at most slightly worse off. Nevertheless, the model in ROME is more intuitive and leads to smaller

Joel Goh; Melvyn Sim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cascode Amplifier Example -Spring 2002 R P x y,( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cascode Amplifier Example - Spring 2002 R P x y,( ) x y. x y Function for calculating parallel resistors. R 1 390000 R 2 200000 R 3 56000 R 4 100 R C 20000 R E 4300 R S 1000 R L 10000 V plus 35 V minus 30 V BE 0.65 V T 0.025 199 0.995 r x 20 r 0 50000 v s 1 With v s = 1, the voltage gain is equal

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

194

Common-Collector Amplifier Example R P x y,( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common-Collector Amplifier Example R P x y,( ) x y. x y Function for calculating parallel resistors. R 1 100000 R 2 120000 R C 0 R E 5600 R S 5000 R L 10000 V plus 15 V minus 15 V BE 0.65 V T 0.025 99 0.99 r x 20 r 0 50000 v s 1 With v s = 1, the voltage gain is equal to v o. DC Bias Circuits

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

195

An evaluation of object oriented example programs in introductory programming textbooks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research shows that examples play an important role for cognitive skill acquisition. Students as well as teachers rank examples as important resources for learning to program. Therefore examples must be consistent with the principles and rules of the ... Keywords: assessment, check list, courseware, example programs, examples, guidelines, principles, textbooks

Jürgen Börstler; Mark S. Hall; Marie Nordström; James H. Paterson; Kate Sanders; Carsten Schulte; Lynda Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices...

197

Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

198

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet)

199

Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

Goff, S.; Goff, F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Common-Base Amplifier Example R P x y,( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common-Base Amplifier Example R P x y,( ) x y. x y Function for calculating parallel resistors. R 1 100000 R 2 120000 R C 4300 R E 5600 R S 100 R L 10000 V plus 15 V minus 15 V BE 0.65 V T 0.025 99 0.99 r x 20 r 0 50000 v s 1 With v s = 1, the voltage gain is equal to v o. 1 #12;DC Bias Circuit V BB V

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

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201

Common-Emitter Amplifier Example R P x y,( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common-Emitter Amplifier Example R P x y,( ) x y. x y Function for calculating parallel resistors. R 1 100000 R 2 120000 R C 4300 R E 5600 R S 5000 R L 10000 V p 15 V m 15 V BE 0.65 V T 0.025 99 0.99 r x 20 r 0 50000 R 3 100 v s 1 With v s = 1, the voltage gain is equal to v o. 1 #12;DC Bias

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

202

Research Support Facility Data Center: An Example of Best Practices Implementation (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure details the design and operations of the Research Support Facility (RSF) data center. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world-renowned for its commitment to green building construction. To further this commitment to green building and leading by example, NREL included an ultra-energy-efficient data center in the laboratory's new Research Support Facility (RSF), which recently received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design{reg_sign} (LEED) Platinum designation from the U.S. Green Building Council.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal

204

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE 40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

205

File:Wind rough example.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Wind rough example.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Wind rough example.pdf Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 196 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:03, 2 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 18:03, 2 January 2014 1,650 × 1,275, 2 pages (196 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools Elementary School Curricula

206

Method for including operation and maintenance costs in the economic analysis of active solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a developing technology such as solar energy, the costs for operation and maintenance (O and M) can be substantial. In the past, most economic analyses included these costs by simply assuming that an annual cost will be incurred that is proportional to the initial cost of the system. However, in assessing the economics of new systems proposed for further research and development, such a simplification can obscure the issues. For example, when the typical method for including O and M costs in an economic analysis is used, the O and M costs associated with a newly developed, more reliable, and slightly more expensive controller will be assumed to increase - an obvious inconsistency. The method presented in this report replaces this simplistic approach with a representation of the O and M costs that explicitly accounts for the uncertainties and risks inherent in the operation of any equipment. A detailed description of the data inputs required by the method is included as well as a summary of data sources and an example of the method as applied to an active solar heating system.

Short, W.D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energetics of a Symmetric Circulation Including Momentum Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory of available potential energy (APE) for symmetric circulations, which includes momentum constraints, is presented. The theory is a generalization of the classical theory of APE, which includes only thermal constraints on the circulation. ...

Sorin Codoban; Theodore G. Shepherd

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

209

Scheduling optimization of a real flexible job shop including side ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 19, 2013 ... including side constraints regarding preventive maintenance, fixture availabil- ...... Engineering and Engineering Management, pp. 787–791.

210

Computational Lexicons: the Neat Examples and the Odd Exemplars Roberto Basili, Maria Teresa Pazienza  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be invented a priori, despite the imagination that linguists exhibit at inventing esoteric examples

211

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial...

212

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

213

FAQ 23-How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium hexafluoride -- is stored in the United States? In addition to the depleted uranium stored...

214

Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination ...

215

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

216

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will be diverse and widespread, including renewables, distributed generation, and energy storage. And they will increase rapidly all along the value chain, from suppliers to...

217

Stocks of Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Including SPR)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

218

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.2 Retro-Cx in Federal ESPCs Including Retro-Commissioning In Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Retro-commissioning generally reduces operating and maintenance costs,...

219

PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

Curtis, Pavel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to...

222

Examples of Climate Information Provided by a State Climate Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of applied climatology and its information-generating research requires recognition of the total cause-and-effect spectrum including the issue detection, the research effort pursued, the type of product, the users, and their ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st century new we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from the Marcellus shale In addition

Walter, M.Todd

225

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

226

What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Whistleblower Program > What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?

227

Notional Examples and Benchmark Aspects Of a Resilient Control System  

SciTech Connect

Digital control system technology has pervaded most industries, leading to improvements in the efficiency and reliability of the associated operations. However, the ease of distributing and connecting related control systems for the purposes of increasing performance has resulted in interdependencies that can lead to unexpected conditions. Even with less complex designs, operators and engineers alike are often left with competing goals that are difficult to resolve. A fundamental reason for this dichotomy is that responsibilities lie with different disciplines, and operations are hosted on separate control systems. In addition, with the rising awareness of cyber security and diverse human interactions with control systems, an understanding of human actions from a malicious and benevolent standpoint is necessary. Resilience considers the multiple facets of requirements that drive the performance of control systems in a holistic fashion, whether they are security or stability, stability or efficiency, human interactions or complex interdependencies. As will be shown by example, current research philosophies lack the depth or the focus on the control system application to satisfy these requirements, such as graceful degradation of hierarchical control while under cyber attack. A resilient control system promises to purposefully consider these diverse requirements, developing an adaptive capacity to complex events that can lead to failure of traditional control system designs.

Craig. G. Rieger

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

An example of fingerprint detection of greenhouse climate changes  

SciTech Connect

As an example of the technique of fingerprint detection of greenhouse climate change, a multivariate signal or fingerprint of the enhanced greenhouse effect is defined using the zonal mean atmospheric temperature change as a function of height and latitude between equilibrium climate model simulations with control and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations. This signal is compared with observed atmospheric temperature variations over the period 1963 to 1988 from radiosonde-based global analyses. There is a signiificant increase of this greenhouse signal in the observational data over this period. These results must be treated with caution. Upper air data are available for a short period only, possibly, to be able to resolve any real greenhouse climate change. The greenhouse fingerprint used in this study may not be unique to the enhanced greenhouse effect and may be due to other forcing mechanisms. However, it is shown that the patterns of atmospheric temperature change associated with uniform global increases of sea surface temperature, with El Nino-Southern Oscillation events and with decreases of stratospheric ozone concentrations individually are different from the greenhouse fingerprint used here. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Karoly, D.J.; Cohen, J.A. [Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Meehl, G.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Market leadership by example: Government sector energy efficiency in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Government facilities and services are often the largest energy users and major purchasers of energy-using equipment within a country. In developing as well as industrial countries, government ''leadership by example'' can be a powerful force to shift the market toward energy efficiency, complementing other elements of a national energy efficiency strategy. Benefits from more efficient energy management in government facilities and operations include lower government energy bills, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, less demand on electric utility systems, and in many cases reduced dependence on imported oil. Even more significantly, the government sector's buying power and example to others can generate broader demand for energy-efficient products and services, creating entry markets for domestic suppliers and stimulating competition in providing high-efficiency products and services. Despite these benefits, with the exception of a few countries government sector actions have often lagged behind other energy efficiency policies. This is especially true in developing countries and transition economies - even though energy used by public agencies in these countries may represent at least as large a share of total energy use as the public sector in industrial economies. This paper summarizes work in progress to inventory current programs and policies for government sector energy efficiency in developing countries, and describes successful case studies from Mexico's implementation of energy management in the public sector. We show how these policies in Mexico, begun at the federal level, have more recently been extended to state and local agencies, and consider the applicability of this model to other developing countries.

Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Harris, Jeffrey; Breceda, Miguel; Campbell, Stephanie; Sachu, Constantine; della Cava, Mirka; Gonzalez Martinez, Jose; Meyer, Sarah; Romo, Ana Margarita

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates 82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates June 4, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft Windows. A remote user may be able to spoof code signing signatures. PLATFORM: Version(s): XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, 7 SP1, 2008 R2 SP1; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself. Reference Links: Security tracker ID 1027114 GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The invalid certificates and their thumbprints are: Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA: 2a 83 e9 02 05 91 a5 5f c6

231

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more i ci e n cy On Thursday, March 31st New River Light & Power will sponsor a seminar that is designed

Rose, Annkatrin

233

Characterizations of Aircraft Icing Environments that Include Supercooled Large Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of aircraft icing environments that include supercooled large drops (SLD) greater than 50 ?m in diameter have been made during 38 research flights. These flights were conducted during the First and Third Canadian Freezing Drizzle ...

Stewart G. Cober; George A. Isaac; J. Walter Strapp

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Including Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formulation to include prognostic atmospheric layers in offline surface schemes is derived from atmospheric equations. Whereas multilayer schemes developed previously need a complex coupling between atmospheric-model levels and surface-scheme ...

Valéry Masson; Yann Seity

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

237

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

238

Coordinated dispatch of regional transmission organizations: Theory and example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the coordination of economic dispatch across multiple Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) to optimize interchange levels, including consideration of the coordination of ''congestion relief'' as practiced in the Eastern ... Keywords: Congestion relief, Economic dispatch, Hierarchical optimization, Interchange optimization, Regional transmission organizations

Ross Baldick, Dhiman Chatterjee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A Tour of the OOF2 GUI via A Simple Example Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. A Tour of the OOF2 GUI via A Simple Example Problem 1 Page 2. A Simple Example 2 OOF Start OOF2 by typing in a terminal window: ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

242

DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are the culmination of a 2-year process to review and update DOE's NEPA implementing procedures. This process involved internal evaluation, public participation, and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) review. The revisions are designed to focus Departmental resources on projects with the potential for significant environmental impact, to better

243

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

SciTech Connect

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Outline The Ensemble Kalman Filter Parameter estimation Test example Conclusion History matching via  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline The Ensemble Kalman Filter Parameter estimation Test example Conclusion History matching estimation Test example Conclusion Test case setup · For the test case we use CERE's own in-house Black Oil estimation Test example Conclusion Test case setup · For the test case we use CERE's own in-house Black Oil

Mosegaard, Klaus

247

Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.

Hummel, J.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

250

Major initiatives in materials research at Western include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in nuclear reactors; and a third in Engineering- J. Jiang, supported by UNENE, working on control in the theory of condensed matter, including its applications to polymers, optical, electronic, and magnetic NSERC Industrial Research Chairs who together make Western a leading university in nuclear power

Christensen, Dan

251

Dye laser amplifier including a low turbulence, stagnation-free dye flow configuration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of for example 30 gallons/minute, a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell and a screen device for insuring that the dye stream passes into the dye cell in a substantially turbulent free, stagnation-free manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

253

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

254

Coordination). Participants include representatives from Balancing Authorities (BAs), Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MRO Subject Matter Expert Team is an industry stakeholder group which includes subject matter experts from MRO member organizations in various technical areas. Any materials, guidance, and views from stakeholder groups are meant to be helpful to industry participants; but should not be considered approved or endorsed by MRO staff or its board of directors unless specified. Page | 2 Disclaimer The Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) Standards Committee (SC) is committed to providing training and non-binding guidance to industry stakeholders regarding existing and emerging Reliability Standards. Any materials, including presentations, were developed through the MRO SC by Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) from member organizations within the MRO region. In 2012, SMEs in the field of System Operator Communications were brought together to prepare a guide for complying with NERC Reliability Standard COM-002-2 (Communications and

Will Behnke; Alliant Energy; Jacalynn Bentz; Great River Energy; Marie Knox Miso; Jacalynn Bentz; Marie Knox; Terry Harbour

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino Oscillations Including SNO CC Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For active and sterile neutrinos, we present the globally allowed solutions for two neutrino oscillations. We include the SNO CC measurement and all other relevant solar neutrino and reactor data. Five active neutrino oscillation solutions (LMA, LOW, SMA, VAC, and Just So2) are currently allowed at 3 sigma; three sterile neutrino solutions (Just So2, SMA, and VAC) are allowed at 3 sigma. The goodness of fit is satisfactory for all eight solutions. We also investigate the robustness of the allowed solutions by carrying out global analyses with and without: 1) imposing solar model constraints on the 8B neutrino flux, 2) including the Super-Kamiokande spectral energy distribution and day-night data, 3) including a continuous mixture of active and sterile neutrinos, 4) using an enhanced CC cross section for deuterium (due to radiative corrections), and 5) a optimistic, hypothetical reduction by a factor of three of the error of the SNO CC rate. For every analysis strategy used in this paper, the most favored solutions all involve large mixing angles: LMA, LOW, or VAC. The favored solutions are robust, but the presence at 3 sigma of individual sterile solutions and the active Just So2 solution is sensitive to the analysis assumptions.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nonlinear thermodynamic quantum master equation: Properties and examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantum master equation obtained from two different thermodynamic arguments is seriously nonlinear. We argue that, for quantum systems, nonlinearity occurs naturally in the step from reversible to irreversible equations and we analyze the nature and consequences of the nonlinear contribution. The thermodynamic nonlinearity naturally leads to canonical equilibrium solutions and extends the range of validity to lower temperatures. We discuss the Markovian character of the thermodynamic quantum master equation and introduce a solution strategy based on coupled evolution equations for the eigenstates and eigenvalues of the density matrix. The general ideas are illustrated for the two-level system and for the damped harmonic oscillator. Several conceptual implications of the nonlinearity of the thermodynamic quantum master equation are pointed out, including the absence of a Heisenberg picture and the resulting difficulties with defining multitime correlations.

Oettinger, Hans Christian [ETH Zuerich, Department of Materials, Polymer Physics, HCI H 543, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

Bawendi, Moungi G. (Boston, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (New York, NY)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

266

Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 Federal Register 83 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 51 / Friday, March 15, 2013 / Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES OF USERS AND THE PURPOSES OF SUCH USES: The Department may disclose information contained in a record in this system of records under the routine uses listed in this system of records without the consent of the individual if the disclosure is compatible with the purposes for which the record was collected. These disclosures may be made on a case-by-case basis or, if the Department has complied with the computer matching requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Privacy Act), under a computer matching agreement. Any disclosure of individually identifiable information from a record in this system must also comply with the requirements of section

267

Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL 2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL Modern Grid Strategy Team Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options Last month we presented the first Principal Characteristic of a Modern Grid, "Motivates and Includes the Consumer". This month we present a second characteristic, "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options". This characteristic will fundamentally transition today's grid from a centralized model for generation to one that also has a more balanced contribution from decentralized generation and storage. This characteristic, along with the other six, define a Modern Grid that will power the 21 st Century economy. For a more detailed discussion on "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options", please see:

269

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield new insights into the parent stars themselves. March 6, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

270

Dye laser amplifier including a specifically designed diffuser assembly  

SciTech Connect

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replened supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a relatively high flow rate and a specifically designed diffuser assembly for slowing down the flow of dye while, at the same time, assuring that as the dye stream flows through the diffuser assembly it does so in a stable manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA); Johnston, James P. (Stanford, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

Marriott, Craig D

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

273

A thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential are disclosed. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Text-Alternative Version: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Walking Through Examples of Real LM-79 & LM-80 Reports on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative

276

Validation examples of the Analytic Hierarchy Process and Analytic Network Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One way to validate a scientific theory is to show that the results predicted by the theory give correct answers; that is, that they match known results. In the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) this usually means finding examples with measures in an ... Keywords: Compatibility index for the AHP, Validating the Analytic Hierarchy Process, Validating the Analytic Network Process, Validation examples for the AHP, Validation examples for the ANP

Rozann Whitaker

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

SciTech Connect

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

278

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

279

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

280

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The e...

Eggenberger, P; Carrier, F; Fernandes, J; Santos, N C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analysis of alpha Centauri AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of alpha Cen A and B based on new seismological data for alpha Cen B by Carrier & Bourban (2003) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including atomic diffusion. Taking into account the numerous observational constraints now available for the alpha Cen system, we find a stellar model which is in good agreement with the astrometric, photometric, spectroscopic and asteroseismic data. The global parameters of the alpha Cen system are now firmly constrained to an age of t=6.52+-0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.275+-0.010 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0434+-0.0020. Thanks to these numerous observational constraints, we confirm that the mixing-length parameter alpha of the B component is larger than the one of the A component, as already suggested by many authors (Noels et al. 1991, Fernandes & Neuforge 1995 and Guenther & Demarque 2000): alpha_B is about 8% larger than alpha_A (alpha_A=1.83+-0.10 and alpha_B=1.97+-0.10). Moreover, we show that asteroseismic measurements enable to determine the radii of both stars with a very high precision (errors smaller than 0.3%). The radii deduced from seismological data are compatible with the new interferometric results of Kervella et al. (2003) even if they are slightly larger than the interferometric radii (differences smaller than 1%).

P. Eggenberger; C. Charbonnel; S. Talon; G. Meynet; A. Maeder; F. Carrier; G. Bourban

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

284

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The effects of atomic diffusion and of the choice of the adopted solar mixture were also studied. We also tested and compared the theoretical tools used for the modeling of stars for which p-modes frequencies are detected by performing this analysis with three different stellar evolution codes and two different calibration methods. We found that the different evolution codes and calibration methods we used led to perfectly coherent results.

P. Eggenberger; A. Miglio; F. Carrier; J. Fernandes; N. C. Santos

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

examples.cahnHilliard.mesh2DCoupled — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next topic. examples.cahnHilliard.sphere. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

Examples — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157-g518df83 documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Glossary. Next topic. Diffusion Examples. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

examples.convection.exponential1DSource.mesh1D — FiPy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next topic. examples.convection.robin. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

UML and SOA Overview with Example Applications to the xLPR V.2 Project  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an overview of the Unified Modeling Language and the Service Oriented Architecture with real examples from the xLPR V2.0 project.

Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 17, Example of Environmental Restoration Code of Accounts  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter describes the fundamental structure of an example remediation cost code system, lists and describes the Level 1 cost codes, and lists the Level 2 ...

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 16, Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

A New Paradigm for Intelligent Tutoring Systems: Example-Tracing Tutors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cognitive Tutor Authoring Tools (CTAT) support creation of a novel type of tutors called example-tracing tutors. Unlike other types of ITSs (e.g., model-tracing tutors, constraint-based tutors), exampletracing tutors evaluate student behavior by ... Keywords: ITS architectures, authoring tools, behavior of tutoring systems, cognitive tutors, example-tracing tutors, programming by demonstration

Vincent Aleven; Bruce M. Mclaren; Jonathan Sewall; Kenneth R. Koedinger

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Industrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms and Examples Matthew Kocoloski, Carnegie Mellon University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Solid-State Energy Harvesting: Mechanisms and Examples Matthew Kocoloski, Carnegie the potential for solid-state energy harvesting in industrial applications. In contrast to traditional heat are on the cusp of practical use. Finally, we present an example of energy harvesting using thermionic devices

Kissock, Kelly

296

SCATMECH: Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cout tab // Scattering angle (theta) tab // Scattering angle (phi) tab // Principal angle of ...

297

General Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...in Fig. 2 are parts in seed and herbicide metering equipment. The dual sprocket shown in Fig. 2(a) is made of two P/M sprockets that are staked together. This provides the flexibility to produce different gear ratios from pairs of single sprockets, rather than manufacturing a complete dual sprocket...

298

Teaching Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario Reference Student Pages At the end of the school year, several teachers were discussing possible projects for the next year. One teacher mentioned about a program called EnergyNet that should help connect the science curriculum to a real-world situation. During the summer, a team of teachers and students attended training offered at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. The authentic orientation of this energy-consumption investigation gave teachers the opportunity to expand the initial program into an interdisciplinary unit integrating technology. Although the EnergyNet program supplied the data collection activities, Internet access and collaboration with support personnel, resources available through Illinois

299

Calling all great examples of open government data | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calling all great examples of open government data Calling all great examples of open government data Developer Data Web Services Source Code Challenges Semantic Web Blogs Let's Talk Developers You are here Data.gov » Communities » Developers » Forums Calling all great examples of open government data Submitted by Jeanne Holm on Mon, 11/15/2010 - 5:49am Log in to vote 5 There are so many great examples of open government data being published. We've linked to some of them at http://www.data.gov/community, but so many more exist. What sites do you know of? Which countries are making their data more open and their operations more transparent? Add new comment Open Government Best Practices Permalink Submitted by Aftab Datta on Mon, 11/15/2010 - 11:28am. New Zealand representative at the IOGDC gave a success story on open

300

SVM-SVDD: a new method to solve data description problem with negative examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Support Vector Data Description(SVDD) is an important method to solve data description or one-class classification problem. In original data description problem, only positive examples are provided in training. The performance of SVDD can be improved ...

Zhigang Wang, Zeng-Shun Zhao, Changshui Zhang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Example of Hurricane Tracking and Forecasting with a Global Analysis-Forecasting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tracking of Hurricane Elena by the ECMWF operational analysis system is compared with reported positions from reconnaissance aircraft and coastal radar. An example forecast is shown for the operational model and also for an experimental ...

W. A. Heckley; M. J. Miller; A. K. Betts

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Three Examples of Fair-Weather Mesoscale Boundary-Layer Convection in the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence indicates that fair-weather to towering cumulus clouds over the East Atlantic Ocean during GATE were frequently organized into mesoscale structures. Three examples of such structures are examined, using gust-probe aircraft data collected ...

Margaret A. LeMone; Rebecca J. Meitin

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications? Home > Groups > Developer Submitted by JessicaLyman on 7 December, 2012 - 09:08 1 answer Points: 1 *...

304

Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Processes in Porous Media: Benchmarks and Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The book comprises an assembly of benchmarks and examples for porous media mechanics collected over the last twenty years. Analysis of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes is essential to many applications in environmental engineering, such ...

Olaf Kolditz; Uwe-Jens Grke; Hua Shao; Wenqing Wang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Distinction between Large-Scale and Mesoscale Contribution to Severe Convection: A Case Study Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a case study of a relatively modest severe weather event as an example, a framework for understanding the large-scale-mesoscale interaction is developed and discussed. Large-scale processes are limited, by definition, to those which are ...

Charles A. Doswell III

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

EPA State Climate and Energy Program Technical Forum Lead-By-Example (LBE) Programs Background and Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State governments are demonstrating the benefits of clean energy through “Lead by Example” (LBE) programs. LBE involves implementing clean energy policies and programs in buildings, facilities, operations, and fleets under their control (U.S. EPA 2006a). EPA and other organizations recognize LBE programs as a key policy option for states seeking to achieve their clean energy goals. For example, the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency “Vision for 2025 ” report identifies LBE as a critical component for achieving the long-term goal of all costeffective energy efficiency by 2025. LBE opportunities have increased importance as states evaluate the best use of clean energy funding in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The Value of Clean Energy LBE Programs States can adopt a number of activities and strategies to capture significant energy, environmental, economic, and other benefits. These benefits include: Demonstrating leadership. Through good energy management, state governments can proactively address the nation’s energy challenge while also being fiscally responsible. Through their direct actions and by sharing their approaches, state governments can help

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Policy Strategies and Paths to promote Sustainable Energy Systems - The dynamic Invert Simulation Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DHW (including solar thermal) Cooling DSM District heatingDSM, heating, cooling, DHW, solar thermal) an option 3technology for heating, cooling, DHW, solar thermal systems.

Stadler, Michael; Kranzl, Lukas; Huber, Claus; Haas, Reinhard; Tsioliaridou, Elena

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal system has been widely studied and reported by scientists through the past several years, but there is still a considerable divergence of opinion regarding the structural setting, origin, and internal structure of this energy resource. Because of accelerating exploration and development drilling that is taking place, there is a need for a reservoir model that is consistent with the limited geologic facts available regarding the area. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F.

309

How a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example How a Wisconsin Nature Center is Leading by Example January 25, 2011 - 1:18pm Addthis Watercolor print of the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC) with new facilities. Watercolor print of the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC) with new facilities. Luke Gomes Project Officer, Golden Field Office Aldo Leopold is considered by many to be the father of wildlife ecology. Now, thanks to funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Wisconsin nature center that bears his name will be at the forefront in demonstrating the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to thousands of visitors every year. The Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC), located near Madison, Wisconsin is using a $500,000 sub-grant from the State of Wisconsin's Energy

310

Software Architecture,the Architecting Process, and Examples of Architecting Infrastructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Syntax Tree 6 s University of Southern California Center for Software Engineering March 5, 1995 Notes: . As an example of the different views, I am going to use a compiler project of a class I took last semester. . The figure above shows one way of organizing the code in subsystems. These subsystems should then be further specified 6 n University of Southern California Center for Software Engineering Software Architecture, the Architecting Process, and Examples of Architecting Infrastructures Views of a Software Architecture -- Compiler Example (cont.) Behavioral / Operational: Scan Parse Semantically Analyze 7 s University of Southern California Center for Software Engineering March 5, 1995 Notes: . The state changes occur as shown on this figure. . The scenarios could be described textually. . Actually, one should be able to try to use a tool that allows to follow how the states are changing, while executing the different scenarios 7 n University of Southern California ...

Cristina Gacek

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Qualitative Assessment of Diversion Scenarios for an Example Sodium Fast Reactor Using the GEN IV PR&PP Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FAST REACTORS;NUCLEAR ENERGY;NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT;PROLIFERATION;SAFEGUARDS;THEFT; A working group was created in 2002 by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the purpose of developing an internationally accepted methodology for assessing the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear energy system (NES) and its individual elements. A two year case study is being performed by the experts group using this methodology to assess the proliferation resistance of a hypothetical NES called the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). This work demonstrates how the PR and PP methodology can be used to provide important information at various levels of details to NES designers, safeguard administrators and decision makers. The study analyzes the response of the complete ESFR nuclear energy system to different proliferation and theft strategies. The challenges considered include concealed diversion, concealed misuse and 'break out' strategies. This paper describes the work done in performing a qualitative assessment of concealed diversion scenarios from the ESFR.

Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Therios, Ike

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Daniel Myers dsm@csail.mit.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Shrira. HQ Replication: a Hybrid Quorum Protocol for Byzantine Fault Tolerance. In Proc. OSDI `06 2004. #12;other activities Commodore, MIT Nautical Association October 2007- Managed organization for students in lower-division courses Organized a weekend student-faculty retreat and a series of program

313

Complete Genome Sequences of Desulfosporosinus orientis DSM765(T), Desulfosporosinus youngiae DSM17734(T), Desulfosporosinus meridiei DSM13257(T), and Desulfosporosinus acidiphilus DSM22704(T)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desulfosporosinus species are sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes. Their genomes will give insights into the genetic repertoire and evolution of sulfate reducers typically thriving in terrestrial environments and able to degrade toluene (Desulfosporosinus youngiae), to reduce Fe(III) (Desulfosporosinus meridiei, Desulfosporosinus orientis), and to grow under acidic conditions (Desulfosporosinus acidiphilus).

Pester, Michael [University of Vienna, Austria; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Alazard, Didier [Universite d'Aix-Marseille; Rattei, Thomas [Vienna University; Weinmaier, Thomas [Vienna University; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wei, Chia-Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wagner, Michael [Vienna University; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Olliver, Bernard [Universite d'Aix-Marseille; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Loy, Alexander [Vienna University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Dynamic computation migration in DSM systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe dynamic computation migration, the runtime choice between computation and data migration. Dynamic computation migration is useful for concurrent data structures with unpredictable read/write patterns. We implemented it in MCRL, a multithreaded ... Keywords: computation migration, data migration, replication, coherence

Wilson C. Hsieh; M. Frans Kaashoek; William E. Weihl

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NEEA Study: Examples of Deep Energy Savings in Existing Buildings | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEEA Study: Examples of Deep Energy Savings in Existing Buildings NEEA Study: Examples of Deep Energy Savings in Existing Buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

316

SALD 18A: JMP examples for one-sample t-test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SALD 18A: JMP examples for one-sample t-test #12;Introduction Notes #12;DO NOT COPY Copyright calculation in JMP To perform a one-sample t-test, select from the data table main menu Analyze 18A-8 To perform a one-sample t-test in JMP, first perform a distribution analysis Under Select

Morgan, Stephen L.

317

Examples of Applications of Climatic Data and Information Provided by State Climate Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The value of climate data and the information derived from the data still seems to be an unknown to many. Five persons engaged in providing climate services in different U.S. climatic zones have assembled a few widely different examples of recent ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.; Howard J. Critchfield; Robert W. Durrenberger; Charles L. Hosler; Thomas B. McKee

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Leveraging usage similarity for effective retrieval of examples in code repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developers often learn to use APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) by looking at existing examples of API usage. Code repositories contain many instances of such usage of APIs. However, conventional information retrieval techniques fail to perform ... Keywords: api usage, code search, software information retrieval, ssi, structural semantic indexing

Sushil K. Bajracharya; Joel Ossher; Cristina V. Lopes

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Use of Java in High Performance Computing: A Data Mining Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Use of Java in High Performance Computing: A Data Mining Example David Walker and Omer Rana in high performance computing is discussed with particular reference to the efforts of the Java Grande Java, Parallel Computing, Neu­ ral Networks, Distributed Objects 1 Introduction High performance

Walker, David W.

320

From mechanics to thermodynamics: an example of how to build the thermodynamics laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a mechanical problem in which a friction force is acting on the system. We explain how to extend Newtonian mechanics to thermodynamics using the fundamental concept of state, time evolution and energy conservation. We derive the two law of thermodynamics and then apply them to significant examples.

Ferrari, Christian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

I. Counterexamples to the DN account of explanation: A. Common cause examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is another one: If the oil warning light comes on in my car, my car has lost its oil pressure. The oil warning light has just come on. ----------------- My car has just lost its oil pressure. F. Examples. All copper conducts electricity. Either my alarm failed to go off this morning, or copper does

Fitelson, Branden

322

Aerial surveys vs hunting statistics to monitor deer density: the example of Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerial surveys vs hunting statistics to monitor deer density: the example of Anticosti Island, Que., Co^te´, S.D., Gingras, A., Potvin, F. & Huot, J. 2007: Aerial surveys vs hunting statistics-tailed deer densities estimated in 2001 on the basis of an extensive aerial survey of 512 plots, each 3.5 km

Laval, Université

323

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Gary Hodges; Tom Stoffel; Mark Kutchenreiter; Bev Kay; Aron Habte; Michael Ritsche; Victor Morris; Mary Anderberg

324

Discovery of characteristic patterns from tabular structured data including missing values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a method dealing with missing values in the discovery of frequent patterns. Also, it proposes a method that effectively discovers the patterns from examples composed of attributes and their values. The method generates candidate patterns ... Keywords: apriori properties, attribute constraints, attributes, frequent patterns, missing values, tabular structured data

Shigeaki Sakurai; Kouichirou Mori

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Impact Evaluation Framework for Technology Deployment Programs: An Overview and Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Overview and Example John H. Reed Innovologie LLC Gretchen Jordan Sandia National Laboratories Edward Vine Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July 2007 IMPACT EVALUATION FRAMEWORK FOR TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAMS An ap pro ach fo r q u anti fyi ng ret ro sp ect ive en erg y savin gs, cl ean en erg y ad van ces, an d m ark et eff ect s Introduction and Background The document briefly describes a framework for evaluating the "ret- rospective" impact of technology deployment programs and provides an example of its use. The framework was developed for the US Depart- ment of Energy's (US DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renew- able Energy (EERE) but potentially can be applied to most deployment programs. 1 This walk through of the seven-step impact framework proc-

326

Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502 502 August 2010 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (938 KB) Technical Report Example Procedures for NREL/TP-550-47502 Developing Acceptance-Range August 2010 Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Prepared under Task No. ARRB.1000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

327

Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications? |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications? Apps for Vehicles: What are some examples of vehicle data applications? Home > Groups > Developer Submitted by JessicaLyman on 7 December, 2012 - 09:08 1 answer Points: 1 * Insurance companies offering cheaper products by directly measuring driving behavior * Smart phone navigation systems are optimizing routes based on how commute-schedules compares to actual traffic and weather changes * Helping consumers understand the cost and overall potential of electric drive vehicles * Enhanced security with real-time notification of a vehicle security breach. * Informing parents of teen-driving behavior * Greater visibility around vehicle maintenance needs - new tires, oil changes, transmission flushes, windshield wiper fluid refills. JessicaLyman on 7 December, 2012 - 09:09

328

Accelerated commercialization program for materials and components. Solar sheet glass: an example of materials commercialization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERI Accelerated Commercialization Program for Materials and Components is designed to serve as a catalyst in promoting technological change through the introduction of new materials into solar technologies. This report focuses on technological diffusion of advances in materials technology from the developer to the manufacturers of solar equipment. It provides an overview and understanding of the problems encountered in the private sector in trying to advance technological change and discusses a program designed to facilitate this change. Using as example of solar sheet glass, this report describes the process by which sample quantities of new materials are sent to solar equipment manufacturers for appliations testing. It also describes other materials that might undergo testing in a similar way. The entire program is an example of how government and industry can work together to accomplish common goals.

Livingston, R.; Butler, B.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

AN EXAMPLE OF ASYMPTOTICALLY CHOW UNSTABLE MANIFOLDS WITH CONSTANT SCALAR CURVATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In [2] Donaldson proved that if a polarized manifold (V, L) has constant scalar curvature Kähler metrics in c1(L) and its automorphism group Aut(V, L) is discrete, (V, L) is asymptotically Chow stable. In this paper, we shall show an example which implies that the above result does not hold in the case when Aut(V, L) is not discrete.

Hajime Ono; et al.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Community Renewable Energy Deployment Provides Replicable Examples of Clean Energy Projects (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) program, which is a more than $20 million effort funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to promote investment in clean energy solutions and provide real-life examples for other local governments, campuses, and small utilities to replicate. Five community-based renewable energy projects received funding from DOE through the CommRE and their progress is detailed.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Common-Emitter Amplifier Example -Summer 2000 R P x y,( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common-Emitter Amplifier Example - Summer 2000 R P x y,( ) x y. x y Function for calculating parallel resistors. R 1 100000 R 2 120000 R C 4300 R E 5600 R S 5000 R L 10000 V p 15 V m 15 V BE 0.65 V T 0.025 99 0.99 r x 20 r 0 50000 R 3 100 v s 1 With v s = 0, the voltage gain is equal to v o. DC

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

332

DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders:...

333

examples.diffusion.coupled — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157-g518df83 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next topic. examples.diffusion.mesh20x20. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

examples.diffusion.mesh1D — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157-g518df83 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next topic. examples.diffusion.coupled. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

examples.updating.update1_0to2_0 — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... examples.updating.update0_1to1_0. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

examples.flow.stokesCavity — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157-g518df83 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next topic. Reactive Wetting Examples. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

examples.phase.anisotropy — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157-g518df83 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... examples.phase.impingement.mesh40x1. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

examples.phase.simple — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157-g518df83 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next topic. examples.phase.binaryCoupled. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

examples.diffusion.nthOrder.input4thOrder1D — FiPy 3.0.1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next topic. examples.diffusion.anisotropy. This Page. Show Source. Quick search. Enter search terms or a module, class or function name. Contact. ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

340

Example process hazard analysis of a Department of Energy water chlorination process  

SciTech Connect

On February 24, 1992, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released a revised version of Section 29 Code of Federal Regulations CFR Part 1910 that added Section 1910.119, entitled ``Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (the PSM Rule). Because US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 5480.4 and 5483.1A prescribe OSHA 29 CFR 1910 as a standard in DOE, the PSM Rule is mandatory in the DOE complex. A major element in the PSM Rule is the process hazard analysis (PrHA), which is required for all chemical processes covered by the PSM Rule. The PrHA element of the PSM Rule requires the selection and application of appropriate hazard analysis methods to systematically identify hazards and potential accident scenarios associated with processes involving highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs). The analysis in this report is an example PrHA performed to meet the requirements of the PSM Rule. The PrHA method used in this example is the hazard and operability (HAZOP) study, and the process studied is the new Hanford 300-Area Water Treatment Facility chlorination process, which is currently in the design stage. The HAZOP study was conducted on May 18--21, 1993, by a team from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Battelle-Columbus, the DOE, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The chlorination process was chosen as the example process because it is common to many DOE sites, and because quantities of chlorine at those sites generally exceed the OSHA threshold quantities (TQs).

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Learning with multiple representations: An example of a revision lesson in mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an example of learning with multiple representations in an A-level revision lesson on mechanics. The context of the problem involved the motion of a ball thrown vertically upwards in air and studying how the associated physical quantities changed during its flight. Different groups of students were assigned to look at the ball's motion using various representations: motion diagrams, vector diagrams, free-body diagrams, verbal description, equations and graphs, drawn against time as well as against displacement. Overall, feedback from students about the lesson was positive. We further discuss the benefits of using computer simulation to support and extend student learning.

Wong, Darren; Ng, Eng Hock; Wee, Loo Kang; 10.1088/0031-9120/46/2/005

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Symmetry as a source of hidden coherent structures in quantum physics: general outlook and examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general algebraic approach, incorporating both invariance groups and dynamic symmetry algebras, is developed to reveal hidden coherent structures (closed complexes and configurations) in quantum many-body physics models due to symmetries of their Hamiltonians $H$. Its general ideas are manifested on some recent new examples: 1) G-invariant bi-photons and a related SU(2)-invariant treatment of unpolarized light; 2) quasi-spin clusters in nonlinear models of quantum optics; 3) construction of composite particles and (para)fields from G-invariant clusters due to internal symmetries.

Valery P. Karassiov

1998-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Common-Collector Amplifier Example -Summer 2000 R P x y,( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common-Collector Amplifier Example - Summer 2000 R P x y,( ) x y. x y Function for calculating parallel resistors. R 1 100000 R 2 120000 R C 0 R E 5600 R S 5000 R L 10000 V p 15 V m 15 V BE 0.65 V T 0.025 99 0.99 r x 20 r 0 50000 v s 1 With v s = 0, the voltage gain is equal to v o. DC Bias Solution V BB

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

344

Common-Base Amplifier Example -Spring 2002 R P x y,( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common-Base Amplifier Example - Spring 2002 R P x y,( ) x y. x y Function for calculating parallel resistors. R 1 100000 R 2 120000 R C 4300 R E 5600 R S 100 R L 10000 V plus 15 V minus 15 V BE 0.65 V T 0.025 99 0.99 r x 20 r 0 50000 v s 1 With v s = 1, the voltage gain is equal to v o. 1 #12;DC Bias Circuit

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

345

Visualizing petroleum systems with a combination of GIS and multimedia technologies: An example from the West Siberia Basin  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum system studies provide an ideal application for the combination of Geographic Information System (GIS) and multimedia technologies. GIS technology is used to build and maintain the spatial and tabular data within the study region. Spatial data may comprise the zones of active source rocks and potential reservoir facies. Similarly, tabular data include the attendant source rock parameters (e.g. pyroloysis results, organic carbon content) and field-level exploration and production histories for the basin. Once the spatial and tabular data base has been constructed, GIS technology is useful in finding favorable exploration trends, such as zones of high organic content, mature source rocks in positions adjacent to sealed, high porosity reservoir facies. Multimedia technology provides powerful visualization tools for petroleum system studies. The components of petroleum system development, most importantly generation, migration and trap development typically span periods of tens to hundreds of millions of years. The ability to animate spatial data over time provides an insightful alternative for studying the development of processes which are only captured in [open quotes]snapshots[close quotes] by static maps. New multimedia-authoring software provides this temporal dimension. The ability to record this data on CD-ROMs and allow user- interactivity further leverages the combination of spatial data bases, tabular data bases and time-based animations. The example used for this study was the Bazhenov-Neocomian petroleum system of West Siberia.

Walsh, D.B.; Grace, J.D. (Earth Science Associates, Arlington, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Resolution of Indirect Anaphora in Japanese Sentences Using Examples "X no Y (Y of X)"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A noun phrase can indirectly refer to an entity that has already been mentioned. For example, "I went into an old house last night. The roof was leaking badly and ..." indicates that "the roof" is associated with "an old house", which was mentioned in the previous sentence. This kind of reference (indirect anaphora) has not been studied well in natural language processing, but is important for coherence resolution, language understanding, and machine translation. In order to analyze indirect anaphora, we need a case frame dictionary for nouns that contains knowledge of the relationships between two nouns but no such dictionary presently exists. Therefore, we are forced to use examples of "X no Y" (Y of X) and a verb case frame dictionary instead. We tried estimating indirect anaphora using this information and obtained a recall rate of 63% and a precision rate of 68% on test sentences. This indicates that the information of "X no Y" is useful to a certain extent when we cannot make us...

Masaki Murata; Hitoshi Isahara; Makoto Nagao

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluation of fracture treatments using a layered-reservoir description: Field examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a practical analysis technique to determine actual fracture geometry and proppant profile using a three-dimensional (3D) hydraulic-fracturing simulator. The hydraulic-fracturing model used in this study considers the variation of in-situ stress, Young`s modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and net pay thickness in the productive interval. When the method is applied, the results from the fracture propagation model conform well with the results the authors obtain from pressure-buildup and production-data analyses. This study analyzed hydraulic-fracturing treatments from several wells in the Vicksburg formation of the McAllen Ranch area in south Texas. The authors have provided guidelines to properly describe the treatment interval, how to use this information in the analysis of such fracture treatments, and how to confirm the results using pressure-transient tests and production-data analyses. This paper presents examples illustrating that a detailed description of the reservoir layers is essential to properly evaluate hydraulic-fracture treatments. For the example wells presented in this paper, post-fracture-production and pressure-transient data were available. The authors have analyzed production and pressure-transient data to estimate permeability and fracture half-length. The values of fracture half-length used to analyze the production data matched closely with those predicted by the fracture model.

Rahim, Z.; Holditch, S.A.; Zuber, M.D. [Holditch and Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Buehring, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Retrieving Biomedical Images through Content-Based Learning from Examples Using Fine Granularity  

SciTech Connect

Traditional content-based image retrieval methods based on learning from examples analyze and attempt to understand high-level semantics of an image as a whole. They typically apply certain case-based reasoning technique to interpret and retrieve images through measuring the semantic similarity or relatedness between example images and search candidate images. The drawback of such a traditional content-based image retrieval paradigm is that the summation of imagery contents in an image tends to lead to tremendous variation from image to image. Hence, semantically related images may only exhibit a small pocket of common elements, if at all. Such variability in image visual composition poses great challenges to content-based image retrieval methods that operate at the granularity of entire images. In this study, we explore a new content-based image retrieval algorithm that mines visual patterns of finer granularities inside a whole image to identify visual instances which can more reliably and generically represent a given search concept. We performed preliminary experiments to validate our new idea for content-based image retrieval and obtained very encouraging results.

Xu, Songhua [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [University of Hong Kong, The; Lau, Francis [University of Hong Kong, The

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Effect of Epistemic Uncertainty Modeling Approach on Decision-Making: Example using Equipment Performance Indicator  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative risk assessments are an integral part of risk-informed regulation of current and future nuclear plants in the U.S. The Bayesian approach to uncertainty, in which both stochastic and epistemic uncertainties are represented with precise probability distributions, is the standard approach to modeling uncertainties in such quantitative risk assessments. However, there are long-standing criticisms of the Bayesian approach to epistemic uncertainty from many perspectives, and a number of alternative approaches have been proposed. Among these alternatives, the most promising (and most rapidly developing) would appear to be the concept of imprecise probability. In this paper, we employ a performance indicator example to focus the discussion. We first give a short overview of the traditional Bayesian paradigm and review some its controversial aspects, for example, issues with so-called noninformative prior distributions. We then discuss how the imprecise probability approach treats these issues and compare it with two other approaches: sensitivity analysis and hierarchical Bayes modeling. We conclude with some practical implications for risk-informed decision making.

Dana Kelly; Robert Youngblood

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

FORMALISM FOR INCLUSION OF MEASURED REACTION CROSS SECTIONS IN STELLAR RATES INCLUDING UNCERTAINTIES AND ITS APPLICATION TO NEUTRON CAPTURE IN THE s-PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general formalism to include experimental reaction cross sections into calculations of stellar rates is presented. It also allows us to assess the maximally possible reduction of uncertainties in the stellar rates by experiments. As an example for the application of the procedure, stellar neutron capture reactivities from KADoNiS v0.3 are revised and the remaining uncertainties shown. Many of the uncertainties in the stellar rates are larger than those obtained experimentally. This has important consequences for s-process models and the interpretation of meteoritic data because it allows the rates of some reactions to vary within a larger range than previously assumed.

Rauscher, Thomas [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements.

MJ Fayer

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Dye lasing arrangement including an optical assembly for altering the cross-section of its pumping beam and method  

SciTech Connect

An optical assembly is disclosed herein along with a method of operation for use in a dye lasing arrangement, for example a dye laser oscillator or a dye amplifier, in which a continuous stream of dye is caused to flow through a given zone in a cooperating dye chamber while the zone is being illuminated by light from a pumping beam which is directed into the given zone. This in turn causes the dye therein to lase and thereby produce a new dye beam in the case of a dye laser oscillator or amplify a dye beam in the case of a dye amplifier. The optical assembly so disclosed is designed to alter the pump beam such that the beam enters the dye chamber with a different cross-sectional configuration, preferably one having a more uniform intensity profile, than its initially produced cross-sectional configuration. To this end, the assembly includes a network of optical components which first act on the beam while the latter retains its initially produced cross-sectional configuration for separating it into a plurality of predetermined segments and then recombines the separated components in a predetermined way which causes the recombined beam to have the different cross-sectional configuration.

O' Neil, Richard W. (Pleasanton, CA); Sweatt, William C. (Alburquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

DOT Motor-fuel use statistics summary to 1995 The data included...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motor-fuel use statistics summary to 1995 The data included in this submission is United States Department of Transportation (DOT) data up to 1995. The data includes motor-fuel...

354

Molecular Dynamics Model of Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Including Ionization Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Dynamics Model of Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Including A molecular dynamics model of UV-MALDI including ionization processes is presented. In addition/desorption of molecular systems, it includes radiative and nonradiative decay, exciton hopping, two pooling processes

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

355

Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

Questions and Answers - What is one example of indirect evidence that  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How do I make amodel of an atom? How do I make a<br>model of an atom? Previous Question (How do I make a model of an atom?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is an element? How many elements are there?) What is an element? Howmany elements are there? What is one example of indirect evidence that scientists use to study an atom? Pretty much everything we know about atoms is indirect evidence. One can't really see atoms. We do see enough of their effects that we can, with confidence, describe the nature of atoms. Here at Jefferson Lab we have quite a few instruments to measure the properties and behavior of atoms. We use a few simple tricks to measure atoms. The most common method is to shoot the atoms through an easy-to-ionize gas or liquid. Argon is the most

357

Guidelines, processes and tools for coastal ecosystem restoration, with examples from the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a systematic approach to coastal restoration projects in five phases: planning, implementation, performance assessment, adaptive management, and dissemination of results. Twenty features of the iterative planning process are synthesized. The planning process starts with a vision, a description of the ecosystem and landscape, and goals. A conceptual model and planning objectives are developed, a site is selected using prioritization techniques, and numerical models contribute to preliminary designs as needed. Performance criteria and reference sites are selected and the monitoring program is designed. The monitoring program is emphasized as a tool to assess project performance and identify problems affecting progression toward project goals, in an adaptive management framework. Key approaches to aspects of the monitoring program are reviewed and detailed with project examples. Within the planning process, cost analysis involves budgeting, scheduling, and financing. Finally, documentation is peer reviewed prior to making construction plans and final costing.

Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Adkins, Jeffery E.; Judd, Chaeli; Anderson, Michael G.; Buenau, Kate E.; Borde, Amy B.; Johnson, Gary E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

DOE-HDBK-1201-97; Guide to Good Practices Evaluation Instrument Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-97 1-97 January 1997 Supersedes DOE-STD-1006-92 July 1992 DOE HANDBOOK GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES EVALUATION INSTRUMENT EXAMPLES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE97000784 DOE-HDBK-1201-97 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by all DOE Components and their contractors. The Handbook incorporates editorial changes to DOE-

359

Tissue distribution as a factor in species susceptibility to toxicity and hazard assessment. Example: methylmercury  

SciTech Connect

Data on the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of methylmercury(MeHg) in cats and humans were utilized as an example of how such data can assist in extrapolating toxicity data between animal species. These data demonstrate that the whole-body half-time for clearance of MeHg was the same for cats and humans and that the concentration of MeHg in the brain at comparable signs of toxicity were the same (10 ppM) in the two species. However, the blood:brain ratio of MeHg concentration was 10 times as high in cats (1:1) as humans (1:10). From these data it was hypothesized that the no-effect level of methylmercury intake in cats should be 10 times that for humans. This hypothesis was verified from toxia data on MeHg toxicity in cats and humans.

Willes, R.F.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

An example of physical system with hyperbolic attractor of Smale - Williams type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple and transparent example of a non-autonomous flow system, with hyperbolic strange attractor is suggested. The system is constructed on a basis of two coupled van der Pol oscillators, the characteristic frequencies differ twice, and the parameters controlling generation in both oscillators undergo a slow periodic counter-phase variation in time. In terms of stroboscopic Poincar\\'{e} section, the respective four-dimensional mapping has a hyperbolic strange attractor of Smale - Williams type. Qualitative reasoning and quantitative data of numerical computations are presented and discussed, e.g. Lyapunov exponents and their parameter dependencies. A special test for hyperbolicity based on statistical analysis of distributions of angles between stable and unstable subspaces of a chaotic trajectory has been performed. Perspectives of further comparative studies of hyperbolic and non-hyperbolic chaotic dynamics in physical aspect are outlined.

Sergey P. Kuznetsov

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Science and the Energy Security Challenge: The Example of Solid-State Lighting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Securing a viable, carbon neutral energy future for humankind will require an effort of gargantuan proportions. As outlined clearly in a series of workshops sponsored by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, fundamental advances in scientific understanding are needed to broadly implement many of the technologies that are held out as promising options to meet future energy needs, ranging from solar energy, to nuclear energy, to approaches to clean combustion. Using solid state lighting based on inorganic materials as an example, I will discuss some recent results and new directions, emphasizing the multidisciplinary, team nature of the endeavor. I will also offer some thoughts about how to encourage translation of the science into attractive, widely available products - a significant challenge that cannot be ignored. This case study offers insight into approaches that are likely to be beneficial for addressing other aspects of the energy security challenge.

Phillips, Julia (Sandia)

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including 0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders: DOE and NNSA employees Scope: DOE Order 440.1 B establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Summary: Among the requirements of DOE Order 440.1 B, the Department must provide its employees, including NNSA, a number of protections relating to whistle blowing guidelines. The relevant section of requirements includes: 4. REQUIREMENTS. DOE elements must:

363

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? Home > Groups > Utility Rate Does anyone know what pieces of electric rates are included in the NREL/Ventyx database of rates by utility, i.e. is it supply only or does the file include supply, transmission & distribution costs? Thanks! Submitted by Vbugnion on 27 February, 2013 - 16:25 1 answer Points: 1 Hi Vbugnion, Just to clarify, you're not asking about the OpenEI utility rates, but rather the Ventyx rates found here: http://developer.nrel.gov/doc/api/georeserv/service/utility_rates If so, then the Ventyx rates do include all bundled rates (which includes supply, trans, and distr costs). However, there's a small but non-zero possibility that a few energy-only or delivery-only rates may not have been cleaned

366

Calculation of two-phase dispersed droplet-in-vapor flows including normal shock waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for calculating quasi-one-dimensional, steady-state, two-phase dispersed droplet-in-vapor flow has been developed. The technique is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic single component flow in which normal shock waves may occur, and is the basis for a two-dimensional model. The flow is assumed to be inviscid except for droplet drag. Temperature and pressure equilibrium between phases is assumed, although this is not a requirement of the technique. Example calculations of flow in one-dimensional nozzles with and without normal shocks are given and compared with experimentally measured pressure profiles for both low quality and high quality two-phase steam/water flow.

Comfort, W.J.; Alger, T.W.; Giedt, W.H.; Crowe, C.T.

1976-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Multi-objective design and optimization of district energy systems including polygeneration energy conversion technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present context of finding ways to decrease CO2 emissions linked with human activity, district energy systems including polygeneration energy conversion technologies are likely… (more)

Weber, Céline Isabelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Stocks of Crude Oil (Including SPR) - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

369

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation describes the projections for petroleum-based gasoline and distillate in the Update AEO 2008, which includes the impacts of the Energy Independence and Security Act.

Information Center

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

ORISE: REAC/TS Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDIA ADVISORY: REACTS International Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima crisis FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 31, 2011 FY11-42 Who: Radiation Emergency Assistance Center...

371

Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new sequences from the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to other angiosperms. BMC Genomics 2006, 7:61. 20.history of chloroplast genomics. Photosynth Res 2003, 76:Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Procedures to identify Energy Conservation Opportunities applied to HVAC system: example of VSD of chilled water pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedures to identify Energy Conservation Opportunities applied to HVAC system: example of VSD of HVAC equipment using variable speed drive (VSD) is an Energy Conservation Opportunity (ECO) which can

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

373

Large-Scale Urban Decontamination; Developments, Historical Examples and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

Recent terrorist threats and actual events have lead to a renewed interest in the technical field of large scale, urban environment decontamination. One of the driving forces for this interest is the real potential for the cleanup and removal of radioactive dispersal device (RDD or “dirty bomb”) residues. In response the U. S. Government has spent many millions of dollars investigating RDD contamination and novel decontamination methodologies. Interest in chemical and biological (CB) cleanup has also peaked with the threat of terrorist action like the anthrax attack at the Hart Senate Office Building and with catastrophic natural events such as Hurricane Katrina. The efficiency of cleanup response will be improved with these new developments and a better understanding of the “old reliable” methodologies. Perhaps the most interesting area of investigation for large area decontamination is that of the RDD. While primarily an economic and psychological weapon, the need to cleanup and return valuable or culturally significant resources to the public is nonetheless valid. Several private companies, universities and National Laboratories are currently developing novel RDD cleanup technologies. Because of its longstanding association with radioactive facilities, the U. S. Department of Energy National Laboratories are at the forefront in developing and testing new RDD decontamination methods. However, such cleanup technologies are likely to be fairly task specific; while many different contamination mechanisms, substrate and environmental conditions will make actual application more complicated. Some major efforts have also been made to model potential contamination, to evaluate both old and new decontamination techniques and to assess their readiness for use. Non-radioactive, CB threats each have unique decontamination challenges and recent events have provided some examples. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as lead agency for these emergency cleanup responses, has a sound approach for decontamination decision-making that has been applied several times. The anthrax contamination at the U. S. Hart Senate Office Building and numerous U. S. Post Office facilities are examples of employing novel technical responses. Decontamination of the Hart Office building required development of a new approach for high level decontamination of biological contamination as well as techniques for evaluating the technology effectiveness. The World Trade Center destruction also demonstrated the need for, and successful implementation of, appropriate cleanup methodologies. There are a number of significant lessons that can be gained from a look at previous large scale cleanup projects. Too often we are quick to apply a costly “package and dispose” method when sound technological cleaning approaches are available. Understanding historical perspectives, advanced planning and constant technology improvement are essential to successful decontamination.

Rick Demmer

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates 03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates April 15, 2011 - 1:46am Addthis PROBLEM: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates PLATFORM: For Mac OS X Server v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.6.7 and Mac OS X Server v10.6.7 ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025362 APPLE-SA-2011-04-14-4 Security Update 2011-002 Apple Support Downloads IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A partner of Comodo with Registration Authority capabilities suffered an internal security breach and the attacker caused seven certificates to be

375

Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of plants included in the estimate of planned capacity per GEA Pages using the property "Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alaska Geothermal Region + 3 + C Cascades Geothermal Region + 1 + Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region + 4 + G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region + 7 + H Hawaii Geothermal Region + 1 + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + 4 + I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region + 1 + N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 9 + Northern Rockies Geothermal Region + 0 + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 6 +

376

Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

Rolllins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material  

SciTech Connect

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fallout of Debris from Tornadic Thunderstorms: A Historical Perspective and Two Examples from VORTEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results of an investigation of debris lofted by tornadoes, its long-distance transport by thunderstorms, and its subsequent fallout are reported. The authors begin with a review of historical accounts, including the unique study of ...

John T. Snow; Amy Lee Wyatt; Ann K. McCarthy; Eric K. Bishop

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications: North Sea oil field example  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Improving Compressed Air Energy Efficiency in Automotive Plants - Practical Examples and Implementation  

SciTech Connect

The automotive industry is the largest industry in the United States in terms of the dollar value of production [1]. U.S. automakers face tremendous pressure from foreign competitors, which have an increasing manufacturing presence in this country. The Big Three North American Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler are reacting to declining sales figures and economic strain by working more efficiently and seeking out opportunities to reduce production costs without negatively affecting the production volume or the quality of the product. Successful, cost-effective investment and implementation of the energy efficiency technologies and practices meet the challenge of maintaining the output of high quality product with reduced production costs. Automotive stamping and assembly plants are typically large users of compressed air with annual compressed air utility bills in the range of $2M per year per plant. This paper focuses on practical methods that the authors have researched, analyzed and implemented to improve compressed air system efficiency in automobile manufacturing facilities. It describes typical compressed air systems in automotive stamping and assembly plants, and compares these systems to best practices. The paper then presents a series of examples, organized using the method of inside-out approach, which strategically identifies the energy savings in the compressed air system by first minimizing end-use demand, then minimizing distribution losses, and finally making improvements to primary energy conversion equipment, the air compressor plant.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Kissock, Professor Kelly [University of Dayton, Ohio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Engineering Manhattan style: Sandia Laboratories as an example of postwar engineering  

SciTech Connect

A great deal has been written about the history of science in America since World War II. Much of that work has explored the government`s research and development establishment, focusing on the scientific community immediately after the war. It is generally argued that the apparent triumphs of the huge and expensive wartime research and development projects gave rise to a belief that scientific resources should be nurtured and kept on hand - ready to provide service in an emergency. The Cold War drive for more and better weapons further fed this belief, leading to a massive system of national laboratories, military laboratories, and defense industries. The science of this complex is built on extensive financial support, the central strategy of which is that by steadily, and occasionally even lavishly funding large research programs, you will have a constant stream of scientific ideas that can be applied to national security purposes. What is true of science, is also true, in slightly modified form, of postwar engineering. The story I want to tell you today is, I think, an example of the way Cold War engineering r&d for national security worked. This report describes aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Investigation and optimization of composting processes--test systems and practical examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine the optimal course of composting it is useful to carry out experiments. The selection of the right experimental set-up depends on the question of concern. Each set-up is useful for a particular application and has its limits. Two test systems of different scales (up to 1500 ml; up to 100 l) are introduced. The purpose and importance of each system design shall be highlighted by application examples: (1) Suitability of a liquid industrial residue as composting accelerator; (2) Determination of the compost maturity; (3) Behaviour of odor-reducing additives during waste collection and composting; (4) Production of tailor-made compost with respect to Nitrogen (5) Suitability of O{sub 2}-enriched air for acceleration of composting. Small-scale respiration experiments are useful to optimize parameters which have to be adjusted during substrate pre-treatment and composting, with the exception of particle size and temperature, and to reduce the number of variants which have to be investigated in greater detail in larger scale experiments. As all regulation possibilities such as aeration, moistening, turning can be simulated with the technical scale set-up, their complex cooperation can be taken into consideration. Encouraging composting variants can be tested, compared and optimized.

Koerner, I.; Braukmeier, J.; Herrenklage, J.; Leikam, K.; Ritzkowski, M.; Schlegelmilch, M.; Stegmann, R

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

An example of neutronic penalizations in reactivity transient analysis using 3D coupled chain HEMERA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEMERA (Highly Evolutionary Methods for Extensive Reactor Analyses), is a fully coupled 3D computational chain developed jointly by IRSN and CEA. It is composed of CRONOS2 (core neutronics, cross sections library from APOLLO2), FLICA4 (core thermal-hydraulics) and the system code CATHARE. Multi-level and multi-dimensional models are developed to account for neutronics, core thermal-hydraulics, fuel thermal analysis and system thermal-hydraulics, dedicated to best-estimate, conservative simulations and sensitivity analysis. In IRSN, the HEMERA chain is widely used to study several types of reactivity accidents and for sensitivity studies. Just as an example of the HEMERA possibilities, we present here two types of neutronic penalizations and their impact on a power transient due to a REA (Rod Ejection Accident): in the first one, we studied a bum-up distribution modification and in the second one, a delayed-neutron fraction modification. Both modifications are applied to the whole core or localized in a few assemblies. Results show that it is possible to use global or local changes but 1) in case of bum-up modification, the total core power can increase when assembly peak power decrease so, care has to be taken if the goal is to maximize a local power peak and 2) for delayed-neutron fraction, a local modification can have the same effect as the one on the whole core, provided that it is large enough. (authors)

Dubois, F.; Normand, B.; Sargeni, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Reactor Safety Div., BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Rose Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 September 6, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline is available to American consumers starting today. "While we've largely seen the best of American generosity and unity throughout the recovery effort, we recognize that there are some bad actors that may try to take advantage of the situation. Consumers are our first line of defense in guarding against gas price gouging. I can assure you, our Administration - from the President down - takes this issue very

385

RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCLUDE IN CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION'S 2009 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT (IEPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCLUDE IN CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION'S 2009 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT solutions. Overview Past Energy Commission Integrated Energy Policy Reports (IEPRs) have recognized (IEPR) Submitted By: Steven Weissman Associate Director Center for Law, Energy and the Environment

Kammen, Daniel M.

386

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of Particulate Matter R degradation, chemostat, models, growth rate, equilibrium, bistability. 1. INTRODUCTION Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

Numerical simulation of ECRIPAC plasma behaviour with Vlasov equations including electron and ion collective effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

976 Numerical simulation of ECRIPAC plasma behaviour with Vlasov equations including electron of 4 MeV energy with very short pulses. (`ompared to ISlectron Ring Accelerators, ECRIPAC presents

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

Code Thrust 1400 Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering (including Aerodynamics, Aerospace Engineering, and Space Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences (including Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technologies, Communication Disorders Sciences and Services, Gerontology, Health and Medical Administrative Services, Other Health Professions and Related Services, Environmental health, Geotechnical, Hydraulic, Hydrologic, Sanitary, Structural, and Transportation) 1404

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

390

Light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Sweatt, William (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Modification of the Köhler Equation to Include Soluble Trace Gases and Slightly Soluble Substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized reformulation of the Köhler theory to include the effect of soluble gases and slightly soluble aerosol substances is presented. A single equation is derived that takes into account 1) the Kelvin effect; 2) the Raoult effect caused ...

Ari Laaksonen; Pekka Korhonen; Markku Kulmala; Robert J. Charlson

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and Temperature-Dependent Ice Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new bulk microphysical parameterization (BMP) scheme is presented that includes a diagnosed riming intensity and its impact on ice characteristics. As a result, the new scheme represents a continuous spectrum from pristine ice particles to ...

Yanluan Lin; Brian A. Colle

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling and Controller Design of a Wind Energy Conversion System Including a Matrix Converter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a grid-connected wind-energy converter system including a matrix converter is proposed. The matrix converter, as a power electronic converter, is used to… (more)

Barakati, Seyed Masoud

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Including Surface Kinetic Effects in Simple Models of Ice Vapor Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for kinetically-limited vapor growth and aspect ratio evolution of atmospheric single ice crystals is presented. The method is based on the adaptive habit model of Chen and Lamb (1994), but is modified to include the deposition ...

Chengzhu Zhang; Jerry Y. Harrington

395

A Simple Model of Abyssal Circulation, Including Effects of Wind, Buoyancy and Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine problems of steady abyssal circulation using an inviscid planetary geostrophic layered model. The model includes an active wind-driven upper layer and arbitrary topography; forcing is in the form of specified interlayer mass fluxes ...

Susan L. Hautala; Stephen C. Riser

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Options for Removing Multiple Pollutants Including CO2 at Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical review of the fuel changes and technology options for existing coal-fired power plants in response to potential new requirements for increasingly stringent multi-pollutant air emissions reductions, possibly including carbon dioxide (CO2). Preliminary costing of the major options is included. A database of the U.S. coal-fired power plants has been developed for further, more specific analyses.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

397

Numerical spin tracking in a synchrotron computer code Spink: Examples (RHIC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the course of acceleration of polarized protons in a synchrotron, many depolarizing resonances are encountered. They are classified in two categories: Intrinsic resonances that depend on the lattice structure of the ring and arise from the coupling of betatron oscillations with horizontal magnetic fields, and imperfection resonances caused by orbit distortions due to field errors. In general, the spectrum of resonances vs spin tune G{gamma}(G = 1.7928, the proton gyromagnetic anomaly, and y the proton relativistic energy ratio) for a given lattice tune {nu}, or vs {nu} for a given G{gamma}, contains a multitude of lines with various amplitudes or resonance strengths. The depolarization due to the resonance lines can be studied by numerically tracking protons with spin in a model accelerator. Tracking will allow one to check the strength of resonances, to study the effects of devices like Siberian Snakes, to find safe lattice tune regions where to operate, and finally to study in detail the operation of special devices such as Spin Flippers. A few computer codes exist that calculate resonance strengths E{sub k} and perform tracking, for proton and electron machines. Most relevant to our work for the AGS and RHIC machines are the programs Depol and Snake. Depol, calculates the E{sub k}`s by Fourier analysis. The input to Depol is the output of a machine model code, such as Synch or Mad, containing all details of the lattice. Snake, does the tracking, starting from a synthetic machine, that contains a certain number of periods, of FODO cells, of Siberian snakes, etc. We believed the complexities of machines like the AGS or RHIC could not be adequately represented by Snake. Then, we decided to write a new code, Spink, that combines some of the features of Depol and Snake. I.E., Spink reads a Mad output like Depol and tracks as Snake does. The structure of the code and examples for RHIC are described in the following.

Luccio, A.

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

398

Faulting, fracturing, and sealing in foreland thrust belts: Examples from the subalpine chains  

SciTech Connect

The hydrocarbon potential of foreland thrust belts arises from source and reservoir rocks juxtaposed by the movement of thrust sheets, promoting maturation by loading and generating structural traps. Deformation in thrust belts can be localized on fault zones or distributed throughout thrust sheets; different deformation mechanisms operate to increase and decrease permeability. Migration and reservoir properties may be enhanced or reduced by faulting and fault-related deformation. These processes are examined in detail using examples from the northwest subalpine chains of France, a fold-and-thrust belt of well-differentiated Mesozoic shales and carbonates. Seeps of bitumen in foreland basin sediments indicate some migration of hydrocarbons along faults linking probable source and reservoir areas. Detailed examination of fault rocks and thrust sheets shows that fracture formation is an important strain mechanism which has the potential to form regions of enhanced permeability in structures such as hanging wall anticlines. However, the fractures observed are in general recemented, forming with crack-seal crystal growth. The faults themselves are complex zones up to tens of meters thick of subparallel anastomosing gouge, fractures, stylolites, and crystalline calcite, indicating synchronous cataclasis and pressure solution. The range of scales of fracturing suggests stick-slip (microseismic) fault activity. Permeability of the fault zones is enhanced during seismic fault slip and is otherwise steadily decreased by pressure solution and calcite deposition. The available migration pathways, and hence the location of potential reservoirs, is controlled by the timing, mechanisms, and extent of fault activity in this common and productive tectonic regime.

Bowler, S.; Butler, R.W.H.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Examples of Benefits from the NEPA process for ARRA funded activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efforts to implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) include ensuring, and reporting on, timely NEPA reviews prepared in support of projects and activities funded under major provisions of ARRA. In addition to reporting on the status of the NEPA environmental reviews, agencies also report on the benefits of NEPA.

400

Information and its management for differentiation of agricultural products: The example of specialty coffee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prices of most of agricultural commodities show a long-term declining trend. Increasingly markets are signaling demand for differentiated products and in order to increase their incomes farmers and traders are looking to higher value options, including ... Keywords: Agricultural product differentiation, Agricultural supply chains, Information management, Internet-based, Specialty coffee

Norbert Niederhauser; Thomas Oberthür; Sibylle Kattnig; James Cock

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, and academic sectors who support advocacy, research, scholarships, hands-on training, funding, and networking opportunities to prepare and inspire young women to enter and thrive in STEM fields. C3E Network participants have pledged many types of commitments, from highlighting female role models to creating hands-on activities for young girls. Ongoing activities include: * Filming and featuring women in clean energy fields on online / TV outlets (Earth Day Network); * Designing pilot projects and expanding Young Women's Conferences at DOE's

402

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Including Alternative Resources Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-55979 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110

403

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-wind-energy-s Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-wind-energy- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about wind turbines and RETscreen's wind module, which can be used to project the cost and production of a wind

404

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability February 25, 2009 - 4:52pm Addthis President Barack Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (P.L.111-5). The $787 billion economic recovery package represents the largest and most ambitious effort to stimulate the economy in United States history. The Department of Energy (DOE) will be responsible for implementing over $38 billion of the $787 billion package. Of the DOE total, $4.5 Billion is allotted to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. As outlined in the legislation, these funds are an investment in a

405

1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the (1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the deployment of new Smart Grid applications, and how are these needs being met? The current communication needs of SCE include: telephony, data, video, voice dispatch, mobile data, grid monitoring, grid control, tele-protection, customer communication, load management, automated meter reading, and collaboration capabilities ranging from virtual meetings to e-learning. SCE is using a combination of private, leased, and shared telecommunication networks to support these requirements. Those applications that require high availability, low latency, and stringent security rely on a private telecommunications network (SCEnet). A combination of transport media are

406

Fourier and Cauchy-Stieltjes transforms of power laws including stable distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a class of probability measures whose densities near infinity are mixtures of Pareto distributions. This class can be characterized by the Fourier transform which has a power series expansion including real powers, not only integer powers. This class includes stable distributions in probability and also non-commutative probability theories. We also characterize the class in terms of the Cauchy-Stieltjes transform and the Voiculescu transform. If the stability index is greater than one, stable distributions in probability theory do not belong to that class, while they do in non-commutative probability.

Takahiro Hasebe

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. Included is a comparison of the proposed Solaron-Heat Pump and Solaron-Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, Installation Drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities from July 1, 1977 through November 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Combinatorial evaluation of systems including decomposition of a system representation into fundamental cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One embodiment of the present invention includes a computer operable to represent a physical system with a graphical data structure corresponding to a matroid. The graphical data structure corresponds to a number of vertices and a number of edges that each correspond to two of the vertices. The computer is further operable to define a closed pathway arrangement with the graphical data structure and identify each different one of a number of fundamental cycles by evaluating a different respective one of the edges with a spanning tree representation. The fundamental cycles each include three or more of the vertices.

Oliveira, Joseph S. (Richland, WA); Jones-Oliveira, Janet B. (Richland, WA); Bailey, Colin G. (Wellington, NZ); Gull, Dean W. (Seattle, WA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Impact of High-Penetration PV on Distribution System Performance: Example Cases and Analysis Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High penetration of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in the electric grid is beginning to challenge distribution planners and engineers. This technical update discusses the factors that can have a significant impact on a distribution feeder's response to PV generation. The report considers both the circuit and the photovoltaic generation characteristics. The circuit types and characteristics span the expected range of power delivery and control elements. Photovoltaic characteristics include syste...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Flux Parameterization Including the Effects of Capillary Waves and Sea State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air–sea interaction model that includes turbulent transport due to capillary waves (surface ripples) is developed. The model differs from others in that the physical premises are applicable to low wind speeds (10-m wind speed, U10 < 5 m s?1) ...

Mark A. Bourassa; Dayton G. Vincent; W. L. Wood

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ECOVILLAGE FACTS The complex includes 50 apartments (18 original and 32 new)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, community gatherings o Kitchen o Playroom o Dryers for Ecovillage residents o Solar water heater o Solar of the Ecovillage apartments include: o solar tubes and compact fluorescent lighting o low-flow toilets College-harvested wood o natural building techniques o a composting toilet o a net-metering solar electric

Baltisberger, Jay H.

414

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Method of preparing a negative electrode including lithium alloy for use within a secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative electrode that includes a lithium alloy as active material is prepared by briefly submerging a porous, electrically conductive substrate within a melt of the alloy. Prior to solidification, excess melt can be removed by vibrating or otherwise manipulating the filled substrate to expose interstitial surfaces. Electrodes of such as solid lithium-aluminum filled within a substrate of metal foam are provided.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Palos Hills, IL); Olszanski, Theodore W. (Roselle, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

1977-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

Postgraduate Handbook Courses, programs and any arrangements for programs including staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn oil; Camelina oil. One of the following: Trans-Esterification, Esterification, Hydrotreating-process renewable biomass and petroleum. 5 POTENTIALLY RELEVANT I Naphtha, LPG Camelina oil Hydrotreating 5 including peat, dung, plant-oils, bees wax, rendered animal fats, draft animals, natural derived sources

Benatallah, Boualem

417

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS OF PARTICULATE MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS-SupAgro MISTEA, 2 p. Viala 34060 Montpellier, France, fekih@supagro.inra.fr Introduction. Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

ON THE STANDARD METABOLIC RATES OF TROPICAL TUNAS, INCLUDING THE EFFECf OF BODY SIZE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE STANDARD METABOLIC RATES OF TROPICAL TUNAS, INCLUDING THE EFFECf OF BODY SIZE AND ACUTE. This study was undertaken to obtain these data for the tropical tuna species, yellowfin tuna, Tkunnl tuna, KatsltWOO1t8 pelamis, previously published. The effect of acute temperature change on the SMR

420

Faddeev-type calculations of few-body nuclear reactions including Coulomb interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The method of screening and renormalization is used to include the Coulomb interaction between the charged particles in the description of few-body nuclear reactions. Calculations are done in the framework of Faddeev-type equations in momentum-space. The reliability of the method is demonstrated. The Coulomb effect on observables is discussed.

A. Deltuva

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that previously contained chemicals (hazardous or non-hazardous) are collected by CWS for recycling. Bottles should be dry and empty without chemical residue. Rinse and collect rinsate in chemical

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

423

Selecting Optional Fees Optional fees include meal plans, money on Tigerstripe, and a TAPS yearbook. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supports all of the services at Redfern and includes: · Professional services of primary health care on pharmaceuticals, psychological testing, laboratory and x- ray services. · After Hours Nursewise telephone service. http://sisweb.clemson.edu/ Health Fee Policy University policy requires all students registered for six

Bolding, M. Chad

424

Solar water heater installation guidelines. A manual for homeowners and professionals. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

The guidelines include detailed diagrams, a selected glossary, a bibliography of books and manuals which might prove useful and a checklist which should be used during and after the installation. The guidelines explain generally how to install a liquid solar hot water heater, but not a specific system. The following are covered: collector location, collector installation, plumbing, solar storage tanks, electrical, and insulation. (MHR)

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

THERMOMECHANICS OF PV MODULES INCLUDING THE VISCOELASTICITY OF EVA Ulrich Eitner1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the cell distance is 170µm. Keywords: PV module, Encapsulation, Simulation, Reliability, Mechanics 1THERMOMECHANICS OF PV MODULES INCLUDING THE VISCOELASTICITY OF EVA Ulrich Eitner1, *, Matthias by a comparison to displacement experiments where the thermomechanical deformation of solar cells in a PV laminate

428

Seismic fracture analysis of concrete gravity dams including dam-reservoir interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the seismic fracture response of concrete gravity dams is investigated with considering the effects of dam-reservoir interaction. A co-axial rotating crack model (CRCM), which includes the strain softening behavior, is selected for concrete ... Keywords: Concrete gravity dam, Dam-reservoir interaction, Non-linear analysis, Seismic fracture

Yusuf Calayir; Muhammet Karaton

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Security and Access Policy Security of and access to campus facilities, including campus residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security and Access Policy Security of and access to campus facilities, including campus residences facilities. Residence halls are secured 24 hours a day. Over extended breaks, the doors of all residence halls will be secured around the clock. Some facilities may have individual hours, which may vary

Escher, Christine

430

The Fuels and Lubricants Research Division of Southwest Research includes extensive engines, fuels and lubricants research,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caterpillar 1K Lubricant Test This test evaluates the piston deposits, liner wear, and oil consumption and oil consumption. The test is proposed for inclusion in the PC-10 category. Mack T8/T8A/T8E Lubricant of Mack engine oil specification EON+ 03, CI-4+ and will be included in PC-10. Mack T12 Lubricant Test

Chapman, Clark R.

431

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Feedback Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

already in effect for 9206 operations, such as plan-of-the-day, daily crew briefs, pre-job briefs, hazard identification, work planning, review of lessons learned, worker...

432

Can we assess the model complexity for a bioprocess ? Theory and example of the anaerobic digestion process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can we assess the model complexity for a bioprocess ? Theory and example of the anaerobic digestion the bioreactor. This provides the dimension of K. The method is applied to data from an anaerobic digestion can be obtained with 2 biomasses. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; Bioreactors; Modelling; Nonlinear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

433

Stippling by Example SungYe Kim Ross Maciejewski Tobias Isenberg William M. Andrews Wei Chen Mario Costa Sousa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and density of the marks can be varied, shades of gray are perceived within the stip- pled image. As such of hand-drawn stip- ple textures in scientific illustration. Our system takes a sample stipple image the stipple image. Although our approach allows us to extract example textures from an artist's stip- ple

434

Numerical Analysis on the Contribution of Urbanization to Wind Stilling: An Example over the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decline of surface wind speed (wind stilling) has been observed in many regions of the world. The greater Beijing metropolitan area in China is taken as an example for analyzing the urbanization impact on wind stilling. This study set up five ...

Aizhong Hou; Guangheng Ni; Hanbo Yang; Zhidong Lei

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz B. (Rocklin, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

437

Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the research performance progress report Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the research performance progress report Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Ellen Colligan, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Contract Management, Office of Acquisition and Project Management at (202) 287-1776, Ellen.colligan@hq.doe.gov Policy Flash 2013-49.pdf Attch_FA_RepReqChecklist_COMBINED_FINAL_4-23-13 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications ATTACHMENT FLASH 2011-46(6) Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for RD&D Projects

438

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

439

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

440

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dsm examples include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

442

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

443

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

444

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

445

2008 CIM-XML Interoperability Including CIM-Based Tools Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Initiatives have produced a number of drafts that have now become International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards, including the Common Information Model (CIM) and the Generic Interface Definition (GID) specifications. These standards provide the basis for model-driven information exchange both within and between control centers and other systems in utility operations across the enterprise. Previous interoperability tests validated the use and acceptance of the CIM standard translated into...

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

446

Method of preparing a negative electrode including lithium alloy for use within a secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative electrode that includes a lithium alloy as active material is prepared by briefly submerging a porous, electrically conductive substrate within a melt of the alloy. Prior to solidification, excess melt can be removed by vibrating or otherwise manipulating the filled substrate to expose interstitial surfaces. Electrodes of such a solid lithium--aluminum filled within a substrate of metal foam are provided. 1 figure, 1 table.

Tomczuk, Z.; Olszanski, W.; Battles, J.E.

1975-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

447

Impact of supersonic and subsonic aircraft on ozone: Including heterogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary calculations suggest that heterogeneous reactions are important in calculating the impact on ozone from emissions of trace gases from aircraft fleets. In this study, three heterogeneous chemical processes that occur on background sulfuric acid aerosols are included and their effects on O{sub 3}, NO{sub x}, Cl{sub x}, HCl, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ClONO{sub 2} are calculated.

Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1992-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

448

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Motor Management Guide Supporting Plant License Renewal Including Environmental Qualification Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute’s Large Electric Motor Users Group Information Working Group, which includes motor engineers, motor specialist consultants, and vendors. Environmental qualification (EQ) program owners were also involved in the development of this report. This report addresses the most important elements of a sound motor management program to support an informed decision on motor preservation and motor life extension. Motor life extensions of ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

450

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500.degree. C. to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, Michael J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Arzoumanidis, Gregory G. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet. 5 figs.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

452

A method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Microelectromechanical accelerometer with resonance-cancelling control circuit including an idle state  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital feedback control circuit is disclosed for use in an accelerometer (e.g. a microelectromechanical accelerometer). The digital feedback control circuit, which periodically re-centers a proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration, is based on a sigma-delta (.SIGMA..DELTA.) configuration that includes a notch filter (e.g. a digital switched-capacitor filter) for rejecting signals due to mechanical resonances of the proof mass and further includes a comparator (e.g. a three-level comparator). The comparator generates one of three possible feedback states, with two of the feedback states acting to re-center the proof mass when that is needed, and with a third feedback state being an "idle" state which does not act to move the proof mass when no re-centering is needed. Additionally, the digital feedback control system includes an auto-zero trim capability for calibration of the accelerometer for accurate sensing of acceleration. The digital feedback control circuit can be fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, bi-CMOS technology or bipolar technology and used in single- and dual-proof-mass accelerometers.

Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT); Campbell, David V. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Boxes G574 through G676 Cones. re: Insurance Directives, including War Risk and Insurance for Crews of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Hawaiian island of Kauai has been transmitting since late 1997. The data obtained during ATOC has shown, 1998). The timeseries obtained using the Kauai acoustic source is of similar quality in its ability, California Current, Kuroshio, and North Equato- rial Current bifurcation in the Philippine Sea are examples

US Army Corps of Engineers

456

The use of carbon fibers in wind turbine blade design: A SERI-8 blade example  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The benefit of introducing carbon fibers in a wind turbine blade was evaluated. The SERI-8 wind turbine blade was used as a baseline for study. A model of the blade strength and stiffness properties was created using the 3D-Beam code; the predicted geometry and structural properties were validated against available data and static test results. Different enhanced models, which represent different volumes of carbon fibers in the blade, were also studied for two design options: with and without bend-twist coupling. Studies indicate that hybrid blades have excellent structural properties compared to the all-glass SERI-8 blade. Recurring fabrication costs were also included in the study. The cost study highlights the importance of the labor-cost to material-cost ratio in the cost benefits and penalties of fabrication of a hybrid glass and carbon blade.

ONG,CHENG-HUAT; TSAI,STEPHEN W.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Design, Manufacturing and Integration of LHC Cryostat Components an Example of Collaboration between CERN and Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The components for the LHC cryostats and interconnections are supplied by European industry. The manufacturing, assembly and testing of these components in accordance with CERN technical specifications require a close collaboration and dedicated approach from the suppliers. This paper presents the different phases of design, manufacturing, testing and integration of four LHC cryostat components supplied by RIAL Vacuum (Parma, Italy), including 112 Insulation Vacuum Barriers (IVB), 482 Cold-mass Extension Tubes (CET), 121 cryostat vacuum vessel Jumper Elbows (JE) and 10800 Interconnection Sleeves (IS). The Quality Assurance Plan, which the four projects have in common, is outlined. The components are all leak-tight thin stainless steel assemblies (<10-8 mbar l/s), most of them operating at cryogenic temperature (2 K), however each having specific requirements. The particularities of each component are presented with respect to manufacturing, assembly and testing. These components are being integrated ...

Slits, Ivo; Canetti, Marco; Colombet, Thierry; Gangini, Fabrizio; Parma, Vittorio; Tock, Jean-Philippe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry  

SciTech Connect

Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse.

Wicks, G.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.; Folz, D.C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

X-ray Thomson scattering for partially ionized plasmas including the effect of bound levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Thomson scattering is being developed as a method to measure the temperature, electron density, and ionization state of high energy density plasmas such as those used in inertial confinement fusion. Most experiments are currently done at large laser facilities that can create bright X-ray sources, however the advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) provides a new bright source to use in these experiments. One challenge with X-ray Thomson scattering experiments is understanding how to model the scattering for partially ionized plasmas in order to include the contributions of the bound electrons in the scattered intensity. In this work we take the existing models of Thomson scattering that include elastic ion-ion scattering and the electron-electron plasmon scattering and add the contribution of the bound electrons in the partially ionized plasmas. We validated our model by analyzing existing beryllium experimental data. We then consider several higher Z materials such as Cr and predict the existe...

Nilsen, J; Cheng, K T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube, so that the threaded ends of the instrumentation tube do not unthread when subjected to vibration, such an instrumentation tube being suitable for use in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The instrumentation tube has a first member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of first holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The instrumentation tube also has a second member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of second holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The threads of the second member are caused to threadably engage the threads of the first member for defining a threaded joint therebetween. A sleeve having an inside surface surrounds the end portion of the first member and the end portion of the second member and thus surrounds the threaded joint. The sleeve includes a plurality of first projections and second projections that outwardly extend from the inside surface to engage the first holes and the second holes, respectively. The outside surface of the sleeve is crimped or swaged at the locations of the first projections and second projections such that the first projections and the second projections engage their respective holes. In this manner, independent rotation of the first member with respect to the second member is prevented, so that the instrumentation tube will not unthread at its threaded joint.

Obermeyer, Franklin D. (Pensacola, FL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

An Evaluation of Molten-Salt Power Towers Including Results of the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report utilizes the results of the Solar Two project, as well as continuing technology development, to update the technical and economic status of molten-salt power towers. The report starts with an overview of power tower technology, including the progression from Solar One to the Solar Two project. This discussion is followed by a review of the Solar Two project--what was planned, what actually occurred, what was learned, and what was accomplished. The third section presents preliminary information regarding the likely configuration of the next molten-salt power tower plant. This section draws on Solar Two experience as well as results of continuing power tower development efforts conducted jointly by industry and Sandia National Laboratories. The fourth section details the expected performance and cost goals for the first commercial molten-salt power tower plant and includes a comparison of the commercial performance goals to the actual performance at Solar One and Solar Two. The final section summarizes the successes of Solar Two and the current technology development activities. The data collected from the Solar Two project suggest that the electricity cost goals established for power towers are reasonable and can be achieved with some simple design improvements.

REILLY, HUGH E.; KOLB, GREGORY J.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

RELAP5-3D Code Includes Athena Features and Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Version 2.3 of the RELAP5-3D computer program includes all features and models previously available only in the ATHENA version of the code. These include the addition of new working fluids (i.e., ammonia, blood, carbon dioxide, glycerol, helium, hydrogen, lead-bismuth, lithium, lithium-lead, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and sodium-potassium) and a magnetohydrodynamic model that expands the capability of the code to model many more thermal-hydraulic systems. In addition to the new working fluids along with the standard working fluid water, one or more noncondensable gases (e.g., air, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen, sf6, xenon) can be specified as part of the vapor/gas phase of the working fluid. These noncondensable gases were in previous versions of RELAP5- 3D. Recently four molten salts have been added as working fluids to RELAP5-3D Version 2.4, which has had limited release. These molten salts will be in RELAP5-3D Version 2.5, which will have a general release like RELAP5-3D Version 2.3. Applications that use these new features and models are discussed in this paper.

Richard A. Riemke; Cliff B. Davis; Richard R. Schultz

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube, so that the threaded ends of the instrumentation tube do not unthread when subjected to vibration, such an instrumentation tube being suitable for use in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The instrumentation tube has a first member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of first holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The instrumentation tube also has a second member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of second holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The threads of the second member are caused to threadably engage the threads of the first member for defining a threaded joint there between. A sleeve having an inside surface surrounds the end portion of the first member and the end portion of the second member and thus surrounds the threaded joint. The sleeve includes a plurality of first projections and second projections that outwardly extend from the inside surface to engage the first holes and the second holes, respectively. The outside surface of the sleeve is crimped or swaged at the locations of the first projections and second projections such that the first projections and the second projections engage their respective holes. In this manner, independent rotation of the first member with respect to the second member is prevented, so that the instrumentation tube will not unthread at its threaded joint. 10 figures.

Obermeyer, F.D.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Transportation R and D included in thermal and mechanical sciences program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is a multiprogram research and development laboratory operated by The University of Chicago for the US Department of Energy. At Argonne, applied research in thermal and mechanical sciences is performed within the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section of the Energy Technology Division. Current program areas include compact evaporators and condensers for the process and transportation industries, ice slurries for district cooling, advanced fluids for improved heat transfer and reduced pressure drop, flow-induced vibration and flow distribution in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and dynamics and control of maglev systems. In general, the objective of the research is to extend the technology base in each of these areas and to facilitate its application in solving problems of importance to US industries and utilities. This is accomplished by developing validated design correlations and predictive methods. The staff of the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section have extensive experimental and analytical experience in heat transfer, multiphase flow, structural dynamics and control, fluid-structure interaction, transient flow and mixing, thermally driven flows, and flow visualization using ultra-high-speed video. Large, general-purpose test facilities and smaller, single-purpose test apparatuses are available for experiments and component design evaluation. A world-class capability in the study of flow-induced vibrations exists within the Section. Individual fact sheets, describing currently active research program areas, related facilities, and listing, as a contact, the principal investigator, are included.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Dye laser amplifier including an improved window configuration for its dye beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dye laser amplifier in which a continuously replenished supply of dye is excited with a first light beam in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam passing therethrough is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a cell though which a continuous stream of the dye is caused to pass, and means for directing the first beam into the cell while the second beam is directed into and through the same cell. There is also disclosed herein a specific improvement to this amplifier which resides in the use of a pair of particularly configured windows through which the second beam passes along fixed paths as the second beam enters and exits the dye cell. Each of these windows has a relatively thick main section which is substantially larger in dimensions transverse to its beam path than the cross section of the second beam itself, whereby to add structural integrity to the overall window. At the same time, the latter includes a second section which is disposed entirely within the confines of the main section and through which the second beam is intended to pass in its entirety. This second section is made substantially thinner than the main section in order to reduce optical distortion as the second beam passes therethrough.

O' Neil, Richard W. (Pleasanton, CA); Davin, James M. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Dye laser amplifier including an improved window configuration for its dye beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dye laser amplifier in which a continuously replenished supply of dye is excited with a first light beam in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam passing therethrough is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a cell though which a continuous stream of the dye is caused to pass, and means for directing the first beam into the cell while the second beam is directed into and through the same cell. There is also disclosed herein a specific improvement to this amplifier which resides in the use of a pair of particularly configured windows through which the second beam passes along fixed paths as the second beam enters and exits the dye cell. Each of these windows has a relatively thick main section which is substantially larger in dimensions transverse to its beam path than the cross section of the second beam itself, whereby to add structural integrity to the overall window. At the same time, the latter includes a second section which is disposed entirely within the confines of the main section and through which the second beam is intended to pass in its entirety. This second section is made substantially thinner than the main section in order to reduce optical distortion as the second beam passes therethrough. 4 figs.

O' Neil, R.W.; Davin, J.M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Analysis of Paraho oil shale products and effluents: an example of the multi-technique approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inorganic analysis of solid, liquid and gaseous samples from the Paraho Semiworks Retort was completed using a multitechnique approach. The data were statistically analyzed to determine both the precision of each method and to see how closely the various techniques compared. The data were also used to determine the redistribution of 31 trace and major elements in the various effluents, including the offgas for the Paraho Retort operating in the direct mode. The computed mass balances show that approximately 1% or greater fractions of the As, Co, Hg, N, Ni, S and Se are released during retorting and redistributed to the product shale oil, retort water or product offgas. The fraction for these seven elements ranged from almost 1% for Co and Ni to 50 to 60% for Hg and N. Approximately 20% of the S and 5% of the As and Se are released. The mass balance redistribution during retorting for Al, Fe, Mg, V and Zn was observed to be no greater than .05%. These redistribution figures are generally in agreement with previous mass balance studies made for a limited number of elements on laboratory or smaller scale pilot retorts. 7 tables.

Fruchter, J. S.; Wilkerson, C. L.; Evans, J. C.; Sanders, R. W.

1979-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

468

Stratigraphic controls on fluid distribution: An example from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Oil, gas, and water distribution in three drill sites (1 79 wells) studied in the Prudhoe Bay Field is controlled dominantly by sandstone and shale stratigraphy. Detailed reservoir description, encompassing genetic-stratigraphic correlations and three-dimensional reservoir modeling has provided a new look at the locations of remaining reserves in the upper Romeo and Tango intervals of the Ivishak Sandstone. Greater than 22 billion stock tank barrels constitute in-place oil reserves in Prudhoe Bay Field. Production in excess of nine billion barrels, in conjunction with waterflood and tertiary-recovery projects, has created a complex distribution of reservoir fluids. As oil is produced, the gas-cap expands and intersects laterally extensive shales to form gas underruns. Underruns are of great economic concern as they disrupt the NLOC and segregate oil lenses as well as causing high GOR wells. Recovering these oil lenses at low GORs requires precise analysis of in-place fluids, well placement, and completion strategy. Core descriptions and stratigraphic correlations provided the basis for facies interpretations and the deterministic division of the strata into twenty-four reservoir layers (twelve sandstone and shale units). Isochore, fluid-distribution, and NILOC maps were compiled for the reservoir horizons. Stratigraphic, structural, and fluid data integrated within a three-dimensional model resulted in an improved fluid-distribution picture and revealed numerous development opportunities including infill wells, sidetracks, and recompletions.

Burns, B.A.; Knock, D.; Tye, R.S. (ARCO Alaska, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Financial system loss as an example of high consequence, high frequency events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much work has been devoted to high consequence events with low frequency of occurrence. Characteristic of these events are bridge failure (such as that of the Tacoma Narrows), building failure (such as the collapse of a walkway at a Kansas City hotel), or compromise of a major chemical containment system (such as at Bhopal, India). Such events, although rare, have an extreme personal, societal, and financial impact. An interesting variation is demonstrated by financial losses due to fraud and abuse in the money management system. The impact can be huge, entailing very high aggregate costs, but these are a result of the contribution of many small attacks and not the result of a single (or few) massive events. Public awareness is raised through publicized events such as the junk bond fraud perpetrated by Milikin or gross mismanagement in the failure of the Barings Bank through unsupervised trading activities by Leeson in Singapore. These event,s although seemingly large (financial losses may be on the order of several billion dollars), are but small contributors to the estimated $114 billion loss to all types of financial fraud in 1993. This paper explores the magnitude of financial system losses and identifies new areas for analysis of high consequence events including the potential effect of malevolent intent.

McGovern, D.E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

471

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

472

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

SciTech Connect

Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

474

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

475

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

476

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

477

Theory, design, and operation of liquid metal fast breeder reactors, including operational health physics  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive evaluation was conducted of the radiation protection practices and programs at prototype LMFBRs with long operational experience. Installations evaluated were the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Richland, Washington; Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), Idaho Falls, Idaho; Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) Dounreay, Scotland; Phenix, Marcoule, France; and Kompakte Natriumgekuhlte Kernreak Toranlange (KNK II), Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany. The evaluation included external and internal exposure control, respiratory protection procedures, radiation surveillance practices, radioactive waste management, and engineering controls for confining radiation contamination. The theory, design, and operating experience at LMFBRs is described. Aspects of LMFBR health physics different from the LWR experience in the United States are identified. Suggestions are made for modifications to the NRC Standard Review Plan based on the differences.

Adams, S.R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Including the Effects of Electronic Excitations and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cascade Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Radiation damage has traditionally been modeled using cascade simulations however such simulations generally neglect the effects of electron-ion interactions, which may be significant in high energy cascades. A model has been developed which includes the effects of electronic stopping and electron-phonon coupling in Molecular Dynamics simulations by means of an inhomogeneous Langevin thermostat. The energy lost by the atoms to electronic excitations is gained by the electronic system and the energy evolution of the electronic system is modeled by the heat diffusion equation. Energy is exchanged between the electronic system and the atoms in the Molecular Dynamics simulation by means of a Langevin thermostat, the temperature of which is the local electronic temperature. The model is applied to a 10 keV cascade simulation for Fe. (authors)

Duffy, Dorothy [Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London (United Kingdom)]|[EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rutherford, Alexis [Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Dispersion in a thermal plasma including arbitrary degeneracy and quantum recoil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The longitudinal response function for a thermal electron gas is calculated including two quantum effects exactly, degeneracy, and the quantum recoil. The Fermi-Dirac distribution is expanded in powers of a parameter that is small in the nondegenerate limit and the response function is evaluated in terms of the conventional plasma dispersion function to arbitrary order in this parameter. The infinite sum is performed in terms of polylogarithms in the long-wavelength and quasistatic limits, giving results that apply for arbitrary degeneracy. The results are applied to the dispersion relations for Langmuir waves and to screening, reproducing known results in the nondegenerate and completely degenerate limits, and generalizing them to arbitrary degeneracy.

Melrose, D. B. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Mushtaq, A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Residential sidewall insulation case histories, including experiences and problems in the field application of loose fill  

SciTech Connect

An unbonded fiberglass loose-fill insulation was selected for this sidewall application study. The insert tube technique is described and the parameters that affect pneumatic application of the product are identified. The initial evaluation was conducted in the laboratory and included density and thermal testing. The laboratory results were then utilized in field studies. Ten homes with no sidewall insulation were retrofitted. Thermographic scans of sidewalls before and after retrofit confirmed the predicted reductions in heat loss based on calculation techniques given in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals. The improvement was further confirmed by comparing utility bills. Typical problems that occur while preparing a house for sidewall retrofit are discussed. The simple payback for typical houses is presented. Good correlation is shown between laboratory test results and field performance. Test data indicate that the application procedure used gave an effective R-value per product claim.

Infante, L.J.; Aller, P.F.; Fay, R.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Engine including hydraulically actuated valvetrain and method of valve overlap control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust valve control method may include displacing an exhaust valve in communication with the combustion chamber of an engine to an open position using a hydraulic exhaust valve actuation system and returning the exhaust valve to a closed position using the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly. During closing, the exhaust valve may be displaced for a first duration from the open position to an intermediate closing position at a first velocity by operating the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly in a first mode. The exhaust valve may be displaced for a second duration greater than the first duration from the intermediate closing position to a fully closed position at a second velocity at least eighty percent less than the first velocity by operating the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly in a second mode.

Cowgill, Joel (White Lake, MI)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z