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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Experimental performance of solid-gas chemical heat pump in solar chemical heat pump dryer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer has been designed, fabricated and tested. The performance of the system has been studied under the meteorological conditions of Malaysia. The system consists of four mean components: solar collector (evacuated ... Keywords: coefficient of performance, drying, energy density, evacuated tubes solar collector, reactor temperature, solid gas chemical heat pump

M. Ibrahim; K. Sopian; A. S. Hussein; W. R. W. Daud; A. Zaharim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Dryer | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dryer Dryer Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

3

Apparatus for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryer  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus and method are disclosed for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryers and return of heat to the dryer system. Fresh air is drawn through a plurality of tubes in heat exchange relation to heated exhaust gases and introduced into the drying system without intermingling of contaminated exhaust gases with the heated fresh air. The apparatus and method have particular utility in gas-fired commercial and industrial laundry dryers.

Winstel, F.H.

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

4

Microcomputer aided calculations of parameters for spray dryer operation  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a series of practical microcomputer programs that can be used as a tool by engineers and researchers working with spray dryers for combustion process effluent control. The microcomputer programs calculate flue gas composition (CO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, and SO/sub 2/) from the composition of the fuel. The residence time of the flue gas in a spray dryer can be estimated, and using values provided by the user for the flow of water and absorbent slurry in the spray dryer, the program recalculates the flue gas composition and heat capacity at the exit of the spray dryer without accounting for any SO/sub 2/ removal that could occur in the spray dryer. From these values and the system pressure, the dew point and flue gas temperature at the spray dryer exit are calculated, providing the approach to saturation resulting from this choice of operating parameters. This computer code would enable a process engineer to quickly evaluate effects of important process parameters, such as flue gas temperature at the inlet to the spray dryer, atomizer water feed rate, and absorbent slurry concentration and feed rate, on the operation of a spray dryer.

Yeh, J.T.; Gyorke, D.F.; Pennline, H.W.; Drummond, C.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Evaluation of energy efficiency standards for residential clothes dryers in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy efficiency standards for residential clothes dryers in energy efficiency standards for residential clothes dryers in the USA Title Evaluation of energy efficiency standards for residential clothes dryers in the USA Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, and Stephen Meyers Journal Energy Efficiency Date Published 05/2013 Keywords appliance standards, energy efficiency Abstract This article describes the analysis of monetary and energy savings attributable to various energy efficiency levels considered as potential US federal standards for residential clothes dryers. The analysis examined benefits to both consumers and the nation as a whole. Benefits to consumers were evaluated based on the life-cycle cost of affected appliances and the payback period associated with increased first costs. Benefits to the nation incorporate both energy and financial savings associated with each potential efficiency standard. The analysis incorporated the most current information on field use of clothes dryers, which shows that dryer usage and the moisture in clothes are less than previously thought. The analysis found that high-efficiency heat pump clothes dryers would be cost-effective for nearly one fifth of US households. However, for both electric standard and gas clothes dryers, standards that improve efficiency by 5 % appear to be the highest levels that have a positive net present value of consumer benefit.

6

Solids transportation model of an industrial rotary dryer  

SciTech Connect

A complete simulation model has been developed for an industrial rotary dryer to account for the heat and mass exchange between the solids and the gas. This simulator is mainly composed of three models: solids transportation model, furnace model, and gas model. The solids transportation model is the modified Cholette-Cloutier model. It consists of a series of interactive reservoirs which are subdivided into an active and dead compartments to account for the characteristic extended tail of the residence time distribution (RTD) curves observed in industrial dryers. To expand the validity of the model, experiments have been performed in an industrial rotary dryer to obtain RTD curves under different mineral concentrate and gas flow rates. This paper describes these experiments and presents the variation of the average residence time and model parameters as function of solids and gas flow rates.

Renaud, M.; Thibault, J.; Trusiak, A.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Outdoor Manners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outdoor Manners Outdoor Manners Nature Bulletin No. 683-A June 10, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OUTDOOR MANNERS I AM AN OLD TIME COUNTRY LANE -- just a plain dirt road with a lot of ups and downs, built by the pioneers who settled this region. I was abandoned, thank goodness, after those tin Lizzies began to honk and rattle through the country. They didn't like me and I didn't like them. For more than a century, people went this way on foot, on horseback, and in vehicles drawn by horses or mules. I became well acquainted with many of them and some of their great-grandchildren. They became acquainted with my trees, my wildflowers, the birds and all of my wild creatures. In those days most folks were friendly, neighborly people. They had time to stop, visit, look and listen.

8

Energy consumption and usage characteristics from field measurements of residential dishwashers, clothes washers and clothes dryers  

SciTech Connect

The measured energy consumption and usage characteristics for household dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers for ten townhouses at Twin Rivers, N.J., are presented. Whenever the dishwashers and/or clothes washers were in use, the energy consumption, water consumption, frequency of usage, and water temperature were measured by a data acquisition system. The electrical energy of electric clothes dryers and the gas consumption of gas clothes dryers were measured, as well as their frequency and duration of use, and exhaust temperature. Typical household usage patterns of these major appliances are included.

Chang, Y.L.; Grot, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Integration of thickener underflow into thermal dryer circuit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A large number of coal preparation plants in the United States are troubled with coal fines and associated plant operation problems. As part of their process, these plants use thermal dryers for producing product coal, cyclones for first-stage recovery of coal fines, and wet scrubbers for the second-stage removal of coal fines carry-over from the dryer exhaust gas. The first challenge for these plants is to recover the clean ultra-fine coal captured in the scrubbers rather than to dispose of it in settling ponds. The second challenge is to mitigate the over-dry fine coal dusting problems in the dryer product. Prior to the completion of this program, the difficulties of the first challenge involving the recovery and use of fine clean coal from the thermal dryer scrubber effluent had not been solved. The second challenge, controlling fine coal dusting, was previously met by applying a solution of surfactants and process water to the over-dry coal fraction. As a result of the demonstration provided by the performance of this program, the implementation of a simple process improvement, involving the use of a thickener in combination with a belt press, simultaneously solved both challenges: the de-dusting and the dryer scrubber effluent recovery issues. The objective of this project was to: (1) Use a clean coal thickener with a squeeze belt press to recover the ultra-fine coal in dryer scrubber effluent; (2) Demonstrate that the coal-water mixture (CWM) produced from scrubber sludge of a thermal dryer can be used as a dust suppressant. The thickener/belt press system has increased the production of JWRI Mine Number 4 by approximately 0.7%. This production increase was accomplished by recovering and re-using 3 metric tons/hr (3.3 tons/hr) of coal fines that were previously sent to holding ponds, returning this as a 50% CWM to de-dust the 430 metric tons/hr (470 tons/hr) of existing dryer production.

McClaine, A.W.; Breault, R.W.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Simulation of transport dynamics in fluidized-bed dryers  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model for predicting three-dimensional, two-phase flow, heat and mass transfer inside fluidized-bed dryers has been developed. The model consists of the full set of partial-differential equations that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and energy for both phases inside the dryer, and is coupled with correlations concerning interphase momentum-, heat-, and mass-transfer. It is shown that the model can predict the most important engineering aspects of a fluidized-bed dryer including pressure drop, particle holdup, temperature distribution in both phases as well as drying efficiency all over the fluidized-bed. Plug-flow conditions are predicted for the gas phase, while back-mixing is predicted for the particles. The effect of particle mass-flow-rate on fluidized-bed dryer performance is evaluated. It is shown that the lower the particle mass flow-rate, the more intense the horizontal moisture gradients, while the higher the particle rate the more uniform the moisture distribution throughout the bed.

Theologos, K.N.; Maroulis, Z.B.; Markatos, N.C. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Christian veneer dryer: Forest products fact sheet  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new closed rotary drum dryer for the forest products industry.

NREL

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Outdoor science field trips.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to assess the cognitive and affective values of an outdoor science field trip. Participants were 28 fifth grade students,… (more)

Loyd, Kerrie Anne Therese

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Conservation and Outdoor Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CONSERVATION AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVE DISTRIC. The Forest...

14

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Outdoor Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outdoor Test Facility Aerial photo of the Outdoor Test Facility. The Outdoor Test Facility at NREL is used to evaluate prototype, precommercial, and commercial modules. Outdoor...

15

Alabama Gas Corporation- Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment....

16

Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt Miljø A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer Søren �stergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

17

Drying radioactive wastewater salts using a thin film dryer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the operational experience in drying brines generated at a radioactive wastewater treatment facility. The brines are composed of aqueous ammonium sulfate/sodium sulfate and aqueous sodium nitrate/sodium sulfate, The brine feeds receive pretreatment to preclude dryer bridging and fouling. The dryer products are a distillate and a powder. The dryer is a vertical thin film type consisting of a steam heated cylinder with rotor. Maintenance on the dryer has been minimal. Although many operability problems have had to be overcome, dryer performance can now be said to be highly reliable.

Scully, D.E.

1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

18

Improving Dryer and Press Efficiencies Through Combustion of Hydrocarbon Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Emission control devices on dryers and presses have been legislated into the industry, and are now an integral part of the drying system. These devices consume large quantities of natural gas and electricity and down-sizing or eliminating them will provide major energy savings. The principal strategy taken here focuses on developing process changes that should minimize (and in some cases eliminate) the need for controls. A second approach is to develop lower-cost control options. It has been shown in laboratory and full-scale work that Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) emerge mainly at the end of the press cycle for particleboard, and, by extension, to other prod-ucts. Hence, only the air associated with this point of the cycle need be captured and treated. A model for estimating terpene emissions in the various zones of veneer dryers has been developed. This should allow the emissions to be concentrated in some zones and minimized in others, so that some of the air could be directly released without controls. Low-cost catalysts have been developed for controlling HAPs from dryers and presses. Catalysts conventionally used for regenerative catalytic oxidizers can be used at much lower temperatures for treating press emissions. Fluidized wood ash is an especially inexpensive mate-rial for efficiently reducing formaldehyde in dryer emissions. A heat transfer model for estimating pinene emissions from hot-pressing strand for the manufacture of flakeboard has been constructed from first principles and validated. The model shows that most of the emissions originate from the 1-mm layer of wood adjoining the platen surface. Hence, a simple control option is to surface a softwood mat with a layer of hardwood prior to pressing. Fines release a disproportionate large quantity of HAPs, and it has been shown both theo-retically and in full-scale work that particles smaller than 400 ���µm are principally responsible. Georgia-Pacific is considering green-screening their furnish at several of their mills in order to remove these particles and reduce their treatment costs.

Sujit Banerjee

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Modeling of the solids transportation within an industrial rotary dryer: A simple model  

SciTech Connect

To better understand the underlying phenomena taking place in an industrial rotary dryer and to determine the optimum operating conditions, a simulator in which the solids transportation, the gas flow, and the heat and mass transfer are modeled is currently being developed. This paper describes the use of interactive perfect mixers in series to model the solids transportation within an industrial rotary dryer, on the basis of an experimental residence time distribution curve (RTD). Two simple models are proposed: a series of perfect well-mixed interacting tanks and a modified Cholette-Cloutier model. The first model is not able to account for the nonideal behavior of the solids transportation in the rotary dryer. To account for the characteristic extended tail of the RTD curves observed in industrial dryers, in a second model, the solid phase is divided between an active and a dead zone. This model, with 36 cells and 25% of the volume occupied by the dead zones, modeled very well the industrial RTD curve. In addition, the model produces bed depth and axial velocity profiles that are consistent with those reported in the literature.

Duchesne, C.; Thibault, J.; Bazin, C. [Laval Univ., Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)] [Laval Univ., Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryers  

SciTech Connect

Several failure investigations and recent research on thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryer surfaces show at least three modes of environmentally induced degradation. Corrosion may occur with the ingress of certain chemicals into coating pores. Erosion or corrosion is manifested by streaks at local sites of high doctor blade loading. Erosion and cracking occur due to coating parameters, thermal stress, and differential expansion. While most of the results described in this paper are from investigations of molybdenum, stainless steel coatings also are discussed.

Bowers, D.F. (Packer Engineering, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Outdoor PV Degradation Comparison  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output; may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined; accurately. At the Performance and Energy Rating Testbed (PERT) at the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) at the; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) more than 40 modules from more than 10 different manufacturers; were compared for their long-term outdoor stability. Because it can accommodate a large variety of modules in a; limited footprint the PERT system is ideally suited to compare modules side-by-side under the same conditions.

Jordan, D. C.; Smith, R. M.; Osterwald, C. R.; Gelak, E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

NETL: News Release - Advanced Coal Dryer Boosts Power Plant Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release Date: May 24, 2006 Advanced Coal Dryer Boosts Power Plant Performance Latest Project in President's Clean Coal Power Initiative Begins Operations in North Dakota...

23

A Review of Literature Related to the Use of Spray Dryer Absorber Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants account for the majority of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions in the United States. Legislative actions in the United States and elsewhere have been responsible for most industrial SO2 controls, resulting in the installation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. In the United States, approximately 85% of FGD systems are wet, 12% are spray dryer absorber (SDA) systems, and 3% are dry injection systems. This report is a compilation of an extensive literature review on SDA systems ...

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Outdoor Play and Playground Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... While each classroom strives to accomplish both morning and afternoon outdoor play times, the weather sometimes prohibits such activity, or ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Aq Dryers Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

26

Development of a Microwave Clothes Dryer: Interim Report I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a microwave clothes dryer has the potential to bring significant consumer benefits to this appliance. Efficient, short drying cycles are possible for both normal and delicate fabrics. The first year of development is described here.

1993-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Outdoor Education in the Greek Mathematics Textbooks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Outdoor education is a promising educational field that can support indoor education and provide benefits beyond the evidentknowledge. Outdoor and indoor education together can… (more)

Skouroupathis, Nicolas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (Replacement): $200 Dryer (Replacement): $100 Natural Gas Range/Cooktop (Replacement): $100 Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Tankless Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Provider Alabama Gas Corporation Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment. All equipment

29

Spray-dryer scrubbers for high-sulfur coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spray-dryer scrubbers for sulfur-dioxide removal from flue gases have been a developing technology for several years. Because spray-dryer scrubbers offer several potential advantages over wet scrubbing, they are attractive to the utility industry. Some of these advantages are: 1) a simpler waste-disposal problem, 2) higher energy efficiency, 3) lower water comsumption, 4) lower capital cost, 5) lower operating costs, 6) less exotic materials of construction, 7) simpler operation, and 8) ability to consume some plant waste water in the spray dryer. The paper provides a broad survey of the state of the art as it might be useful to electric utilitites using high-sulfur coal.

Henry, J.M.; Robards, R.F.; Wells, W.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Performance analysis of solar-assisted chemical heat-pump dryer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar-assisted chemical heat-pump dryer has been designed, fabricated and tested. The performance of the system has been studied under the meteorological conditions of Malaysia. The system consists of four main components: solar collector (evacuated tubes type), storage tank, solid-gas chemical heat pump unit and dryer chamber. A solid-gas chemical heat pump unit consists of reactor, condenser and evaporator. The reaction used in this study (CaCl2-NH{sub 3}). A simulation has been developed, and the predicted results are compared with those obtained from experiments. The maximum efficiency for evacuated tubes solar collector of 80% has been predicted against the maximum experiment of 74%. The maximum values of solar fraction from the simulation and experiment are 0.795 and 0.713, respectively, whereas the coefficient of performance of chemical heat pump (COP{sup h}) maximum values 2.2 and 2 are obtained from simulation and experiments, respectively. The results show that any reduction of energy at condenser as a result of the decrease in solar radiation will decrease the coefficient of performance of chemical heat pump as well as decrease the efficiency of drying. (author)

Fadhel, M.I. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, 75450, Melaka (Malaysia); Sopian, K.; Daud, W.R.W. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy Saving Technology of Thermal Regenerative Compressed Air Dryer by Regenerates Adsorbent with Residual Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the characteristic of the compressed air dryer located at the same place with the air compressor, for the large capacity thermal regenerative compressed air dryer that the absorbent is regenerated by an electric heater, this thesis puts ... Keywords: Compressed air dryer, Regeneration, Heater, Residual heat, Energy saving

Zhang Mingzhu; Zhou Zhili; Li Hongtao; Zhang Yongbo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Comparison of residence time models for cascading rotary dryers  

SciTech Connect

The predictions of the models of Matchett and Baker (1988), Saeman and Mitchell (1954) and Friedman and Marshall (1949) for the solids residence time in rotary dryers have been compared with both pilot-scale and industrial-scale data. A countercurrent pilot-scale dryer of 0.2m diameter and 2m long has been used with air velocities up to 1.5 m to measure the residence times of sorghum grain. The average discrepancy for the solids residence time between the predictions and the experiments that were carried out in the pilot-scale rotary dryer is {minus}10.4%. Compared with the models of Friedman and Marshall (1949) and Saeman and Mitchell (1954) for the pilot-scale data obtained here, the Matchett and Baker model is more satisfactory for predicting the solids residence time in this pilot-scale dryer. It has also been found that the model of Matchett and Baker describes the industrial data of Saeman and Mitchell (1954) than the correlation of Friedman and Marshall (1949).

Cao, W.F.; Langrish, T.A.G. [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Preliminary Design of an Industrial/Commercial Microwave Clothes Dryer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drying fabrics with microwave energy can reduce both the drying time and the drying temperature. This process provides a new level of fabric care to make all fabrics last longer and look better. The purpose of designing a 125-pound commercial/industrial microwave dryer was to perform cost exercises and calculate payback periods.

1997-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

34

SUBCHAPTER D. OUTDOOR BURNING Sec. 352.081. REGULATION OF OUTDOOR BURNING. (a) In this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBCHAPTER D. OUTDOOR BURNING Sec. 352.081. REGULATION OF OUTDOOR BURNING. (a) In this section measurement that takes into consideration the burning index, spread component, or ignition component court of a county by order may prohibit or restrict outdoor burning in general or outdoor burning

35

Color models for outdoor machine vision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops models for illumination and surface reflectance for use in outdoor color vision, and in particular for predicting the color of surfaces under outdoor conditions. Existing daylight and reflectance models have limitations that reduce ... Keywords: color, daylight, outdoor images, photometric function, reflectance model

Shashi D. Buluswar; Bruce A. Draper

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heater: 450 Natural Gas Clothes Dryer: 30 Windows: 0.95sq ft Attic Insulation: 0.15sq ft Floor Insulation: 0.30sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: 450...

37

Outdoor Solar Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outdoor Solar Lighting Outdoor Solar Lighting Outdoor Solar Lighting July 29, 2012 - 6:34pm Addthis Outdoor solar lights use solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ndejan Outdoor solar lights use solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ndejan What does this mean for me? Outdoor solar lights are easy to install and virtually maintenance free They work in most areas of the United States Find out if replacement bulbs or batteries are available before you buy them Outdoor solar lights are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. Best of all, using them won't increase your electric bill. Popular home

38

Outdoor Solar Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outdoor Solar Lighting Outdoor Solar Lighting Outdoor Solar Lighting July 29, 2012 - 6:34pm Addthis Outdoor solar lights use solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ndejan Outdoor solar lights use solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ndejan What does this mean for me? Outdoor solar lights are easy to install and virtually maintenance free They work in most areas of the United States Find out if replacement bulbs or batteries are available before you buy them Outdoor solar lights are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. Best of all, using them won't increase your electric bill. Popular home

39

Contaminated Outdoor High Voltage Insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external insulation of power lines and outdoor substations is a weak point in transmission systems. The insulation is particularly susceptible to failure if proper attention has not been given to its design, condition monitoring, and maintenance. In regions with high contamination levels, regular maintenance and the application of palliative measures can be critical to ensure that the system meets its outage performance targets. This can involve pure maintenance measures such as cleaning the insulato...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Slurry spray distribution within a simulated laboratory scale spray dryer  

SciTech Connect

It was found that the distribution of liquid striking the sides of a simulated room temperature spray dryer was not significantly altered by the choice of nozles, nor by a variation in nozzle operating conditions. Instead, it was found to be a function of the spray dryer's configuration. A cocurrent flow of air down the drying cylinder, not possible with PNL's closed top, favorably altered the spray distribution by both decreasing the amount of liquid striking the interior of the cylinder from 72 to 26% of the feed supplied, and by shifting the zone of maximum impact from 1.0 to 1.7 feet from the nozzle. These findings led to the redesign of the laboratory scale spray dryer to be tested at the Savannah River Plant. The diameter of the drying chamber was increased from 5 to 8 inches, and a cocurrent flow of air was established with a closed recycle. Finally, this investigation suggested a drying scheme which offers all the advantages of spray drying without many of its limitations.

Bertone, P.C.

1979-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

BWRVIP-139: Vessel and Internals Project, Steam Dryer Inspection and Flaw Evaluation Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides steam dryer inspection and flaw evaluation guidelines consistent with those developed for other boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components. It includes (1) documentation of the steam dryer configurations for the different plants, (2) a summary of dryer cracking incidents based on field experience, (3) documentation of the regions of susceptibility for fatigue cracking and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), (4) a review of the failure modes and effects of cracking...

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

National Parks Move Transportation Forward in America's Great Outdoors |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parks Move Transportation Forward in America's Great Parks Move Transportation Forward in America's Great Outdoors National Parks Move Transportation Forward in America's Great Outdoors March 28, 2013 - 3:00pm Addthis Together, the five newest National Parks Initiative projects will save the equivalent of nearly 10,000 gallons of gasoline and 71 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Together, the five newest National Parks Initiative projects will save the equivalent of nearly 10,000 gallons of gasoline and 71 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per year. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts? The five new National Parks Initiative projects will save the

43

Do Heat Pump Clothes Dryers Make Sense for the U.S. Market?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American homes. The results show that HPCDs have positive economic benefits only for households with high clothes dryer usage or for households with high electricity prices and...

44

Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Title Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51758 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Start Page Chapter Abstract Basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks

46

Measuring Outdoor Airflow into HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEASURING OUTDOOR AIRFLOW INTO HVAC SYSTEMS W i l l i a m J.minimum OA flow rate if HVAC system has an economizer

Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Indoor to Outdoor Channel Measurements & Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... delay dispersion statistics for outdoor-indoor average PDPs (all values in ns). Band RMS Delay Spread Delay Window 90% Energy Delay Interval ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Outdoor Solar Lighting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.comndejan Outdoor solar lights use solar cells,...

49

Health Relevant Outdoor Air Change Rates in Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Relevant Outdoor Air Change Rates in Homes Health Relevant Outdoor Air Change Rates in Homes Speaker(s): Jan Sundell Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The Damp Building and Health (DBH) study started as a cross-sectional questionnaire study of all 14000 children, 1-6 years of age in Värmland, Sweden. The response rate on the questionnaire (year 2001) was 79%, meaning that basic data exists on almost 12,000 children and their homes. In a second step a case-control study on 200 sick (wheezing, asthma, excema), and 200 healthy children, extensive measurements in the home, as well as clinical examinations of the children has been conducted during 2002. Ventilation has been measured with a passive tracer gas method during one week. The results will be presented in this seminar-- seemingly sick

50

Outdoor Recreation Participation Trends in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outdoor recreation is a popular pastime in Texas. This publication reports on the participation and trends in outdoor recreation in the U.S. and Texas revealed in the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

Schuett, Michael A.; Shafer, Carl Scott; Lu, Jiaying

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Measuring rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems Title Measuring rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51583 Year...

52

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment Title The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment...

53

Spray dryer/baghouse system testing - CRADA 92-001. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A series of seven tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of scrubbing both NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in a spray dryer/baghouse system. The operating conditions specified were a high spray dryer inlet temperature (500{degrees}F), and a high spray dryer outlet temperature (250 to 300 {degrees}F). The data required to adequately evaluate the effectiveness of this technology is enclosed. Discussion of some of the variables as well as an itemized list of the testing information is part of the report.

Pennline, H.W. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)]|[Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Laundry dryer lint: A novel matrix for nonintrusive environmental lead screening  

SciTech Connect

North American health agencies have set ambitious goals to reduce childhood and occupational lead poising. A central tool in attaining lead exposure reduction objectives is screening populations to identify persons at risk. The authors have identified laundry dryer lint as a novel matrix with potential use as a nonintrusive, first stage screening mechanism for households with elevated lead levels. This Edmonton, AB, pilot study provides the first measures of lead levels in household laundry dryer lint. Three populations were included: a control group, a group using communal dryers at an inner city service agency (Bissel Centre), and households where a family member had occupational exposure to lead. Background levels of lead in laundry dryer lint from a Canadian urban environment were established, households with elevated lead levels resulting from the transport of occupational lead by an adult family member were identified, and scanning electron microscopy was used to identify the form of the lead particles and determine their source.

Mahaffy, P.G.; Martin, N.I.; Newman, K.E. [King`s University College, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Hohn, B. [Capital Health, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Environmental Health Div.; Mikula, R.J.; Munoz, V.A. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, Alberta (Canada)

1998-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Do Heat Pump Clothes Dryers Make Sense for the U.S. Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimating the active mode and standby mode energy use anddryer energy use during standby mode is determined by usingCD _ Time ? ? ClothesDryerEnergyUse Standby ? ? 8760 ? CD _

Meyers, Steve

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Method and apparatus for improving the fuel efficiency of a laundry dryer  

SciTech Connect

A laundry dryer of the type having a pair of upstream and downstream side-by-side gas burners is modified by the removal of the upstream burner and replacing the burner with a reheat plenum. The reheat plenum is generally tear-shaped in cross section to provide an inlet portion having a relatively large airflow cross sectional area located laterally adjacent the burner so that the recirculated airflow enters the reheat plenum at a relatively low velocity conducive to settlement of lint therein at a point in the plenum away from high temperature heat exchange relation with the burner. The lower wall of the reheat plenum is angularly inclined and preferably curvilinear in contour and extends above the downstream burner in flame deflecting and heat exchange relation therewith to heat the recirculated air within the reheat plenum. The reheat plenum also has a discharge portion of relatively smaller cross sectional area which injects the reheated air at relatively high velocity into the flow of heated makeup air to effect mixing of the reheated and makeup airflow.

Bowley, R.J.

1980-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Outdoor Visual Position Estimation for Planetary Rovers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes (1) a novel, effective algorithm for outdoor visual position estimation; (2) the implementation of this algorithm in the Viper system; and (3) the extensive tests that have demonstrated the superior accuracy and speed of ... Keywords: computer vision, mobile robots, position estimation, space robotics

Fabio Cozman; Eric Krotkov; Carlos Guestrin

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Do Heat Pump Clothes Dryers Make Sense for the U.S. Market  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump clothes dryers (HPCDs) can be as much as 50percent more energy-efficient than conventional electric resistance clothes dryers, and therefore have the potential to save substantial amounts of electricity. While not currently available in the U.S., there are manufacturers in Europe and Japan that produce units for those markets. Drawing on analysis conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) current rulemaking on amended standards for clothes dryers, this paper evaluates the cost-effectiveness of HPCDs in American homes, as well as the national impact analysis for different market share scenarios. In order to get an accurate measurement of real energy savings potential, the paper offers a new energy use calculation methodology that takes into account the most current data on clothes washer cycles, clothes dryer usage frequency, remaining moisture content, and load weight per cycle, which is very different from current test procedure values. Using the above methodology along with product cost estimates developed by DOE, the paper presents the results of a life-cycle cost analysis of the adoption of HPCDs in a representative sample of American homes. The results show that HPCDs have positive economic benefits only for households with high clothes dryer usage or for households with high electricity prices and moderately high utilization.

Meyers, Steve; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; Sturges, Andy

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

Solar-assisted electric clothes dryer using a home attic as a heat source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of using a southeastern home attic as a means of reducing the energy consumption of an electric clothes dryer. An inexpensive duct (duplicable for $25) was constructed to collect hot attic air from the peak of a south facing roof and introduce it into the dryer inlet. Instrumentation was added to measure inlet temperatures and operating time/energy consumption of the dryer. Standardized test loads, in addition to normal laundry, were observed over the period of one year. The heat-on time of the dryer tested was shown to be reduced .16 to .35 minutes per /sup 0/C rise in inlet temperature. Inlet temperatures produced by the attic duct peaked at 56/sup 0/C(133/sup 9/F) in May/June and 40/sup 0/C(104/sup 0/F) in February. Based on peak temperatures available between 2 and 4 pm each month, a potential 20% yearly average savings could be realized. Economic viability of the system, dependant primarily on dryer usage, can be computed using a formula derived from the test results and included in the report.

Stana, J.M.

60

Energy-saver's guide to good outdoor lighting  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in outdoor lighting design and technology offer opportunities for improving the quality of outdoor lighting and significantly reducing energy consumption. This guidebook provides information on these developments and offers ideas on designing new systems or modifying existing systems.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Abstraction and depiction of sparsely scanned outdoor environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes various techniques and applications of rendering three-dimensionally digitized outdoor en- vironments in non-photorealistic rendering styles. The difficulty in rendering outdoor environments is accommodating their inaccuracy, incompleteness, ...

Hui Xu; Nathan Gossett; Baoquan Chen

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Dimming Controllers Offer Potential Energy Savings in Outdoor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sheet: * Introduction * HID Dimming * Conclusions Dimming Controllers Offer Potential Energy Savings in Outdoor Lighting Lighting control technology reduces energy consumption...

63

Supporting outdoor mixed reality applications for architecture and cultural heritage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces new approaches to enable collaborative outdoor mixed reality design review in the architectural domain as well as outdoor mixed reality experiences in the cultural heritage domain. For this purpose we present the results of three ... Keywords: cultural heritage, design review, display technologies, human computer interaction, outdoor mixed reality, pose estimation, rendering

Pedro Santos; Dominik Acri; Thomas Gierlinger; Hendrik Schmedt; André Stork

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

NETL: News Release - Unique DOE-Funded Coal Dryers Meet Goal of Increased  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2007 6, 2007 Unique DOE-Funded Coal Dryers Meet Goal of Increased Efficiency, Reduced Emissions North Dakota Power Station to Expand Use of "Very Successful" Coal-Drying Technology WASHINGTON, DC - A prototype coal dryer demonstrated at Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station has proven so successful that the power company intends not only to install full-size dryers on the station's 546-megawatt Unit 2 as part of the second phase of its cost-shared project with the U.S. Department of Energy, but also to install the award-winning technology on the 546-megawatt Unit 1 - at its own expense. Coal Creek Power Station Aerial view of the Coal Creek Station, Underwood, ND. DOE-funded coal-drying technology installed at the power plant cuts emissions by reducing the amount of coal needed to produce electricity. (Photo courtesy of Great River Energy)

65

Outdoor Solid-State Lighting Technology Deployment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies » Technology Deployment » Outdoor Solid-State Technologies » Technology Deployment » Outdoor Solid-State Lighting Technology Deployment Outdoor Solid-State Lighting Technology Deployment October 7, 2013 - 9:10am Addthis Outdoor solid-state lighting (SSL) technology has the potential to reduce U.S. lighting energy usage by nearly one half and contribute significantly to our nation's climate change solutions. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Buildings Technologies Office offers a wealth of information on its Solid-State Lighting website. Visit the site to find: SSL Basics Studies and Reports CALiPER Summary Reports Tools SSL Webcasts. Also see: FEMP Outdoor SSL Initiative: Resources for Outdoor SSL Applications outlines resources available for outdoor solid-state lighting projects. Better Buildings Alliance: This DOE initiative is driven and managed

66

Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This presentation documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

Muller, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This paper documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

Muller, M.; Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Bosco, N.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluation of Cooling Solutions for Outdoor Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal management of an outdoor electronic enclosure can be quite challenging due to the additional thermal load from the sun and the requirement of having an air-sealed enclosure. It is essential to consider the effect of solar heating loads in the design process; otherwise, it can shorten the life expectancy of the electronic product or lead to catastrophic failure. In this paper we analyze and compare the effectiveness of different cooling techniques used for outdoor electronics. Various cooling techniques were compared like special coatings and paints on the outer surface, radiation shields, double-walled vented enclosures, fans for internal air circulation and air-to-air heat exchangers. A highly simplified, typical outdoor system was selected for this study measuring approximately 300x300x400 mm (WxLxH). Solar radiation was incident on 3 sides of the enclosure. There were 8 equally spaced PCBs inside the enclosure dissipating 12.5W each uniformly (100 watts total). A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the system was built and analyzed. This was followed by building a mock-up of the system and conducting experiments to validate the CFD model. It was found that some of the simplest cooling techniques like white oil paint on the outer surface can significantly reduce the impact of solar loads. Adding internal circulation fans can also be very effective. Using air-to-air heat exchangers was found to be the most effective solution although it is more complex and costly.

Mahendra Wankhede; V. Khaire; A. Goswami; S. D. Mahajan

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluation of Cooling Solutions for Outdoor Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal management of an outdoor electronic enclosure can be quite challenging due to the additional thermal load from the sun and the requirement of having an air-sealed enclosure. It is essential to consider the effect of solar heating loads in the design process; otherwise, it can shorten the life expectancy of the electronic product or lead to catastrophic failure. In this paper we analyze and compare the effectiveness of different cooling techniques used for outdoor electronics. Various cooling techniques were compared like special coatings and paints on the outer surface, radiation shields, double-walled vented enclosures, fans for internal air circulation and air-to-air heat exchangers. A highly simplified, typical outdoor system was selected for this study measuring approximately 300x300x400 mm (WxLxH). Solar radiation was incident on 3 sides of the enclosure. There were 8 equally spaced PCBs inside the enclosure dissipating 12.5W each uniformly (100 watts total). A computational fluid dynamics (C...

Wankhede, Mahendra; Goswami, A; Mahajan, S D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Use of Spray Dryer Absorber Product in Agriculture – Sulfite Oxidation Kinetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory study evaluated the rate of sulfite oxidation and the chemical quality of water extracts when spray dryer absorber (SDA) material was added to soil at rates of 0, 100, 1000, 5000, and 10,000 lb acre-1.* Water was then added to the soil on 10 occasions beginning at day 0 and ending at day 98 after the addition of ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of model based sensors for the supervision of a solar dryer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar dryers are increasingly used in developing countries as an alternative to drying in open air, however the inherent variability of the drying conditions during day and along year drive the need for achieving low cost sensors that would enable to ... Keywords: Automated control, Energy efficiency, Psychrometric model, Smart sensor, Ubiquitous monitoring, Wood

E. Correa-Hernando; F. J. Arranz; B. Diezma; E. Juliá; J. I. Robla; L. Ruiz-Garcia; J. GarcíA-Hierro; P. Barreiro

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Summer Loving-Energy-Efficient Outdoor Lighting! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer Loving-Energy-Efficient Outdoor Lighting! Summer Loving-Energy-Efficient Outdoor Lighting! Summer Loving-Energy-Efficient Outdoor Lighting! June 20, 2013 - 9:47am Addthis Outdoor solar lights use solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ndejan Outdoor solar lights use solar cells, which convert sunlight into electricity, and are easy to install and virtually maintenance free. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/ndejan Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Check to see if energy-efficient or solar lighting can fit your outdoor lighting needs this summer. One of the best things about summer to me is all the time I get to spend

73

Federal Energy Management Program: Outdoor Solid State Lighting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Power Resources Renewable Energy Outdoor Solid State Lighting Case Studies Picture of LED lighting in a covered parking structure. LED lighting replaced aging systems in this...

74

UVOC-MAC: a MAC protocol for outdoor ultraviolet networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UVOC-MAC: a MAC protocol for outdoor ultraviolet networks. Yiyang Li • Jianxia Ning • Zhengyuan Xu •. Srikanth V. Krishnamurthy • Gang Chen. Ó Springer ...

75

Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CPV community has agreed to have both indoor and outdoor power ratings at the module level. The indoor rating provides a repeatable measure of module performance as it leaves the factory line while the outdoor rating provides a measure of true performance under real world conditions. The challenge with an outdoor rating is that the spectrum, temperature, wind speed, etc are constantly in flux and therefore the resulting power rating varies from day to day and month to month. This work examines different methodologies for determining the outdoor power rating with the goal of minimizing variation even if data are collected under changing meteorological conditions.

Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Kurtz, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Federal Energy Management Program: Outdoor Solid State Street...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Structures Case Studies Resources Working Group Distributed Energy ResourcesCombined Heat & Power Resources Renewable Energy Outdoor Solid State Street and Roadway Lighting...

77

Federal Energy Management Program: Outdoor Solid State Lighting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Structures Case Studies Resources Working Group Distributed Energy ResourcesCombined Heat & Power Resources Renewable Energy Outdoor Solid State Lighting Resources Picture of...

78

Federal Energy Management Program: Outdoor Solid State Parking...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Structures Case Studies Resources Working Group Distributed Energy ResourcesCombined Heat & Power Resources Renewable Energy Outdoor Solid State Parking Lot and Structure...

79

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

80

Retrofitting A Spray Dryer ESP-Equipped Facility Marty Suchan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Therefore, without cooling the flue gas, significant quantities of mercury will pass through the particulate, page 4824. Licata, A., et al, June 1994, "An Economic Alternative to Controlling Acid Gases, Mercury electrostatic precipitator combination. -Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction System to reduce nitrogen oxide

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Slurry atomizer for a coal-feeder and dryer used to provide coal at gasifier pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a coal-water slurry atomizer for use a high-pressure dryer employed in a pumping system utilized to feed coal into a pressurized coal gasifier. The slurry atomizer is provided with a venturi, constant area slurry injection conduit, and a plurality of tangentially disposed steam injection ports. Superheated steam is injected into the atomizer through these ports to provide a vortical flow of the steam, which, in turn, shears slurry emerging from the slurry injection conduit. The droplets of slurry are rapidly dispersed in the dryer through the venturi where the water is vaporized from the slurry by the steam prior to deleterious heating of the coal.

Loth, John L. (Morgantown, WV); Smith, William C. (Morgantown, WV); Friggens, Gary R. (Morgantown, WV)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Long Term Stability of the LHC Superconducting Cryodipoles after Outdoor Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main superconducting dipoles for the LHC are being stored outdoors for periods from a few weeks to several years after conditioning with dry nitrogen gas. Such a storage before installation in the 27 km circumference tunnel may affect not only the mechanical and cryogenic functionality of the cryodipoles but also their quench and field performance. A dedicated task force was established to study all aspects of long term behaviour of the stored cryodipoles, with particular emphasis on electrical and vacuum integrity, quench training behaviour, magnetic field quality, performance of the thermal insulation, mechanical stability of magnet shape and of the interface between cold mass and cryostat, degradation ofmaterials and welds. In particular, one specifically selected cryodipole stored outdoors for more than one year, was retested at cold. In addition, various tests have been carried out on the cryodipole assembly and on the most critical subcomponents to study aspects such as the hygrothermal behaviour of...

Seyvet, F; Bertarelli, A; Denis, O; El-Kallassi, P; Fernández-Cano, E D; Fessia, P; Ilie, S D; Jeanneret, J B; Letant, D; Poncet, A; Pugnat, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, Stefano; Siemko, A; Todesco, E; Tommasini, D; Veness, R; Vullierme, B; Wildner, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Conservation and Outdoor Education in the Schools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education in the Schools Education in the Schools Nature Bulletin No. 374-A March 21, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CONSERVATION AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION IN THE SCHOOLS Given a favorable climate, two things make and keep a nation great: its people and its natural resources. The well-being of our nation depends upon the wise use of those resources. They provide our basic requirements -- food, clothing and shelter. There is ample evidence that a very large portion of all teachers recognize the need for conservation and the importance of environmental education. Leading educators say that teachers realize the why of conservation but need help with the what, when, where and how -- how to teach the topic so that it hooks onto the personal lives of their students and is translated into behavior -- how to bring conservation home to all pupils in terms of day-to-day living.

84

Progress on building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 in homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a physically-based, semi-empirical model that describes the concentration of indoor concentration of PM-2.5 (particle mass that is less than 2.5 microns in diameter) and its sulfate, nitrate, organic and black carbon constituents, derived from outdoor sources. We have established the methodology and experimental plan for building the model. Experimental measurements in residential style houses, in Richmond and Fresno, California, are being conducted to provide parameters for and evaluation of this model. The model will be used to improve estimates of human exposures to PM-2.5 of outdoor origin. The objectives of this study are to perform measurement and modeling tasks that produce a tested, semi-mechanistic description of chemical species-specific and residential PM-2.5 arising from the combination of outdoor PM and gas phase sources (HNO{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}), and indoor gas phase (e.g. NH{sub 3}) sources. We specifically address how indoor PM is affected by differences between indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity. In addition, we are interested in losses of particles within the building and as they migrate through the building shell. The resulting model will be general enough to predict probability distributions for species-specific indoor concentrations of PM-2.5 based on outdoor PM, and gas phase species concentrations, meteorological conditions, building construction characteristics, and HVAC operating conditions. Controlled intensive experiments were conducted at a suburban research house located in Clovis, California. The experiments utilized a large suite of instruments including conventional aerosol, meteorological and house characterization devices. In addition, two new instruments were developed providing high time resolution for the important particulate species of nitrate, sulfate, and carbon as well as important gaseous species including ammonia and nitric acid. Important initial observations include the result that, with rare exceptions, there is virtually no nitrate found inside the house. This nitrate appears to dissociate into ammonia and nitric acid with the nitric acid quickly depositing out. Initial model development has included work on characterizing penetration and deposition rates, the dynamic behavior of the indoor/outdoor ratio, and predicting infiltration rates. Results from the exploration of the indoor/outdoor ratio show that the traditional assumption of steady state conditions does not hold in general. Many values of the indoor/outdoor ratio exist for any single value of the infiltration rate. Successful prediction of the infiltration rate from measured driving variables is important for extending the results from the Clovis house to the larger housing stock.

Lunden, Melissa M.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Littlejohn, David; Fischer, Marc L.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Brown, Nancy J.; Hering, Susanne

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Outdoor Outfitter Gets Greener With Solar Water Heater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outdoor Outfitter Gets Greener With Solar Water Heater Outdoor Outfitter Gets Greener With Solar Water Heater Outdoor Outfitter Gets Greener With Solar Water Heater October 8, 2010 - 12:51pm Addthis L.L. Bean’s flagship store sees nearly 3 million visitors each year. The store now uses solar-heated water for showers, restrooms and two cafes. | Photo courtesy of L.L. Bean | L.L. Bean's flagship store sees nearly 3 million visitors each year. The store now uses solar-heated water for showers, restrooms and two cafes. | Photo courtesy of L.L. Bean | Lindsay Gsell L.L. Bean is known for its outdoor apparel- jackets, backpacks and cozy winter sweaters. However, the company does more than just dress for the outdoors, it also works to protect and preserve it. For nearly 100 years, L.L. Bean has been committed to environmental conservation and

86

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012) Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoorPredictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor airpredictive models of clothing insulation have been developed

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Title Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2002 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Melissa M. Lunden, Tracy L. Thatcher, David Littlejohn, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Susanne V. Hering, Richard G. Sextro, and Nancy J. Brown Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms -- one in each pair -- based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

89

Federal Energy Management Program: Outdoor Solid-State Lighting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outdoor solid-state lighting (SSL) technology has the potential to reduce U.S. lighting energy usage by nearly one half and contribute significantly to our nation's climate...

90

Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presented at the 7th International Conference on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (CPV-7), 4-6 April 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada. The CPV community has agreed to have both indoor and outdoor power ratings at the module level. The indoor rating provides a repeatable measure of module performance as it leaves the factory line while the outdoor rating provides a measure of true performance under real world conditions. The challenge with an outdoor rating is that the spectrum, temperature, wind speed, etc are constantly in flux and therefore the resulting power rating varies from day to day and month to month. This work examines different methodologies for determining the outdoor power rating with the goal of minimizing variation even if data are collected under changing meteorological conditions.

Muller, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Use of the Dryer Off-gas Latent Heat for Improved Energy Efficiency ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... resulting in further reduction in energy consumption by additional 20-30 %. Energy efficiency and technology of this new innovation is discussed in the paper

92

Thermocompressor design for efficient energy recovery of paper production plant dryers  

SciTech Connect

The operational performance of a paper production plant can be significantly improved by appropriate process interventions. This paper deals with energy aspects of the most important section of such a plant, the paper drying section. A significant intervention that would lower the operational cost of the drying process is proposed. It refers to the recompression of low pressure steam leaving the dryers by means of a thermocompressor that would utilize high pressure steam coming from the plant burners. The mathematical model of the thermocompressor is evaluated and its design procedure is formulated as a mathematical programming problem involving appropriate objective function and constraints.

Kiranoudis, C.T.; Krokida, M.K.; Maroulis, Z.B. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Laboratory Testing of the Heating Capacity of Air-Source Heat Pumps at Low Outdoor Temperature Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-source heat pump systems offer an alternative to the common heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) configuration of single split unitary air conditioners with gas heating. In simple terms, heat pumps are traditional air conditioning units with the added capability of running in reverse as required by the building load. Thus, where the traditional air conditioning unit has an indoor evaporator to remove heat from the space and an outdoor condenser to reject heat to the ambient environment, ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas gas Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

95

Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization State of the Art Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies, including circulating dry scrubbers (CDS), spray dryer absorbers (SDA), and the Alstom Novel Integrated Desulfurization (NID) technology. These can all be considered “semi-dry” technologies, as the flue gas is cooled and humidified as part of each of these processes. This report also discusses a completely dry FGD technology, dry sorbent injection (DSI), which is ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Title Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sohn, Michael D., Richard G. Sextro, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(6) Pagination 1792-1796 Date Published Sept. 4-9, 2005 Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, airflow modeling, comis, countermeasures to chemical and biological threats, emergency response, exposure, indoor environment department, shelter-in-place Abstract An accidental or intentional outdoor release of pollutants can produce a hazardous plume, potentially contaminating large portions of a metropolitan area as it disperses downwind. To minimize health consequences on the populace, government and research organizations often recommend sheltering in place when evacuation is impractical. Some reports also recommend "hardening" an indoor shelter, for example by applying duct tape to prevent leakage into a bathroom. However, few studies have quantified the perceived beneficial effects of sheltering and hardening, or examined the limits of their applicability. In this paper, we examine how sheltering and hardening might reduce exposure levels under different building and meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction). We predict concentrations and exposure levels for several conditions, and discuss the net benefits from several sheltering and hardening options

97

Trio: enabling sustainable and scalable outdoor wireless sensor network deployments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the philosophy, design, and initial evaluation of the Trio Testbed, a new outdoor sensor network deployment that consists of 557 solar-powered motes, seven gateway nodes, and a root server. The testbed covers an area of approximately 50,000 ... Keywords: detection, large-scale, long-life, sensor networks, surveillance, target tracking, testbed

Prabal Dutta; Jonathan Hui; Jaein Jeong; Sukun Kim; Cory Sharp; Jay Taneja; Gilman Tolle; Kamin Whitehouse; David Culler

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Long Term Outdoor Testing of Low Concentration Solar Modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1?axis carousel tracker equipped with four 3?sun low?concentration mirror modules has now been under test outdoors at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas (UNLV) for three years. There are three unique features associated with this unit. First

Lewis Fraas; James Avery; Leonid Minkin; H. X. Huang; Tim Hebrink; Rik Hurt; Robert Boehm

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Improving data fusion in personal positioning systems for outdoor environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fault detection and correction methodology for personal positioning systems for outdoor environments is presented. We demonstrate its successful use in a system consisting of a global positioning system receiver and an inertial measurement unit. Localization ... Keywords: Adaptive Kalman filtering, Causal diagnosis, Chi-square test, Dead reckoning, Fault detection, Pedestrian positioning

E. Pulido Herrera; H. Kaufmann; J. Secue; R. QuiróS; G. Fabregat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Socioeconomic and Outdoor Meteorological Determinants of Indoor Temperature and Humidity in New York City Dwellings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous mechanisms link outdoor weather and climate conditions to human health. It is likely that many health conditions are more directly affected by indoor rather than outdoor conditions. Yet, the relationship between indoor temperature and ...

J. D. Tamerius; M. S. Perzanowski; L. M. Acosta; J. S. Jacobson; I. F. Goldstein; J. W. Quinn; A. G. Rundle; J. Shaman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Objective Method for Selecting Outdoor Reporting Conditions for Photovoltaic Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Outdoor performance of photovoltaic modules and systems depends on prevailing conditions at the time of measurement. Outdoor test conditions must be relevant to device performance and readily attainable. Flat-plate, nonconcentrator PV device performance is reported with respect to fixed conditions referred to as Standard Reporting Conditions (SRC) of 1 kW/m{sup 2} plane of array total irradiance, 25 C device temperature, and a reference spectral distribution at air mass 1.5 under certain atmospheric conditions. We report a method of analyzing historical meteorological and irradiance data to determine the range of outdoor environmental parameters and solar irradiance components that affect solar collector performance when the SRC 1 kW/m{sup 2} total irradiance value occurs outdoors. We used data from the 30 year U.S. National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) , restricting irradiance conditions to within +/- 25 W/m{sup 2} of 1 kW/m{sup 2} on a solar tracking flat-plate collector. The distributions of environmental parameter values under these conditions are non-Gaussian and site dependent. Therefore the median, as opposed to the mean, of the observed distributions is chosen to represent appropriate outdoor reporting conditions. We found the average medians for the direct beam component (834 W/m{sup 2}), ambient temperature (24.4 C), total column water vapor (1.4 cm), and air mass (1.43) are near commonly used SRC values. Average median wind speed (4.4 m/s) and broadband aerosol optical depth (0.08) were significantly different from commonly used values.

Myers, D. R.; Kurtz, S. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Whitaker, C.; Townsend, T. (Endecon Engineering: San Ramon, California); Maish, A. (Sandia National Laboratories: Albuquerque, New Mexico)

1999-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

102

Real-Time Measurement of Rates of Outdoor Airflow into HVAC Systems: A Field Study of Three Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to determine flow resistance of HVAC ducts and fittings.W. 2003. Outdoor airflow into HVAC systems: an evaluation ofof outdoor airflow into HVAC systems. Lawrence Berkeley

Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Life cycle assessment of an energy-system with a superheated steam dryer integrated in a local district heat and power plant  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a method for analyzing and assessing the environmental impact of a material, product or service throughout the entire life cycle. In this study 100 GWh heat is to be demanded by a local heat district. A mixture of coal and wet biofuel is frequently used as fuel for steam generation (Case 1). A conversion of the mixed fuel to dried biofuel is proposed. In the district it is also estimated that it is possible for 4000 private houses to convert from oil to wood pellets. It is proposed that sustainable solution to the actual problem is to combine heat and power production together with an improvement in the quality of wood residues and manufacture of pellets. It is also proposed that a steam dryer is integrated to the system (Case 2). Most of the heat from the drying process is used by the municipal heating networks. In this study the environmental impact of the two cases is examined with LCA. Different valuation methods shows the Case 2 is an improvement over Case 1, but there is diversity in the magnitudes of environmental impact in the comparison of the cases. The differences depend particularly on how the emissions of CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and hydrocarbons are estimated. The impact of the organic compounds from the exhaust gas during the drying is estimated as low in all of the three used methods.

Bjoerk, H.; Rasmuson, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Case history of industrial plant steam system layup for direct-fired gas operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the facts of an industrial plant steam system layup for direct fired gas operations. Fuel price savings indicated that gas firing a paper dryer, the largest steam user in the plant, would pay for itself in one year. Conversion work is detailed. Primary gas distribution was achieved by using one line of the steam loop. Machine water heating, power venting, space heating, and air makeup heating, among other conversions, are also specified.

Stacy, G.N.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Solid-State Lighting: Hitting the Target: ENERGY STAR® SSL Outdoor Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hitting the Target: ENERGY Hitting the Target: ENERGY STAR® SSL Outdoor Area Lighting Webcast to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Hitting the Target: ENERGY STAR® SSL Outdoor Area Lighting Webcast on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Hitting the Target: ENERGY STAR® SSL Outdoor Area Lighting Webcast on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Hitting the Target: ENERGY STAR® SSL Outdoor Area Lighting Webcast on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Hitting the Target: ENERGY STAR® SSL Outdoor Area Lighting Webcast on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Hitting the Target: ENERGY STAR® SSL Outdoor Area Lighting Webcast on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Hitting the Target: ENERGY STAR® SSL Outdoor Area Lighting Webcast on AddThis.com...

106

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Title Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Price, Phillip N., Arman Shehabi, Wanyu R. Chan, and Ashok J. Gadgil Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

107

Outdoor airflow into HVAC systems: An evaluation of measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outdoor airflow into HVAC systems: An evaluation of measurement Outdoor airflow into HVAC systems: An evaluation of measurement technologies Title Outdoor airflow into HVAC systems: An evaluation of measurement technologies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53834 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Fisk, William J., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, and William W. Delp Abstract During the last few years, new technologies have been introduced for measuring the flow rates of outdoor air (OA) into HVAC systems; however, an evaluation of these measurement technologies has not previously been published. This document describes a test system and protocols developed for controlled evaluation of these measurement technologies. The results of tests of three measurement technologies are also summarized. The test system and protocol were judged practical and very useful. The test results indicate that one measurement technology can measure OA flow rates with errors of 20% or less without a field-based calibration, as long as the OA velocities are sufficient to provide an accurately measurable pressure signal. The test results for a second measurement technology are similar; however, a difficult field-based calibration relating the OA flow rate with the pressure signal would be required to reduce errors below approximately 30%. The errors in OA flow rates measured with the third measurement technology, that uses six electronic airspeed sensors downstream of the OA inlet louver, exceeded 100%; however, these errors could be substantially reduced through a difficult field based calibration. The effects of wind on the accuracy of these measurement technologies still needs to be evaluated

108

Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Module data from NREL's CPV test bed is used to examine methods for calculating outdoor CPV power ratings. IEC 62670 and ASTM E2527 are used as a starting point for determining a module power rating on a monthly basis. Monthly power ratings vary by more than desired using existing methods. The presentation examines modifications to existing methods as well as spectral corrections to reduce variation in monthly module power ratings.

Muller, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Outdoor Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Digital Signage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have been supporting outdoor advertising companies and their traditional simple billboards for many years. The level of support these billboards needed was minimal because electricity for them was only used to power basic lighting technologies. The growth in the billboard industry combined with the explosion in available electronic and digital systems and the advancements made in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has resulted in a new type of billboard8212the LED electronic billboard. Electronic bil...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method for Evaluating Energy Use of Dishwashers, Clothes Washers, and Clothes Dryers: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Building America teams are researching opportunities to improve energy efficiency for some of the more challenging end-uses, such as lighting (both fixed and occupant-provided), appliances (clothes washer, dishwasher, clothes dryer, refrigerator, and range), and miscellaneous electric loads, which are all heavily dependent on occupant behavior and product choices. These end-uses have grown to be a much more significant fraction of total household energy use (as much as 50% for very efficient homes) as energy efficient homes have become more commonplace through programs such as ENERGY STAR and Building America. As modern appliances become more sophisticated the residential energy analyst is faced with a daunting task in trying to calculate the energy savings of high efficiency appliances. Unfortunately, most whole-building simulation tools do not allow the input of detailed appliance specifications. Using DOE test procedures the method outlined in this paper presents a reasonable way to generate inputs for whole-building energy-simulation tools. The information necessary to generate these inputs is available on Energy-Guide labels, the ENERGY-STAR website, California Energy Commission's Appliance website and manufacturer's literature. Building America has developed a standard method for analyzing the effect of high efficiency appliances on whole-building energy consumption when compared to the Building America's Research Benchmark building.

Eastment, M.; Hendron, R.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Method for Evaluating Energy Use of Dishwashers, Clothes Washers, and Clothes Dryers: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Building America teams are researching opportunities to improve energy efficiency for some of the more challenging end-uses, such as lighting (both fixed and occupant-provided), appliances (clothes washer, dishwasher, clothes dryer, refrigerator, and range), and miscellaneous electric loads, which are all heavily dependent on occupant behavior and product choices. These end-uses have grown to be a much more significant fraction of total household energy use (as much as 50% for very efficient homes) as energy efficient homes have become more commonplace through programs such as ENERGY STAR and Building America. As modern appliances become more sophisticated the residential energy analyst is faced with a daunting task in trying to calculate the energy savings of high efficiency appliances. Unfortunately, most whole-building simulation tools do not allow the input of detailed appliance specifications. Using DOE test procedures the method outlined in this paper presents a reasonable way to generate inputs for whole-building energy-simulation tools. The information necessary to generate these inputs is available on Energy-Guide labels, the ENERGY-STAR website, California Energy Commission's Appliance website and manufacturer's literature. Building America has developed a standard method for analyzing the effect of high efficiency appliances on whole-building energy consumption when compared to the Building America's Research Benchmark building.

Eastment, M.; Hendron, R.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Title Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Lobscheid, Agnes B., Thomas E. McKone, and D. A. Valleroc Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5659-5672 Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particulate matter (PM) are co-pollutants emitted as by-products of combustion processes. Convincing evidence exists for PAHs as a primary toxic component of fine PM (PM2.5). Because PM2.5 is listed by the US EPA as a "Criteria Pollutant," it is monitored regularly at sites nationwide. In contrast, very limited data is available on measured ambient air concentrations of PAHs. However, between 1999-2001, ambient air concentrations of PM2.5 and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are available for California locations. We use multivariate linear regression models (MLRMs) to predict ambient air levels of BaP in four air basins based on reported PM2.5 concentrations and spatial, temporal and meteorological variables as variates. We obtain an R2 ranging from 0.57-0.72 among these basins. Significant variables (p<0.05) include the average daily PM2.5 concentration, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity, and the coastal distance as well as season, and holiday or weekend. Combining the data from all sites and using only these variables to estimate ambient BaP levels, we obtain an R2 of 0.55. These R2-values, combined with analysis of the residual error and cross validation using the PRESS-statistic, demonstrate the potential of our method to estimate reported outdoor air PAH exposure levels in metropolitan regions. These MLRMs provide a first step towards relating outdoor ambient PM2.5 and PAH concentrations for epidemiological studies when PAH measurements are unavailable, or limited in spatial coverage, based on publicly available meteorological and PM2.5 data

113

Process for simultaneous removal of SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from gas streams  

SciTech Connect

A process for simultaneous removal of SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from a gas stream that includes flowing the gas stream to a spray dryer and absorbing a portion of the SO.sub.2 content of the gas stream and a portion of the NO.sub.x content of the gas stream with ZnO by contacting the gas stream with a spray of an aqueous ZnO slurry; controlling the gas outlet temperature of the spray dryer to within the range of about a 0.degree. to 125.degree. F. approach to the adiabatic saturation temperature; flowing the gas, unreacted ZnO and absorbed SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from the spray dryer to a fabric filter and collecting any solids therein and absorbing a portion of the SO.sub.2 remaining in the gas stream and a portion of the NO.sub.x remaining in the gas stream with ZnO; and controlling the ZnO content of the aqueous slurry so that sufficient unreacted ZnO is present in the solids collected in the fabric filter to react with SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x as the gas passes through the fabric filter whereby the overall feed ratio of ZnO to SO.sub.2 plus NO.sub.x is about 1.0 to 4.0 moles of ZnO per of SO.sub.2 and about 0.5 to 2.0 moles of ZnO per mole of NO.sub.x. Particulates may be removed from the gas stream prior to treatment in the spray dryer. The process further allows regeneration of ZnO that has reacted to absorb SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from the gas stream and acid recovery.

Rosenberg, Harvey S. (Columbus, OH)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Process for simultaneous removal of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for simultaneous removal of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from a gas stream that includes flowing the gas stream to a spray dryer and absorbing a portion of the SO[sub 2] content of the gas stream and a portion of the NO[sub x] content of the gas stream with ZnO by contacting the gas stream with a spray of an aqueous ZnO slurry; controlling the gas outlet temperature of the spray dryer to within the range of about a 0 to 125 F approach to the adiabatic saturation temperature; flowing the gas, unreacted ZnO and absorbed SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from the spray dryer to a fabric filter and collecting any solids therein and absorbing a portion of the SO[sub 2] remaining in the gas stream and a portion of the NO[sub x] remaining in the gas stream with ZnO; and controlling the ZnO content of the aqueous slurry so that sufficient unreacted ZnO is present in the solids collected in the fabric filter to react with SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] as the gas passes through the fabric filter whereby the overall feed ratio of ZnO to SO[sub 2] plus NO[sub x] is about 1.0 to 4.0 moles of ZnO per of SO[sub 2] and about 0.5 to 2.0 moles of ZnO per mole of NO[sub x]. Particulates may be removed from the gas stream prior to treatment in the spray dryer. The process further allows regeneration of ZnO that has reacted to absorb SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from the gas stream and acid recovery. 4 figs.

Rosenberg, H.S.

1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

115

Outdoor polymeric insulators long-term exposed to HVDC  

SciTech Connect

Field experience from outdoor polymeric insulators exposed to HVDC under natural contamination conditions is presented. This paper summarizes the peak leakage current statistics, the hydrophobicity and the surface material conditions studied by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The results show a strong interrelation between the surface conditions and the performance with respect to leakage currents. Moreover, the results show that the surface conditions and the performance of the insulators exposed to HVDC are rather similar to those of the insulators exposed to HVAC.

Soerqvist, T.; Vlastos, A.E. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Outdoor unit construction for an electric heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The outdoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided with an upper portion 10 containing propeller fan means 14 for drawing air through the lower portion 12 containing refrigerant coil means 16 in the form of four discrete coils connected together in a subassembly forming a W shape, the unit being provided with four adjustable legs 64 which are retracted in shipment, and are adjusted on site to elevate the unit to a particular height suitable for the particular location in which the unit is installed.

Draper, Robert (Pittsburgh, PA); Lackey, Robert S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Outdoor unit construction for an electric heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The outdoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided with an upper portion containing propeller fan means for drawing air through the lower portion containing refrigerant coil means in the form of four discrete coils connected together in a subassembly forming a W shape, the unit being provided with four adjustable legs which are retracted in shipment, and are adjusted on site to elevate the unit to a particular height suitable for the particular location in which the unit is installed. 4 figs.

Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.

1984-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

An outdoor exposure testing program for optical materials used in solar thermal electric technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developing low-cost, durable advanced optical materials is important for making solar thermal energy. technologies viable for electricity production. The objectives of a new outdoor testing program recently initiated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are to determine the expected lifetimes of candidate reflector materials and demonstrate their optical durability in real-world service conditions. NREL is working with both utilities and industry in a collaborative effort to achieve these objectives. To date, simulated/accelerated exposure testing of these materials has not been correlated with actual outdoor exposure testing. Such a correlation is desirable to provide confidence in lifetime predictions based upon accelerated weathering results. This outdoor testing program will allow outdoor exposure data to be obtained for realistic environments and will establish a data base for correlating simulated/accelerated outdoor exposure data with actual outdoor exposure data. In this program, candidate reflector materials are subjected to various outdoor exposure conditions in a network of sites across the southwestern United States. Important meteorological data are continuously recorded at these sites; these data will be analyzed for possible correlations with material optical performance. Weathered samples are characterized on a regular basis using a series of optical tests. These tests provide the basis for tracking material performance and durability with exposure time in the various outdoor environments. This paper describes the outdoor testing program in more detail including meteorological monitoring capabilities and the optical tests that are performed on these materials.

Wendelin, T.; Jorgensen, G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Dynamic predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor airrange of the clothing insulation calculated for eachbuilding). Figure 8 Clothing insulation versus dress code [

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Rooftop Unitary Air Conditioner with Integral Dedicated Outdoor Air System  

SciTech Connect

Energy use of rooftop and other unitary air-conditioners in commercial applications accounts for about 1 quad (10{sup 15} Btu) of primary energy use annually in the U.S. [Reference 7]. The realization that this cooling equipment accounts for the majority of commercial building cooled floorspace and the majority also of commercial building energy use has spurred development of improved-efficiency equipment as well as development of stricter standards addressing efficiency levels. Another key market driver affecting design of rooftop air-conditioning equipment has been concern regarding comfort and the control of humidity. Trends for increases in outdoor air ventilation rates in certain applications, and the increasing concern about indoor air quality problems associated with humidity levels and moisture in buildings points to a need for improved dehumidification capability in air-conditioning equipment of all types. In many cases addressing this issue exacerbates energy efficiency, and vice versa. The integrated dedicated outdoor air system configuration developed in this project addresses both energy and comfort/humidity issues.

Tiax Llc

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Appliances: Maximum of 2 units per equipment type per customer Weatherization: 1 rebate per type per customer Rebate amount cannot exceed 75% of the purchase and installation cost of weatherization measures. Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount All SWG Customers Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: $350 Natural Gas Clothes Dryer: $30 Smart Low-flow Showerhead: $20 Lavatory Faucet: $50 Windows: $1/SqFt

122

DOE/EA-1449; Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia (August 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2002 Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray-dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 2 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The proposed action is for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide cost- shared financial support to Universal Aggregates, LLC, for the design, construction, and operation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Mirant-Birchwood Power Plant Facility (Mirant-Birchwood Facility) in King George County, Virginia.

123

Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash  

SciTech Connect

Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant availability and throughput capacity and to produce quality lightweight aggregate for use in commercial applications.

Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Small-Area Study of Environmental Risk Assessment of Outdoor Falls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Falls in public places are an issue of great health concern especially for the elderly. Falls among the elderly is also a major health burden in many countries. This study describes a spatial approach to assess environmental causes of outdoor falls using ... Keywords: Environmental risk assessment, GIS, Outdoor falls, Small-area study, Spatial clustering

Poh-Chin Lai; Wing-Cheung Wong; Chien-Tat Low; Martin Wong; Ming-Houng Chan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bateau ivre: an artistic markerless outdoor mobile augmented reality installation on a riverboat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bateau Ivre is a project presented on the Seine River to make a large audience aware of the possible developments of Augmented Reality through an artistic installation in a mobile outdoor environment. The installation could be viewed from a ship ... Keywords: augmented reality, heritage, mobile augmented reality, outdoor digital art, real-time image processing

Christian Jacquemin; Wai Kit Chan; Mathieu Courgeon

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wind heat transfer coefficient in solar collectors in outdoor conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of wind heat transfer coefficient, h{sub w}, is required for estimation of upward losses from the outer surface of flat plate solar collectors/solar cookers. In present study, an attempt has been made to estimate the wind induced convective heat transfer coefficient by employing unglazed test plate (of size about 0.9 m square) in outdoor conditions. Experiments, for measurement of h{sub w}, have been conducted on rooftop of a building in the Institute campus in summer season for 2 years. The estimated wind heat transfer coefficient has been correlated against wind speed by linear regression and power regression. Experimental values of wind heat transfer coefficient estimated in present work have been compared with studies of other researchers after normalizing for plate length. (author)

Kumar, Suresh; Mullick, S.C. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Thermosyphon coil arrangement for heat pump outdoor unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For a heat pump, the outdoor unit is provided with a coil and a refrigerant flow arrangement there for which is such that in the heating mode of operation of the heat pump they operate in a thermosyphon fashion. The coil has a feed portion and an exit portion leading to a separator drum from which liquid refrigerant is returned through downcomer line for recirculation to the feed portion. The coil is tilted upwardly from entry to exit by the angle alpha to enhance the clearance of the two phases of refrigerant from each other in the heating mode of operation. There is no thermosyphon function in the cooling mode of operation. 9 figs.

Draper, R.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

128

Texas A&M AgriLife Research Procedures 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M AgriLife Research Procedures 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning Approved: October 5, 2000: August 27, 2014 Texas A&M AgriLife Research Procedure 24.01.01.A0.09 Outdoor Burning Page 1 of 2 PROCEDURE STATEMENT The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) regulates outdoor burning (30 TAC

129

Energy Efficiency Retrofits for U.S. Housing: Removing the Bottlenecks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dryer from Electric Dryer *Air Sealing involves reduction inCost Gas Dryer# Air Duct Sealing* Sealing** Yearly Savingsventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), (2) sealing and

Bardhan, Ashok; Jaffee, Dwight; Kroll, Cynthia; Wallace, Nancy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building  

SciTech Connect

Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Colour Recognition In Outdoor Images Through Context-Based Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the variation of the color of objects with respect to existing models of daylight and surface reflectance, and develops context-based models of daylight (based on the CIE model [18]) and hybrid surface reflectance (based on existing hybrid surface reflectance models [21, 25, 32, 35]) called the Normalized Photometric Function. Thereafter, given the time-of-day (which, along with location, is used to calculate the sun-angle [23]), approximate cloud cover and sun-visibility, the color of the incident daylight is predicted, and combined with the reflectance model of the target object to predict the apparent color of the object; image pixels are then classified based on the predicted color. Section 2 describes the causes for the variation in apparent color; section 3 gives a brief literature review; section 4 describes the CIE daylight model and the context-based daylight model developed in this study; section 5 analyzes surface reflectance with respect to existing models and then develops the Normalized Photometric Function (NPF) model; section 6 combines the daylight and NPF models for context-based color prediction; finally, section 7 summarizes the conclusions of the study. 2 Causes for color shift in outdoor scenes

Shashi Buluswar; Red Green; Red Green

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

HYDRONIC BASEBOARD THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WITH OUTDOOR RESET CONTROL TO ENABLE THE USE OF A CONDENSING BOILER.  

SciTech Connect

Use of condensing boilers in residential heating systems offers the potential for significant improvements in efficiency. For these to operate in a condensing mode the return water temperature needs to be about 10 degrees below the saturation temperature for the flue gas water vapor. This saturation temperature depends on fuel type and excess air and ranges from about 110 F to 135 F. Conventional baseboard hydronic distribution systems are most common and these are designed for water temperatures in the 180 F range, well above the saturation temperature. Operating strategies which may allow these systems to operate in a condensing mode have been considered in the past. In this study an approach to achieving this for a significant part of the heating season has been tested in an instrumented home. The approach involves use of an outdoor reset control which reduces the temperature of the water circulating in the hydronic loop when the outdoor temperature is higher than the design point for the region. Results showed that this strategy allows the boiler to operate in the condensing region for 80% of the winter heating season with oil, 90% with propane, and 95% with gas, based on cumulative degree days. The heating system as tested combines space heating and domestic hot water loads using an indirect, 40 gallon tank with an internal heat exchanger. Tests conducted during the summer months showed that the return water temperature from the domestic hot water tank heat exchanger is always below a temperature which will provide condensing operation of the boiler. In the field tests both the condensing boiler and the conventional, non-condensing boiler were in the test home and each was operated periodically to provide a direct performance comparison.

BUTCHER,T.A.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Florida City Gas - Residential Energy Smart Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Gas - Residential Energy Smart Rebate Program City Gas - Residential Energy Smart Rebate Program Florida City Gas - Residential Energy Smart Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $350 - $500 Tankless Water Heater: $550 - $ 675 Furnace: $500 - $725 Cooking Range: $100 - $200 Dryer: $100 - $150 Space Conditioning Conversion: $1,200 Provider Florida City Gas Florida City Gas (FCG) encourages residential customers to become more energy efficient by offering various rebates for the purchase and installation of efficient natural gas appliances. Rebate amounts depend on whether appliances are converted from a different power source or natural

135

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate Program (Arizona) Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate Program (Arizona) < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Residential: 2 per household Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: $450 Natural Gas Clothes Dryer: $30 Windows: $0.95/sq ft Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq ft Floor Insulation: $0.30/sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: $450 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: $450 Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq ft

136

Architecture for environmental learning : a National Outdoor Leadership School in Baja, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An understanding of people, program, and place establishes a foundation from which to make architectural decisions. The focus of this thesis is to understand the needs of those involved in an outdoor education school in ...

Galyean, Taylor

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON MATERIALS AND COMPONENTS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON MATERIALS AND COMPONENTS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed AetioD: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct outdoor tests and experiments on materials and equipment components under controlled conditions. No source, special nuclear, or byproduct materials would be involved, but encapsulated radioactive sources manufactured to applicable standards or other radiological materials could be used in activities under this categorical exclusion (eX). LoeatioD of Action: The locations would include DOE property at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and other offsite outdoor locations. Description of the Proposed Action:

138

Ideal balance of work, play makes outdoor enthusiast's James Miller life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ideal balance of work, play makes outdoor enthusiast's life enviable Ideal balance of work, play makes outdoor enthusiast's life enviable Ideal balance of work, play makes outdoor enthusiast's James Miller life enviable Nuclear engineer graduate research assistant gets valueable experience while taking advantage of local outdoor recreational activities. August 2, 2012 James Miller Miller first came to the Laboratory in 2006 as a summer student. His college advisor, a former LANL employee, found him an internship through the student programs office. Miller highly recommends LANL as a place to start a career, "The student programs are very mentor-driven, allowing you to gain phenomenal experience and build a professional network that will set you up for the rest of your life." "I have access to top-level scientists in the world, doing some of the best

139

Roughness Lengths for Momentum and Heat Derived from Outdoor Urban Scale Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban climate experimental results from the Comprehensive Outdoor Scale Model (COSMO) were used to estimate roughness lengths for momentum and heat. Two different physical scale models were used to investigate the scale dependence of the ...

M. Kanda; M. Kanega; T. Kawai; R. Moriwaki; H. Sugawara

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

IntenCity - 2 Solid State Outdoor Luminaire SL-3200 High Output LED Street Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The product under assessment is an advanced lighting technology8212a solid state outdoor luminarie light emitting diode (LED) street lighting system designed to provide various levels of direct white light.

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Valley of California, USA. J. Aerosol Science 32, S631-S632.particles of outdoor origin. Aerosol Science and Technology,in Central California. Aerosol Science and Technology, 40,

Lunden, Melissa M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Gas & Water Sys Electric Gas & Water Sys Jump to: navigation, search Name Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys Place New York Utility Id 1343 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial (20 KW to 75 KW demand) Commercial Industrial (Over 75 KW demand) Industrial Outdoor Lighting (175W MV-150W HPS) Lighting Outdoor Lighting (250W HPS) Lighting Outdoor Lighting (400W MV/HPS) Lighting Residential Residential Small Commercial ( Under 20 KW demand) Commercial

143

An RTD study for the flow of lignite particles through a pilot rotary dryer. Part 2: Flighted drum case  

SciTech Connect

In Part 2 of this work a flighted pilot rotating cylindrical drum, intended to be used as either a dryer or calciner (kiln), has been used to investigate the flow, through it, of pulverized moist lignite. Tracer pulse input-response experiments have been performed. Residence Time Distribution (RTD) data have been deduced for three types of flight geometry, namely: Rectangular (RA), Equal Angular Distribution (EAD) and Equal Horizontal Distribution (EHD). For each flight shape, mean residence time {bar t} has been correlated with drum operating conditions. The sequence {bar t}{sub EAD} < {bar t}{sub RA} < {bar t}{sub EHD} has been validated. A comparison between the residence time predictions for the flighted and the bare drum has indicated that {bar t} for the former may be higher by up to 3.5 times than that for the latter. Exceptionally high solids hold-up values (i.e., Z = 0.13--0.42) have been observed and compared to theoretical predictions. Particle size segregation during lignite flow through the flighted drum was not confirmed.

Hatzilyberis, K.S.; Androutsopoulos, G.P. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

An evaluation of three commercially available technologies for real-time measurement of rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RATES OF OUTDOOR AIRFLOW INTO HVAC SYSTEMS William J. Fisk,determine flow resistance of hvac ducts and fittings. A S H

Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Making recreational space: citizen involvement in outdoor recreation and park establishment in British Columbia, 1900-2000.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studies of outdoor recreation and the social construction of wilderness have shown how urban consumption of wilderness areas dispossessed rural residents from traditional land uses.… (more)

Clayton, Jenny

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The effects of outdoor heat exchanger hydrophobic treatment on the performance of an air source heat pump.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effects of outdoor heat exchanger hydrophobic treatment on the performance of an air source heat pump were investigated. The base case tests used a… (more)

Parker, Brandon DeWayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Microsoft Word - Outdoor Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development 3768X_final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outdoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3768X) Outdoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3768X) Program or Field Office: Office of Science - ORNL Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site Office (DOE-OSO) proposes to conduct outdoor, small- and pilot-scale research and development activities and associated transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal or real property involving advanced materials, biological and ecological systems, energy science, and national security including but not limited to collecting samples and analyzing ecosystem and atmospheric field data; developing, evaluating and testing equipment, materials and components; and

148

Solar Decathlon Design Places People and the Outdoors at its Heart |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Decathlon Design Places People and the Outdoors at its Heart Solar Decathlon Design Places People and the Outdoors at its Heart Solar Decathlon Design Places People and the Outdoors at its Heart May 26, 2011 - 5:57pm Addthis Members of Team New Zealand | Courtesy of the New Zealand team's Flickr photostream Members of Team New Zealand | Courtesy of the New Zealand team's Flickr photostream Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? The next Solar Decathlon will be held Sept. 23-Oct. 2, 2011, at the National Mall's West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C. In honor of the U.S Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon -- which challenges 20 collegiate teams to design, build and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive -- we are

149

B3.11 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- 1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components Introduction .A .. s defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same n

150

Solar Decathlon Design Places People and the Outdoors at its Heart |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Decathlon Design Places People and the Outdoors at its Heart Solar Decathlon Design Places People and the Outdoors at its Heart Solar Decathlon Design Places People and the Outdoors at its Heart May 26, 2011 - 5:57pm Addthis Members of Team New Zealand | Courtesy of the New Zealand team's Flickr photostream Members of Team New Zealand | Courtesy of the New Zealand team's Flickr photostream Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? The next Solar Decathlon will be held Sept. 23-Oct. 2, 2011, at the National Mall's West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C. In honor of the U.S Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon -- which challenges 20 collegiate teams to design, build and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive -- we are

151

Textile drying using solarized can dryers to demonstrate the application of solar energy to industrial drying or dehydration processes, Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has resulted in the installation of a solar energy collection system for providing process heat to a textile drying process. The solar collection subsystem uses 700 square meters (7500 square feet) of parabolic trough, single-axis tracking, concentrating collectors to heat water in a high temperature water (HTW) loop. The solar collectors nominally generate 193/sup 0/C (380/sup 0/F) water with the HTW loop at 1.9 x 10/sup 6/ Pa (275 psi). A steam generator is fueled with the HTW and produces 450 kg/hour (1000 pounds per hour) of process steam at the nominal design point conditions. The solar-generated process steam is at 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ Pa (75 psi) and 160/sup 0/C (321/sup 0/F). It is predicted that the solar energy system will provide 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ MJ/year (1.1 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/year) to the process. This is 46 percent of the direct isolation available to the collector field during the operational hours (300 days/year of the Fairfax mill. The process being solarized is textile drying using can dryers. The can dryers are part of a slashing operation in a WestPoint Pepperell mill in Fairfax, Alabama. Over 50 percent of all woven goods are processed through slashers and dried on can dryers. The collectors were fabricated by Honeywell at a pilot production facility in Minneapolis, Minnesota, under a 3000-square-meter (32,000-square-foot) production run. The collectors and other system components were installed at the site by the Bahnson Service Company and their subcontractors, acting as the project general contractor. System checkout and start-up was conducted. Preliminary system performance was determined from data collected during start-up. System design, fabrication and installation, data analysis, operation and maintenance procedures, and specifications and drawings are presented.

Mitchell, P.D.; Beesing, M.E.; Bessler, G.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The NREL Outdoor Accelerated-Weathering Tracking System Photovoltaic Module Exposure Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Status results are presented for the Outdoor Accelerated-Weathering Tracking System (OATS) first study on photovoltaic (PV) modules. Studies began in November 1997 on pairs of commercially available crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules kept at constant resistive load.

Basso, T. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

EVLA Memo No. 89 The EVLA Outdoor Antenna Test Range Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projected Costs if new range equipment were purchased Total Material and Equipment costs (to date) for building test range: Funds required to complete project Total NRAO Costs (estimate) without NMT involvementEVLA Memo No. 89 The EVLA Outdoor Antenna Test Range Project: Fourth Quarter 2004, Progress Report

Groppi, Christopher

154

Evaluation of Emerging Line Inspection Technologies: Results of 2012 Outdoor Laboratory Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes outdoor laboratory testing performed in 2012 to evaluate different approaches to establish conductor temperature during a helicopter-based Lidar field survey of an existing overhead transmission line. Establishing conductor temperature during Lidar surveys is necessary to assemble a line model to determine line sags, and thus clearances, under full rating and specified environmental conditions. ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Stability of CIS/CIGS Modules at the Outdoor Test Facility over Two Decades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses examining the status and question of long-term stability of copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic (PV) module performance for numerous modules that are deployed in the array field, or on the roof of, the outdoor test facility (OTF) at NREL, acquired from two manufacturers.

del Cueto, J. A.; Rummel, S.; Kroposki, B.; Osterwald, C.; Anderberg, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES III Speaker(s): Ronald Briggs Date: August 15, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer Do emissions from natural gas stoves in American homes degrade respiratory health? The combustion of natural gas yields byproducts such as NOx , PM2.5 , and CO that the US EPA regulates outdoors. But while ambient air quality has improved in the US over the last few decades as a consequence of the Clean Air Act of and its amendments, the prevalence of asthma and morbidity and mortality associated with asthma continue to rise (Mannino /et al./, 1998). Concentrations of most air pollutants are higher indoors than outdoors in the US, however, and people in the US spend more than 90%

157

City of Gas City, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City, Indiana (Utility Company) City, Indiana (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Gas City Place Indiana Utility Id 6993 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electric Heat for Library or School Service Commercial Commercial and General Power Service Commercial Outdoor Lighting- 1000 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting- 175 W Lighting Outdoor Lighting- 400 W Lighting Public Street Lighting and Highway Lighting- 175 W Mercury Vapor/100 W HPS Lighting Public Street Lighting and Highway Lighting-400 W Mercury Vapor/250 W HPS

158

Questar Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives are available for clothes washers and dryers, water heaters, furnaces, boilers, windows, insulation and programmable thermostats. A reduced-cost home energy audit...

159

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Melissa M. Lunden 1 ∗ , Thomas W. Kirchstetter 1 , Tracy L. Thatcher 2 , Susanne V. Hering 3 , and Nancy J. Brown 1 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA 2 Aerosol Dynamics Inc., 2329 4th Street, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA Abstract A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a

160

Outdoor Performance of a Thin-Film Gallium-Arsenide Photovoltaic Module  

SciTech Connect

We deployed a 855 cm2 thin-film, single-junction gallium arsenide (GaAs) photovoltaic (PV) module outdoors. Due to its fundamentally different cell technology compared to silicon (Si), the module responds differently to outdoor conditions. On average during the test, the GaAs module produced more power when its temperature was higher. We show that its maximum-power temperature coefficient, while actually negative, is several times smaller in magnitude than that of a Si module used for comparison. The positive correlation of power with temperature in GaAs is due to temperature-correlated changes in the incident spectrum. We show that a simple correction based on precipitable water vapor (PWV) brings the photocurrent temperature coefficient into agreement with that measured by other methods and predicted by theory. The low operating temperature and small temperature coefficient of GaAs give it an energy production advantage in warm weather.

Silverman, T. J.; Deceglie, M. G.; Marion, B.; Cowley, S.; Kayes, B.; Kurtz, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Analysis of a Dedicated Outdoor Air System and Low Temperature Supply Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the principles and the characteristics of a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) and low temperature supply air system. DOAS is offered based on the demands of indoor air quality and the low temperature supply air system is offered based on the demands of saving energy. The two systems are very similar, which is analyzed in this paper. Using actual engineering, we compute the air flow rate, cold load and energy consumption in detail, and provide some good conclusions.

Guang, L.; Li, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Comparison of indoor-outdoor thermal performance for the Sunpak evacuated tube liquid collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance data is provided for current Sunpak production collectors. The effects of an improved manifold are seen from the test results. The test results show excellent correlation between the solar simulator derived test results and outdoor test results. Also, because of different incident angle modifiers, the all-day efficiency of this collector with a diffuse reflector is found to be comparable to the performance with the standard shaped specular reflector.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers Title Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4951E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Coles, Henry C., Tae Won Han, Phillip N. Price, Ashok J. Gadgil, and William F. Tschudi Date Published 03/2011 Abstract There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: "closed" and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percentage of the recirculation air is "make-up" air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both "closed" and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups:

164

Outdoor Air, Heat Wheels and JCPenney: A New Approach to Retail Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JCPenney Construction Services department is responsible for the construction of new stores, takeover of existing facilities to create a new store, repairs to existing JCPenney facilities and the expansion and modernization of stores across the nation and the world. Each year, JCPenney Construction Services handles approximately 50 projects along these lines. After the implementation of ASHRAE 62- 1989 by JCPenney and many major building codes, including BOCA, mechanical engineers at JCPenney noticed a sharp increase in the percentage of cooling capacity required to cool the outdoor ventilation air. In an effort to limit this impact, both in first cost and in operational costs, JCPenney is beginning to make an effort to use enthalpy heat wheels in the hot and humid climate areas where it is economically feasible. This paper discusses the efforts of JCPenney to implement this option to the treatment of outdoor air in a store in Baton Rouge, LA while maintaining indoor air quality requirements as stated in ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 and maintaining energy efficiency. This paper also discusses the projected energy savings and operations of this alternative to the standard treatment of outdoor air.

Smith, C. S.; Bartlett, T. A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Numerical Simulations of Outdoor Heat Stress Index and Heat Disorder Risk in the 23 Wards of Tokyo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the summertime outdoor heat stress hazard and heat disorder risks (HDRs) were simulated numerically using a mesoscale meteorological model combined with an urban canopy model and a building energy model. Model grid maps ...

Yukitaka OHASHI; Yukihiro KIKEGAWA; Tomohiko IHARA; Nanami SUGIYAMA

166

Urban Energy Balance Obtained from the Comprehensive Outdoor Scale Model Experiment. Part I: Basic Features of the Surface Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine the basic features of the surface energy balance (SEB) using the data obtained from the Comprehensive Outdoor Scale Model (COSMO). COSMO is an idealized miniature city that has no vegetation, no human ...

Toru Kawai; Manabu Kanda

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedures 24.01.01.X0.09 Outdoor Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedures 24.01.01.X0.09 Outdoor Burning Approved: October 5 Review: August 27, 2014 Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedure 24.01.01.X0.09 Outdoor Burning burning (30 TAC 111.201-221).Those units located on the Texas A&M University campus will follow the Open

168

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 in homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural GasAssistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating Dryer Range/oven Pool heating Spa heating TotalWater heating Space heating Range/oven Dryer Pool/spa Water heating Outdoor lighting Microwave Range/oven Clothes 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Transpired Collectors (Solar Preheaters for Outdoor Ventilation Air)--023385m FTA collectors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Federal Technology Alert describes transpired collectors or solar preheaters for outdoor ventilation air. The President's Million Solar Roofs Initiative aims to install 1 million solar energy systems on residential, commercial, and public-sector buildings by 2010. In support of the Initiative, and as part of a continual effort to ensure U.S. buildings are energy efficient and environmentally sustainable, the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will help install those solar systems targeted for the federal sector.

171

Thermal performance evaluation of the solargenics solar collector at outdoor conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information contained within this report presents test procedures used during the performance of an evaluation program. The test program was conducted to obtain the following performance data and information on the solar collector. (1) Thermal performance data under outdoor conditions, (2) Structural behavior of collector under static conditions, and (3) Effects of long term exposure to material weathering elements. The Solargenics is a liquid, single-glazed, flat-plate collector. Approximate dimensions of each collector are 240 inches long, 36 inches wide, and 3.5 inches in depth.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

AEP Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program AEP Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Homes Program: Contact AEP Ohio In-home Energy Audit: $75 Pin Based CFL Indoor Fixture: $20 Pin Based CFL Outdoor Fixture: $35 CFL Torchieres: $20 Wall Insulation: $75 Air Sealing: $50 Window Film: $45 ENERGY STAR Window Replacement: $75 Attic Insulation: $90 Shower Start/Stop: $25

173

The Measured Energy Impact of Infiltration in an Outdoor Test Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy consumption calculation of house envelopes assumes that conduction heat loss is independent on air infiltration heat loss, and that energy consumption is the sum of these losses. Anderlind [1985], Liu [1987], and Claridge et at. [1989] showed this method can overestimate energy consumption substantially under steady-state conditions. Bailly [1987] and Anderson [1987] reported much smaller house energy consumption when the air flow was organized by mechanical systems. However, none of these studies quantified energy loss reduction under a variety of outdoor weather conditions. The energy performance was investigated in an outdoor test cell with different leakage configurations and air flow rates under both infiltration and exfiltration. It was found that the energy consumption was not only dependent on air flow rate, temperature differences, and solar radiation, but also on the air flow direction and the air leakage configuration. Infiltration could lead to a much lower heating energy consumption than that of exfiltration, and exfiltration could lead to a much lower cooling energy consumption than that of infiltration. The air infiltration energy consumption of a leaky house could be 9 times as high as that of a tight house even when the air flow rate was the same for both houses.

Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Outdoor recreational use of the Salton Sea with reference to potential impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to describe the types, levels, and locations of outdoor recreation uses in the Salton Sea area, the number and principal activities of visitors, and to estimate the consequences upon outdoor recreation of geothermal development and other activities that might affect the Salton Sea. It is concluded that since the Salton Sea is considered legally to be a sump for agricultural, municipal, and presumably geothermal waste waters, recreational use of the Sea for fishing and boating (from present marinas) will undoubtedly continue to decline, unless there is a major policy change. Use of the shoreline for camping, the surrounding roads and lands for scenic viewing, ORV events, and retirement or recreation communities will not decline, and will probably increase, assuming control of hydrogen sulfide odors. Two ways in which the fishing and present boating facilities could be returned to a wholly usable steady state are discussed. One is by construction of a diked evaporation pond system at the south end of the Sea. This would allow a means of control over both water level and salinity. Another means, less costly but more difficult to effectively control, would be to budget geothermal plant use of, and disposal of wastes in, Salton Sea water. (JGB)

Twiss, R.; Sidener, J.; Bingham, G.; Burke, J.E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Influence of Transfer Efficiency of the Outdoor Pipe Network and Boiler Operating Efficiency on the Building Heat Consumption Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the influence of transfer efficiency of the outdoor pipe network and operating efficiency of the boiler on the building heat consumption index, on the premise of saving up to 65 percent energy in different climates. The results show that transfer efficiency is not influenced by the climate, and the influence is in accordance with that in other climates. The article also presents data on the energy consumption caused by the improvement of the transfer efficiency of the outdoor pipe network and the operating efficiency of the boiler, and the calculated formula for the building heat consumption index on the condition of saving 65 percent energy.

Fang, X.; Wang, Z.; Liu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Outdoor test for thermal performance evaluation of the Owens-Illinois Sunpak SEC-601 (air) solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedures used and the test results obtained during the performance of an evaluation test program on the Owens-Illinois Sunpak, model SEC-601, air solar collector under natural outdoor weather conditions are presented. All testing activities were performed on a single module installed on the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar House. The test was performed and the data evaluated according to the methods provided in ASHRAE 93-77 (Method of Testing to Determine the Thermal Performance of Solar Collectors) as applicable to outdoor testing of solar collectors.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Development of a formula to determine outdoor residential water consumption in College Station, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports the findings of a telephone survey, public tax records, and water bills of 233 randomly selected single family detached residences, built between 1992 and 1994 in College Station, Texas. Weather information consisting of average daily temperature, daily precipitation, and daily evaporation was also necessary for analysis of gallons of water used. The purpose of this study was to (1) develop a marketing tool that builders could use to determine the water saving features for a particular area to increase sales and lead to possible mortgage reductions, and (2) help cities and developers size water lines appropriately for projected water needs. The COMBEAS computer program and various statistical tests were used to report to findings of the study. No known study has been produced that has analyzed water usage using the COMBEAS regression program and analyzed all of the variables contained in this study. Using the COMBEAS program, comparing gallons to temperature, a base load was determined that remains constant throughout the year. Any watering above this base load was attributed to temperature related (outdoor) watering. Twenty three variables, arrived at by prior research and related to water usage were then tested for significance against the amount of water attributable to outdoor watering. Of these variables, 11 were found to be significant using forward stepwise regression. Multi-colinearity tests were then conducted using the Peal-son Product Moment correlation. After eliminating all but one of those variables in each group that were highly related, 6 variables remained, including non-baseload rainfall and evaporation, yard area, existence of a sprinkler system and/or pool, and the predominant variety of grass. Using these six variables as independent variables, and the temperature dependent watering as the dependent variable, the group was then tested using best subset regression. From these results, those variables making up the highest R2 combination with p-values of less than .05 were then analyzed using multiple linear regression, producing a formula that would most accurately predict outdoor water usage for College Station, Texas and areas with similar climates and populations.

Winkelblech, Audrey Kristen

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Southwest Gas Corporation - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate General: 50% of purchase price Custom: $20,000 Program Info Expiration Date 12/15/2013 State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Curtain: $1,950 Modulating Burner Control: $10,000 Boiler Steam Trap: $250 Non-condensing Boiler: $1/MBtuh Condensing Boiler: $1.25/MBtuh Clothes Dryer: $30 Custom: $1/therm up to $20,000 Convection Oven: $550 Conveyor Oven: $300-$750 Dishwasher: $1,050-$2,000 Energy Audit: $5,000/facility; $50,000/customer Furnace (Northern Nevada Only): $300-$500

179

Capabilities of the High Voltage Stress Test System at the Outdoor Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We illustrate the capabilities of the High Voltage Stress Test (HVST) which operates continuously in the array field east of the Outdoor Test Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Because we know that photovoltaic (PV) modules generating electrical power in both residential and utility-scale array installations will develop high-voltage biases approaching 600 VDC and 1,000 VDC, respectively, we expect such high voltages will result in current leakage between cells and ground, typically through the frames or mounts. We know that inevitably such leakage currents are capable of producing electrochemical corrosion that adversely impacts long-term module performance. With the HVST, we stress or operate PV modules under high-voltage bias, to characterize their leakage currents under all prevailing ambient conditions and assess performance changes emanating from high-voltage stress. We perform this test both on single modules and an active array.

del Cueto, J. A.; Trudell, D.; Sekulic, W.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Measuring the Optical Performance of Evacuated Receivers via an Outdoor Thermal Transient Test: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modern parabolic trough solar collectors operated at high temperatures to provide the heat input to Rankine steam power cycles employ evacuated receiver tubes along the collector focal line. High performance is achieved via the use of a selective surface with a high absorptance for incoming short-wave solar radiation and a low emittance for outgoing long-wave infrared radiation, as well as the use of a hard vacuum to essentially eliminate convective and conductive heat losses. This paper describes a new method that determines receiver overall optical efficiency by exposing a fluid-filled, pre-cooled receiver to one sun outdoors and measuring the slope of the temperature curve at the point where the receiver temperature passes the glass envelope temperature (that is, the point at which there is no heat gain or loss from the absorber). This transient test method offers the potential advantages of simplicity, high accuracy, and the use of the actual solar spectrum.

Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Netter, J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Contextual analysis of human non-verbal guide behaviors to inform the development of FROG, the fun robotic outdoor guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the first step in a series of studies to design the interaction behaviors of an outdoor robotic guide. We describe and report the use case development carried out to identify effective human tour guide behaviors. In this paper we focus ... Keywords: contextual analysis, human tour guide behavior, non-verbal robot behavior

Daphne E. Karreman; Elisabeth M. A. G. van Dijk; Vanessa Evers

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

An outdoor time scenes simulation scheme based on support vector regression with radial basis function on DCT domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel strategy for forecasting outdoor scenes is introduced. This new approach combines the support vector regression in neural network computation and the discrete cosine transform (DCT). In 1995, Vapnik introduced a neural-network ... Keywords: Discrete cosine transform, Neural network, Radial basis function (RBF), Scene, Support vector regression

Chen-Chung Liu; Kai-Wen Chuang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Field Results from Application of the Outdoor-Air/Economizer Diagnostician for Commissioning and O&M  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results of field testing an automated diagnostician for outdoor-air-supply and economizer systems that can be used for commissioning purposes. The fundamental capabilities of the tool are described and key results of its application on six air handlers in a large hotel building are discussed. Ancillary issues pertinent to the development and application of such tools are also presented.

Pratt, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.; Blanc, Steven L.

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

The effect of hardware configuration on the performance of residential air conditioning systems at high outdoor ambient temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed which investigated the effect of hardware configuration on air conditioning cooling system performance at high outdoor temperatures. The initial phase of the investigation involved the testing of ten residential air conditioning units in psychrometric rooms at Texas A&M University. All units were tested using ARI Standard 210/240 (1989) test procedures. Tests were conducted at indoor conditions of 80'F (26.7'C) db and 67'F (19.4'C) wb, and outdoor db temperatures of 82'F (27.8'C), 95-F (35-C), 100-F (37.8-C), 105-F (40.6-C), 1 10-F (43.3-C), and 120-F (48.90C). The second phase of the research involved the analysis of manufacturers' published cooling performance data for various hardware configurations. For the experimental work, measurements were taken to determine total capacity, system power, EER, and power factor. These results were then compared to manufacturers' predicted values. For the capacity, the experimental results were an average of 2.6% below the manufacturers' published values for outdoor temperatures from 85'F (29.4'C) to 115'F (46.l'C). Experimental power measurements were on average 0.4% above manufacturers' listed results. For the EER, experimental results were an average of 2.9% less than the manufacturers' predicted values. The power factors of all units were above 0.95 for the tested outdoor temperatures. In the analysis of manufacturers' published data, relationships between steady-state performance, cyclic performance, and hardware configuration were investigated for a variety of air conditioning units. A statistical relationship was found between the SEER of a unit and its corresponding EER. The split-system units possessed greater increases in EER for a given increase in SEER than the package or two-speed units. Averages values of EER/SEER for EER's at 95F (350C) were highest for the split-system units, followed by the package and two-speed units, respectively. Normalized capacity, power, and EER curves were investigated at outdoor temperatures from 85F (29.40C) to 115OF (46.1"C). On average, the two-speed units showed the smallest decrease in capacity with an increase in outdoor temperature, followed by the split-system and package-system units. The smallest power increase and smallest EER decrease with an increase in outdoor temperature were exhibited by the split-system units, followed by the two-speed and package-system units.

Bain, Joel Alan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Evaluation of energy efficiency standards for residential clothes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat pump clothes dryers would be cost-effective for nearly one fifth of US households. However, for both electric standard and gas clothes dryers, standards that improve...

186

Home systems research house: Gas heat pump cooling characterization test results. Topical report, July-September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling performance characterization tests were performed at the GRI Home Systems Research House located in the NAHB Research Home Park in Prince George's County, Maryland. Test protocols followed guidelines set forth in GRI's Research House Utilization Plan (RHUP). A combination of minute-by-minute and hourly average data consisting of weather, comfort, and energy parameters was collected by using an automated data acquisition system. The tests were performed from July 1991 through September 1991. The gas heat pump (GHP) had an average daily gas coefficient of performance (COP) value of 1.49 at an outdoor temperature of 72.8 F and 0.84 at an outdoor temperature of 83.9 F. The average test period gas COP was 1.13. The GHP peak cooling capacity achieved was approximately 34,000 Btuh. The GHP provided good overall thermal comfort control on the first-floor and moderate thermal comfort control on the second floor. Reduced second floor performance was primarily due to thermostat location and the stack effect. Good latent heat removal existed throughout the test period. Unit modulation kept room air stratification to a minimum. Thermostat setback saved energy at high average daily outdoor temperatures and used more energy at lower average daily outdoor temperatures, compared to a constant thermostat setpoint control, due to changes in unit gas COP values from low-speed to high-speed operation.

Reigel, H.D.; Kenney, T.M.; Liller, T.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The development of solar-assisted gas-fired appliances: phase ii. Final report dec 80-nov 81  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of applying solar assistance to commercial laundry drying and supermarket dehumidification was accomplished. The laundry drying project included experimental evaluation of the transient and steady-state characteristics of the hot air produced by an air-heating solar collector; experimental evaluation of the performance characteristics of a gas-fired laundry dryer as affected by varying the inlet air temperature and humidity; and an assessment of the characteristics of commercial laundries in relation to the potential commercialization of the solar-assisted dryer concept. The supermarket dehumidification project included an assessment of the relative latent and sensible cooling requirements as a function of geographic location; typical design studies of the performance and cost effectiveness of desiccant dehumidification systems in this application; and the incremental effectiveness of solar assistance to desiccant regeneration. In both projects, the solar-assist feature is, at best, marginally cost effective, including incentives, in the near term; however, the gas-fired only desiccant dehumidification concept is shown to be a potentially attractive alternative to vapor compression dehumidification with a potential for widespread application.

Hagen, K.G.; Levine, A.; Colarusso, J.M.; Zakak, A.I.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evaluation of surface sampling method performance for Bacillus Spores on clean and dirty outdoor surfaces.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of Bacillus atrophaeous spores from grime-treated and clean surfaces was measured in a controlled chamber study to assess sampling method performance. Outdoor surfaces investigated by wipe and vacuum sampling methods included stainless steel, glass, marble and concrete. Bacillus atrophaeous spores were used as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis spores in this study designed to assess whether grime-coated surfaces significantly affected surface sampling method performance when compared to clean surfaces. A series of chamber tests were carried out in which known amounts of spores were allowed to gravitationally settle onto both clean and dirty surfaces. Reference coupons were co-located with test coupons in all chamber experiments to provide a quantitative measure of initial surface concentrations of spores on all surfaces, thereby allowing sampling recovery calculations. Results from these tests, carried out under both low and high humidity conditions, show that spore recovery from grime-coated surfaces is the same as or better than spore recovery from clean surfaces. Statistically significant differences between method performance for grime-coated and clean surfaces were observed in only about half of the chamber tests conducted.

Wilson, Mollye C.; Einfeld, Wayne; Boucher, Raymond M.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Tezak, Matthew Stephen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

194

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

The NREL Outdoor Accelerated-weathering Tracking System and Photovoltaic Module Exposure Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the Outdoor Accelerated-weathering Tracking System (OATS) and interim results for the first OATS study on photovoltaic (PV) modules. With two test planes measuring 1.52 x 1.83 m, OATS provides a unique solar-concentrating exposure capability. Test sample temperatures are moderated by air blowers. Water spray capability exists for wetting samples. The OATS two-axis tracker points to the sun using software calculations. Non-imaging aluminum reflectors give a nominal clear-sky optical concentration ratio of three. Field-qualification measurements in the test plane under reflector conditions showed its relative irradiance non-uniformity was '' 15% for a clear-sky summer day with '' 75 mm as the smallest distance for that non-uniformity. Exposure studies began in November 1997 on seven pairs of commercially available ribbon silicon, crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon PV modules kept at constant resistive load. The modules were periodically removed from OATS for visual inspection and solar simulator performance measurements. There were no module failures. This PV module study is ongoing and later results will be compared to other testing techniques. Through July 1998, the modules under reflector conditions received 392 MJ/m2 of total ultraviolet (TUV) exposure. That was 2.07 times the TUV exposure compared to a south-facing fixed array tilted 40{sup o} up from horizontal at NREL. Similarly, the modules in the test plane under the covered reflectors received 1.04 times the fixed array TUV exposure. For the test plane under the covered reflectors there was a loss of 13% TUV exposure attributed to the reflectors blocking some of the diffuse-sky UV light. Also through July 1998, the OATS sunlight availability measured 95% compared to the cumulative global normal exposure at the NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The OATS sunlight availability losses included downtime when the PV modules were removed, and when there were OAT S tracking problems, maintenance, and repair. For December 1997 through July 1998, the SRRL cumulative exposure was 99% compared to the respective monthly averages from years 1961 through 1990 at Boulder, Colorado.

Basso, T. S.

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency Standards for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,heating, dishwasher motor, domes dryer, gas range and gas oven

Koomey, J.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer to Measure the Absolute Outdoor Longwave Irradiance with Traceability to International System of Units, SI  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a method of measuring the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance using an absolute cavity pyrgeometer (ACP), U.S. Patent application no. 13/049, 275. The ACP consists of domeless thermopile pyrgeometer, gold-plated concentrator, temperature controller, and data acquisition. The dome was removed from the pyrgeometer to remove errors associated with dome transmittance and the dome correction factor. To avoid thermal convection and wind effect errors resulting from using a domeless thermopile, the gold-plated concentrator was placed above the thermopile. The concentrator is a dual compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) with 180{sup o} view angle to measure the outdoor incoming longwave irradiance from the atmosphere. The incoming irradiance is reflected from the specular gold surface of the CPC and concentrated on the 11 mm diameter of the pyrgeometer's blackened thermopile. The CPC's interior surface design and the resulting cavitation result in a throughput value that was characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The ACP was installed horizontally outdoor on an aluminum plate connected to the temperature controller to control the pyrgeometer's case temperature. The responsivity of the pyrgeometer's thermopile detector was determined by lowering the case temperature and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The responsivity is then used to calculate the absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance with an uncertainty estimate (U{sub 95}) of {+-}3.96 W m{sup 02} with traceability to the International System of Units, SI. The measured irradiance was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the Interim World Infrared Standard Group, WISG. A total of 408 readings were collected over three different nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m{sup 2} lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG, with a standard deviation of {+-}0.7 W m{sup -2}. These results suggest that the ACP design might be used for addressing the need to improve the international reference for broadband outdoor longwave irradiance measurements.

Reda, I.; Zeng, J.; Scheuch, J.; Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

By-product disposal from MSW incinerator flue gas cleaning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste incineration has been found to be an effective method of achieving significant volume reduction of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) while at the same time allowing for energy recovery in the form of steam or electricity. Concern over potential air pollution from incinerators in the form of acid gases, heavy metals and dioxins has led to the application of Spray Dryer Absorption (SDA) flue gas cleaning systems to control these emissions. SDA has demonstrated high efficiencies in converting these air pollutants into a dry by-product for disposal. This has, in turn, led to concerns over potential secondary pollution from the disposal of these by-products. This paper presents a description of the SDA process and reviews disposal options for the SDA product. Product characteristics are given and results of leaching studies are presented. Comparisons between EPA's and TEP and TCLP procedures are presented. Results of dioxin measurements from the by-product are given.

Donnelly, J.R. (Joy Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles, CA (US)); Jons, E. (A/S Niro Atomizer, Copenhagen (DK))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

202

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

203

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

204

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

205

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

206

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

207

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

208

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

209

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

210

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

211

Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the gases or vapors, liquids with volatility need sensors near the potential sources of release, nature and concentration of gas releases, natural and mechanical ventilation, detector installation locations not vulnerable to mechanical or water damage from normal operations, and locations that lend themselves to convenient maintenance and calibration. The guidance also states that sensors should be located in all areas where hazardous accumulations of gas may occur. Such areas might not be close to release points but might be areas with restricted air movement. Heavier than air gases are likely to accumulate in pits, trenches, drains, and other low areas. Lighter than air gases are more likely to accumulate in overhead spaces, above drop ceilings, etc. In general, sensors should be located close to any potential sources of major release of gas. The paper gives data on monitor sensitivity and expected lifetimes to support the monitor selection process. Proper selection of indoor and outdoor locations for monitors is described, accounting for the vapor densities of hydrogen and oxygen. The latest information on monitor alarm setpoint selection is presented. Typically, monitors require recalibration at least every six months, or more frequently for inhospitable locations, so ready access to the monitors is an important issue to consider in monitor siting. Gas monitors, depending on their type, can be susceptible to blockages of the detector element (i.e., dus

Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Outdoor Testing of GaInP2/GaAs Tandem Cells with Top Cell Thickness Varied  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, we measure the performance of GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells under direct beam sunlight outdoors in order to quantify their sensitivity to both spectral variation and GaInP2 top-cell thickness. A set of cells with five different top-cell thicknesses was mounted on a two-axis tracker with the incident sunlight collimated to exclude all except the direct beam. Current-voltage (I-V) curves were taken throughout the course of several days, along with measurements of the direct solar spectrum. Our two major conclusions are: (1) GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells designed for either the ASTM G-173 direct (G-173D) spectrum or the "air mass 1.5 global" (AM1.5G) spectrum perform the best, and (2) cells can be characterized indoors and modeled using outdoor spectra with the same result. These results are equally valid for GaInP2/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells.

McMahon, W. E.; Emergy, K. E.; Friedman, D. J.; Ottoson, L.; Young, M. S.; Ward, J. S.; Kramer, C. M.; Duda, A.; Kurtz, S.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

214

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

215

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

216

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

217

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

218

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

219

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

220

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

222

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

223

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

224

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

225

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

227

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

228

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

229

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

230

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

231

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

232

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

233

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

234

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

235

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

236

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Title Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Neil E. Klepeis, Agnes B. Lobscheid, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Date Published 11/2013 Abstract Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. Objective: Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO2 were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%.

238

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 15:

240

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

242

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

243

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

244

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

245

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

246

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

247

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

248

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

249

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

250

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

251

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

252

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

253

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

254

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

255

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

256

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

257

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

258

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

259

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

260

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

262

Sustainable Materials Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Phase Stability in Gasification Carbon Feedstock Slags Influenced by Extensive Vanadium Oxide Concentration · Use of the Dryer Off- gas ...

263

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ground source) dryers of CO2 as refrigerant, absorption replace standard cycle use for gas-heat pump

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

International Review of the Development and Implementation of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

machines and dryers, dishwashers, ovens, water heaters andlabeled clothes washers, dishwashers, air conditioners, andrefrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, clothes washers, gas

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners  

SciTech Connect

Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Generation of a Parabolic Trough Collector Efficiency Curve from Separate Measurements of Outdoor Optical Efficiency and Indoor Receiver Heat Loss  

SciTech Connect

The thermal efficiency of a parabolic trough collector is a function of both the fraction of direct normal radiation absorbed by the receiver (the optical efficiency) and the heat lost to the environment when the receiver is at operating temperature. The thermal efficiency can be determined by testing the collector under actual operating conditions or by separately measuring these two components. This paper describes how outdoor measurement of the optical efficiency is combined with laboratory measurements of receiver heat loss to obtain the thermal efficiency curve. This paper describes this approach and also makes the case that there are advantages to plotting collector efficiency versus the difference between the operating temperature and the ambient temperature at which the receiver heat loss was measured divided by radiation to a fractional power (on the order of 1/3 but obtained via data regression) - as opposed to the difference between operating and ambient temperatures divided by the radiation. The results are shown to be robust over wide ranges of ambient temperature, sky temperature, and wind speed.

Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Stynes, J. K.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Outdoor Fire Range Upgrades at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement actions in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is partially located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to upgrade the existing outdoor shooting range facilities at TA-72. These upgrades will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel. In order to remain current on training requirements, the firing ranges at TA-72 will be upgraded which will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel (Figure 1). These upgrades will allow for an increase in class size and more people to be qualified at the ranges. Some of these upgrades will be built within the 100-year floodplain. The upgrades include: concrete pads for turning target systems and shooting positions, new lighting to illuminate the firing range for night fire, a new speaker system for range operations, canopies at two locations, an impact berm at the far end of the 300-yard mark, and a block wall for road protection.

Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

269

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

270

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

271

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

272

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

273

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

274

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

275

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Equipment, Mobile Home Furnaces, Kitchen Ranges and Ovens,oven only range only GDR all gas dryers Gas Dryer cycle data only Gas HeatingHeating Waterbed Heaters Automatic Drip Coffeemaker Crankcase Heater Iron Spa/Hot Tub Electric Blankets Toaster Hair Dryer Toaster Oven

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by numerical simulation below. pipeline gas shalecushion gas sand shale CH4 working gas CH4 working gas sand

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

GAS SEAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

279

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 152 170 165 195 224 Production (million cubic feet)...

280

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 280 300 225 240 251 Production (million cubic feet)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: ... coalbed production data are included in Gas Well totals.

282

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

283

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

284

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

285

Gas Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automobile industry meeting more stringent … more. Audit of EPA Protocol Gas Suppliers EPA Protocol gas mixture calibration ...

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Comparison of the effect of outdoor exposure on the optical properties of solar mirrors and transparent encapsulant materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of outdoor exposure on solar mirrors and transparent encapsulant materials are assessed and compared. The encapsulant materials tested included glasses, polymers and silicones. Samples of the materials were placed on stationary exposure racks in six locations that represented urban, desert, oceanside and high altitude mountain areas. Samples were removed periodically for optical characterizations. The spectral hemispherical and diffuse reflectance of the mirror samples and the spectral hemispherical transmittance and diffuse reflectance of the encapsulant materials was measured. The relative normal hemispherical transmittance of the encapsulant materials was measured. Correlations between the glass and mirror data showed that the average diffuse reflectance losses were six times larger for the mirrors than for the glass samples. The average specular reflectance losses for the mirror samples were seven times as large as the average hemispherical transmittance losses for the glass samples. These correlations may enable one to predict the performance of mirrors made using the other encapsulant materials for superstrates. It was found that the urban and oceanside sites were the dirtiest, while the desert and mountain sites were the cleanest. Average specular reflectance losses varied from 4% at the cleanest site to 50% at the dirtiest site. The range in hemispherical transmittance losses for the encapsulant materials varied between 0% and 6%. At one site, the average daily specular reflectance losses were .04% for the mirror samples and average daily hemispherical transmittance losses were about .01% for the glass samples. The polymer materials degraded somewhat more rapidly than the glasses, and the silicones irreversible degraded too rapidly and severely to be useful for either photovoltaic or solar thermal applications.

Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.; Maag, C.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Exhibit F-3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

on All Night Outdoor Lights with a Timer, Motion Sensor, or Photosensor Outdoor Gas Light High Intensity Discharge (HID) Outdoor Lights (Such as metal halide or high pressure...

288

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Generation of a Parabolic Trough Collector Efficiency Curve from Separate Measurements of Outdoor Optical Efficiency and Indoor Receiver Heat Loss: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall efficiency of a parabolic trough collector is a function of both the fraction of direct normal radiation absorbed by the receiver (the optical efficiency) and the heat lost to the environment when the receiver is at operating temperature. The overall efficiency can be determined by testing the collector under actual operating conditions or by separately measuring these two components. This paper describes how outdoor measurement of the optical efficiency is combined with laboratory measurements of receiver heat loss to obtain an overall efficiency curve. Further, it presents a new way to plot efficiency that is more robust over a range of receiver operating temperatures.

Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Stynes, K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

291

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

292

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

293

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

294

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

295

North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

296

Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

297

Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

298

Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

299

Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

300

Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

302

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

303

California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

304

New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

305

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

306

West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

307

Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

308

Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

309

Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

310

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

311

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

312

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

313

South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

314

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

315

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 Production...

316

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year... 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production...

317

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ... 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 Production (million...

318

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

319

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

320

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) Eligibility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas...

322

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

323

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

324

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

325

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

326

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

327

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

328

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Natural Gas Processed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

330

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

331

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

332

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service “Evolving Estimate” in Natural Gas Monthly.

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

334

February Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

335

November Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

336

January Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

337

March Natural Gas Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

338

May Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Annual. Preliminary Monthly Data Preliminary monthly data in the "balancing item" cat- egory are calculated by subtracting dry gas production, withdrawals from storage,...

339

CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

340

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

342

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

343

Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Collett, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

345

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Combustion chamber for a commercial laundry dryer  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes combustion for a laundry article-drying device or the like, comprising: a front wall; a back wall having a flame source mounted thereon; a burner cylinder mounted at one end to the back wall around the flame source, the burner cylinder having an open end facing the front wall; and a heating cylinder coaxial with and slightly overlapping the burner cylinder. The heating cylinder has a larger diameter than the burner cylinder to provide a clearance for fresh air entering between the heating and burner cylinders into the heating cylinder.

Grantham, C.R.

1986-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

Open-loop heat-recovery dryer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drying apparatus is disclosed that includes a drum and an open-loop airflow pathway originating at an ambient air inlet, passing through the drum, and terminating at an exhaust outlet. A passive heat exchanger is included for passively transferring heat from air flowing from the drum toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the ambient air inlet toward the drum. A heat pump is also included for actively transferring heat from air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the drum. A heating element is also included for further heating air flowing from the heat pump toward the drum.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward Evan

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Isotopic Exchange in Air Detritiation Dryers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

A.E. Everatt; A.H. Dombra; R.E. Johnson

349

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

350

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

351

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

352

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

353

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

354

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

355

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

356

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

357

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

358

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

359

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

360

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

362

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

363

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cushion gas for natural gas storage, Energy and Fuels,GAS RECOVERY AND NATURAL GAS STORAGE Curtis M. Oldenburgits operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

365

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

366

Measurements of gas permeability on crushed gas shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decade, more attention has been given to unconventional gas reservoirs, including tight gas shales. Accurate description of gas transport and permeability measurements… (more)

Guarnieri, R.V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

368

Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Natural Gas Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Other Heating...

369

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

370

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

371

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

372

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

373

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

374

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

375

Southern California Gas Co  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern California Gas Co ... 236,147,041 98,326,527 274,565,356 690,930 139,093,560 748,823,414 Lone Star Gas Co......

376

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

377

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

378

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

379

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

380

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

383

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

384

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

385

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

386

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

387

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

388

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

389

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Res., 104(B10), 22985-23003. Collett, T.S. (1992), Potential of gas hydrates outlined, Oil Gas J., 90(25), 84-87. 70 Cook, A.E., Goldberg, D., and R.L. Kleinberg (2008),...

390

Natural gas annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Oil and Gas Exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

Tingley, Joseph V.

392

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173"...

393

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves U.S. natural gas liquids proved reserves decreased 7 percent to 7,459 million ...

394

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Exports...

396

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association ConferenceMarch 12, 2004

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

397

Gas Turbine Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...times higher than atmospheric pressure.Ref 25The gas turbine was developed generally for main propulsion and power

398

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with active programs. More information is available at: http:www.eia.doe.govcneafelectricitypagerestructuringrestructureelect.html. Information about natural gas...

399

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 6 Task 5: Carbon Inputs and Outputs to Gas Hydrate Systems ... 7 Task 6: Numerical Models for...

400

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural gas annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented to: Ohio Oil & Gas Association Conference, March 12, 2004 Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, Administrator, Energy Information Administration

Information Center

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

403

Residual gas analysis device  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson; Santosh Gangwal; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Margaret Williams; Douglas P. Harrison

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Natural gas industry directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

408

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

410

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, storage, and usage of compressed gas cylinders. 2.0 POLICY Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the, storage, and usage requirements outlined below. This policy is applicable school-wide including all, or electrical circuits. Flammable gas cylinders must be stored in the building's gas cylinder storage cage until

411

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

413

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

414

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

415

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

416

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

417

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

418

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

419

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

420

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

422

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

423

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

424

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

425

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

426

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

427

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

428

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

429

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

430

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

431

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

432

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

433

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

434

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

435

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

436

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

437

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

438

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

439

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: 350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: 500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas Furnace: 200 - 500...

440

Experimental Study of Main Gas Ingestion and Purge Gas Egress Flow in Model Gas Turbine Stages.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Efficient performance of gas turbines depends, among several parameters, on the mainstream gas entry temperature. At the same time, transport of this high temperature gas… (more)

Balasubramanian, Jagdish Harihara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates

442

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

443

NUCLEAR GAS ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study of the nuclear gas engine, consisting of a gas-cooled reactor directly coupled to a reciprocating engine, is presented. The principles of operation of the proposed gas engine are outlined and typical variations anre discussed. The nuclear gas engine is compared with other reciprocating engines and air compressors. A comparison between the ideal and actual cycles is made, with particular attention given to pumping, heat, and other losses to be expected. The applications and development of the nuclear gas engine are discussed. (W.D.M.)

Fraas, A.P.

1958-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

Southwest Gas Corporation - Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation: 0.15sq ft Floor Insulation: 0.30sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: 450 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: 450 Attic Insulation: 0.15sq ft Equipment...

445

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

446

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Natural gas sdtrategic plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s natural gas program is aimed at meeting simultaneously our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy The Natural Gas Strategic Plan for 1995 represents a Department-wide effort to articulate the key issues related to the expanded development and utilization of natural gas, and defines the roles of the federal government and US industry in partnering to accomplish the strategic goals defined. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Strategic Plan are to: foster the development of advanced natural gas technologies; encourage the adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets; support the removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets; and foster technologies and policies to maximize the environmental benefits of natural gas use. DOE`s proposed fiscal year (FY) 1996 budget represents a commitment to natural gas research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) from reservoir to end use. DOE has redirected and increased funding for its natural gas exploration, production, delivery and storage, processing, and utilization RD&D programs, shifting funds from other energy programs to programs that will enhance efficiency and advance the role of natural gas in our domestic energy resources portfolio.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

450

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

452

Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs? Gas pipelines attract substantial reseach to improve safety and cut costs. They operate ...

453

Natural Gas 1995: Preliminary Highlights  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Monthly April 1996 1. ... Widespread economic growth ... Growth in electric utility gas con-

454

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas - Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info Start Date 01/01/2013 Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ComEd Rebates Central Air Conditioner Unit 14 SEER or above: $350 Central Air Conditioner Unit Energy Star rated: $500 Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Furnace: $200 - $500 (varies based on gas company and unit installed) Provider ComEd Energy ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is

455

U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

456

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

457

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

458

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

459

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

460

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Flue gas desulfurization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

464

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

465

GAS METERING PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid piston gas pump is described, capable of pumping minute amounts of gas in accurately measurable quantities. The pump consists of a flanged cylindrical regulating chamber and a mercury filled bellows. Sealed to the ABSTRACTS regulating chamber is a value and having a gas inlet and outlet, the inlet being connected by a helical channel to the bellows. A gravity check valve is in the gas outlet, so the gas passes through the inlet and the helical channel to the bellows where the pumping action as well as the metering is accomplished by the actuation of the mercury filled bellows. The gas then flows through the check valve and outlet to any associated apparatus.

George, C.M.

1957-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Post-test analysis of 20kW molten carbonate fuel cell stack operated on coal gas. Final report, August 1993--February 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 20kW carbonate fuel cell stack was operated with coal gas for the first time in the world. The stack was tested for a total of 4,000 hours, of which 3,900 hours of testing was conducted at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Incorporated, Plaquemine, Louisiana outdoor site. The operation was on either natural gas or coal gas and switched several times without any effects, demonstrating duel fuel capabilities. This test was conducted with 9142 kJ/m{sup 3} (245 Btu/cft) coal gas provided by a slipstream from Destec`s entrained flow, slagging, slurry-fed gasifier equipped with a cold gas cleanup subsystem. The stack generated up to 21 kW with this coal gas. Following completion of this test, the stack was brought to Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and a detailed post-test analysis was conducted to identify any effects of coal gas on cell components. This investigation has shown that the direct fuel cell (DFC) can be operated with properly cleaned and humidified coal-as, providing stable performance. The basic C direct fuel cell component materials are stable and display normal stability in presence of the coal gas. No effects of the coal-borne contaminants are apparent. Further cell testing at ERC 1 17, confirmed these findings.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management  

SciTech Connect

The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L ARID (Algae Raceway Integrated Design) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8 to 20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superior temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9 °C, the water temperature was 18 °C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 - 25 % and 5 - 15 %, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acid comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 vs 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.34 vs. 3.47 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.

Crowe, Braden J.; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Chavis, Aaron R.; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Huesemann, Michael H.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Yun Soo Myung

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

469

GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The construction of gas discharge devices where the object is to provide a gas discharge device having a high dark current and stabilized striking voltage is described. The inventors have discovered that the introduction of tritium gas into a discharge device with a subsequent electrical discharge in the device will deposit tritium on the inside of the chamber. The tritium acts to emit beta rays amd is an effective and non-hazardous way of improving the abovementioned discharge tube characteristics

Arrol, W.J.; Jefferson, S.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

470

Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

Myung, Yun Soo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Pulsed gas laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

Anderson, Louis W. (Madison, WI); Fitzsimmons, William A. (Madison, WI)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Valve for gas centrifuges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

each of the consumption sectors, excluding the industrial sector, according to BENTEK Energy Services, LLC. Moderating temperatures likely contributed to lower natural gas...

474

4. Natural Gas Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

hydraulic fracturing, including shales and low permeability (tight) formations. Total U.S. dry natural gas reserves additions replaced 237 percent of 2007 dry

475

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Report," and the Historical Weekly Storage Estimates Database. Other Market Trends: FERC Investigates Natural Gas Wash-Trading: The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)...

477

String Gas Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

G. L. Alberghi

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

478

Natural Gas Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for ... Tables 1 and 2 ...

479

Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Outlook National Association of State Energy Officials State Heating Oil and Propane Conference August 30, 2004 William Trapmann Energy Information ...

480

Gas Turbine Optimum Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many offshore installations are dependent on power generated by gas turbines and a critical issue is that these experience performance deterioration over time. Performance deterioration… (more)

Flesland, Synnøve Mangerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dryer outdoor gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increased to 3,683 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 15, according to the Energy Information Administrations (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The West...

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

storage facilities. Other Market Trends: EIA Releases Report on Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a special...

483

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013"...

484

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

485

Oil and Gas (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

486

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,...

487

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

488

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

489

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

490

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

491

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

492

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

493

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

494

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

495

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

496

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

497

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

498

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

499

Natural Gas Citygate Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross...

500

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013" ,"Next Release...