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1

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

5

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Development Program is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of HDR as a significant energy source and to provide a basis for its timely commercial development. Principal operational tasks are those activities required to enable a decision to be made by FY86 on the ultimate commercialization of HDR. These include development and analyis of a 20- to 50-MW Phase II HDR reservoir at Site 1 (Fenton Hill) with the potential construction of a pilot electric generating station, Phase III; selection of a second site with subsequent reservoir development and possible construction of a direct heat utilization pilot plant of at least 30 MW thermal thereon; the determination of the overall domestic HDR energy potential; and the evaluation of 10 or more target prospect areas for future HDR plant development by commercial developers. Phase I of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Fenton Hill project was completed. Phase I evaluated a small subterranean system comprised of two boreholes connected at a depth of 3 km by hydraulic fracturing. A closed-loop surface system has been constructed and tests involving round-the-clock operation have yielded promising data on heat extraction, geofluid chemistry, flow impedance, and loss of water through the underground reservoir between the two holes, leading to cautions optimism for the future prospects of private-sector HDR power plants. (MHR)

Franke, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The greatest potential for geothermal energy is the almost unlimited energy contained in the vast regions of hot, but essentially impermeable, rock within the first six or seven km of the Earth's crust. For the past five years, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been investigating and developing a practical, economical and environmentally acceptable method of extracting this energy. By early 1978, a 10 MW (thermal) heat extraction experiment will be in operation. In the Los Alamos concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir is formed by drilling into a region of suitably hot rock, and then creating within the rock a very large surface for heat transfer by large-scale hydraulic-fracturing techniques. After a circulation loop is formed by drilling a second hole to intersect the fractured region, the heat contained in this reservoir is brought to the surface by the buoyant closed-loop circulation of water. The water is kept liquid throughout the loop by pressurization, thereby increasing the rate of heat transport up the withdrawal hole compared to that possible with steam.

Brown, D.W.; Pettitt, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Issues facing the developmt of hot dry rock geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic issues related to the commercial feasibility of hot dry rock geothermal energy for producing electricity and heat will be discussed. Topics covered will include resource characteristics, reservoir thermal capacity and lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, financial risk and anticipated rate of return.

Tester, J.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

11

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal energy experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent heat flow data indicates that about 95,000 sq. mi. in 13 western U.S. states is underlain, at a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft) by hot dry rock at temperatures above 290/sup 0/C (440/sup 0/F.). Therefore a geothermal energy development program was undertaken to develop methods from extracting thermal energy from hot rock in the earth crust by man-made underground circulation systems; demonstrate the commercial feasibility of such systems; and encourage use of this technology. Experiments performed on the Jemez Plateau in New Mexico are described with information on the drilling of boreholes, hydraulic fracturing of hot rocks, well logging, and environmental monitoring to establish base line data and define the potential effects of the project. The technical achievements of the project include boreholes were drilled to 3k (10,000 ft) with bottomhole temperatures of approximately 200/sup 0/C (390/sup 0/F); hydraulic fracturing produced fractured regions with 150 m (500 ft) radii; at least 90 percent of the water injected was recovered; and data was obtained on geologic conditions, seismic effects, and thermal, fracturing, and chemical properties of the downhole rocks. A geothermal power-production system model was formulated for evaluating the total cost of developing power production using a hot-dry-rock geothermal energy source. (LCL)

Pettitt, R.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Proceedings of hot dry rock geothermal workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts of 38 papers are included on the following subjects: rock mechanics, part 1: hydraulic fracturing; fracture imaging and borehole surveying; fluid flow-pressure analyses; rock mechanics, part 2: hydraulic fracturing and thermal cracking; geochemistry; heat extraction modeling; and economics and energy conversion. (MHR)

Elsner, D.B. (comp.)

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Recent developments in the hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, most of the Hot Dry Rock Programs effort has been focused on the extraction technology development effort at the Fenton Hill test site. The pair of approximately 4000 m wells for the Phase II Engineering System of the Fenton Hill Project have been completed. During the past two years, hydraulic fracture operations have been carried out to develop the geothermal reservoir. Impressive advances have been made in fracture identification techniques and instrumentation. To develop a satisfactory interwellbore flow connection the next step is to redrill the lower section of one of the wells into the fractured region. Chemically reactive tracer techniques are being developed to determine the effective size of the reservoir area. A new estimate has been made of the US hot dry rock resource, based upon the latest geothermal gradiant data. 3 figs.

Franke, P.R.; Nunz, G.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Borehole temperature survey analysis hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively investigating the potential for extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock. A man-made geothermal reservoir has been formed at the Fenton Hill Test Site in northern New Mexico. The 10-MW (thermal) prototype energy extraction circulation loop has been completed and has been continuously operating since January 28 of this year. The performance of the Phase I 1000-h circulation experiment would establish technological assessment of the particular hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. The major parameters of interest include equipment operations, geochemistry, water loss, and reservoir thermal drawdown. Temperature measurements were used extensively as one method to study the man-made geothermal reservoir. The temperature probe is one of the less complex wellbore survey tools that is readily fielded to allow on-line analysis of changing conditions in the hydraulic-fracture system. Several downhole temperature instruments have been designed and fabricated for use in the GT-2/EE-1 wellbores.

Dennis, B.R.; Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Alternate operating strategies for Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flow testing and heat extraction experiments in prototype Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs have uncovered several challenges which must be addressed before commercialization of the technology is possible. Foremost among these is the creation of a reservoir which simultaneously possesses high permeability pathways and a large volume of fractured rock. The current concept of heat extraction -- a steady state circulation system with fluid pumping from the injection well to a single, low pressure production well -- may limit our ability to create heat extraction systems which meet these goals. A single injection well feeding two production wells producing fluid at moderate pressures is shown to be a potentially superior way to extract heat. Cyclic production is also demonstrated to have potential as a method for sweeping fluid through a larger volume of rock, thereby inhibiting flow channeling and increasing reservoir lifetime. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Robinson, B.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Bibliography of the geological and geophysical aspects of hot dry rock geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first issue of an annual compilation of references that are useful to the exploration, understanding and development of the hot dry rock geothermal resource.

Heiken, G.; Sayer, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Federal hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The formulation and evolution of the Federal Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are traced. Program motivation is derived from the enormous potential of the resource. Accomplishments to date, including the establishment and evaluation of the 5-MW/sub t/ Phase 1 reservoir at Fenton Hill, NM and various instrument and equipment developments, are discussed. Future plans presented include (1) establishment of a 20- to 50-MW/sub t/ Phase 2 reservoir at Fenton Hill that will be used to demonstrate longevity and, eventually, electric power production and (2) the selection of a second site at which a direct thermal application will be demonstrated.

Nunz, G.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Energy extraction characteristics of hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is investigating methods to extract energy at useful temperatures and rates from naturally heated crustal rock in locations where the rock does not spontaneously yield natural steam or hot water at a rate sufficient to support commercial utilization. Several concepts are discussed for application to low and high permeability formations. The method being investigated first is intended for use in formations of low initial permeability. It involves producing a circulation system within the hot rock by hydraulic fracturing to create a large crack connecting two drilled holes, then operating the system as a closed pressurized-water heat-extration loop. With the best input assumptions that present knowledge provides, the fluid-flow and heat-exchange calculations indicate that unpumped (buoyant) circulation through a large hydraulic fracture can maintain a commercially useful rate of heat extraction throughout a usefully long system life. With a power cycle designed for the temperature of the fluid produced, total capital investment and generating costs are estimated to be at least competitive with those of fossil-fuel-fired and nuclear electric plants. This paper discusses the potential of the hot dry rock resource, various heat extraction concepts, prediction of reservoir performance, and economic factors, and summarizes recent progress in the LASL field program.

Tester, J.W.; Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fracture network modeling of a Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluid flow and tracer transport in a fractured Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir are modeled using fracture network modeling techniques. The steady state pressure and flow fields are solved for a two-dimensional, interconnected network of fractures with no-flow outer boundaries and constant-pressure source and sink points to simulate wellbore-fracture intersections. The tracer response is simulated by particle tracking, which follows the progress of a representative sample of individual tracer molecules traveling through the network. Solute retardation due to matrix diffusion and sorption is handled easily with these particle tracking methods. Matrix diffusion is shown to have an important effect in many fractured geothermal reservoirs, including those in crystalline formations of relatively low matrix porosity. Pressure drop and tracer behavior are matched for a fractured HDR reservoir tested at Fenton Hill, NM.

Robinson, B.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Proceedings of the second NATO-CCMS information meeting on dry hot rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the second and last NATO-CCMS (North Atlantic Treaty Organization--Committee on Challenges of Modern Society) Geothermal Pilot Study Information Meeting on Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Energy. Only summaries of the formal presentations are included. Overviews of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geothermal projects are included with emphasis on the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Reports of developments in nine foreign countries and on geothermal projects in US universities are also presented.

Mortensen, J.J. (comp.)

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Comparison of two hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs were created by hydraulic fracturing of granite at 2.7 to 3.0 km (9000 to 10,000 ft) at the Fenton Hill site, near the Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Both reservoirs are research reservoirs, in the sense that both are fairly small, generally yielding 5 MWt or less, and are intended to serve as the basic building blocks of commercial-sized reservoirs, consisting of 10 to 15 similar fractures that would yield approximately 35 MWt over a 10 to 20 yr period. Both research reservoirs were created in the same well-pair, with energy extraction well number 1 (EE-1) serving as the injection well, and geothermal test well number 2 (GT-2) serving as the extraction, or production, well. The first reservoir was created in the low permeability host rock by fracturing EE-1 at a depth of 2.75 km (9020 ft) where the indigenous temperature was 185/sup 0/C (364/sup 0/F). A second, larger reservoir was formed by extending a small, existing fracture at 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the injection well about 100 m deeper and 10/sup 0/C hotter than the first reservoir. The resulting large fracture propagated upward to about 2.6 km (8600 ft) and appeared to Rave an inlet-to-outlet spacing of 300m (1000 ft), more then three times that of the first fracture. Comparisons are made with the first reservoir. Evaluation of the new reservoir was accomplished in two steps: (1) with a 23-day heat extraction experiment that began October 23, 1979, and (2) a second, longer-term heat extraction experiment still in progress, which as of November 25, 1980 has been in effect for 260 days. The results of this current experiment are compared with earlier experiments.

Murphy, H.D.; Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site grew continuously during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat-extraction and thermal-contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m3. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure

27

Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing: 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. This report traces reservoir growth as demonstrated during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m/sup 3/. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D.; Cremer, G.M. (eds.)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA David Duchane and Donald Brown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utility options such as pumped storage or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is that the HDR power plant1 Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA by David Duchane and Donald Brown Los energy resources lies right beneath our feet in the form of hot dry rock (HDR), the common geologic

30

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large, young calderas possess immense geothermal potential due to the size of shallow magma bodies that underlie them. Through the example of the Valles and Toledo calderas, New Mexico, and older, more deeply eroded and exposed calderas, it is possible to reconstruct a general view of geothermal environments associated with such magmatic systems. Although a zone of anomalous heat flow extends well beyond caldera margins, high- to moderate-temperature hydrothermal systems appear to be restricted to zones

31

Electricity from hot dry rock geothermal energy: technical and economic issues  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of energy from hot dry rock would make available a nearly unlimited energy source. Some of the technical problems and possible economic tradeoffs involved in a power generating system are examined and possible solutions proposed. An intertemporal optimization computer model of electricity production from a hot dry rock geothermal source has been constructed. The effects of reservoir degradation, variable fluid flow rate, and drilling operations are examined to deetermine optimal strategies for reservoir management and necessary conditions for economic feasibility.

Tester, J.W.; Morris, G.E.; Cummings, R.G.; Bivins, R.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

LASL hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of the hot-dry-rock project is traced. Efforts to establish a two-hole and connecting fracture system on the southwest flank of the Valles Caldera in north-central New Mexico are summarized. Problems encountered in drilling and hydraulic fracturing are described. Current results with the loop operation for heat extraction are encouraging, and plans for a second energy extraction hole are underway. (JBG)

Hill, J.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Characterization of hot dry rock geothermal energy extraction systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering of heat exchange systems by which geothermal heat can be efficiently extracted from hot impermeable rocks is studied. The system currently under investigation at Fenton Hill, New Mexico consists of a network of large fractures created through the hydraulic pressurization of a well penetrating hot basement rocks and subsequently intersected by a second well drilled to form a flow-thru system. Cool water pumped into the fractures through one well, once heated in the reservoir, returns to the surface through the second well, is cooled, and then recirculated. While much is known about the performance parameters of the fracture network from short-term flow tests, little is understood concerning the spatial dimensions and geometrical relationship of individual fractures comprising the network. Ultimately, the success one has in estimating the long-term performance of such a system where commercialization is an issue, and in engineering future systems with optimal performance, depends on the success in characterizing the flow-thru fracture networks. To date only nonconventional application of oil field logging techniques and acoustic emissions studies have been used in the characterization of the fracture network.

Albright, J.N.; Newton, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Future of hot dry rock geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Where natural groundwater circulation does not exist, the obvious method of extracting heat from the earth's crust is to imitate nature by creating it. A means of doing so by hydraulic fracturing has been demonstrated. Alternatively, explosives or mechanical or chemical methods might be used to open circulation paths. However, where permeabilities are sufficient so that fluid loss is excessive, other approaches are also possible. The magnitude and distribution of hot dry rock and the variety of possible heat-extraction techniques make it appear inevitable that this energy supply will eventually be used on a large scale.

Smith, M.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Thermal conductivity of rocks associated with energy extraction from hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of thermal conductivity measurements are given for 14 drill core rock samples taken from two exploratory HDR geothermal wellbores (maximum depth of 2929 m (9608 ft) drilled into Precambrian granitic rock in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. These samples have been petrographically characterized and in general represent fresh competent Precambrian material of deep origin. Thermal conductivities, modal analyses, and densities are given for all core samples studied under dry and water-saturated conditions. Additional measurements are reported for several sedimentary rocks encountered in the upper 760 m (2500 ft) of that same region. A cut-bar thermal conductivity comparator and a transient needle probe were used for the determinations with fused quartz and Pyroceram 9606 as the standards. The maximum temperature range of the measurements was from the ice point to 250/sup 0/C. The measurements on wet, water-saturated rock were limited to the temperature range below room temperature. Conductivity values of the dense core rock samples were generally within the range from 2 to 2.9 W/mK at 200/sup 0/C. Excellent agreement was achieved between these laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity and those obtained by in situ measurements used in the HDR wellbores. By using samples of sufficient thickness to provide a statistically representative heat flow path, no difference between conductivity values and their temperature coefficients for orthogonal directions (heat flow parallel or perpendicular to core axis) was observed. This isotropic behavior was even found for highly foliated gneissic specimens. Estimates of thermal conductivity based on a composite dispersion analysis utilizing pure minerallic phase conductivities and detailed modal analyses usually agreed to within 9 percent of the experimental values.

Sibbitt, W.L.; Dodson, J.G.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Development of hot dry rock geothermal resources; technical and economic issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic issues related to the commercial feasibility of hot dry rock geothermal energy for producing electricity and heat are discussed. Topics covered include resource characteristics, reservoir thermal capacity and lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, financial risk and anticipated rate of return. The current status of research and deveopment efforts in the US are also summarized.

Tester, J.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

Salazar, J.; Brown, M. [eds.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Environmental investigations associated with the LASL hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is currently evaluating the feasibility of extracting thermal energy from hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. An overview of the environmental studies that LASL has conducted relative to its HDR Geothermal Energy Development Project is presented. Because HDR geothermal technology is a new field of endeavor, environmental guidelines have not been established. It is anticipated that LASL's research will lead to the techniques necessary to mitigate undesirable environmental impacts in future HDR developments. To date, results of environmental investigations have been positive in that no undesirable environmental impacts have been found.

Rea, K.H.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The xerolithic geothermal (``hot dry rock``) energy resource of the United States: An update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents revised estimates, based upon the most current geothermal gradient data, of the xerolithic geothermal (``hot dry rock`` or HDR) energy resources of the United States. State-by-state tabular listings are provided of the HDR energy resource base, the accessible resource base, and the potentially useful resource base. The latter further subdivided into components with potential for electricity generation, process heat, and space heat. Comparisons are made with present estimates of fossil fuel reserves. A full-sized geothermal gradient contour map is provided as a supplement in a pocket inside the back cover of the report.

Nunz, G.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This is a short history, so far as it can now be assembled, of early speculations and observations concerning the existence and origin of natural heat in the earth's crust; of some of the many methods proposed to extract and use it; and of recent investigations designed to develop and demonstrate such methods. It is probably only the preface to a much longer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The UK geothermal hot dry rock R&D programme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UK hot dry rock research and development programme is funded by the Department of Energy and aims to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial exploitation of HDR in the UK. The philosophy of the UK programme has been to proceed to a full-scale prototype HDR power station via a number of stages: Phase 1--Experiments at shallow depth (300 m) to assess the feasibility of enhancing the permeability of the rock. Phase 2--Studies at intermediate depth (2500 m) to determine the feasibility of creating a viable HDR subsurface heat exchanger. Phase 3--Establishment of an HDR prototype at commercial depth. The programme has run over a 15 year period, and has been formally reviewed at stages throughout its progress. The 1987 review towards the end of Phase 2 identified a number of technical objectives for continuing research and proposed that the initial design stage of the deep HDR prototype should start. Phase 3A is now complete. It addressed: the feasibility of creating an underground HDR heat exchanger suitable for commercial operation; techniques for improving hydraulic performance and correcting short circuits in HDR systems; modeling of the performance, resource size and economic aspects of HDR systems. The work has been conducted by a number of contractors, including Cambome School of Mines, Sunderland and Sheffield City Polytechnics and RTZ Consultants Limited. This paper focuses upon the experimental work at Rosemanowes in Cornwall and the recently completed conceptual design of a prototype HDR power station. The economics of HDR-generated electricity are also discussed and the conclusions of a 1990 program review are presented. Details of the HDR program to 1994, as announced by the UK Department of Energy in February 1991, are included.

MacDonald, Paul; Stedman, Ann; Symons, Geoff

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Annual report, fiscal year 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock in the earth's crust was investigated. The concept being investigated involves drilling a deep hole, creating an artificial geothermal reservoir at the bottom of the hole by hydraulic fracturing, and then intersecting the fracture with a second borehole. At the beginning of FY77, the downhole system was complete, but the impedance to the flow of fluid was too high to proceed confidently with the planned energy extraction demonstration. Therefore, in FY77 work focused on an intensive investigation of the characteristics of the downhole system and on the development of the necessary tools and techniques for understanding and improving it. Research results are presented under the following section headings: introduction and history; hot dry rock resource assessment and site selection; instrumentation and equipment development; drilling and fracturing; reservoir engineering; energy extraction system; environmental studies; project management and liaison; and, looking back and ahead. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The hot dry rock geothermal potential of the Susanville (CA) area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A portion of northeastern California that lies within the Basin and Range Province represents a large, untapped geothermal energy resource in the form of hot, but essential impermeable, rock. If a means of developing sufficient permeability in the deep, granitic basement can be demonstrated, the electric power generation potential would be considerable. The objective of this study is to look at the specific geographical region extending from northeast to southeast of the village of Litchfield to the Nevada border as a target area for the first commercial application of Hot Dry Rock reservoir stimulation techniques. The ultimate goal is to provide background information that could lead to the creation of a commercial-scale, engineered geothermal reservoir in granitic basement rock of low permeability.

Brown, D.W.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Use of hot-dry-rock geothermal resources for space heating: a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study shows that a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal space heat system proposed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations's Wallops Flight Center (WFC) will cost $10.9 million, saving $4.1 million over the existing oil heating system over a 30-yr lifetime. The minimal, economically feasible plan for HDR at WFC is shown to be the design of a single-fracture reservoir using a combined HDR preheat and a final oil burner after the first 4 years of operation. The WFC cost savings generalize and range from $3.1 million to $7.2 million for other HDR sites having geothermal temperature gradients ranging from 25/sup 0/C/km to 40/sup 0/C/km and depths to basement rock of 2400 ft or 5700 ft compared to the 30/sup 0/C/km and 9000 ft to basement rock at WFC.

Cummings, R.G.; Arundale, C.J.; Bivins, R.L.; Burness, H.S.; Drake, R.H.; Norton, R.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Economic predictions for heat mining : a review and analysis of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components.

Tester, Jefferson W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Seismic reconnaissance of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active seismic methods using high-explosive sources and nondestructive energy sources were used to determine seismic velocities, signal detectability, and subsurface geologic structure in the vicinity of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Project area. Positions of several faults have been determined. A synthetic seismogram has been created that shows good agreement with recorded reflection records taken near exploratory borehole GT-2.

Kintzinger, P.R.; West, F.G.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hot dry rock geothermal potential of Roosevelt Hot Springs area: review of data and recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Roosevelt Hot Springs area in west-central Utah possesses several features indicating potential for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. The area is characterized by extensional tectonics and a high regional heat flow of greater than 105 mW/m/sup 2/. The presence of silicic volcanic rocks as young as 0.5 to 0.8 Myr and totaling 14 km/sup 3/ in volume indicates underlying magma reservoirs may be the heat source for the thermal anomaly. Several hot dry wells have been drilled on the periphery of the geothermal field. Information obtained on three of these deep wells shows that they have thermal gradients of 55 to 60/sup 0/C/km and bottom in impermeable Tertiary granitic and Precambrian gneissic units. The Tertiary granite is the preferred HDR reservoir rock because Precambrian gneissic rocks possess a well-developed banded foliation, making fracture control over the reservoir more difficult. Based on a fairly conservative estimate of 160 km/sup 2/ for the thermal anomaly present at Roosevelt Hot Springs, the area designated favorable for HDR geothermal exploration may be on the order of seven times or more than the hydrogeothermal area currently under development.

East, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hot dry rock geothermal energy: status of exploration and assessment. Report No. 1 of the hot dry rock assessment panel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of knowledge of attempts to utilize hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy is summarized. It contains (1) descriptions or case histories of the ERDA-funded projects at Marysville, MT, Fenton Hill, NM, and Coso Hot Springs, CA; (2) a review of the status of existing techniques available for exploration and delineation of HDR; (3) descriptions of other potential HDR sites; (4) definitions of the probable types of HDR resource localities; and (5) an estimate of the magnitude of the HDR resource base in the conterminous United States. The scope is limited to that part of HDR resource assessment related to the determination of the extent and character of HDR, with emphasis on the igneous-related type. It is estimated that approximately 74 Q (1 Q = 1,000 Quads) of heat is stored in these sites within the conterminous U.S. at depths less than 10 km and temperatures above 150/sup 0/C, the minimum for power generation. (Q = 10/sup 18/ BTU = 10/sup 21/J; the total U.S. consumption for 1972 was approximately 0.07 Q). Approximately 6300 Q are stored in the conduction-dominated parts of the crust in the western U.S. (23% of the total surface area), again at depths less than 10 km and temperatures above 150/sup 0/C. Nearly 10,000 Q are believed to be contained in crustal rocks underlying the entire conterminous U.S., at temperatures above 150/sup 0/C. The resource base is significantly larger for lower grade heat. (JGB)

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Clearlake Hot Dry Rock geothermal project: Institutional policies, administrative issues, and technical tasks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Clearlake Project is a three-party collaboration between the California Energy Commission, City of Clearlake, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. It aims to develop a deep hot, dry geothermal resource under the city. The project is funded by the Commission, and administered by the City. Technical operations are conducted by Laboratory staff and resources seconded from the Hot Dry Rock program. In addition to the normal geothermal exploration problems of predicting geological and geophysical properties of the subsurface, there are uncertainties as to what further material and environmental parameters are relevant, and how they might be measured. In addition to technical factors, policy objectives are an influence in choosing the most appropriate development scenario. 11 refs., 4 figs.

Burns, K.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Potential for hot-dry-rock geothermal energy in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

ABS>The U. S. Geological Survey has identified 1.5 million acres (2800 square miles) of western lands as having a significant potential for geothermal development.'' The LASL for the past 2 years has been actively investigating the potential for and preblems associated with extracting geothermal energy from the much more numerous regions of the western United States containing hot, but essentially dry, rock at moderate depths. A recent survey reveals that about 7% of the 13-state area comprising the Western Heat Flow Province---about 95,000 square miles--is underlain, at a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft), by hot rock at temperature levels above 290 deg C (>550 deg F). In the Los Alamos concept a man- made geothermal reservoir would be formed by first drilling into suitably hot rock, and then creating a very large surface area for heat transfer using conventional hydraulic fracturing techniques developed by the oil industry. After forming a circulation loop by drilling a second hole into the top of the fractured region, the heat contained would be convected to the surface by the buoyant circulation of water, without the need for pumping. The water in the Earth loop would be maintained as a liquid throughout by pressurization at the surface, both increasing the amount of heat transport up the second (withdrawal) hole, and enhancing the rate of heat removal from the fractured reservoir, when compared to steam. Thermal stresses resulting from the cooling of the hot rock in such a man-made reservoir may gradually enlarge the initial fracture system so that its useful lifetime will be greatly extended beyond the planned 10 to 15 years provided by the original reservoir. If these thermal stress cracks grow preferentially downward and outward into regions of hotter rock, as seems probable, the quality of the geothermal source may actually improve as energy is withdrawn from it. (auth)

Brown, D.W.

1973-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hot-dry-rock geothermal-energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During fiscal year 1981, activities of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program were concentrated in four principal areas: (1) data collection to permit improved estimates of the hot dry rock geothermal energy resource base of various regions of the United States and of the United States as a whole, combined with detailed investigations of several areas that appear particularly promising either for further energy extraction experiments or for future commercial development; (2) successful completion of a 9-month, continuous, closed-loop, recirculating flow test in the enlarged Phase I System at Fenton Hill, New Mexico - a pressurized-water heat-extraction loop developed in low-permeability granitic rock by hydraulic fracturing; (3) successful completion at a depth of 4084 m (13,933 ft) of well EE-3, the production well of a larger, deeper, and hotter, Phase II System at Fenton Hill. Well EE-3 was directionally drilled with control of both azimuth and inclination. Its inclined section is about 380 m (1250 ft) vertically above the injection well, EE-2, which was completed in FY80; and (4) supporting activities included new developments in downhole instrumentation and equipment, geochemical and geophysical studies, rock-mechanics and fluid-mechanics investigations, computer analyses and modeling, and overall system design. Under an International Energy Agency agreement, the New Energy Development Organization, representing the Government of Japan has joined Kernforschungsanlage-Juelich GmbH, representing the Federal Republic of Germany, and the US Department of Energy as an active participant in the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Project.

Smith, M.C.; Ponder, G.M. (comps.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Environmental analysis of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Techniques for the extraction of geothermal energy from hot dry rock within the earth's crust were tested at the first experimental system at Fenton Hill and proved successful. Because new concepts were being tried and new uses of the natural resources were being made, environmental effects were a major concern. Therefore, at all phases of development and operation, the area was monitored for physical, biological, and social factors. The results were significant because after several extended operations, there were no adverse environmental effects, and no detrimental social impacts were detected. Although these results are specific for Fenton Hill, they are applicable to future systems at other locations.

Kaufman, E.L.; Siciliano, C.L.B. (comps.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot-dry-rock geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field program cnsists of experiments in which hot rock of low permeability is hydraulically fractured between two wellbores. Water is circulated from one well to the other through the fractured hot rock. Our field experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as heat-extraction rates, water-loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity, and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments were designed to provide information on the mineral-water reactivity encountered during the field program. Two experimental circulation systems tested the rates of dissolution and alteration during dynamic flow. Solubility of rock in agitated systems was studied. Moreover, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir, and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to the observations made in field experiments done within the hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km where the initial rock temperature was 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

Charles, R.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Heat flow and hot dry rock geothermal resources of the Clearlake Region, northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal anomaly is an area of high heat flow in northern California. The anomaly is caused by abnormally high heat flows generated by asthenospheric uplift and basaltic magmatic underplating at a slabless window created by passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction. The Clear Lake volcanic field is underlain by magmatic igneous bodies in the form of a stack of sill-form intrusions with silicic bodies generally at the top and basic magmas at the bottom. The tabular shape and wide areal extent of the heat sources results in linear temperature gradients and near-horizontal isotherms in a broad region at the center of the geothermal anomaly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) portion of The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal field is that part of the geothermal anomaly that is external to the steamfield, bounded by geothermal gradients of 167 mW/m2 (4 heat flow units-hfu) and 335 mW/m2 (8 hfu). The HDR resources, to a depth of 5 km, were estimated by piece-wise linear summation based on a sketch map of the heat flow. Approximately, the geothermal {open_quotes}accessible resource base{close_quotes} (Qa) is 1.68E+21 J; the {open_quotes}HDR resource base{close_quotes} (Qha) is 1.39E+21 J; and the {open_quotes}HDR power production resource{close_quotes} (Qhp) is 1.01E+21 J. The HDR power production resource (Qhp) is equivalent to 2.78E+ 11 Mwht (megawatt hours thermal), or 1.72E+11 bbls of oil.

Burns, K.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hot dry rock geothermal energy for U.S. electric utilities. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to bring an electric utility component into the study of hot dry rock geothermal energy called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), EPRI organized a one-day conference in Philadelphia on January 14,1993. The conference was planned as the first day of a two-day sequence, by coordinating with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These two federal agencies were charged under EPAct with the development of a report on the potential for hot dry rock geothermal energy production in the US, especially the eastern US. The USGS was given lead responsibility for a report to be done in association with DOE. The EPRI conference emphasized first the status of technology development and testing in the U.S. and abroad, i.e., in western Europe, Russia and Japan. The conference went on to address the extent of knowledge regarding the resource base in the US, especially in the eastern half of the country, and then to address some practical business aspects of organizing projects or industries that could bring these resources into use, either for thermal applications or for electric power generation.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fenton Hill Project is still the principal center for developing methods, equipment, and instrumentation for creating and utilizing HDR geothermal reservoirs. The search for a second site for a similar experimental system in a different geological environment has been intensified, as have the identification and characterization of other HDR areas that may prove suitable for either experimental or commercial development. The Phase I fracture system was enlarged during FY79. Drilling of the injection well of the Phase II system began at Fenton Hill in April 1979. Environmental monitoring of the Fenton Hill area continued through FY79. The environmental studies indicate that the hot dry rock operations have caused no significant environmental impact. Other supporting activities included rock physics, rock mechanics, fracture mapping, and instrumentation development. Two closely related activities - evaluation of the potential HDR energy resource of the US and the selection of a site for development of a second experimental heat-extraction system generally similar to that at Fenton Hill - have resulted in the collection of geology, hydrology, and heat-flow data on some level of field activity in 30 states. The resource-evaluation activity included reconnaissance field studies and a listing and preliminary characterization of US geothermal areas in which HDR energy extraction methods may be applicable. The selection of Site 2 has taken into account such legal, institutional, and economic factors as land ownership and use, proximity to possible users, permitting and licensing requirements and procedures, environmental issues, areal extent of the geothermal area, and visibility to and apparent interest by potential industrial developers.

Cremer, G.M.; Duffield, R.B.; Smith, M.C.; Wilson, M.G. (comps.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy--- A new energy agenda for the twenty-first century  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy, which utilizes the natural heat contained in the earth's crust, can provide a widely available source of nonpolluting energy. It can help mitigate the continued warming of the earth through the ''greenhouse effect,'' and the accelerating destruction of forests and crops by acid rain, two of the major environmental consequences of our ever-increasing use of fossil fuels for heating and power generation. In addition, HDR, as a readily available source of indigenous energy, can reduce our nation's dependence on imported oil, enhancing national security and reducing our trade deficit. The earth's heat represents an almost unlimited source of energy that can begin to be exploited within the next decade through the HDR heat-mining concept being actively developed in the United States and in several other countries. On a national scale, we can begin to develop this new energy source, using it directly for geothermal power or indirectly in hybrid geothermal/fossil-fueled systems, in diverse applications such as: baseload power generation, direct heat use, feedwater heating in conventional power plants, and pumped storage/load leveling power generation. This report describes the nature of the HDR resource and the technology required to implement the heat-mining concept in several applications. An assessment of the requirements for establishing HDR feasibility is presented in the context of providing a commercially competitive energy source. 37 refs., 6 figs.

Tester, J.W.; Brown, D.W.; Potter, R.M.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Economic modeling of electricity production from hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs: methodology and analyses. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytical methodology is developed for assessing alternative modes of generating electricity from hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy sources. The methodology is used in sensitivity analyses to explore relative system economics. The methodology used a computerized, intertemporal optimization model to determine the profit-maximizing design and management of a unified HDR electric power plant with a given set of geologic, engineering, and financial conditions. By iterating this model on price, a levelized busbar cost of electricity is established. By varying the conditions of development, the sensitivity of both optimal management and busbar cost to these conditions are explored. A plausible set of reference case parameters is established at the outset of the sensitivity analyses. This reference case links a multiple-fracture reservoir system to an organic, binary-fluid conversion cycle. A levelized busbar cost of 43.2 mills/kWh ($1978) was determined for the reference case, which had an assumed geothermal gradient of 40/sup 0/C/km, a design well-flow rate of 75 kg/s, an effective heat transfer area per pair of wells of 1.7 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 2/, and plant design temperature of 160/sup 0/C. Variations in the presumed geothermal gradient, size of the reservoir, drilling costs, real rates of return, and other system parameters yield minimum busbar costs between -40% and +76% of the reference case busbar cost.

Cummings, R.G.; Morris, G.E.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy--- A new energy agenda for the twenty-first century  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy, which utilizes the natural heat contained in the earth's crust, can provide a widely available source of nonpolluting energy. It can help mitigate the continued warming of the earth through the ''greenhouse effect,'' and the accelerating destruction of forests and crops by acid rain, two of the major environmental consequences of our ever-increasing use of fossil fuels for heating and power generation. In addition, HDR, as a readily available source of indigenous energy, can reduce our nation's dependence on imported oil, enhancing national security and reducing our trade deficit. The earth's heat represents an almost unlimited source of energy that can begin to be exploited within the next decade through the HDR heat-mining concept being actively developed in the United States and in several other countries. On a national scale, we can begin to develop this new energy source, using it directly for geothermal power or indirectly in hybrid geothermal/fossil-fueled systems, in diverse applications such as: baseload power generation, direct heat use, feedwater heating in conventional power plants, and pumped storage/load leveling power generation. This report describes the nature of the HDR resource and the technology required to implement the heat-mining concept in several applications. An assessment of the requirements for establishing HDR feasibility is presented in the context of providing a commercially competitive energy source. 37 refs., 6 figs.

Tester, J.W.; Brown, D.W.; Potter, R.M.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hot dry rock geothermal energy in the USA: Moving toward practical use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology for extracting geothermal energy from the vast hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource has been under development by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for about 25 years. In 1992--1993, an extensive flow-testing program was conducted at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico HDR Test Facility. During two segments of this test energy was produced at a rate of 4 thermal megawatts on a continuous basis for periods of 112 and 65 days, respectively. Surface and logging measurements showed no decline in the temperature of the water produced from the HDR reservoir during the flow testing. In fact, tracer evidence indicated that the circulating water was continually gaining access to additional hot rock as the testing proceeded. Water consumption was low and all other test data were positive. The encouraging results of the flow testing at Fenton Hill provided the incentive for the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) to solicit the interest of private industry in a jointly funded program to construct and operate a facility that would produce and sell energy derived from HDR resources. A number of organizations responded positively. On the basis of the interest expressed in these responses, the USDOE subsequently authorized the issuance of a formal solicitation to initiate the project.

Duchane, D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Capacitive discharge firing system for providing acoustic sources in the hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a capacitive discharge firing unit designed to initiate electrically exploded foil slapper detonators in a subsurface, high-pressure (5000 psi), high-temperature (> 200/sup 0/C) environment is described. The unit is used to conduct acoustic ranging experiments in deep boreholes (approx. = 10,000 ft) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Hot Dry Rock experiment.

Patterson, W.W.; Deam, D.R.; MacDonald, H.J.; Rochester, R.H.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Semiannual report, October 1, 1978-March 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of energy extracted from hot dry rock (HDR) was investigated as a commercailly feasible alternate energy source. Run Segments 3 and 4 were completed in the prototype reservoir of the Phase I energy-extraction system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Results of these tests yielded significant data on the existing system and this information will be applicable to future HDR systems. Plans and operations initiating a Phase II system are underway at the Fenton Hill site. This system, a deeper, hotter commercial-size reservoir, is intended to demonstrate the longevity and economics of an HDR system. Major activity occurred in evaluation of the national resource potential and in characterizing possible future HDR geothermal sites. Work has begun in the institutional and industrial support area to assess the economics and promote commercial interest in HDR systems as an alternate energy source.

Brown, M.C.; Nunz, G.J.; Cremer, G.M.; Smith, M.C.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Summary of talks third annual hot dry rock geothermal information conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three basic comparisons can be made between weapon system development and energy system development in the US--driving factors, system lifetime, and development time. Weapon system development and response is determined by a perceived threat to national security. Because the threat can change radically in this high technology atmosphere, weapon systems are usually designed for a 5 to 20 year lifetime. Development time from idea to capability is about 20 years on the average. In contrast, energy system development has been influenced by economics--demand, supply, return on investment--until the recent threat created by our dependence on oil. Energy systems are expected to operate 20 to 50 years and even longer. Development time is correspondingly long, i.e., 40 years from idea to large-scale use. The US needs to adopt a ''defense-oriented'' approach to protect its threatened energy security. Geothermal energy from hot dry rock is a new concept. The Hot Dry Rock Program is designed to minimize development time and may become a prime example of how a recognized threat to energy security can be answered by combined government/industry effort.

Gaddy, James

1980-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A combined heat transfer and quartz dissolution/deposition model for a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A kinetic model of silica transport has been coupled to a heat transfer model for a Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir to examine the effect of silica rock-water interactions on fracture aperture and permeability. The model accounts for both the dissolution and deposition of silica. Zones of local dissolution and deposition were predicted, but their effect on aperture and permeability were fairly small for all cases studied. Initial rock temperature, reservoir size, and the ratio of rock surface area to fluid volume have the largest effect on the magnitude of silica mass transferred between the liquid and solid phases. 13 refs., 6 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Simulation and optimization of hot dry rock geothermal energy conversion systems: process conditions and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is currently engaged in a field program aimed at designing and testing man-made geothermal reservoirs in hot granitic formations of low permeability created by hydraulic fracturing. A very important segment of the program is concerned with defining and optimizing several parameters related to the performance of the reservoir and their impact on the potential commercial feasibility of the hot dry rock technique. These include effective heat transfer area, permeation water loss, depth to the reservoir, geothermal temperature gradient, reservoir temperature, mass flow rate, and geochemistry. In addition, the optimization of the energy end use system (process or district heating, electricity or cogeneration) is directly linked to reservoir performance and associated costs. This problem has been studied using several computer modeling approaches to identify the sensitivity of the cost of power to reservoir and generation plant parameters. Also examined were a variety of important economic elements including rate of return on invested capital, discount or interest rates, taxes, cash flow, energy selling price, plant and reservoir lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, and royalties.

Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Unique aspects of drilling and completing hot-dry-rock geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling operations at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site have led to numerous developments needed to solve the problems caused by a very harsh downhole environment. A pair of deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures were in excess of 600/sup 0/F (300/sup 0/C). The wells were directionally drilled, inclined at 35/sup 0/, one above the other, in a direction orthogonal to the least principal stress field. The well site is near the flank of a young silicic composite volcano in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. The completion of this pair of wells is unique in reservoir development. The lower well was planned as a cold water injector which will be cooled by the introduced water from the static geothermal gradient to about 80/sup 0/F (25/sup 0/C). The upper well will be heated during production to over 500/sup 0/F (250/sup 0/C). The well pair is designed to perform as a closed loop heat-extraction system connected by hydraulic fractures with a vertical spacing of 1200 ft between the wells. These conditions strongly constrain the drilling technique, casing design, cement formulation, and cementing operations.

Carden, R.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Rowley, J.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geologic framework and hot dry rock geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area, Yuma County, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Castle Dome Mountains and surrounding ranges constitute a voluminous pile of silicic volcanic rocks within the Basin and Range province of southwestern Arizona. Previously reported as Cretaceous and Quaternary in age, these volcanics all are of late Oligocene to early Miocene age as indicated by five new K-Ar dates. Reconnaissance field studies indicate that the volcanic section locally has undergone large rotations that contrast with the usual structural style of the Basin and Range and resemble the thin-skinned rotational tectonics documented for earlier, mid-Tertiary extensional deformation in ranges to the north and northeast. Significant geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area is suggested by a shallow depth to the Curie isotherm and by the apparent presence of a good electrical conductor at anomalously shallow depth in the crust. Warm wells exist in the area and Shearer (1979) reported a geothermal gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km in a dry well near the center of the gravity low. Radiogenic heat production in the silicic batholith inferred above constitutes a reasonable candidate for a shallow regional heat source.

Gutmann, J.T.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Petrologic considerations for hot dry rock geothermal site selection in the Clear Lake Region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Clear Lake area is well known for anomalous heat flow, thermal springs, hydrothermal mineral deposits, and Quaternary volcanism. These factors, along with the apparent lack of a large reservoir of geothermal fluid north of Collayomi fault make the Clear Lake area an attractive target for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. Petrologic considerations provide some constraints on site selection for HDR development. Spatial and temporal trends in volcanism in the Coast Ranges indicate that magmatism has migrated to the north with time, paralleling passage of the Mendocino triple junction and propagation of the San Andreas fault. Volcanism in the region may have resulted from upwelling of hot asthenosphere along the southern margin of the subducted segment of the Gorda plate. Spatial and temporal trends of volcanism within the Clear Lake volcanic field are similar to larger-scale trends of Neogene volcanism in the Cost Ranges. Volcanism (especially for silicic compositions) shows a general migration to the north over the {approximately}2 Ma history of the field, with the youngest two silicic centers located at Mt. Konocti and Borax Lake. The Mt. Konocti system (active from {approximately} 0.6 to 0.3 Ma) was large and long-lived, whereas the Borax Lake system is much smaller but younger (0.09 Ma). Remnants of silicic magma bodies under Mt. Konocti may be in the latter stages of cooling, whereas a magma body centered under Borax Lake may be in the early stages of development. The existence of an upper crustal silicic magma body of under Borax Lake has yet to be demonstrated by passive geophysics, however, subsurface temperatures in the area as high (> 200{degrees}C at 2000 m) as those beneath the Mt. Konocti area. Based on petrologic considerations alone, the Mt. Konocti-Borax Lake area appears to be the most logical choice for HDR geothermal development in the region.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hearn, B.C. Jr. (US Geological Survey, Reston, VA, Branch of Lithospheric Processes (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Quartz dissolution and silica deposition in hot-dry-rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of quartz dissolution control the produced fluid dissolved silica concentration in geothermal systems in which the downhole residence time is finite. The produced fluid of the Phase I, Run Segment 5 experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system at Fenton Hill, NM, was undersaturated with respect to quartz in one pass through the reservoir, suggesting that the rate of granite dissolution governed the outlet dissolved silica concentration in this system. The literature data for the rate of quartz dissolution in water from 65 to 625/sup 0/C is correlated using an empirical rate law which is first order in quartz surface area and degree of undersaturation of the fluid. The Arrhenius plot (ln k vs T/sup -1/) is linear over eight orders of magnitude of the rate constant, verifying the validity of the proposed rate expression. Carefully performed quartz dissolution experiments in the present study duplicated the literature data and completed the data base in the temperature range from 150 to 250/sup 0/C. Identical experiments using crushed granite indicate that the rate of quartz dissolution in the presence of granite could be as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude faster than the rates observed in the pure quartz experiments. A temperature dependent HDR reservoir model incorporates the quartz dissolution rate law to simulate the dissolved silica behavior during the Fenton Hill Run Segment 5 experiment. For this low-permeability, fracture-dominated reservoir, the assumptions of one-dimensional plug flow through a vertically-inclined rectangular fracture and one-dimensional rock heat conduction perpendicular to the direction of flow are employed. These simplifications lead to an analytical solution for the temperature field in the reservoir.

Robinson, B.A.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigation and flow testing of the enlarged Phase I heat-extraction system at Fenton Hill continued throughout FY80. Temperature drawdown observed at that time indicated an effective fracture of approximately 40,000 to 60,000 m/sup 2/. In May 1980, hot dry rock (HDR) technology was used to produce electricity in an interface demonstration experiment at Fenton Hill. A 60-kVA binary-cycle electrical generator was installed in the Phase I surface system and heat from about 3 kg/s of geothermal fluid at 132/sup 0/C was used to boil Freon R-114, whose vapor drove a turboalternator. A Phase II system was designed and is now being constructed at Fenton Hill that should approach commercial requirements. Borehole EE-2, the injection well, was completed on May 12, 1980. It was drilled to a vertical depth of about 4500 m, where the rock temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C. The production well, EE-3 had been drilled to a depth of 3044 m and drilling was continuing. Environmental monitoring of Fenton Hill site continued. Development of equipment, instruments, and materials for technical support at Fenton Hill continued during FY80. Several kinds of models were also developed to understand the behavior of the Phase I system and to develop a predictive capability for future systems. Data from extensive resource investigations were collected, analyzed, and assembled into a geothermal gradient map of the US, and studies were completed on five specific areas as possible locations for HDR Experimental Site 2.

Cremer, G.M. (comp.)

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Economics of a conceptual 75 MW Hot Dry Rock geothermal electric power station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Man-made, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been investigated for over ten years. As early as 1977 a research-sized reservoir was created at a depth of 2.9 km near the Valles Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex in New Mexico, by connecting two wells with hydraulic fractures. Thermal power was generated at rates of up to 5 MW(t) and the reservoir was operated for nearly a year with a thermal drawdown less than 10/sup 0/C. A small 60kW(e) electrical generation unit using a binary cycle (hot geothermal water and a low boiling point organic fluid, R-114) was operated. Interest is now worldwide with field research being conducted at sites near Le Mayet de Montagne, France; Falkenberg and Urach, Federal Republic of Germany; Yakedake, Japan; and Rosemanowes quarry in Cornwall, United Kingdom. To assess the commercial viability of future HDR electrical generating stations, an economic modeling study was conducted for a conceptual 75 MW(e) generating station operating at conditions similar to those prevailing at the New Mexico HDR site. The reservoir required for 75 MW(e), equivalent to 550 MW of thermal energy, uses at least 9 wells drilled to 4.3 km and the temperature of the water produced should average 230/sup 0/C. Thermodynamic considerations indicate that a binary cycle should result in optimum electricity generation and the best organic fluids are refrigerants R-22, R-32, R-115 or R-600a (Isobutane). The break-even bus bar cost of HDR electricity was computed by the levelized life-cycle method, and found to be competitive with most alternative electric power stations in the US.

Murphy, H.D.; Drake, R.H.; Tester, J.W.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Summary of hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. Reservoir growth is traced. Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266/sup 3/m. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Environmental studies conducted at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock geothermal development site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental investigation of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal development was conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, during 1976-1979. Activities at the Fenton Hill Site included an evaluation of baseline data for biotic and abiotic ecosystem components. Identification of contaminants produced by HDR processes that had the potential for reaching the surrounding environment is also discussed. Three dominant vegetative communities were identified in the vicinity of the site. These included grass-forb, aspen, and mixed conifer communities. The grass-forb area was identified as having the highest number of species encountered, with Phleum pratense and Dactylis glomerata being the dominant grass species. Frequency of occurrence and mean coverage values are also given for other species in the three main vegetative complexes. Live trapping of small mammals was conducted to determine species composition, densities, population, and diversity estimates for this component of the ecosystem. The data indicate that Peromyscus maniculatus was the dominant species across all trapping sites during the study. Comparisons of relative density of small mammals among the various trapping sites show the grass-forb vegetative community to have had the highest overall density. Comparisons of small mammal diversity for the three main vegetative complexes indicate that the aspen habitat had the highest diversity and the grass-forb habitat had the lowest. Analyses of waste waters from the closed circulation loop indicate that several trace contaminants (e.g., arsenic, cadmium, fluoride, boron, and lithium) were present at concentrations greater than those reported for surface waters of the region.

Miera, F.R. Jr.; Langhorst, G.; McEllin, S.; Montoya, C.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

Jager, A.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program Annual Report Fiscal Year 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The complete list of HDR objectives is provided in Reference 10, and is tabulated below in Tables 1 and 2 for the reader's convenience. The primary, level 1, objective for HDR is ''to improve the technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known HDR resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh by 1997''. A critically important milestone in attaining this cost target is the level II objective: ''Evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir''. To appreciate the significance of this objective, a brief background is helpful. During the past 14 years the US DOE has invested $123 million to develop the technology required to make Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy commercially useful. The Governments of Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany have contributed an additional $32 million to the US program. The initial objectives of the program were met by the successful development and long-term operation of a heat-extraction loop in hydraulically-fractured hot dry rock. This Phase I reservoir produced pressurized hot water at temperatures and flow rates suitable for many commercial uses such as space heating and food processing. It operated for more than a year with no major problems or detectable environmental effect. With this accomplished and the technical feasibility of HDR energy systems demonstrated, the program undertook the more difficult task of developing a larger, deeper, hotter reservoir, called ''Phase II'', capable of supporting pilot-plant-scale operation of a commercial electricity-generating power plant. As described earlier in ''History of Research'', such a system was created and operated successfully in a preliminary 30-day flow test. However, to justify capital investment in HDR geothermal technology, industry now requires assurance that the reservoir can be operated for a long time without major problems or a significant decrease in the rate and quality of energy production. Industrial advisors to the HDR Program have concluded that, while a longer testing period would certainly be desirable, a successful and well-documented flow test of this high-temperature, Phase II reservoir lasting at least one year should convince industry that HDR geothermal energy merits their investment in its commercial development. This test is called the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT), and its completion will be a major milestone in attaining the Level 1 objective. However, before the LTFT could be initiated, well EE-2 had to be repaired, as also briefly described in the ''History of Research''. During this repair operation, superb progress was made toward satisfying the next most critically important Level II objective: Improve the Performance of HDR Drilling and Completion Technology. During the repair of EE-2, Los Alamos sidetracked by drilling out of the damaged well at 2.96 km (9700 ft), and then completed drilling a new-wellbore (EE-2A) to a total depth of 3.78 km (12,360 ft). As a consequence of this drilling experience, Los Alamos believes that if the original wells were redrilled today their combined cost would be only $8 million rather than the $18.8 million actually spent (a 60% cost saving). Further details, particularly of the completion of the well, can be found in the major section, ACCOMPLISHMENTS, but it can be seen that the second, Level II objective is already nearing attainment.

Dash, Zora V.; Murphy, Hugh D.; Smith, Morton C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Zuni Mountains, New Mexico as a potential dry hot rock geothermal energy Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many of the criteria for the successful exploitation of energy from dry hot rock are met in the Zuni Mountains, New Mexico. This area falls within a broad region of abnormally high heat flow on the Colorado Plateau. Within this region, a variety of evidence indicates that local ''hot spots'' may be present. These ''hot spots'' are prime targets for dry hot rock exploration. A site-evaluation program utilizing geological, geochemical-geochronological, and geophysical techniques is proposed to delineate the optimal sites for subsequent exploratory drilling.

Laughlin, A.W.; West, F.G.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, California: Implications for conventional and hot dry rock geothermal development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of recent volcanism, high heat flow ({ge} HFU or 167 mW/m{sup 2}), and high conductive geothermal gradient (up to 120{degree} C/km) makes the Clear Lake region of northern California one of the best prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development in the US. The lack of permeability in exploration wells and lack of evidence for widespread geothermal reservoirs north of the Collayomi fault zone are not reassuring indications for conventional geothermal development. This report summarizes results of thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, and discusses implications for HDR site selection in the region. The thermal models incorporate a wide range of constraints including the distribution and nature of volcanism in time and space, water and gas geochemistry, well data, and geophysical surveys. The nature of upper crustal magma bodies at Clear Lake is inferred from studying sequences of related silicic lavas, which tell a story of multistage mixing of silicic and mafic magma in clusters of small upper crustal chambers. Thermobarometry on metamorphic xenoliths yield temperature and pressure estimates of {approximately}780--900 C and 4--6 kb respectively, indicating that at least a portion of the deep magma system resided at depths from 14 to 21 km (9 to 12 mi). The results of thermal modeling support previous assessments of the high HDR potential of the area, and suggest the possibility that granitic bodies similar to The Geysers felsite may underlie much of the Clear Lake region at depths as little as 3--6 km. This is significant because future HDR reservoirs could potentially be sited in relatively shallow granitoid plutons rather than in structurally complex Franciscan basement rocks.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F.; Wohletz, K.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Progress in making hot dry rock geothermal energy a viable renewable energy resource for America in the 21. century  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An enormous geothermal energy resource exists in the form of rock at depth that is hot but essentially dry. For more than two decades, work has been underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop and demonstrate the technology to transport the energy in hot dry rock (HDR) to the surface for practical use. During the 1980`s, the world`s largest, deepest and hottest HDR reservoir was created at the Fenton Hill HDR test facility in northern New Mexico. The reservoir is centered in rock at a temperature of about 460 F at a depth of about 11,400 ft. After mating the reservoir to a fully automated surface plant, heat was mined at Fenton Hill for a total period of almost a year in a series of flow tests conducted between 1992 and 1995. These tests addressed the major questions regarding the viability of long-term energy extraction from HDR. The steady-state flow tests at Fenton Hill showed that energy can be produced from an HDR reservoir on a routine basis and that there are no major technical obstacles to implementation of this heat mining technology. Additional brief special flow tests also demonstrated that the energy output from HDR systems can be rapidly increased in a controlled manner to meet sudden changes in power demand.

Duchane, D.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project. Progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Successful drilling into hard crystalline rock was accomplished to depths of about 3 km. Hydraulic fractures in the crystalline rock with radii as large as 150 m were produced. Values of in situ permeability of the Fenton Hill granite were measured. Directional drilling at depths of up to 3 km was accomplished. At least 90 to 95 percent of water injected into fractured regions was recovered. A connection was established between two deep boreholes through a fractured region of hot granite for the first time. Instruments were developed to operate for several hours under the downhole conditions. The compressional and shear components of seismic signals produced by fracture extension and inflation were detected downholes. Acoustic ranging has generally identified the relative positions of two boreholes at several depths. Self-potential and induced potential techniques have determined vertical fracture lengths at the borehole. Pressure-flow and fluid residence time distribution studies have measured properties of the downhole system. Core sample studies have provided physical and chemical data. Techniques were developed to examine reservoir performance. A geothermal power-production model was formulated. (MHR)

Blair, A.G.; Tester, J.W.; Mortensen, J.J. (comps.)

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The furnace in the basement: Part 1, The early days of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program, 1970--1973  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the descriptions of the background information and formation of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Energy Group. It discusses the organizational, financial, political, public-relations,geologic, hydrologic, physical, and mechanical problems encountered by the group during the period 1970--1973. It reports the failures as well as the successes of this essential first stage in the development of hot dry rock geothermal energy systems.

Smith, M.C.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Results of fluid-circulation experiments: LASL hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first large-scale field experiment to investigate the extraction of heat from hot dry rock is now in progress on the Jemez Plateau in northern New Mexico. The experimental system consists of two holes about 3 km deep, from each of which hydraulic fractures have been made. The two major fractures appear to be approximately vertical and parallel, and separated by about 9 m of granodiorite through which fluid is transmitted probably along a distributed set of secondary fractures. Experiments to this point have demonstrated that the surface area of each hydraulic fracture is sufficient to accomplish effective heat transfer from the rock, at about 200/sup 0/C, to water circulated through the system; that there is no significant short-circuiting of the water within the fractures; but that the impedance to fluid flow through the rock between the fractures is too high to permit the rate of heat extraction (initially about 10 MWt) desired of the experimental system. An attempt to reduce impedance by leaching with dilute sodium carbonate solution was unsuccessful. Therefore an attempt is now being made to reduce it by re-drilling from near the bottom of one hole in order to produce a simple system geometry in which the two holes are connected directly through a single hydraulic fracture.

Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Environmental monitoring for the hot dry rock geothermal energy development project. Annual report, July 1975--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this environmental monitoring report are to provide a brief conceptual and historical summary of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project, a brief overview of the environmental monitoring responsibilities and activities of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, and descriptions of the studies, problems, and results obtained from the various monitoring programs. Included are descriptions of the work that has been done in three major monitoring areas: (1) water quality, both surface and subsurface; (2) seismicity, with a discussion of the monitoring strategy of regional, local, and close-in detection networks; and (3) climatology. The purpose of these programs is to record baseline data, define potential effects from the project activities, and determine and record any impacts that may occur.

Pettitt, R.A. (comp.)

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Enhanced heat extraction from hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs due to interacting secondary thermal cracks. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

How the fluid circulating through the main hydraulic fracture and the thermally-induced secondary, growing, interacting cracks affects the time-varying temperature, deformations, stresses, thermal crack geometry, water flow rates through the main and thermal cracks, reservoir coolant outlet temperature, and reservoir thermal power of the cracked geothermal reservoir is investigated. First, a simplified version of the proposed hot-dry-rock reservoir is considered. A closed-form solution of the rock temperature without thermal crack was found and substituted into SAP-IV computer code to calculate the stresses. These stresses being superposed with earth stresses and fluid pressure were used in conjunction with the fracture mechanics criterion to determine the initiation of secondary thermal crack. After the initiation of secondary thermal crack, the rock temperature was then calculated by a two-dimensional heat conduction program AYER. The detailed procedures for carrying out these steps are listed. Solutions developed are applied to studying the time-varying temperature field, thermal stresses and crack geometry produced, and additional heat power generated in the reservoir. Conclusions were discussed and summarized. (MHR)

Hsu, Y.C.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program: Annual report, fiscal year 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective for the Hot Dry Rock Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during fiscal year 1985 was to complete the Phase 2 reservoir connection and to begin flow testing the resulting reservoir. The connection was achieved through redrilling one well and additional fracturing operations, and progress was made toward developing a detailed understanding of the fractured region through a variety of reservoir interrogation methods. Other accomplishments during the fiscal year included improvement of the high-temperature, inflatable, open-hole packer used to isolate sections of the uncased wellbore in collaboration with the Baker Corporation and the design and fabrication of a high-temperature borehole acoustic televiewer in a cooperative program with a research institute in West Germany. Progress was also made in techniques for the collection and analysis of microseismic data. Reservoir-engineering activities and geochemical studies, as well as the more routine support activities, continued in FY85. 18 refs., 15 figs.

Brown, D.W.; Franke, P.R.; Smith, M.C.; Wilson, M.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Prospects for the commercial development of hot dry rock geothermal energy in New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vast store of energy is available to the world in the form of hot dry rock (HDR) which exists almost everywhere beneath the surface of the earth. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed technology to mine the heat from HDR by using techniques developed in the petroleum industry. In practice, an artificial reservoir is created in the hot rock and water is circulated through the reservoir to extract the thermal energy and bring it to the surface. There are virtually no adverse environmental effects from an HDR plant when the system is operated in a closed-loop mode with the process water continually recirculated. An experimental plant at Fenton Hill, NM is now undergoing long-term testing to demonstrate that energy can be obtained from HDR on a sustained basis with operational procedures which are readily adaptable to industry. Significant HDR resources exist in the state of New Mexico. Resources in the Valles Caldera, Zuni Uplift, and Rio Grande Rift have been evaluated in detail. Studies indicate that it should be possible to economically develop high grade HDR resources with technology available today. As advanced concepts for developing and operating HDR systems are investigated, even more widespread utilization of the technology will be commercially feasible.

Duchane, D.V.; Goff, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evaluation of the hot-dry-rock geothermal potential of an area near Mountain Home, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation of an area near Mountain Home, Idaho, was performed to assess the hot dry rock (HDR) potential of the prospect. The techniques reported include telluric and gravity profiling, passive seismic, hydrology and water chemistry surveys, and lineament analysis. Gravity and telluric surveys were unsuccessful in locating fractures buried beneath recent volcanics and sediments of the plain because density and conductivity contrasts were insufficient. Gravity modeling indicated areas where granite was not likely to be within drilling depth, and telluric profiling revealed an area in the northwest part of the prospect where higher conductivity suggested the presence of fractures or water or both, thereby making it unsuitable for HDR. Water geochemistry indicated that (hot water) reservoir temperatures do not exceed 100/sup 0/C. An area in the east central part of the prospect was delineated as most favorable for HDR development. Temperature is expected to be 200/sup 0/C at 3-km depth, and granitic rock of the Idaho Batholith should be intersected at 2- to 3-km depth.

Arney, B.H.; Goff, F.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Program was on development of methods to produce the hydraulic fractures required to connect the deep, inclined wells of the Phase II system at Fenton Hill. Environmental surveillance, instrument development, laboratory and modeling studies, and other supporting activities were continued. After two unsuccessful attempts to fracture hydraulically through inflatable packers, formation breakdown was produced in an uncased section near the bottom of well EE-2 by pumping water through a cemented-in steel liner. Breakdon occurred at a wellhead pressure of 33.1 MPa and a total of 8539 m/sup 3/ of water was injected. Mapping of source locations of microseismic events indicated opening of an extensive set of planar features dipping about 40/sup 0/W, striking about N20/sup 0/W, and apparently passing beneath the bottom of well EE-3. An attempt was then made to fracture at a higher level where the relative positions of the two wells increased the probability that an inclined fracture would connect them. Repeated failures of drill pipe, tubing, couplings, and packers terminated most pumping experiments prematurely. Important advances were made in thermal protection of downhole instruments, real-time mapping source locations of microseismic signals, modeling of heat and mass transport, and the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing.

Smith, M.C.; Nunz, G.J.; Ponder, G.M. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: Annual report, Fiscal year 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preparation, execution, and analysis of a 30-day Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test (ICFT) of the Phase II reservoir were the primary objectives of the Hot Dry Rock Program in fiscal year 1986. The ICFT successfully tested the Phase II heat-extraction loop with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,000 m/sup 3/ of hot water, extracting up to 10 MW/sub t/ when production reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, water loss rate has decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water had been recovered, 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Geochemical, tracer, and seismic analyses suggest reservoir fracture volume was growing throughout the test. A new technique, the ''three-point'' method, was developed to determine locations and orientations of seismically active planes. Fault or joint planes are identified in what superficially appears to be an amorphous microearthquake location set. Five planes were determined when the three-point method was applied to a location data set for the massive hydraulic-fracturing experiment conducted in 1983. 23 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

Dash, Z.V.; Grant, T.; Jones, G.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Experimental verification of the load-following potential of a Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent 6-day flow experiment conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site in north-central New Mexico has verified that an HDR reservoir has the capability for a significant, and very rapid, increase in power output upon demand. The objective of this cyclic load-following experiment was to investigate the performance of the reservoir in a nominal high-backpressure (2200 psi) baseload operating condition upon which was superimposed greatly increased power production for a 4-hour period each day. In practice, this enhanced production was accomplished by dropping the production well backpressure from the preexisting level of 2200 psi down to about 500 psi to rapidly drain the fluid stored in the pressure-dilated joints surrounding the production well. During the last cycle of this six-cycle test, the mean production conditions were 146.6 gpm for 4 hours at a temperature of 189C followed by 92.4 gpm for 20 hours at a temperature of 183C. These flow and temperature values indicate a flow enhancement of 59%, and a power enhancement of 65% during the high-production period. The time required to increase the reservoir power output from the baseload to the peaking rate was about 2 minutes.

Brown, Donald

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hot Dry Rock Heat Mining Geothermal Energy Development Program - Annual Report Fiscal Year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This was a year of significant accomplishment in the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program. Most importantly, the design, construction, and installation of the surface plant for the Phase II system neared completion by the end of the year. Basic process design work has been completed, and all major components of the system except the gas/particle separator have been procured. For this component, previous design problems have been resolved, and purchase during the first half of FY91 is anticipated. Installation of the surface plant is well underway. The system will be completed and ready for operation by the end of FY91 under the current funding scenario. The operational schedule to be followed will then depend upon the program funding level. Our goal is to start long-term flow testing as soon as possible. Of equal importance, from the standpoint of the long-term viability of HDR technology, during this year, for the first time, it has been demonstrated in field testing that it should be possible to operate HDR reservoirs with water losses of 1-3%, or even less. Our experience in the deep, hot, Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill is in sharp contrast to the significant water losses seen by Japanese and British scientists working in shallower, cooler, HDR reservoirs. Calculations and modeling based on field data have shown that water consumption declines with the log of time in a manner related to water storage in the reservoir. This work may be crucial in proving that HDR can be an economically viable means for producing energy, and that it is useful even in areas where water is in short supply. In addition, an engineering model was developed to predict and explain water consumption in HDR reservoirs under pressure, the collection and processing of seismic information was more highly automated, and the detection limits for reactive tracers were lowered to less than 1 part per billion. All of these developments will add greatly to our ability to conduct, analyze, and understand the long-term test (LTFT). Water-rights acquisition activities, site clean-up, and improvements in the 1 million gallon storage pond at Fenton Hill have assured that we will have adequate water to carry out a vigorous testing program in a safe and environmentally-sound manner. The 1 million gallon pond was recontoured, and lined with a sophisticated multi-layer plastic barrier. A large part of the work on the pond was paid for with funds from the Laboratory's Health, Safety and Environment Division. Almost all the expected achievements set forth in the FY90 Annual Operating Plan were substantially accomplished this past year, in spite of a $300,000 shortfall in funding. This funding shortfall did delay some work and result in some projects not being completed, however. They have had to go more slowly than they would like on some aspects of the installation of the surface plant for the LTFT, purchase of non-critical equipment, such as a back-up electric generator for Fenton Hill, has been delayed, and some work has not been brought to an adequate conclusion. The fracture healing work, for example, was completed but not written up. they simply did not have the funds to pay for the effort needed to fully document this work. As the program enters FY91, the completion of the surface plant at Fenton Hill is within sight. The long-awaited LTFT can then begin, and the large investment in science and technology represents by the HDR Program will begin to bear still greater dividends.

Duchane, David

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Power produced from hot dry rock geothermal resources: a case study for the Imperial Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

The case study described here concerns an HDR system which provides geothermal fluids for a hypothetical electric plant located in California's Imperial Valley. Primary concern is focused on the implications of differing drilling conditions, as reflected by costs, and differing risk environments for the potential commercialization of an HDR system. Drilling costs for best, medium and worst drilling conditions are taken from a recent study of drilling costs for HDR systems. Differing risk environments are presented by differing rate of return requirements on stocks and interest on bonds which the HDR system is assumed to pay; rate of return/interest combinations considered are 6%/3%, 9%/6%, 12%/9% and 15%/12%. The method used for analyzing the HDR system involves a two-stage process. In stage 1, the maximum amount that the electric plant can pay to an HDR system for geothermal fluids is calculated for alternative busbar prices of electricity received by the electric plant. In stage 2, costs for the HDR system are calculated under differing assumed risk environments and drilling conditions. These two sets of data may then be used to analyze the minimum busbar price of electricity - which defines a maximum fuel bill that could be paid to the HDR system by the electric plant - which could result in the HDR system's full recouperation of all production and drilling costs.

Cummings, R.G.; Morris, G.E.; Arundale, C.J.; Erickson, E.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Economic Predictions for Heat Mining: A Review and Analysis of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components. The economic models reviewed include the following studies sponsored by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)-Cummings and Morris (1979), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-Murphy, et al. (1982), United Kingdom (UK)-Shock (1986), Japan-Hori, et al. (1986), Meridian-Entingh (1987) and Bechtel (1988). A general evaluation of the technical feasibility of HDR technology components was also conducted in view of their importance in establishing drilling and reservoir performance parameters required for any economic assessment. In this review, only economic projections for base load electricity produced from HDR systems were considered. Bases of 1989 collars ($) were selected to normalize costs. Following the evaluation of drilling and reservoir performance, power plant choices and cost estimates are discussed in section 6 of the report. In Section 7, the six economics studies cited above are reviewed and compared in terms of their key resource, reservoir and plant performance, and cost assumptions. Based on these comparisons, the report estimates parameters for three composite cases. Important parameters include: (1) resource quality-average geothermal gradient (C/km) and well depth, (2) reservoir performance-effective productivity, flow impedance, and lifetime (thermal drawdown rate), (3) cost components-drilling, reservoir formation, and power plant costs and (4) economic factors-discount and interest rates, taxes, etc. In Section 8, composite case conditions were used to reassess economic projections for HDR-produced electricity. In Section 9, a generalized economic model for HDR-produced electricity is presented to show the effects of resource grade, reservoir performance parameters, and other important factors on projected costs. A sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using this model is given in Section 10. Section 11 treats a modification of the economic model for predicting costs for direct, non-electric applications. HDR economic projections for the U.S. are broken down by region in Section 12. In Section 13, the report provides recommendations for continued research and development to reduce technical and economic uncertainties relevant to the commercialization of HDR. [DJE-2005

Tester, Jefferson W.; Herzog, Howard J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emphasis was on hydraulic-fracturing experiments at depths around 3.5 km (11,473 ft) in the two inclined wells of the Phase II system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico; on improved facilities and techniques for mapping the source locations of acoustic signals generated by the fracturing events; on mathematical modeling of the fracture systems produced in these and earlier experiments; and on development of a family of slimline high-temperature downhole instruments that can be used within or through relatively small-diameter pressure tubing. Hydraulic fracturing at a vertical depth of approximately 3500 m (11,500 ft) in well EE-2, the deeper well, produced fractures that, in acoustic maps, appear to occupy a large, roughly ellipsoidal volume whose major axis is directed to the north of the other well, EE-3. Hydraulic fracturing from EE-3 at a similar depth produced another set of fractures that appear to be approximately parallel to and centered about 180 m (600 ft) east of the earlier set. Subsequent fluid injections reduced the distance between the two sets, but no hydraulic connection between them was established. Modeling the silica concentrations of fluid circulated through the earlier Phase I system indicates that this type of permeation also contributes significantly to heat extraction during system operation. The precision and accuracy of locating the sources of acoustic signals detected during hydraulic-fracturing operations have been increased by improvements in equipment, drilling of another deep hole for geophone emplacement, and additional station calibrations. Analysis of the signals has also been improved and broadened. Development of slimline downhole instruments has included a detonator tool, a geophone package, and final design of a high-temperature borehole acoustic televiewer. A crosswell acoustic transceiver has also been developed for investigating rock type and structure between wellbores. 32 refs., 35 figs.

Smith, M.C.; Nunz, G.J.; Wilson, M.G. (comps.)

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Evaluation of the second hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoir: results of Phase I, Run Segment 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a long-term (286 day) flow test of the second hot dry rock reservoir at the Fenton Hill field site are presented. This second reservoir was created by fracturing an interval of granitic rock located at a depth of 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the same wellbore pair used in the creation of the first, smaller reservoir. The new fracture system has a vertical extent of at least 320 m (1050 ft), suggesting that the combined heat-transfer area of the old and new fracture systems is much greater than that of the old system. The virgin rock temperature at the bottom of the deeper interval was 197/sup 0/C (386/sup 0/F). Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet, as well as temperatures inferred from geothermometry, showed that the thermal drawdown of the reservoir was about 8/sup 0/C, and preliminary estimates indicate that the minimum effective heat-transfer area of the new reservoir is 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), which is six times larger than the first reservoir.

Zyvoloski, G.A.; Aamodt, R.L.; Aguilar, R.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Determination of in-situ stress to predict direction of hydraulically created fractures for development of hot dry rock geothermal reservoir in Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is very important to know the underground stress state to design and complete a Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir because the direction of the hydraulic fractures depends on the earth stress. The hydraulic mini fracturing technique was introduced to determine the in-situ stress state without assuming the borehole axis to be parallel to one of the principal stresses. Small scale hydraulic fracturing tests were conducted to verify this technique at an underground power plant and microseismic activities were monitored for fracture mapping. The direction of the fracture propagation was estimated from the in-situ stress state and compared with the fracture plane mapped by microseismic activities. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Kuriyagawa, Michio; Kobayashi, Hideo; Matsunaga, Isao; Kosugi, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Tsutomu; Sasaki, Shunji; Hori, Yoshinao

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

104

The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements  

SciTech Connect

The potential synergism between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources to produce transportation fuel has very positive environmental implications. One of the distinct advantages of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating conditions. The latter obtains since an HDR system is an injection conditions of flow rate, pressure, temperature, and water chemistry are under the control of the operator. The former obtains since, unlike a naturally occurring geothermal resource, the HDR resource is very widespread, particularly in the western US, and can be developed near transportation and plentiful supplies of biomass. Conceptually, the pressurized geofluid from the HDR reservoir would be produced at a temperature in the range of 200{degrees} to 220{degrees}c. The higher enthalpy portion of the geofluid thermal energy would be used to produce a lower-temperature steam supply in a countercurrent feedwater-heater/boiler. The steam, following a superheating stage fueled by the noncellulosic waste fraction of the biomass, would be expanded through a turbine to produce electrical power. Depending on the lignin fraction of the biomass, there would probably be excess electrical power generated over and above plant requirements (for slurry pumping, stirring, solids separation, etc.) which would be available for sale to the local power grid. In fact, if the hybrid HDR/biomass system were creatively configured, the power plant could be designed to produce daytime peaking power as well as a lower level of baseload power during off-peak hours.

Brown, D.W.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Stress control of seismicity patterns observed during hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill hot dry rock geothermal energy site, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seismicity accompanying hydraulic injections into granitic rock is often diffuse rather than falling along a single plane. This diffuse zone of seismicity cannot be attributed to systematic errors in locations of the events. It has often been asserted that seismicity occurs along preexisting joints in the rock that are favorably aligned with the stress field so that slip can occur along them when effective stress is reduced by increasing pore fluid pressure. A new scheme for determining orientations and locations of planes along which the microearthquakes occurred was recently developed. The basic assumption of the method, called the three point method, is that many of the events fall along well defined planes; these planes are often difficult to identify visually in the data because planes of many orientations are present. The method has been applied to four hydraulic fracturing experiments conducted at Fenton Hill as part of a hot dry rock geothermal energy project. While multiple planes are found for each experiment; one plane is common to all experiments. The ratio of shear to normal stress along planes of all orientations is calculated using a best estimate of the current stress state at Fenton Hill. The plane common to all experiments has the highest ratio of shear to normal stress acting along it, so it is the plane most likely to slip. The other planes found by the three point method all have orientations with respect to current principal stresses that are favorable for slip to occur along preexisting planes of weakness. These results are consistent with the assertion that the rock contains pre-existing joints which slip when the effective stress is reduced by the increased pore fluid pressure accompanying the hydraulic injection. Microearthquakes occur along those planes that are favorably aligned with respect to the current stress field.

Fehler, M.C.

1987-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

106

A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

Tatro, C.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

Single-Well Enhanced Geothermal System Front-End Engineering and Design: Optimization of a Renewable Geothermal System for Harvesting Heat from Hot, Dry Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, GTherm and the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College, under an EPRI Polaris grant, evaluated the potential for a GTherm single-well enhanced geothermal system (SWEGS) and bottom-hole HeatNest to produce enough heat from deep geothermal wells to be an effective alternative for generating electric power. The research focused on the thermodynamic properties of the SWEGS design and the optimal geologic conditions. The results indicated that, given the right conditions, the SWEGS can extr...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

Engineering methods for predicting productivity and longevity of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoir in the presence of thermal cracks. Technical completion report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional heat extraction from geothermal energy reservioirs depends on the feasibility to extend the main, hydraulic fracture through secondary thermal cracks of the adjacent hot rock. When the main, hydraulic fracture is cooled sufficiently, these secondary thermal cracks are produced normal to the main fracture surface. As such, both the heat transfer surface area and heat energy available to the fluid circulating through the main, hydraulic fracture system increase. Methods for predicting the productivity and longevity of a geothermal reservoir were developed. A question is whether a significant long-term enhancement of the heat extraction process is achieved due to these secondary thermal cracks. In short, the objectives of this investigation are to study how the main, hydraulic fracture can be extended through these secondary thermal cracks of the rock, and to develop methods for predicting the productivity and longevity of a geothermal reservoir.

Hsu, Y.C.; Lu, Y.M.; Ju, F.D.; Dhingra, K.C.; Lu, Y.M.; Ju, F.D.; Dhingra, K.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Development of hot dry rock resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is the only U.S. field test of this geothermal resource. In the LASL concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir would be formed by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rock, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by fracturing the rock hydraulically, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the circulation loop. In 1974, the first hole was drilled to a depth of 2929 m (9610 ft) and a hydraulic fracture was produced near the bottom. In 1975, a second hole was directionally drilled to intersect the fracture. Although the desired intersection was not achieved, a connection was made through which water was circulated. After a year's study of the fracture system, drilling began again in April 1977 and an improved connection was achieved. In September of 1977 a 5 MW (thermal) heat extraction and circulation experiment was conducted for 100 h as a preliminary test of the concept. An 1800-h circulation experiment was concluded on April 13, 1978 to determine temperature-drawdown, permeation water loss and flow characteristics of the pressurized reservoir, to examine chemistry changes in the circulating fluid, and to monitor for induced seismic effects.

Pettitt, R.A.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Field study of tracer and geochemistry behavior during hydraulic fracturing of a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents tracer and geochemistry data from several hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill, NM, HDR geothermal reservoir. Tracers have been injected at various times during these tests: (1) initially, before any flow communication existed between the wells; (2) shortly after a flow connection was established; and (3) after the outlet flow had increased to its steady state value. An idealized flow model consisting of a combination of main fracture flow paths and fluid leakoff into secondary permeability explains the different tracer response curves for these cases, and allows us to predict the fracture volume of the main paths. The geochemistry during these experiments supports our previously developed models postulating the existence of a high concentration indigenous ''pore fluid.'' Also, the quartz and Na-K-Ca geothermometers have been used successfully to identify the temperatures and depths at which fluid traveled while in the reservoir. The quartz geothermometer is somewhat more reliable because at these high temperatures (about 250/sup 0/C) the injected fluid can come to equilibrium with quartz in the reservoir. The Na-K-Ca geothermometer relies on obtaining a sample of the indigenous pore fluid, and thus is somewhat susceptible to problems of dilution with the injection fluid. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Robinson, B.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Exploration for Hot Dry Rock geothermal resources in the Midcontinent USA. Volume 1. Introduction, geologic overview, and data acquisition and evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Midcontinent of North America is commonly characterized as a stable cratonic area which has undergone only slow, broad vertical movements over the past several hundreds of millions of years. This tectonically stable crust is an unfertile area for hot dry rock (HDR) exploration. However, recent geophysical and geological studies provide evidence for modest contemporary tectonic activity in limited areas within the continent and, therefore, the possibility of localized thermal anomalies which may serve as sites for HDR exploration. HDR, as an energy resource in the Midcontinent, is particularly appealing because of the high population density and the demand upon conventional energy sources. Five generalized models of exploration targets for possible Midcontinent HDR sites are identified: (1) radiogenic heat sources, (2) conductivity-enhanced normal geothermal gradients, (3) residual magnetic heat, (4) sub-upper crustal sources, and (5) hydrothermal generated thermal gradients. Three potential sources of HDR, each covering approximately a 2/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ area, were identified and subjected to preliminary evaluation. In the Mississippi Embayment test site, lateral thermal conductivity variations and subcrustal heat sources may be involved in producing abnormally high subsurface temperatures. Studies indicate that enhanced temperatures are associated primarily with basement rift features where vertical displacement of aquifers and faults cause the upward migration of hot waters leading to anomalously high local upper crustal temperatures. The Western Nebraska test site is a potential low temperature HDR source also related, at least in part, to groundwater movement. The Southeast Michigan test site was selected for study because of the possible presence of radiogenic plutons overlain by a thickened sedimentary blanket.

Hinze, W.J.; Braile, L.W.; von Frese, R.R.B.; Lidiak, E.G.; Denison, R.E.; Keller, G.R.; Roy, R.F.; Swanberg, C.A.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Morgan, P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Geothermal Food Processors Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Fernley, Nevada Coordinates 39.6079683°, -119.2518349° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

115

Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hot Dry Rock at Fenton Hill, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program, operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock at Fenton Hill, outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase 1, 1978--1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/degree/C. A second (Phase 2) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/degree/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Hendron, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The US Hot Dry Rock project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

Hendron, R.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The economics of heat mining: An analysis of design options and performance requirements of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal power systems  

SciTech Connect

A generalized economic model was developed to predict the breakeven price of HDR generated electricity. Important parameters include: (1) resource quality--average geothermal gradient ({sup o}C/km) and well depth, (2) reservoir performance--effective productivity, flow impedance, and lifetime (thermal drawdown rate), (3) cost components--drilling, reservoir formation, and power plant costs and (4) economic factors--discount and interest rates, taxes, etc. Detailed cost correlations based on historical data and results of other studies are presented for drilling, stimulation, and power plant costs. Results of the generalized model are compared to the results of several published economic assessments. Critical parameters affecting economic viability are drilling costs and reservoir performance. For example, high gradient areas are attractive because shallower well depths and/or lower reservoir production rates are permissible. Under a reasonable set of assumptions regarding reservoir impedance, accessible rock volumes and surface areas, and mass flow rates (to limit thermal drawdown rates to about 10 C per year), predictions for HDR-produced electricity result in competitive breakeven prices in the range of 5 to 9 cents/kWh for resources having average gradients above 50 C/km. Lower gradient areas require improved reservoir performance and/or lower well drilling costs.

Tester, Jefferson W.; Herzog, Howard J.

1991-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS-CO2: New Zealand TVZ Geothermal Systems as a Natural Analog Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Economics of a 75-MW(e) hot-dry-rock geothermal power station based upon the design of the Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based upon EE-2 and EE-3 drilling costs and the proposed Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir conditions the break-even cost of producing electricity is 4.4 cents per kWh at the bus bar. This cost is based upon a 9-well, 12-reservoir hot dry rock (HDR) system producing 75 MW(e) for 10 yr with only 20% drawdown, and an assumed annual finance charge of 17%. Only one-third of the total, potentially available heat was utilized; potential reuse of wells as well as thermal stress cracking and augmentation of heat transfer was ignored. Nearly half the bus bar cost is due to drilling expenses, which prompted a review of past costs for wells GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3. Based on comparable depth and completion times it is shown that significant cost improvements have been accomplished in the last seven years. Despite these improvements it was assumed for this study that no further advancements in drilling technology would occur, and that even in commercially mature HDR systems, drilling problems would continue nearly unabated.

Murphy, H.; Drake, R.; Tester, J.; Zyvoloski, G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fracturing operations in a dry geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracturing operations at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site initiated unique developments necessary to solve problems caused by an extremely harsh downhole environment. Two deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures are in excess of 600/sup 0/F (315/sup 0/C). The wells were drilled during 1979 to 1981, inclined at 35 degrees, one above the other, and directionally drilled in an azimuthal direction orthogonal to the least principal in-situ crustal stress field. Hydraulic fracturing experiments to connect the two wells have used openhole packers, hydraulic jet notching of the borehole wall, cemented-in insolation liners and casing packers. Problems were encountered with hole drag, high fracture gradients, H/sub 2/S in vent back fluids, stress corrosion cracking of tubulars, and the complex nature of three-dimensional fracture growth that requires very large volumes of injected water. Two fractured zones have been formed by hydraulic fracturing and defined by close-in, borehole deployed, microseismic detectors. Initial operations were focused in the injection wellbore near total depth, where water injection treatments totalling 51,000 bbls (8100 m/sup 3/) were accomplished by pumping through a cemented-in 4-1/2 in. liner/PBR assembly. Retrievable casing packers were used to inject 26,000 bbls (4100 m/sup 3/) in the upper section of the open hole. Surface injection pressures (ISIP) varied from 4000 to 5900 psi (27 to 41 MPa) and the fracture gradient ranged from 0.7 to 0.96 psi/ft.

Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Hendron, R.H.; Sinclair, A.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Exploration for hot dry rock geothermal resources in the Midcontinent USA. Hot dry rock conceptual models for exploration, HDR test site investigations, and the Illinois Deep Drill Hole Project. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three potential sources of HDR, each covering approximately a 2/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ area, were identified and subjected to preliminary evaluation with ad hoc exploration strategies. In the Mississippi Embayment test site, lateral thermal conductivity variations and subcrustal heat sources may be involved in producing abnormally high subsurface temperatures. Studies indicate that enhanced temperatures are associated primarily with basement rift features where vertical displacement of aquifers and faults cause the upward migration of hot waters leading to anomalously high, local, upper crustal temperatures. The Western Nebraska test site is a potential low temperature HDR source also related, at least in part, to groundwater movement. There appear to be much more widespread possibilities for similar HDR sites in the Great Plains area. The Southeast Michigan test site was selected for study because of the possible presence of radiogenic plutons overlain by a thickened sedimentary blanket. There is no direct information on the presence of abnormally high temperatures in this area, but the study does show that a combination of gravity and magnetic anomaly mapping with regional geological information derived from sparse drill holes in the Phanerozoic rocks is useful on a widespread basis for focusing on local areas for detailed evaluation.

Hinze, W.J.; Braile, L.W.; von Frese, R.R.B.; Lidiak, E.G.; Denison, R.E.; Keller, G.R.; Roy, R.F.; Swanberg, C.A.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Morgan, P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1997 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine a major lithospheric boundary Notes Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area. The

127

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field Notes The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The two earliest rhyolites probably

128

Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date 1995 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N. ; Copp, J.F. (1 June 1995) Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area,

129

Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

Zyvoloski, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

132

Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I prototype hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system was developed in Precambrian basement rocks at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Core and cuttings samples from the four deep wells indicate that the reservoir of this Phase I HDR system lies within a homogeneous biotite granodiorite body of very low permeability. Natural fractures, although present, are

133

Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Core samples from the Dunes, California, and Raft River, Idaho, geothermal areas show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Sealed fractures can act as barriers to fluid flow. Sealed fractures often mark boundaries between regions of significantly

134

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

135

Hot dry rock: A climate change action opportunity for industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of heat found in rock that is hot but is not in contact with sufficient mobile fluid to transport that heat to the surface are a large, as yet virtually unexploited, source of clean energy. The technology to extract useful amounts of energy from this ubiquitous hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource has been under development for more than twenty years. During the last two years, flow testing at the Fenton Hill HDR pilot facility in New Mexico has answered many of the questions about the viability of HDR heat mining. While the most important issue of thermal longevity of the artificial geothermal reservoir that is the heart of an HDR energy system was not fully resolved, the test results provided good reasons to be optimistic that such reservoirs can have long lifetimes. No decline was observed in the temperature of the fluid produced during the relatively short test period and tracer testing indicated that the reservoir may be thermally self sustaining. In addition, water consumption during the circulation test was reduced to very low levels, the production of significant excess energy over that required simply to operate the system was verified, and routine energy production with virtually no emissions to the environment, except waste heat, was demonstrated.

Duchane, D.V.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Winnemucca Dry Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

137

Hot dry rock: A new energy source for clean power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions provide a vivid illustration of the vast amount of thermal energy stored within the earth, while geysers, hot springs, and related geothermal features demonstrate that this energy can be brought to the surface in a more benign manner over extended time periods. These latter phenomena have, in fact, been utilized as sources of heat since ancient ones. During the second half of this century, the use of natural geothermal fluids to generate electricity has rapidly expanded. Today, in excess of 5,000 megawatts of electric power are produced from geothermal energy sources around the world. The vast majority of geothermal energy is found, not in the form of hot fluids, but rather as hot dry rock (HDR) which exists almost everywhere beneath the surface of the earth. The object of this paper is to review and summarize the current state of development of HDR technology in the United States and around the world, including preliminary results of a long-term test now underway at the HDR heat mine in Fenton Hill, NM.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Generalized geologic and other data are tabulated for 24 potential hot dry rock (HDR) sites in the contiguous United States. The data show that HDR resources occur in many geologic and tectonic settings. Potential reservoir rocks at each prospect are described and each system is categorized according to inferred heat sources. The Fenton Hill area in New Mexico is discussed in detail because this region may be considered ideal for HDR development. Three other prospectively valuable localities are

139

Preliminary investigation of two areas in New York State in terms of possible potential for hot dry rock geothermal energy. [Adirondack Mountains and Catskill Mountains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two areas in New York State were studied in terms of possible long range potential for geothermal energy: the Adirondack Mountains which are undergoing contemporary doming, and an anomalous circular feature centered on Panther Mountain in the Catskill Mountains. The Adirondack Mountains constitute an anomalously large, domical uplift on the Appalachian foreland. The domical configuration of the area undergoing uplift, combined with subsidence at the northeastern perimeter of the dome, argues for a geothermal rather than glacioisostatic origin. A contemporary hot spot near the crust-mantle boundary is proposed as the mechanism of doming, based on analogy with uplifts of similar dimensions elsewhere in the world, some of which have associated Tertiary volcanics. The lack of thermal springs in the area, or high heat flow in drill holes up to 370 m deep, indicates that the front of the inferred thermal pulse must be at some depth greater than 1 km. From isopach maps by Rickard (1969, 1973), it is clear that the present Adirondack dome did not come into existence until sometime after Late Devonian time. Strata younger than this are not present to provide further time stratigraphic refinement of this lower limit. However, the consequent radial drainage pattern in the Adirondacks suggests that the dome is a relatively young tectonic feature. Using arguments based on fixed hot spots in central Africa, and the movement of North American plate, Kevin Burke (Appendix I) suggests that the uplift may be less than 4 m.y. old.The other area of interest, the Panther Mountain circular feature in the Catskill Mountains, was studied using photogeology, gravity and magnetic profiling, gravity modeling, conventional field methods, and local shallow seismic refraction profiling.

Isachsen, Y.W.

1978-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Economic factors relevant for electric power produced from hot dry rock geothermal resources: a case study for the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, area  

SciTech Connect

The case study described here concerns an HDR system which provides geothermal fluids for a hypothetical electric plant located in the Fenton Hill area in New Mexico's Jemez Mountains. Primary concern is focused on the implications of differing drilling conditions, as reflected by costs, and differing risk environments for the potential commercialization of an HDR system. Drilling costs for best, medium and worst drilling conditions are taken from a recent study of drilling costs for HDR systems. Differing risk environments are represented by differing rate-of-return requirements on stocks and interest on bonds which the HDR system is assumed to pay; rate of return/interest combinations considered are 6%/3%, 9%/6%, 12%/9% and 15%/12%. The method of analysis used here is that of determining the minimum busbar cost for electricity for this case study wherein all costs are expressed in annual equivalent terms. The minimum cost design for the electric generating plant is determined jointly with the minimum cost design for the HDR system. The interdependence between minimum cost designs for the plant and HDR system is given specific attention; the optimum design temperature for the plant is shown here to be lower than one might expect for conventional power plants - in the range 225/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C. Major results from the analyses of HDR-produced electricity in the Fenton Hill area are as follows. With real, inflation-free debt/equity rates of 6% and 9%, respectively, the minimum busbar cost is shown to lie in the range 18 to 29 mills/kwh. When real debt/equity rates rise to 12% and 15%, busbar costs rise to 24 to 39 mills/kwh.

Cummings, R.G.; Morris, G.; Arundale, C.J.; Erickson, E.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

Brown, D.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

Brown, D.W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

144

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hot dry rock fracture propagation and reservoir characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

North America's largest hydraulic fracturing opeations have been conducted at Fenton hill, New mexico to creae hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs. Microearthquakes induced by these fracturing operations were measured with geophones. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the pre-existing joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60)degree) to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. Field testing of HDR reservoirs at the Fenton Hill site shows that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area. These temporal increases indicate that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock system occurred. For future reservoir testing, Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts. Recent studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene, which can be used in reservoirs as hot as 275)degree)C.

Murphy, H.; Fehler, M.; Robinson, B.; Tester, J.; Potter, R.; Birdsell, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.

Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M.; Jacobson, J.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

Tennyson, George P..

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

Developing hot dry rock reservoirs with inflatable open hole packers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An open hole packer system was designed for high pressure injection operations in high temperature wells at the Fenton Hill, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Site. The packer runs were required to verify that the HDR reservoir fractures had been penetrated during the drilling of well EE-3A. They were also used to stimulate fractures connecting EE-3A to the reservoir and to conduct two massive hydraulic fracture treatments at the bottom of EE-3A. An attempt to use a modified packer design as a temporary well completion system was not successful but with modification the system may prove to be an important HDR completion technique. The eleven packer runs have demonstrated that formation testing, stimulation and HDR reservoir development can now be conducted with an open hole inflatable packer operating over large temperature ranges and high differential pressures.

Dreesen, D.S.; Miller, J.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two wells, GT-2 and EE-1, were originally drilled to a depth of 9600 ft (2.93 km) and 10,000 ft (3.05 km), respectively, and, after some difficulties, including redrilling of the bottom portion of GT-2, a good fracture connection was made between EE-1 and GT-2B, as the modified GT-2 was called. The circulation system was studied extensively for the purpose of establishing a number of fracture properties. Techniques were developed to determine orientation, geometry, heat exchange area, volume, flow impedance and impedance distribution. A much larger fracture system was then created from a depth of 9620 ft (2.93 km) in EE-1. The techniques used and results obtained in the study of the new and old fracture systems are discussed. (MHR)

Aamodt, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.W. : A hot dry rock geothermal energy concept utilizingtwenty-?fth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering,the development of enhanced geothermal systems? In: Paper

Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Subterrene rock-melting concept applied to the production of deep geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells comprises a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and cost studies were made of the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to deep wells such as may be used for dry-hot-rock or geopressure geothermal energy extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene requirements are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. Certain features of the rock-melting concept such as the glass lining on the borehole wall, and nonrotation, provide opportunities for the development of better well production techniques in hot wells. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost-savings are significant: a 33 percent or 4.5 million dollars reduction from rotary drilled well costs are estimated for a 10 km depth well with bottom hole temperatures of 673 K. Even for normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 10 km depth is estimated as 23 percent or 2 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Technical and cost analysis of rock-melting systems for producing geothermal wells. [GEOWELL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells makes up a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and economic systems studies are summarized regarding the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to the production of deep wells such as may be used for dry hot rock or geopressurized geothermal energy-extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene features are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. In fact, some special features could lead to improved well production techniques. These include the buildup of a glass lining along the borehole wall which provides structural resistance to collapse; close control of hole geometry; the existence of a barrier between the drilling fluids and the formations being penetrated; nonrotation; potentially better bit life; and faster rates of penetration in deep, hard rock. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost savings are significant: a 30 percent or 3.9 million dollar (1975 $) reduction from rotary-drilled well costs are estimated for a 10-km depth well with a bottom hole temperature of 673 K. Even for relatively cool normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 1..pi..-km well are estimated as 23 percent of 2.1 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Aq Dryers Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

156

Hot dry rock: A versatile alternative energy technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hot dry rock (HDR) is the most abundant geothermal resource, and is found almost everywhere at depth. The technology to extract energy from HDR for practical use has been under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than twenty years. During the 1970`s, the possibility of mining the heat from HDR by circulating water through an engineered geothermal reservoir was first demonstrated on a small scale. Between 1980 and 1986 a larger, deeper, and hotter HDR reservoir was constructed. This large reservoir was subsequently mated to a permanent surface plant. A number of flow tests of this large HDR reservoir were conducted between 1991 and 1995. The results of these tests have indicated that it should be practical to operate an HDR heat mining facility to produce power on a sustained basis. An industry-led, government cost-shared project to produce and market energy generated from HDR is currently being put in place. That project should help demonstrate that HDR reservoirs can be operated to provide energy for long periods of time at rates sufficient to be commercially viable. In the longer run, additional applications of HDR technology such as water and waste treatment, and steam generation for oil field flooding may come into widespread use.

Duchane, D.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Low Temperature Direct Use Agricultural Drying Geothermal Facilities | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Temperature Direct Use Agricultural Drying Geothermal Facilities Low Temperature Direct Use Agricultural Drying Geothermal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":800,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":"Geothermal

158

Community Geothermal Technology Program: Experimental lumber drying kiln. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goals were to demonstrate feasibility of using the geothermal waste effluent from the HGP-A well as a heat source for a kiln operation to dry hardwoods, develop drying schedules, and develop automatic systems to monitor/control the geothermally heated lumber dry kiln systems. The feasibility was demonstrated. Lumber was dried in periods of 2 to 6 weeks in the kiln, compared to 18 months air drying and 6--8 weeks using a dehumidified chamber. Larger, plate-type heat exchangers between the primary fluid and water circulation systems may enable the kiln to reach the planned temperatures (180--185 F). However, the King Koa partnership cannot any longer pursue the concept of geothermal lumber kilns.

Leaman, D.; Irwin, B.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Black Rock Point Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9553,"lon":-119.1141,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

Hot dry rock Phase II reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early attempts to hydraulically fracture and connect two wells drilled at the Hot Dry Rock site at Fenton Hill in New Mexico failed. Microearthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing indicated that the fracture zones grew in unexpected directions. Consequently one of the wells was sidetracked at a depth of 2.9 km; was redrilled into the zones of most intense microseismic activity; and a flow connection was achieved. Hydraulic communication was improved by supplemental fracturing using recently developed high temperature and high pressure open hole packers. Preliminary testing indicates a reservoir with stimulated joint volume which already surpasses that attained in the earlier phase I reservoir after several years of development. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, H.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Data Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the data collected during the hot dry rock experimental project conducted by the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico from about 1971 through 1995. Five main categories of data were reviewed: (1) geologic data; (2) flow test data; (3) reservoir modeling data; (4) chemical tracer data; and (5) seismic data. The review determines the important data sets from the project, determines where and how these data are stored, and evaluates whether further analyses of the data might be likely to yield additional information valuable to the geothermal industry or to the further development of enhanced geothermal systems.

GeothermEx, Inc.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Rock properties in support of geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal rock mechanics needs have been defined and subsequently a test system was designed and built for providing appropriate material properties. The development areas identified as requiring rock mechanics were stimulation, reservoir engineering, subsidence prediction, surface exploration and subsurface evaluation, and drilling. The resulting test system provides mechanical, electrical, thermal and physical properties on 2 and 4 inch diameter cores at confining pressures and pore fluid pressures to 200 MPa (30,000 psi) and temperatures to 535/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F). The test system development was continued and site specific rock mechanics requirements were identified. (MHR)

Butters, S.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Peer Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report briefly describes the history of the hot dry rock experiment project conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, from about 1971 through 1995. The authors identify the primary lessons learned and techniques developed during the course of the Fenton Hill project, and summarize the extent to which these technologies have been transferred to the U.S. geothermal industry.

None

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Evaluation of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir. Part I. Heat extraction performance and modeling. Part II. Flow characteristics and geochemistry. Part III. Reservoir characterization using acoustic techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On May 28, 1977, as the production well GT-2 at Fenton Hill was being redrilled along a planned trajectory, it intersected a low-impedance hydraulic fracture in direct communication with the injection well, EE-1. Thus, a necessary prerequisite for a full-scale test of the LASL Hot Dry Rock Concept, that of establishing a high flow rate between wells at low wellhead differential pressures, was satisified. Full-scale operation of the loop occurred for 75 days from January 27 to April 12, 1978. This test is referred to as Phase 1, Segment 2 and was designed to examine the thermal drawdown, flow characteristics, water losses, and fluid geochemistry of the system in detail. Results of these studies are the major topic of this paper which is divided into three separate parts covering first the heat extraction performance, second the flow characteristics and geochemistry and third the use of acoustic techniques to describe the geometry of the fracture system. In the third section, dual-well acoustic measurements used to detect fractures are described. These measurements were made using modified Dresser Atlas logging tools. Signals intersecting hydraulic fractures in the reservoir under both hydrostatic and pressurized conditions were simultaneously detected in both wells. Signal attenuation and characteristic waveforms can be used to describe the extent of fractured rock in the reservoir.

Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Tester, J.W.; Albright, J.N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Improvement of tubulars used for fracturing in hot dry rock wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Completion of hot dry rock wells as it is currently envisioned, requires that hydraulic fracturing be used to develop a heat extraction reservoir and to provide low impedance flow paths between the designated water injection and production wells. Recent fracturing operations at measured depths from 11,400 ft to 15,300 ft at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Test Site have resulted in numerous failures of tubulars caused by the high fracturing pressures, corrosive environment and large treatment volumes at high flow rates. Two new fracturing strings were designed and purchased. Physical and chemical properties exceeding API specifications were demanded and supplied by the manufacturers. These tubulars have performed to design specifications.

Nicholson, R.W.; Dreesen, D.S.; Turner, W.C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Black Rock I Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock I Geothermal Project Rock I Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3705792,"lon":-115.77401,"alt":0,"address":"33\u00b019'59\" N, 115\u00b050'3 W","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

167

Black Rock II Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock II Geothermal Project Black Rock II Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3705792,"lon":-115.77401,"alt":0,"address":"33\u00b019'59\" N, 115\u00b050'3 W","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

168

Hot dry rock resources of the Clear Lake Area, Northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal area of northern California is underlain by an asthenospheric upwarp. The upwarp was generated at a slabless window trailing the northward-moving Mendocino triple junction. The geothermal area lies immediately east of the Rodgers Creek rather than the San Andreas fault because of a transform jump in progress. Decompression melting of the mantle has led to basaltic underplating, and crustal anatexis. The high heat flow is due to conduction through a thin lithosphere and the latent heat of solidifying basalt, while the uniformity is due to the distribution of sources over a wide area of large flatlying sills, The Hot Dry Rock resource has heat flow exceeding 4 HFU over an area exceeding 800 km2.

Burns, K.L.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

HDR (Hot Dry Rock) technology transfer activities in the Clear Lake Area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large Hot Dry Rock resource has been recognized in northern California. It underlies the region extending NE of The Geysers to N of the City of Clearlake. The long-range productive potential is thousands of megawatts. The geothermal resource is heterogeneous. There are two mechanisms of heat flow occurring together. One is fluid transport, up natural zones of permeability, to outflows as surface springs. The other is conductive heat flow through impermeable rock. The temperature isotherms are thought to be nearly level surfaces, for example, the 300{degree}C isotherm is at about 8000 ft depth, with spikes'' or ridges'' occurring around narrow zones of fluid flow. While there is accessible heat at shallow depth in the naturally permeable rocks, the really substantial resource is in the impermeable rock. This is the HDR resource. The potential reservoir rocks are Franciscan greywackes and greenstones. Recorded drilling problems appear to be mainly due to intersection with serpentinites or to the effects of stimulation, so are potentially avoidable. Greywacke is favoured as a reservoir rock, and is expected to fail by brittle fracture. The water shortages in Northern California appear to be surmountable. Leakoff rates are expected to be low. Sewerage water may be available for fill and makeup. There is a possibility of combining HDR heat power production with sewerage disposal. To establish the first HDR producer in Northern California offers challenges in technology transfer. Two significant challenges will be creation of dispersed permeability in a greywacke reservoir, and pressure management in the vicinity of naturally permeable zones. A successful demonstration of HDR production technology will improve the long-term prospects for the geothermal power industry in California. 29 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

Burns, K.; Potter, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Status and prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The vast majority of accessible geothermal energy exists in the form of heat stored in dry rock at depth. For nearly the last two decades, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been engaged in a program to develop the technology to mine the thermal energy in this hot dry rock (HDR). The world's first heat mine was developed and operated at Fenton Hill, N.M. in the 1970's by using drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques to create an artificial reservoir in hot rock and subsequently circulating water through this reservoir to mine the heat from the rock. Over the last ten years, a much larger, deeper, and hotter heat mine has been constructed at Fenton Hill and a permanent energy extraction plant has been built on the surface. A long-term testing program has recently begun to evaluate the potential for sustained energy extraction from the large Fenton Hill heat mine. This paper summarizes the history of HDR research and development at Los Alamos, reports the initial results of the long-term testing program at Fenton Hill, and discusses the possible future course of HDR technology.

Brown, D.; Duchane, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Temperature histories in geothermal wells: survey of rock thermomechanical properties and drilling, production, and injection case studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal and mechanical properties for geothermal formations are tabulated for a range of temperatures and stress conditions. Data was obtained from the technical literature and direct contacts with industry. Thermal properties include heat capacity, conductivity, and diffusivity. Undisturbed geothermal profiles are also presented. Mechanical properties include Youngs modulus and Poisson ratio. GEOTEMP thermal simulations of drilling, production and injection are reported for two geothermal regions, the hot dry rock area near Los Alamos and the East Mesa field in the Imperial Valley. Actual drilling, production, and injection histories are simulated. Results are documented in the form of printed GEOTEMP output and plots of temperatures versus depth, radius, and time. Discussion and interpretation of the results are presented for drilling and well completion design to determine: wellbore temperatures during drilling as a function of depth; bit temperatures over the drilling history; cement temperatures from setting to the end of drilling; and casing and formation temperatures during drilling, production, and injection.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Method of extracting heat from dry geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is used to interconnect two or more holes that penetrate a previously dry geothermal reservoir, and to produce within the reservoir a sufficiently large heat-transfer surface so that heat can be extracted from the reservoir at a usefully high rate by a fluid entering it through one hole and leaving it through another. Introduction of a fluid into the reservoir to remove heat from it and establishment of natural (unpumped) convective circulation through the reservoir to accomplish continuous heat removal are important and novel features of the method. (auth)

Potter, R.M.; Robinson, E.S.; Smith, M.C.

1974-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Geothermal Energy Program Overview: Fiscal Year 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In FY 1990-1991, the Geothermal Energy Program made significant strides in hydrothermal, geopressured brine, hot dry rock, and magma research, continuing a 20-year tradition of advances in geothermal technology.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal field Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In mid-1989 the authors designed and collected four seismic reflection/refraction profiles that addressed the crustal structure of the Coso geothermal field. The two main east-west and north-south profiles crossed at the southeasternmost base of Sugar Loaf Mountain. Both in-line and cross-line Vibroseis and explosion data were recorded on each of these approximately 12-mi lines. This was accomplished with the simultaneous operation of two 1024-channel sign bit recording systems while four

175

Los Alamos hot-dry-rock project: recent results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new deeper reservoir is presently being investigated at the Laboratory's Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) site. The region surrounding the lower of two inclined boreholes, directionally-drilled to about 4 km in hot crystalline rock, has been pressurized in a sequence of injection tests. Based primarily on the measurements made by two close-in microseismic detectors, two similar volumetric reservoir regions have been developed by massive hydraulic fracturing, but with no significant hydraulic communication with the upper borehole as yet.

Brown, D.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Roosevelt Hot Springs/hot-dry-rock prospect and evaluation of the Acord 1-26 well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous hot, dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation efforts have identified the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA as a prime HDR target. The size of the HDR resource is estimated to be at least eight times larger than the adjacent hydrothermal resource. Further research activities to evaluate this HDR resource have involved review of data from the Acord hot dry well, the seismic structure of the area, fluid geochemistry, and hydrology of a shallow aquifer. These recent results are summarized and the most likely HDR prospect area is identified.

Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Goff, F.; Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Vuataz, F.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Utilization of geothermal heat in tropical fruit-drying process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The power plant utilizes only the steam portion of the HGP-A well production. There are approximately 50,000 pounds per hour of 360/sup 0/F water produced (approximately 10 million Btu per hour) and the water is currently not used and is considered a waste. This tremendous resource could very well be used in applications such as food processing, food dehydration and other industrial processing that requires low-grade heat. One of the applications is examined, namely the drying of tropical fruits particularly the papaya. The papaya was chosen for the obvious reason that it is the biggest crop of all fruits produced on the Big Island. A conceptual design of a pilot plant facility capable of processing 1000 pounds of raw papaya per day is included. This facility is designed to provide a geothermally heated dryer to dehydrate papayas or other tropical fruits available on an experimental basis to obtain data such as drying time, optimum drying temperature, etc.

Chen, B.H.; Lopez, L.P.; King, R.; Fujii, J.; Tanaka, M.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability. At reservoir depths, borehole image, temperature, and mud logs indicate fluid flow is concentrated in extensively fractured damage zones of large faults well-oriented for slip.

179

Use of geothermal heat for crop drying and related agricultural applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Observations led to the selection of the alfalfa dehydration industry for in-depth analysis of the application of moderate-temperature geothermal heat. Six geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A low-temperature conveyor dryer using geothermal water to supply all required heat was chosen for site-specific analysis, the retrofitting of a large alfalfa dehydration plant within the Heber KGRA in the Imperial Valley, California. Even in the most favorable scenario--sharing a geothermal pipeline with the neighboring fertilizer plant--geothermal retrofitting would increase the price of the alfalfa ''dehy'' about 40 percent. The geothermal brine is estimated to cost $2.58/million Btu's compared with a 1977 natural gas cost of $1.15. Capital cost for heat exchangers and the new dryers is estimated at $3.3 million. The Heber plant appeared to offer the only good opportunity for geothermal retrofitting of an existing alfalfa dehydration plant. Construction of new plants at geothermal resource sites cannot be justified due to the uncertain state of the ''dehy'' industry. Use of geothermal heat for drying other crops may be much more promising. The potato dehydration industry, which is concentrated in the geothermal-rich Snake River Valley of Idaho, appears to offer good potential for geothermal retrofitting; about 4.7 x 10{sup 12}Btu's are used annually by plants within 50 miles of resources. Drying together at the geothermal wellhead several crops that have interlocking processing seasons and drying-temperature requirements may be quite attractive. The best ''multicrop drying center'' site identified was at Power Ranch Wells, Arizona; 34 other sites were defined. Agricultural processing applications other than drying were investigated briefly.

Gordon, T.J.; Wright, T.C.; Fein, E.; Munson, T.R.; Richmond, R.C.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hot dry rock in the United States: Putting a unique technology to practical use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy technology is unique in many aspects. HDR resources are much more widely distributed than hydrothermal resources, the production temperatures of fluids extracted from fully-engineered HDR reservoirs can be selected at will, and other important characteristics of HDR reservoirs can be controlled and even deliberately varied over time. Because HDR reservoirs can be rapidly discharged and recharged, a wide variety of operating scenarios can be envisioned that are not normally feasible for hydrothermal systems. Flow testing over the past few years has shown that HDR systems can be operated in a routine, automated manner that should make them rapidly adaptable to industrial applications. An industry-led HDR project now being formulated will lead to the development and operation of a practical facility to produce and market energy from an HDR resource by the turn of the century.

Duchane, D.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Hot dry rock heat mining: An alternative energy progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mining Heat from the hot dry rock (HDR) resource that lies beneath the earth's crust may provide an almost inexhaustible supply of energy for mankind with minimal environmental effects. In the heat mining process, water is pumped down an injection well into a mass of hydraulically fractured hot rock. As the water flows under high pressure through the opened rock joints, it becomes heated by the rock. It is returned to the surface through a production well (or wells) located some distance from the injector where its thermal energy is recovered by a heat exchanger. The same water is then recirculated through the system to extract more thermal energy. In this closed-loop process, nothing but heat is released to the environment during normal operation. The technical feasibility of HDR heat mining already has been proven by field testing. A long-term flow test is scheduled to begin in 1991 at the world's largest HDR heat mine in New Mexico, USA, to demonstrate that energy can be produced from HDR on a continuous basis over an extended time period. Significant HDR programs are also underway in several other countries. The paper describes the HDR resource, the heat mining concept, environmental characteristics, economics, developments at Los Alamos to date, and HDR development outside the US. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Duchane, D.V.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The design and construction of a hot dry rock pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal energy program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is directed toward demonstrating the potential of the hot dry rock (HDR) technology as an alternate energy source. Since the inception of the program, scientists and engineers have perfected drilling and fracturing techniques to create underground reservoirs for the purpose of tapping the potential heat energy from the hot rock in the earth. One of the achievements to date has been the creation of a reservoir at the Laboratory's test site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. This reservoir, located at a depth of 12,000 feet below the surface of the earth, has an estimated fluid capacity of one million gallons within the large volume of fractured rock. To evaluate the thermal power potential of this reservoir, preparations are currently underway to conduct a test which will entail the circulation of fluid through the reservoir by the injection of water at high pressures. A major part of the preparations involves the building of a demonstration pilot plant. The process concept poses a number of unique technical challenges with regard to the design and construction of the equipment and facilities. This paper reviews the system design and operating features of this plant. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Ponden, R.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two-models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

Robinson, B.A.; Kruger, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An interpretation theory based on the fluid-filled crack model of geothermal systems is being developed and tested against a variety of data from various geothermal areas. Progress is reported on the following subjects: (1) analysis and interpretation of seismic data obtained from the bore holes at the LASL Hot Dry Rock geothermal site. (2) Collection, analysis and interpretation of data on deep volcanic tremors at the USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory. (3) Development of a new method for determining seismic attenuation at frequencies higher than 1HZ, and initiation of a cooperative work with Mexican seismologists on the attenuation measurements at various geothermal areas in Baja, California using the method. (4) Installation of 3-component digital event-recorders at four stations in the Newberry Peak volcano, Oregon. (5) Developing a computer program for calculating seismic motion generated by the vibration of fluid-filled crack in a layered medium.

Aki, K.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hot Dry Rock resources of the Clear Lake area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock resources of the Clear Lake area of northern California are hot, large and areally uniform. The geological situation is special, probably overlying a slabless window caused by interaction between tectonic plates. Consequent magmatic processes have created a high-grade resource, in which the 300{degree}C isotherm is continuous, subhorizontal, and available at the shallow depth of 2.4 to 4.7 km over an area of 800 km{sup 2}. The region is very favorable for HDR development.

Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Peake, R.A. [California Energy Commission, CA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).31 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, 301998). Computer modeling for geothermal systems: predicting

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: interpretation of seismic data from hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Site, interpretation of 3-D velocity anomalies in the western US with special attention to geothermal areas, theoretical and observational studies of scattering and attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves, theoretical and observational studies of volcanic tremors in relation to magma transport mechanisms, and deployment and maintenance of 9 event-recorders around Mt. St. Helens. Abstracts of papers submitted for publication are included. (MHR)

Aki, K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Progress of the US Hot-Dry-Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While other geologic environments and possible heat-extraction methods are recognized, the US Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program has so far concentrated on the use of hydraulic fracturing to create flow passages and heat-transfer surface between two wells drilled into hot crystalline rock of low initial permeability. A recirculating pressurized-water loop has been used at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, to extract heat at rates up to 5MW(t) from a system of this type in granitic rock at a depth of 2600 m. The two wells for a larger, deeper, hotter system have now been drilled at the same location. They will be connected during 1982 by a set of hydraulic fractures, and the resulting heat-extraction loop is expected to yield the engineering experience and performance data required to demonstrate the commercial usefulness of such systems. Meanwhile, an evaluation of the HDR resource base of the United States is continuing, together with detailed investigation of local areas that appear especially promisng either for future heat-extraction experiments or for eventual commercial development.

Smith, M.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hot dry rock: What does it take to make it happen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ubiquitous heat in hot dry rock (HDR) is an abundant, widely distributed form of geothermal energy. Until recently, development of this energy source has been largely focused on understanding the scientific and engineering principles involved in forming and operating HDR reservoirs. During the past year, however, a pilot facility at Fenton Hill, NM has been run under steady-state conditions simulating the operation of a commercial HDR energy plant. Issues important to commercialization such as sustainability of thermal production, water loss, operating costs, and others have been addressed to the extent possible. The results, while not always definitive, have been encouraging. The stage is now set for the formation of an initiative led by private industry to take HDR technology from its current state of scientific and engineering demonstration to the production and marketing of energy in commercial quantities. Because of the technology risks involved, this can probably only be accomplished through a cost-shared industry/government effort. The potential rewards are great, since HDR represents the best, and perhaps the only, opportunity for geothermal energy to take its rightful place as a major energy source for the 21st century.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Hot dry rock: What does it take to make it happen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ubiquitous heat in hot dry rock (HDR) is an abundant, widely distributed form of geothermal energy. Until recently, development of this energy source has been largely focused on understanding the scientific and engineering principles involved in forming and operating HDR reservoirs. During the past year, however, a pilot facility at Fenton Hill, NM has been run under steady-state conditions simulating the operation of a commercial HDR energy plant. Issues important to commercialization such as sustainability of thermal production, water loss, operating costs, and others have been addressed to the extent possible. The results, while not always definitive, have been encouraging. The stage is now set for the formation of an initiative led by private industry to take HDR technology from its current state of scientific and engineering demonstration to the production and marketing of energy in commercial quantities. Because of the technology risks involved, this can probably only be accomplished through a cost-shared industry/government effort. The potential rewards are great, since HDR represents the best, and perhaps the only, opportunity for geothermal energy to take its rightful place as a major energy source for the 21st century.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Geothermal utilization at Castle Oaks Subdivision, Castle Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Designs of geothermal systems for using warm water from four aquifers of the Denver Basin are presented. Advantages of using heat pumps with the geothermal resource are discussed. Two design cases-one with separate heat load and heat pump, and the other with the heat pump and heat load located at the well site-are evaluated in terms of pump costs, operating costs, and payback periods. The 20-year delivered energy costs for the two geothermal systems would be slightly less than those for natural gas ($5.64 to $6.42 versus $6.70 per million Btu).

Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Goering, S.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hot-dry-rock energy: review of environmental aspects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the production of energy contained in hot dry rock (HDR) is surveyed here. In general, careful siting and timing and routine control measures should be adequate to prevent significant environmental harm; sites of particular ecological or visual and recreational value, however, may require more extensive (and more expensive) precautions such as using multiwell pads to reduce land disturbance and dry or wet and dry cooling towers to reduce or eliminate the consumptive use of water. The most important uncertainty among the environmental concerns is the seismic response of HDR formations to short-duration fluid injections at pressures above fracture thresholds; continued monitoring at HDR development sites is necessary. The direct socioeconomic impacts of HDR development should be relatively minor, owing to its capital-intensive nature. Of greater potential importance are the indirect jobs resulting from such development, which could cause significant demographic (and thus fiscal and social) impacts in sparsely populated regions. However, such indirect growth is not expected to begin until a large, stable HDR industry is established in a region, and thus its impacts are expected to be permanent rather than transient.

O'Banion, K.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

The US Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent accomplishments of the program are highlighted by a successful limited term flow test of the Phase 2 reservoir at the Fenton Hill site near Los Alamos. This reservoir connection was established by sidetracking one of the deep wells into hydraulically fractured areas, identified by microseismic data after original fracture attempts failed to connect the two wells. Hydraulic communication was improved by supplemental fracturing. Preliminary testing indicated a reservoir with fracture volume and heat production area surpassing the values from the earlier Phase 1 reservoir. Following completion of the downhole reservoir system, preparations were made for a reservoir-energy-extraction test. This Initial Closed Loop Flow Test (ICFT) was needed to obtain operating characteristics for planning a much longer test for thorough reservoir evaluation. The 30-day ICFT succeeded with final production of about 10 MWt at 192/sup 0/C, while injecting 285 gpm at 4600 psi and producing 206 gpm at 500 psi. The water loss rate and flow impedance were high, 27% and 18 psi/gpm respectively, but were declining. Radioactive tracer tests indicated reservoir volume growth during the experiment which was continuously monitored for acoustic or microseismic activity. Following the flow test, experiments were continued for several months during the venting process. Preparations are now underway for the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT). To understand as much as possible about the Phase 2 reservoir and to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of energy from HDR reservoirs, a flow test of approximately one year's duration is deemed necessary. Part of the preparation for the LTFT is the workover and repair of the production well and the installation of a competent overall flow loop and energy exchange system. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Franke, P.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. A progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the enlargement of the research reservoir was effected, two extended heat-extraction runs have been made. Run Segment 4 was conducted during October and November of 1979 for a total operating duration of 551 hours. The thermal drawdown data indicated that the effective heat-transfer area had been increased by not less than a factor of 6. The second test, Run Segment 5, began near the end of February 1980, and concluded on 16 December 1980. The enlargement of the reservoir is confirmed by the very gradual thermal drawdown, and the effective heat-transfer area of the research reservoir is now believed to be of the order of 50,000 m/sup 2/. To date, over 20 million kilowatt-hours of thermal energy have been extracted from the Fenton Hill research reservoir at Power Levels ranging from 2.3 to 5.0 MW/sub t/. Recently, a small on-line electric generation experiment was added as part of Run Segment 5. In the larger engineering system, the injection well (EE-2) is now complete to a depth of 4450 m with a bottom-hole temperature of 320 C and the production well (EE-3) is being drilled.

Franke, P.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

FY 1996 Summary of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Power Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes progress and status of the HDR project at Hijiori. The year was notable for a flow enhancement test of a system with two production wells in operation. Other items include a geochemical survey, reinterpretation of acoustic emission data from 1988 through 1995, borehole measurements to find intersections with fractures, a geological survey, preparation for modeling fractures, improvements in crack simulation in a reservoir analysis model, and environmental survey work. (DJE 2005)

None

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin. Final report. [QUAGMR (quasi-active geothermal reservoir)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General balance laws and constitutive relations are developed for convective hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. A fully interacting rock-fluid system is considered; typical rock-fluid interactions involve momentum and energy transfer and the dependence of rock porosity and permeability upon the fluid and rock stresses. The mathematical model also includes multiphase (water/steam) effects. A simple analytical model is employed to study heat transfer into/or from a fluid moving in a porous medium. Numerical results show that for fluid velocities typical of geothermal systems (Reynolds number much less than 10), the fluid and the solid may be assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium. Mathematical formalism of Anderson and Jackson is utilized to derive a continuum species transport equation for flow in porous media; this method allows one to delineate, in a rigorous manner, the convective and diffusive mechanisms in the continuum representation of species transport. An existing computer program (QUAGMR) is applied to study upwelling of hot water from depth along a fault; the numerical results can be used to explain local temperature inversions occasionally observed in bore hole measurements.

Garg, S.K.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Nayfeh, A.H.; Pritchett, J.W.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase II HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90-100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180[degrees]C (356[degrees]F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10-12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

Duchane, D.V.; Winchester, W.W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase 2 HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90--100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180{degrees}C (356{degrees}F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10--12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

Winchester, W.W. [ed.; Duchane, D.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fluidized-bed potato waste drying experiments at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized-bed dryer was built and operated at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site in south central Idaho to test the feasibility of using low-temperature (145/sup 0/C or lower) geothermal fluids as an energy source for drying operations. The dryer performed successfully on two potato industry waste products that had a solid content of 5 to 13%. The dried product was removed as a sand-like granular material or as fines with a flour-like texture. Test results, observations, and design recommendations are presented. Also presented is an economic evaluation for commercial-scale drying plants using either geothermal low-temperature water or oil as a heat source.

Cole, L.T.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Expectations for a second US Hot Dry Rock Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The worlds first hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir was created at Fenton Hill, NM in the late 1970`s. Today, Fenton Hill is the site of the largest, deepest, and hottest HDR reservoir. Over the past two decades, HDR systems have also been developed in a number of other countries. However, HDR reservoirs to date have always been created as part of research and development programs aimed at understanding the fundamentals of HDR technology. The time has come to begin planning the construction of a commercial-scale facility which will show the world that HDR can be a practical source of power. The second domestic HDR facility should demonstrate that commercial production of energy from HDR is feasible at a variety of locations. Day-today operating data should provide the cost figures needed in order to unambiguously design and build future commercial HDR power production plants. Successful construction and operation of the second HDR plant will both supply needed electric power at competitive costs and set the stage for the widespread application of HDR technology both domestically and throughout the world. If preliminary work is begun promptly, it should be possible to develop a fully operational second site by 1997. The Clearlake region of northern California may be an ideal area in which to locate the second HDR site.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Expectations for a second US Hot Dry Rock Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The worlds first hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir was created at Fenton Hill, NM in the late 1970's. Today, Fenton Hill is the site of the largest, deepest, and hottest HDR reservoir. Over the past two decades, HDR systems have also been developed in a number of other countries. However, HDR reservoirs to date have always been created as part of research and development programs aimed at understanding the fundamentals of HDR technology. The time has come to begin planning the construction of a commercial-scale facility which will show the world that HDR can be a practical source of power. The second domestic HDR facility should demonstrate that commercial production of energy from HDR is feasible at a variety of locations. Day-today operating data should provide the cost figures needed in order to unambiguously design and build future commercial HDR power production plants. Successful construction and operation of the second HDR plant will both supply needed electric power at competitive costs and set the stage for the widespread application of HDR technology both domestically and throughout the world. If preliminary work is begun promptly, it should be possible to develop a fully operational second site by 1997. The Clearlake region of northern California may be an ideal area in which to locate the second HDR site.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program, Status Report: Foreign Research on Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) research outside the United States. The term ''enhanced geothermal systems'' refers to the use of advanced technology to extract heat energy from underground in areas with higher than average heat flow but where the natural permeability or fluid content is limited. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from low permeability hydrothermal to hot dry rock.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evidence for the existence of a stable, highly fluidized-pressurized region of deep, jointed crystalline rock from Fenton Hill hot dry rock test data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated several times at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Fenton Hill hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal test site, that large volumes of naturally jointed Precambrian crystalline rock can be stably maintained at pressures considerably above the least principal earth stress in the surrounding rock mass. In particular, for the deeper, larger, and tighter of the two HDR reservoirs tested at this site in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico, testing was carried out for a cumulative period of 11 months without evidence of fracture extension at the boundaries of the pressure-stimulated region, even though a very high reservoir inlet circulating pressure of 27.3 MPa (3960 psi) above hydrostatic was maintained throughout the testing, considerably in excess of the least principal stress in the surrounding rock mass of about 10 MPa above hydrostatic at a depth of 3500 m. The author reviews and summarizes information concerning the earth stresses at depth and the test data relative to the containment of pressurized fluid, particularly the data showing the declining rate of water loss and the absence of microseismicity--the two principal indicators of a stable, pressurized reservoir region. The author then provides a coherent and concise evaluation of this and other evidence supporting his assertion that one can indeed maintain large volumes of jointed rock at pressures considerably in excess of the least principal earth stress. In addition, a discussion is presented concerning the initial state of stress at depth beneath Fenton Hill and then possible changes to the stress state resulting from the very large volumes of injected high-pressure water and the accompanying shear displacements--and shear dilation--associated with these pressurizations.

Brown, D.W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following research areas: a synthesis of seismic experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot-Dry-Rock System; attenuation of high-frequency shear waves in the lithosphere; a new kinematic source model for deep volcanic tremors; ground motion in the near-field of a fluid-driven crack and its interpretation in the study of shallow volcanic tremor; low-velocity bodies under geothermal areas; and operation of event recorders in Mt. St. Helens and Newberry Peak with preliminary results from them. (MHR)

Aki, K.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Rock Mechanics and Enhanced Geothermal Systems: A DOE-sponsored Workshop to Explore Research Needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop on rock mechanics and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) was held in Cambridge, Mass., on June 20-21 2003, before the Soil and Rock America 2003 International Conference at MIT. Its purpose was to bring together experts in the field of rock mechanics and geothermal systems to encourage innovative thinking, explore new ideas, and identify research needs in the areas of rock mechanics and rock engineering applied to enhanced geothermal systems. The agenda is shown in Appendix A. The workshop included experts in the fields of rock mechanics and engineering, geological engineering, geophysics, drilling, the geothermal energy production from industry, universities and government agencies, and laboratories. The list of participants is shown is Appendix B. The first day consisted of formal presentations. These are summarized in Chapter 1 of the report. By the end of the first day, two broad topic areas were defined: reservoir characterization and reservoir performance. Working groups were formed for each topic. They met and reported in plenary on the second day. The working group summaries are described in Chapter 2. The final session of the workshop was devoted to reaching consensus recommendations. These recommendations are given in Chapter 3. That objective was achieved. All the working group recommendations were considered and, in order to arrive at a practical research agenda usable by the workshop sponsors, workshop recommendations were reduced to a total of seven topics. These topics were divided in three priority groups, as follows. First-priority research topics (2): {sm_bullet} Define the pre-existing and time-dependent geometry and physical characteristics of the reservoir and its fracture network. That includes the identification of hydraulically controlling fractures. {sm_bullet} Characterize the physical and chemical processes affecting the reservoir geophysical parameters and influencing the transport properties of fractures. Incorporate those processes in reservoir simulators. Second-priority research topics (4): {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced fracture detection geophysical methods, such as 3-D surface seismics, borehole seismics, and imaging using earthquake data. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced stress measurement techniques, such as borehole breakout analysis, tilt-meters, and earthquake focal mechanism analysis. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test high-temperature down-hole tools for short-term and long-term diagnostics, such as borehole imaging, geophone arrays, packers, and electrical tools.

Francois Heuze; Peter Smeallie; Derek Elsworth; Joel L. Renner

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hot dry rock reservoir characterization and modeling. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Resuls of analytical and experimental studies on hydraulic fracturing and on the characterization and modeling of hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoirs are presented. The first four Chapters are concerned with problems of thermal cracking and heat transfer, with fluid flow through large cracks, and with the stable and unstable growth of water-filled cracks under internal pressure and thermal loading. Experiments are reported, which present visually observable hydraulic fractures in transparent materials to demonstrate the interaction between hydraulic fractures and the development of thermal cracks. Seismic detection of hydraulic fractures is discussed, and a method to invert crack-scattering data is presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the six chapters.

Achenbach, J.D.; Bazant, Z.P.; Dundurs, J.; Keer, L.M.; Nemat-Nasser, S.; Mura, T.; Weertman, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

Dry hot rock in the Earth's crust represents the largest and most broadly distributed reservoir of usable energy accessible to man. The engineering equipment and methods required to extract and use this energy appear to exist and are now being investigated actively at LASL. At least for deep systems in relatively impermeable rock, not close to active faults, the extraction of energy frtom dry geothermal resertvoirs should involve no significant environmental hazards. The principal environmental effects of such energy systems will be those associated with the surface facilities that use the geothermal heat; these will be visual, in land use, and in the thermal-pollution potential of low-temperature power plants. The energy extraction system itself should be clean; safe, unobtrusive, and economical. (auth)

Smith, M.C.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Preliminary measurements of the thermal conductivity of rocks from LASL geothermal test holes GT-1 and GT-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conductivities on a number of dry rocks have been measured in an air environment. These experimental values are probably about 10 percent lower than the in situ values. Initial attempts to prepare ''wet'' rock samples (rocks saturated with water) have so far resulted in only ''damp'' rocks. Considerable effort will be required to characterize the crack system in ''solid'' rocks and to predict the probable conductivity values for in situ conditions.

Sibbitt, W.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The origin of high-temperature zones in vapor-dominated geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vapor-dominated geothermal systems are proposed to originate by downward extension (by the ''heat pipe'' mechanism) into hot dry fractured rock above a large cooling igneous intrusion. High temperature zones found by drilling are shallow parts of the original hot dry rock where the penetration of the vapor reservoir was limited, and hot dry rock may extend under much of these reservoirs. An earlier hot water geothermal system may have formed during an early phase of the heating episode.

Truesdell, Alfred H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hot dry rock energy extraction field test: 75 days of operation of a prototype reservoir at Fenton Hill, Segment 2 of Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from the first extensive field test of a man-made hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir in low permeability crystalline rock are presented. A reservoir with a small heat transfer area was utilized to study the characteristics of a prototype HDR system over a shortened lifetime. The resulting accelerated thermal drawdown was modeled to yield an effective area of 8000 m/sup 2/. In addition to the thermal effects, this test provided an opportunity to examine equipment operation, water permeation into the formation, geochemical interaction between the circulating fluid and the rock and flow characteristics including impedance and residence time distributions. Continuous monitoring for induced seismic effects showed that no activity to a Richter threshold of -1.0 was detected during the 75-day experiment.

Tester, J.W.; Albright, J.N. (eds.)

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

217

Floating dry cooling: a competitive alternative to evaporative cooling in a binary cycle geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the floating cooling concept to non-evaporative and evaporative atmospheric heat rejection systems was studied as a method of improving the performance of geothermal powerplants operating upon medium temperature hydrothermal resources. The LBL thermodynamic process computer code GEOTHM is used in the case study of a 50 MWe isobutane binary cycle power plant at Heber, California. It is shown that operating a fixed capacity plant in the floating cooling mode can generate significantly more electrical energy at a higher thermodynamic efficiency and reduced but bar cost for approximately the same capital investment. Floating cooling is shown to benefit a plant which is dry cooled to an even greater extent than the same plant operating with an evaporative heat rejection system. Results of the Heber case study indicate that a dry floating cooling geothermal binary cycle plant can produce energy at a bus bar cost which is competitive with the cost of energy associated with evaporatively cooled systems.

Pines, H.S.; Green, M.A.; Pope, W.L.; Doyle, P.A.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Electrical properties of geothermal reservoir rocks as indicators of porosity distribution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the electrical resistivity of metashales from borehole SB-15-D in The Geyers geothermal area at a variety of conditions in the laboratory provide information regarding the distribution of porosity as interpreted from observations of boiling as downstream pore pressure. Electrical resistivity measurements on core,with and without pore pressure control, to confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150 C allow assessment of the separate and combined effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature for rocks from this borehole.

Duba, A.; Roberts, J.; Bonner, B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Modeling Fluid Flow and Electrical Resistivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase change of pore fluid (boiling/condensing) in rock cores under conditions representative of geothermal reservoirs results in alterations of the electrical resistivity of the samples. In fractured samples, phase change can result in resistivity changes that are more than an order of magnitude greater than those measured in intact samples. These results suggest that electrical resistivity monitoring may provide a useful tool for monitoring the movement of water and steam within fractured geothermal reservoirs. We measured the electrical resistivity of cores of welded tuff containing fractures of various geometries to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. We then used the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) (Nitao, 1998) to simulate the propagation of boiling fronts through the samples. The simulated saturation profiles combined with previously reported measurements of resistivity-saturation curves allow us to estimate the evolution of the sample resistivity as the boiling front propagates into the rock matrix. These simulations provide qualitative agreement with experimental measurements suggesting that our modeling approach may be used to estimate resistivity changes induced by boiling in more complex systems.

Detwiler, R L; Roberts, J J; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electrical Resistivity as an Indicator of Saturation in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir Rocks: Experimental Data and Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrical resistivity of rock cores under conditions representative of geothermal reservoirs is strongly influenced by the state and phase (liquid/vapor) of the pore fluid. In fractured samples, phase change (vaporization/condensation) can result in resistivity changes that are more than an order of magnitude greater than those measured in intact samples. These results suggest that electrical resistivity monitoring of geothermal reservoirs may provide a useful tool for remotely detecting the movement of water and steam within fractures, the development and evolution of fracture systems and the formation of steam caps. We measured the electrical resistivity of cores of welded tuff containing fractures of various geometries to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction from the matrix. We then used the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) (Nitao, 1998) to simulate the propagation of boiling fronts through the samples. The simulated saturation profiles combined with previously reported measurements of resistivity-saturation curves allow us to estimate the evolution of the sample resistivity as the boiling front propagates into the rock matrix. These simulations provide qualitative agreement with experimental measurements suggesting that our modeling approach may be used to estimate resistivity changes induced by boiling in more complex systems.

Detwiler, R L; Roberts, J J

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermal gradient map of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geothermal gradient map is needed in order to determine the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource of the United States. Based on published and unpublished data (including new measurements) the HDR program will produce updated gradient maps annually, to be used as a tool for resource evaluation and exploration. The 1980 version of this map is presented.

Kron, A.; Heiken, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Next stages in HDR technology development. [Hot Dry Rock (HDR)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty years of research and development have brought HDR heat mining technology from the purely conceptual stage to the establishment of an engineering-scale heat mine at Fenton Hill, NM. In April 1992, a long-term flow test (LTFT) of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill was begun. The test was carried out under steady-state conditions on a continuous basis for four months, but a major equipment failure in late July forced a temporary suspension of operations. Even this short test provided valuable information and extremely encouraging results as summarized below: There was no indication of thermal drawdown of the reservoir. There was evidence of increasing access to hot rock with time. Water consumption was in the rangki of 10--12%. Measured pumping costs were $0.003 per kilowatt of energy produced. Temperature logs conducted in the reservoir production zone during and after the flow test confirmed the fact that there was no decline in the average temperature of the fluid being produced from the reservoir. In fact, tracer testing showed that the fluid was taking more indirect pathways and thus contacting a greater amount of hot rock as the test progressed. Water usage quickly dropped to a level of 10--15 gallons per minute, an amount equivalent to about 10--12% of the injected fluid volume. At a conversion rate of 10--15%, these would translate to effective fuel costs'' of 2--3[cents] per kilowatt hour of electricity production potential. The completion of the LTFT will set the stage for commercialization of HDR but will not bring HDR technology to maturity. Relatively samples extensions of the current technology may bring significant improvements in efficiency, and these should be rapidly investigated. In the longer run, advanced operational concepts could further improve the efficiency of HDR energy extraction and may even offer the possibility of cogeneration schemes which solve both energy and water problems throughout the world.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks I.N. Bindeman a,n , C.C. Lundstrom b , C. Bopp b , F. Huang b,c a Department of Geological Sciences, 1272 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA b Department of Geology, University of Illinois

Bindeman, Ilya N.

226

Quantitative model of vapor dominated geothermal reservoirs as heat pipes in fractured porous rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a numerical model of vapor-dominated reservoirs which is based on the well-known conceptual model of White, Muffler, and Truesdell. Computer simulations show that upon heat recharge at the base, a single phase liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir in fractured rock with low matrix permeability will evolve into a two-phase reservoir with B.P.D. (boiling point-for-depth) pressure and temperature profiles. A rather limited discharge event through cracks in the caprock, involving loss of only a few percent of fluids in place, is sufficient to set the system off to evolve a vapor-dominated state. The attributes of this state are discussed, and some features requiring further clarification are identified. 26 refs., 5 figs.

Pruess, K.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Advanced geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the US Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was producing 10 MW thermal - and still climbing - proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction has been demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive. Noteworthy among these technological advances are techniques in computer simulation of geothermal reservoirs, new means for well stimulation, new high-temperature logging tools and packers, new hard-rock penetration techniques, and new methods for mapping fracture flow paths across large underground areas in reservoirs. In addition, many of these same technological advances can be applied by the petroleum industry to help lower production costs in domestic oil and gas fields. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Whetten, J.T.; Murphy, H.D.; Hanold, R.J.; Myers, C.W.; Dunn, J.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sizing of a hot dry rock reservoir from a hydraulic fracturing experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs do not lend themselves to the standard methods of reservoir sizing developed in the petroleum industry such as the buildup/drawdown test. In a HDR reservoir the reservoir is created by the injection of fluid. This process of hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock usually involves injection of a large volume (5 million gallons) at high rates (40BPM). A methodology is presented for sizing the HDR reservoir created during the hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir created during a recent fracturing experiment is sized using the techniques presented. This reservoir is then investigated for commercial potential by simulation of long term power production. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Zyvoloski, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Candidate sites for future hot-dry-rock development in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Generalized geologic and other data are tabulated for 24 potential hot dry rock (HDR) sites in the contiguous United States. The data show that HDR resources occur in many geologic and tectonic settings. Potential reservoir rocks at each prospect are described and each system is cateogrized accoridng to inferred heat sources. The Fenton Hill area in New Mexico is discussed in detail because this region may be considered ideal for HDR development. Three other prospectively valuable localities are described: The Geysers-Clear lake region in California, the Roosevelt Hot Springs area in Utah, and the White Mountains region in New Hampshire. These areas are singled out to illustrate the roles of significantly different geology and geophysics, reservoir rocks, and reservoir heat contents in possible HDR developments.

Goff, F.; Decker, E.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geothermal well completions: an overview of existing methods in four types of developments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing practices and capabilities for completing producing and injection wells for geothermal application in each of four categories of geothermal environments are discussed. Included are steam wells in hard, fractured rocks (The Geysers, California), hot water wells in sedimentary formations (Imperial Valley, California), hot, dry impermeable rocks with circulating water systems (Valles Caldera, New Mexico), and geopressured, geothermal water wells with associated hydrocarbon production on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

Snyder, R.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

An estimate of the cost of electricity production from hot-dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives an estimate of the cost to produce electricity from hot-dry rock (HDR). Employment of the energy in HDR for the production of electricity requires drilling multiple wells from the surface to the hot rock, connecting the wells through hydraulic fracturing, and then circulating water through the fracture system to extract heat from the rock. The basic HDR system modeled in this paper consists of an injection well, two production wells, the fracture system (or HDR reservoir), and a binary power plant. Water is pumped into the reservoir through the injection well where it is heated and then recovered through the production wells. Upon recovery, the hot water is pumped through a heat exchanger transferring heat to the binary, or working, fluid in the power plant. The power plant is a net 5.1-MW[sub e] binary plant employing dry cooling. Make-up water is supplied by a local well. In this paper, the cost of producing electricity with the basic system is estimated as the sum of the costs of the individual parts. The effects on cost of variations to certain assumptions, as well as the sensitivity of costs to different aspects of the basic system, are also investigated.

Pierce, K.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Overview of the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market - The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This overview at the Geothermal Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market'' by John E. Mock; ''Geothermal Energy Market in Southern California: Past, Present and Future'' by Vikram Budraja; ''Taking the High Ground: Geothermal's Place in the Revolving Energy Market'' by Richard Jaros; ''Recent Developments in Japan's Hot Dry Rock Program'' by Tsutomu Yamaguchi; and ''Options in the Eleventh Year for Interim Standard Offer Number Four Contracts'' by Thomas C. Hinrichs.

Mock, John E.; Budraja, Vikram; Jaros, Richard; Yamaguchi, Tsutomu; Hinrichs, Thomas C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fracture Mapping in the Soultz-sous-Forets Geothermal Field from Microearthquake Relocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2003, a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment was carried out at the European Geothermal Hot Dry Rock site at Soultz-sous-Forts, France. The two week injection of water generated a high level of microseismic activity. ...

Michelet, Sophie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Strength and ductility of four dry igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy extraction from magma requires stable boreholes at relatively shallow depths (< 10 km) in rocks at temperatures of the order of 1000/sup 0/C. Accordingly, the failure strengths, strains at failure, and associated deformation mechanisms of room-dry andesite, besalt, granodiorite, and obsidian are determined at temperatures to partial melting (> 1050/sup 0/C), at confining pressures of 0 and 50 MPa, and strain rate of 10/sup -4//s. The strength reductions of the crystalline rocks are more or less linear until they steepen suddenly with approach to melting. When that occurs, strengths vanish and deformations become quasiviscous. The obsidian is stronger than the crystalline rocks to 600/sup 0/C where glass softening begins and strength goes to zero at 800/sup 0/C. All rocks are brittle throughout the entire temperature range until melting or softening occurs. Shortenings at failure are 3 percent or less. The crystalline rocks tend to deform primarily by precursive microscopic extension fracturing and its coalescence into macroscopic faults. The abundance of load-induced fractures remains about constant, but thermal cracking increases with increasing temperature. Results from tests at 25/sup 0/C on specimens that previously had been heated to 900-1000/sup 0/C clearly show that the weakening of unconfined specimens is due to the thermal cracking. Weakening of confined specimens, however, probably is due to an inherent temperature effect on the load-induced fracturing process. Comparisons of instantaneous failure-strengths with stresses likely ot occur at the walls of boreholes show that a hole as deep as 10 km in impermeable crystalline rock is not likely to fail under short-time loading even at 1000/sup 0/C, unless the maximum in-situ horizontal stress is greater than or equal to vetical stress and the hole is open (i.e., borehole pressure is zero). 27 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

SciTech Connect

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Results from a discrete fracture network model of a Hot Dry Rock system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described represents a move towards better representations of the natural fracture system. The discrete fracture network model used during the study was the NAPSAC code (Grindrod et al, 1992). The goals of the work were to investigate the application of discrete fracture network models to Hot Dry Rock systems, increase the understanding of the basic thermal extraction process and more specifically the understanding of the Rosemanowes Phase 2B system. The aim in applying the work to the Rosemanowes site was to use the discrete fracture network approach to integrate a diverse set of field measurements into as simple a model as possible.

Lanyon, G.W.; Batchelor, A.S.; Ledingham, P.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

Inert and Reacting Tracers for Reservoir Sizing in Fractured, Hot Dry Rock Systems  

SciTech Connect

Flow characterization and volumetric sizing techniques using tracers in fractured hot dry rock reservoirs are discussed. Statistical methods for analyzing the residence time distribution (RTD) are presented. Tracer modal volumes and RTD shape are correlated with reservoir performance parameters such as active heat transfer area and dispersion levels. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed for mapping advance rates of cooled regions in HDR reservoirs, providing early warning of thermal drawdown. Important reaction rate parameters are identified for screening potential tracers. Current laboratory research and field work is reviewed.

Tester, J.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Ferguson, J.H.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

239

Borehole survey instrumentation development for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The creation and subsequent study of hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs requires sophisticated tools and instruments that can function for relatively long periods of time in the hostile downhole environment. Detection of fracture dimensions and orientation of the geothermal reservoir is critical for the successful completion of the hot dry rock energy extraction system. The development of downhole instrumentation capable of characterizing the hydraulic-fracture systems must emphasize reliability of measuring devices and electro-mechanical components to function properly at borehole temperature exceeding 275/sup 0/C and pressures of 69 MPa (10,000 psi).

Dennis, B.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooper Basin, Australia. Geothermal Resources Council Trans.a hot fractured rock geothermal project. Engineering Geologyseismicity in The Geysers geothermal area, California. J.

Majer, Ernest L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Economic evaluation of four types of dry/wet cooling applied to the 5-MWe Raft River geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cost study is described which compared the economics of four dry/wet cooling systems to use at the existing Raft River Geothermal Plant. The results apply only at this site and should not be generalized without due consideration of the complete geothermal cycle. These systems are: the Binary Cooling Tower, evaporative condenser, Combin-aire, and a metal fin-tube dry cooling tower with deluge augmentation. The systems were evaluated using cooled, treated geothermal fluid instead of ground or surface water in the cooling loops. All comparisons were performed on the basis of a common plant site - the Raft River 5 MWe geothermal plant in Idaho. The Binary Cooling Tower and the Combin-aire cooling system were designed assuming the use of the isobutane/water surface condenser currently installed at the Raft River Plant. The other two systems had the isobutane ducted to the evaporative condensers. Capital credit was not given to the system employing the direct condensing process. The cost of the systems were estimated from designs provided by the vendors. The levelized energy cost range for each cooling system is listed below. The levelized energy cost reflects the incremental cost of the cooling system for the life of the plant. The estimates are presented in 1981 dollars.

Bamberger, J.A.; Allemann, R.T.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Geothermal Energy Program overview  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems, paper presentedin the Deep Reservoir of the Mt. Amiata Geothermal Field,Italy, Transactions, Geothermal Resources Council, 31, 153-

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geothermal Literature Review At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goff & Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=511314"

245

Exploration methods for hot dry rock. Report of the panel held June 22, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geological and geophysical characteristics of hot dry rock (HDR) necessary for an effective exploration program were discussed. The type of HDR project discussed, that being developed by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), would utilize hydraulic fracturing to develop a large surface area in rock of low permeability, 10/sup -6/ darcys, and at temperatures greater than 200/sup 0/C. A better definition of the thermal regime in the crust and mantle at reconnaissance (hundreds to tens of kilometers) and exploration (tens of kilometers to 1 km) scales is needed. Geophysical methods capable of deep investigation would be used with the near-surface geologic information to extrapolate conditions at the depth of interest. Detection of HDR per se may be difficult because the contrast in physical properties of HDR and other rock is not always unambiguous, but boundaries between rock environments can be delineated. When patterns and coincidence of various types of geophysical anomalies and geologic maps are used, the probability of the detection of HDR is greatly increased, especially when a consistent picture is described. Various geophysical methods are required to detect these anomalies: (a) electromagnetic techniques can map deep electrically conductive structures, which to some extent can be used to infer isotherms. (b) Bouguer gravity maps corrected for regional topography are found to correlate with large silicic intrusive bodies, which are often associated with high heat flow. (c) isotherms and open crack systems at depth can be inferred from seismic wave attenuations, dispersions, and delay times. (d) heat flow measurements are useful as a primary tool and as a check on the results of other methods. Abstracts for individual presentations by the twelve panel members are included. 111 references.

West, F.G.; Shankland, T.J. (comps.)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Use of low-quality geothermal heat in grain drying and related agricultural applications. Quarterly report, January 4, 1977-April 4, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State profiles of geothermal area crop acreage, production, dollar value, and drying energy were begun. Technical feasibility analyses were done for four geothermally augmented, natural gas alfalfa dryers, a steam-tube predryer design, and an all-geothermal conveyor dryer; costing is underway. Details of a geothermal conveyor-type alfalfa dryer in New Zealand were obtained. A computer simulation of rotary drum dehydration was acquired and extensively modified for use in determining operating parameters and performance for low-temperature geothermal alfalfa dryers. The most important nutrients in alfalfa from a market standpoint were determined and experimental results assessed showing the changes nutrients undergo in conventional drying; indications are that low-temperature drying will yield an acceptable product. Innovative techniques for alfalfa processing were identified for potential geothermal application. Markets, institutional characteristics, and the outlook for growth in the dehydrated alfalfa industry were examined, and a list of existing plants near geothermal resources was compiled. Only three plants were close enough to permit geothermal retrofitting; two plants, at El Centro, California, and Twin Falls, Idaho, are the subject of site-specific studies in which detailed costs and siting options are to be analyzed.

Gordon, T.J.; Wright, T.C.; Fein, E.; Munson, T.R.; Richmond, R.C.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Geothermal Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Basics Resource Basics Geothermal Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are located in the west, where the geothermal resource base is concentrated. Current drilling technology limits the development of geothermal resources to relatively shallow water- or steam-filled reservoirs, most of which are found in the western part of the United States. But researchers are developing new technologies for capturing the heat in deeper, "dry" rocks, which would support drilling almost anywhere. Geothermal Resources Map This map shows the distribution of geothermal resources across the United States. If you have trouble accessing this information because of a

250

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Mean br Capacity Mean br Reservoir br Temp Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics Mesozoic granite granodiorite MW K Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics triassic metasedimentary MW K Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone

251

Geothermal reservoir categorization and stimulation study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyses of the fraction of geothermal wells that are dry (dry-hole fraction) indicate that geothermal reservoirs can be fitted into four basic categories: (i) Quaternary to late Tertiary sediments (almost no dry holes); (ii) Quaternary to late Tertiary extrusives (approximately 20 percent dry holes); (iii) Mesozoic or older metamorphic rocks (approximately 25-30 percent dry holes); and (iv) Precambrian or younger rocks (data limited to Roosevelt Springs where 33 percent of the wells were dry). Failure of geothermal wells to flow economically is due mainly to low-permeability formations in unfractured regions. Generally the permeability correlates inversely with the temperature-age product and directly with the original rock porosity and pore size. However, this correlation fails whenever high-stress fields provide vertical fracturing or faulting, and it is the high-stress/low-permeability category that is most amenable to artificial stimulation by hydraulic fracturing, propellant fracturing, or chemical explosive fracturing. Category (i) geothermal fields (e.g., Cerro Prieto, Mexico; Niland, CA; East Mesa, CA) are not recommended for artificial stimulation because these younger sediments almost always produce warm or hot water. Most geothermal fields fit into category (ii) (e.g., Wairakei, New Zealand; Matsukawa, Japan; Ahuachapan, El Salvador) and in the case of Mt. Home, ID, and Chandler, AZ, possess some potential for stimulation. The Geysers is a category (iii) field, and its highly stressed brittle rocks should make this site amenable to stimulation by explosive fracturing techniques. Roosevelt Springs, UT, well 9-1 is in category (iv) and is a flow failure. It represents a prime candidate for stimulation by hydraulic fracturing because it has a measured temperature of 227/sup 0/C, is cased and available for experimentation, and is within 900 m of an excellent geothermal producing well.

Overton, H.L.; Hanold, R.J.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Geothermal Energy Contract List: Fiscal Year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the lead federal role in the research and development (R D) of technologies that will assist industry in economically exploiting the nation's vast geothermal resources. The Geothermal Energy R D Program represents a comprehensive, balanced approach to establishing all forms of geothermal energy as significant contributors to the nation's energy supply. The program is structured both to maintain momentum in the growth of the existing hydrothermal industry and to develop long-term options offering the greatest promise for practical applications. The Geothermal Energy Contract List, Fiscal Year 1990 is a tabulation of geothermal R D contracts that were begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990). The R D activities are performed by national laboratories or industrial, academic, and nonprofit research institutions. The contract list is organized in accordance with the Geothermal Division R D work breakdown structure. The structure hierarchy consists of Resource Category (hydrothermal, geopressured-geothermal, hot dry rock, and magma energy), Project (hard rock penetration, reservoir technology, etc.), and Task (lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, etc.). For each contract, the contractor, the FY 1990 funding, and a brief description of the milestones planned for FY 1991 are provided.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

The National Energy Strategy - The role of geothermal technology development: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. Topics in this year's conference included Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology, Hydrothermal Reservoir Technology, Hydrothermal Hard Rock Penetration Technology, Hot Dry Rock Technology, Geopressured-Geothermal Technology and Magma Energy Technology. Each individual paper has been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The National Energy Strategy - The role of geothermal technology development: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. Topics in this year's conference included Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology, Hydrothermal Reservoir Technology, Hydrothermal Hard Rock Penetration Technology, Hot Dry Rock Technology, Geopressured-Geothermal Technology and Magma Energy Technology. Each individual paper has been cataloged separately.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1977--August 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New seismological methods were developed for determining the structure of a geothermal energy source region by the use of data from both active and passive experiments. Technical papers were published on four topics, namely: a field experiment at Kilauea Iki, source models of volcanic tremors, microearthquake source spectra, and a numerical study of elastic wave diffraction by fluid-filled cracks. In addition, papers were submitted for publication on a statistical synthesis of source mechanism of seismic events in Kilauea Iki and the observation of a temporal variation in the attenuation of earthquake coda in central California. The following subjects were worked on: (1) interpretation of seismic data from the LASL Hot Dry Rock system; (2) analyisis of volcanic tremor data from the U.S.G.S. Hawaiian seismic network; (3) frequency dependence and three-dimensional distribution of seismic attenuation in central Japan; (4) experimental study of seismic scattering by a penny-shaped crack; (5) development of a microprocessor system for the treatment of the data from digital event recorders.

Aki, K.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in EnhancedGeothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO{sub 2} will achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO{sub 2} are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO{sub 2}. Our numerical simulations of chemically reactive transport show a combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects in the peripheral zone of the systems. These could impact reservoir growth and longevity, with important ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO{sub 2} loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and geologic storage of CO{sub 2}.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

260

Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Groundwater Sampling Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Groundwater_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689261"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689258

262

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Injectivity_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511318

263

Seismic signal location program for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's dry hot rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During hydraulic fracturing, seismic signals produced as the fracture grows may be used to determine orientation, size, and shape of the fracture. This seismic signal location program has been written to utilize such signals, along with an experimentally determined seismic velocity model to help determine the fracture orientation, size, and shape.

Kintzinger, P.R.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. Transient Shut-in Pressure Profiles for the Injection and Production Wells. Conversely, when. During this entire period of cyclic production, the pressure at the injection well was maintained experience. The control system on the injection well worked adequately until the 4-hour pulsed flow period

265

A discrete fracture model for a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modeling results are presented for the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir using a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. Fluid flow and tracer response data are simulated using a fracture flow model in which the fracture apertures are string functions of pressure. The model is used to match the available steady state data of pressure drop versus flow rate and the tracer data. Various schemes for improving reservoir performance, such as high backpressure, chemical etching, stimulation using a viscous fluid, and the drilling of a second production wellbore, are then examined. 15 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Robinson, B.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Potential of Hot-Dry-Rock Geothermal Energy in the Eastern United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is subtitled, ''A report to the United States Congress under Section 2502 of Public Law 102-486 (The Energy Policy Act of 1992)''. It documents a workshop held by the U.S.G.S. (in Philadelphia, January 1993) as required by EPACT 1992. The workshop concluded that under present (1993) economic and technological constraints, mining heat for power electrical power generation is not feasible in the eastern United States. The main issues are the costs of drilling very deep wells and the general applicability of hydrofracturing technology to compressional stress field typical of the eastern U.S. (DJE-2005)

None

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development project: cablehead assembly. Equipment development report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development, design, and service history of a multiconductor cablehead capable of operation at 275/sup 0/C and 103 MPa (15,000 psi) are discussed. This high-temperature cablehead has been in service for about 18 months; conclusions drawn from this test period are summarized.

Archuleta, J.R.; Todd, B.E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Geology, drill holes, and geothermal energy potential of the basal Cambrian rock units of the Appalachian Basin of New York State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The published geologic and geophysical records plus data gathered from deep wells during hydrocarbon exploration were inventoried, discussed and summarized to evaluate hydro-geothermal energy potential in the western counties of New York, south of the 42/sup 0/ latitude. An assessment is provided of local geothermal energy potential based on these data. The assessed potential is a function of the geothermal gradient, the depth of porous Cambrian age sedimentary units and a variety of features thought to be related to deep fracturing and hence enhanced porosity and permeability. The completion history of a selected set of plugged and abandoned deep wells was examined to determine the feasibility and advisability of re-entering these holes for geothermal development. All wells showed extensive cement plugging and uncertain materials introduced for bridging. It was recommended that no attempt be made to re-enter these wells. The hydro-geothermal energy potential in Western New York State is largely comparable to that of other regions possessing porous/permeable units of sedimentary rock at sufficient depth to contain formation waters of useful temperatures (>140/sup 0/F). A comparison of geothermal reservoirs in New York to similar sites now under development in Canada and France has revealed that potential resources in New York State are slightly hotter, though somewhat thicker and less permeable with significantly higher proportions of dissolved constituents.

Pferd, J.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Use of scale models to determine thermo-hydromechanics of hot-dry-rock reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study reported here had as its main objective a determination of the feasibility of physical scale models as a way to confirm mathematical models and to explore fundamental behavior of hydraulically-fractured hot dry rock reservoirs. Included in the study are: similitude analyses, based on full-scale data, simplified mathematical models, and physical reasoning, formulation of scaling laws from the similitude analyses, preliminary determination of the processes and phenomena that can be reliably studied in scale model tests, and recommended test program to implement the results of the study. Many of the major studies conducted in hot dry rock reservoir engineering were reviewed and evaluated in the course of meeting the objectives of this study.

Dodge, F.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511285

271

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Potential for crop drying with geothermal hot water resources in the western United States: alfalfa, a case study. Report 305-100-02  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results of engineering, economic, and geographic analysis of the use of low-temperature geothermal heat for the commercial drying of grains, grasses, fruits, vegetables and livestock products in the United States are reported. Alfalfa (lucerne) dehydration was chosen for detailed process and cost study. Six different geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A conveyor type that could utilize geothermal hot water for its entire heat requirement proved to be the most economical. A capital cost estimate for an all-geothermal alfalfa dehydration plant near the Heber Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Imperial Valley, California was prepared. The combined cost for heat exchangers and dryer is about $1.6 million. Output is about 11 metric tons per hour. Acreage, production and dollar value data for 22 dryable crops were compiled for the areas surrounding identified hydrothermal resources in 11 western states. The potential magnitude of fossil fuel use that could be replaced by geothermal heat for drying these crops will be estimated.

Wright, T.C.

1977-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

274

Geothermal development plan: Yuma County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yuma County Area Development Plan evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F), and in addition, two areas are inferred to contain geothermal resources with intermediate (90/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C, 194/sup 0/F to 300/sup 0/F) temperature potential. The resource areas are isolated, although one resource area is located near Yuma, Arizona. One resource site is inferred to contain a hot dry rock resource. Anticipated population growth in the county is expected to be 2 percent per year over the next 40 years. The primary employment sector is agriculture, though some light industry is located in the county. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support future growth without advese affect on agriculture. Six firms were found in Yuma County which may be able to utilize geothermal energy for process heat needs. In addition, several agricultural processors were found, concentrated in citrus processing and livestock raising. Geothermal energy utilization projections suggest that by the year 2000, geothermal energy may economically provide the energy equivalent of 53,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector if developed privately. Geothermal utilization projections increase to 132,000 barrels of oil per year by 2000 if a municipal utility developed the resource.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

S-cubed geothermal technology and experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries of ten research projects are presented. They include: equations describing various geothermal systems, geohydrological environmental effects of geothermal power production, simulation of linear bench-scale experiments, simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin, geopressured geothermal reservoir simulator, user-oriented geothermal reservoir simulator, geothermal well test analyses, geothermal seismic exploration, high resolution seismic mapping of a geothermal reservoir, experimental evaluation of geothermal well logging cables, and list of publications. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

277

Geothermal Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to assist the physicist, chemist, engineer, and geologist engaged in discovering and developing geothermal energy resources. This first section contains a glossary of the approximately 500 most frequently occurring geological, physical, and engineering terms, chosen from the geothermal literature. Sections 2 through 8 are fact sheets that discuss such subjects as geothermal gradients, rock classification, and geological time scales. Section 9 contains conversion tables for the physical quantities of interest for energy research in general and for geothermal research in particular.

Leffel, C.S., Jr.; Eisenberg, R.A.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A two-dimensional numerical model of coupled fluid flow, heat transfer and rock mechanics in naturally fractured rock is developed. The model is applicable to assessments of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir characterisation experiments, and to the study of hydraulic stimulations and the heat extraction potential of HDR reservoirs. Modelling assumptions are based on the characteristics of the experimental HDR reservoir in the Carnmenellis granite in Cornwall, S. W. England. In

279

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Laboratory investigation of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Laboratory investigation of steam adsorption in geothermal reservoir rocks Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic...

280

Fractured geothermal reservoir growth induced by heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field testing of a hydraulically-stimulated, hot dry rock geothermal system at the Fenton Hill site in northern New Mexico has indicated that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for documenting the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area that were observed during energy extraction operations which caused substantial thermal drawdown in portions of the reservoir. These temporal increases suggest that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock systems may be possible.

Tester, J.W.; Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Robinson, B.A.; Potter, R.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Geothermal Division Multiyear Plan FY 1992-1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This administrative report of the Department of Energy is dated December 21, 1990. It is marked ''DRAFT'' as were many of this type of report, most of which were never made ''Final''. It provides contextual elements for program planning, and covers research on Hydrothermal, Geopressured Geothermal, Hot Dry Rock, and Magma Energy systems. (DJE 2005)

None

1990-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Support services relating to geothermal programs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities designed to assist in the assessment of processes through which geopressured methane production and geopressure-geothermal power can be increased are discussed. Progress is reported on the following: general support, hot-dry-rock review, R and D plan, and the Edna Delcambre final report. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Interagency Geothermal Coordinating Council. Fifth annual report, FY 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highlights of significant accomplishments for the Federal program are given as follows: leasing of Federal lands; resource identification, assessment, and exploration; hydrothermal industrialization; hydrothermal technology development; geopressured resources; hot dry rock resources; geosciences research; environment, Federal use of geothermal energy, international activities, program coordination, and state government activities.

Not Available

1982-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: Monitoring EGS-Related Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews technologies that could be applicable to Enhanced Geothermal Systems development. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from hydrothermal to hot dry rock. We monitored recent and ongoing research, as reported in the technical literature, that would be useful in expanding current and future geothermal fields. The literature review was supplemented by input obtained through contacts with researchers throughout the United States. Technologies are emerging that have exceptional promise for finding fractures in nonhomogeneous rock, especially during and after episodes of stimulation to enhance natural permeability.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel; Carwile, Clifton

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Investigation of the geothermal potential of the UK. A preliminary assessment. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologically, Britain is an extremely stable area without active volcanism. In this situation the development of geothermal resources depends upon the occurrence of permeable rocks in deep sedimentary basins or the successful development of the hot dry rock concept. The average geothermal gradient is about 25C/km, but two belts of above average heat flow extend across northern and south-western England. In these areas the gradient can be 30C/km or more. The principal aquifers occur in the Mesozoic and the greatest geothermal potential is in sandstones of the Permo-Triassic where their occurrence at depth coincides with the high heat flow belts.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Geothermal energy technology: issues, R and D needs, and cooperative arrangements  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the National Research Council, through its Energy Engineering Board, formed the Committee on Geothermal Energy Technology. The committee's study addressed major issues in geothermal energy technology, made recommendations for research and development, and considered cooperative arrangements among government, industry, and universities to facilitate RandD under current severe budget constraints. The report addresses four types of geothermal energy: hydrothermal, geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. Hydrothermal systems are the only type that are now economically competitive commercially. Further technology development by the Department of Energy could make the uneconomical hydrothermal resources commercially attractive to the industry. The economics are more uncertain for the longer-term technologies for extracting energy from geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. For some sites, the cost of energy derived from geopressured and hot dry rock systems is projected within a commercially competitive range. The use of magma energy is too far in the future to make reasonable economic calculations.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geothermal energy technology: issues, R and D needs, and cooperative arrangements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1986, the National Research Council, through its Energy Engineering Board, formed the Committee on Geothermal Energy Technology. The committee's study addressed major issues in geothermal energy technology, made recommendations for research and development, and considered cooperative arrangements among government, industry, and universities to facilitate RandD under current severe budget constraints. The report addresses four types of geothermal energy: hydrothermal, geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. Hydrothermal systems are the only type that are now economically competitive commercially. Further technology development by the Department of Energy could make the uneconomical hydrothermal resources commercially attractive to the industry. The economics are more uncertain for the longer-term technologies for extracting energy from geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma systems. For some sites, the cost of energy derived from geopressured and hot dry rock systems is projected within a commercially competitive range. The use of magma energy is too far in the future to make reasonable economic calculations.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Geothermal Progress Monitor 12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the more interesting articles in this GPM are: DOE supporting research on problems at The Geysers; Long-term flow test of Hot Dry Rock system (at Fenton Hill, NM) to begin in Fiscal Year 1992; Significant milestones reached in prediction of behavior of injected fluids; Geopressured power generation experiment yields good results. A number of industry-oriented events and successes are reported, and in that regard it is noteworthy that this report comes near the end of the most active decade of geothermal power development in the U.S. There is a table of all operating U.S. geothermal power projects. The bibliography of research reports at the end of this GPM is useful. (DJE 2005)

None

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Rock failure during massive hydraulic stimulation of the Baca location geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analyses of microearthquake signals occurring during hydraulic stimulation provide an estimate of the size and location of the fractures thus produced. Studies of microearthquakes occurring during two large (> 10/sup 3/m/sup 3/) hydraulic stimulations of the hydrothermal reservoir at the Baca Location in the Jemez Mountains of northeastern New Mexico are reported. Both stimulations consisted of water, viscosity enhancer, and proppant. The microearthquake event rate was low but variable throughout most of the treatment. Rock failure as indicated by the distribution of the microearthquakes' foci appeared restricted to a nearly vertical NE striking zone. This orientation is in good agreement with the local earth stresses inferred from geological considerations. The second stimulation which occurred in a neighboring well was similar to the first except for a larger injected volume. The lateral extent of the detected fracture system was 600 m in both stimulations.

Pearson, C.; Keppler, H.; Albright, J.; Potter, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hot rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australias Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the worldrock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an ...

S. Upson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Observation Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Observation_Wells_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511330"

292

Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_Wells_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511310"

293

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Injectivity_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511316"

294

Overview of the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market - The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market  

SciTech Connect

This overview at the Geothermal Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market'' by John E. Mock; ''Geothermal Energy Market in Southern California: Past, Present and Future'' by Vikram Budraja; ''Taking the High Ground: Geothermal's Place in the Revolving Energy Market'' by Richard Jaros; ''Recent Developments in Japan's Hot Dry Rock Program'' by Tsutomu Yamaguchi; and ''Options in the Eleventh Year for Interim Standard Offer Number Four Contracts'' by Thomas C. Hinrichs.

Mock, John E.; Budraja, Vikram; Jaros, Richard; Yamaguchi, Tsutomu; Hinrichs, Thomas C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in jointed and layered rocks in geothermal fields.of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 116, 257- 278.fracturing in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir: Results

Wessling, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Research on the physical properties of geothermal reservoir rock. Quarterly report, March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A laboratory study of the P-wave velocity and electric resistivity was undertaken on Cenozoic volcanic rocks collected from the Columbia Plateau volcanic basin (C) and the Jemez volcanic field (NM). Electric resistivities of cylindrical samples saturated with 0.1 N NaCl solution were measured using a four electrode system and a 1.0 KHz frequency source. Seismic P-wave velocities were calculated from measured transit time of mechanical pulses generated and received by piezoelectric transducers. The electric resistivity of water saturated samples decreased as temperature increased to the boiling point of water. Above boiling point, resistivity increased rapidly as water changed to vapor. Resistivity is most sensitive to temperature changes between 35/sup 0/C to 65/sup 0/C. Resistivities of samples increased with decrease in saturation. The effect is more pronounced at lower temperatures. No dependence of seismic P-wave velocities on temperature was observed. Both resistivity and P-wave velocity depend on porosity. The increase in porosity results in a decrease in the resistivity formation factor. Assuming a relationship FF = a phi/sup -m/ (Archie's Law), where FF and phi represent the formation factor and porosity respectively, least squares indicate a variation of a between .5 and 2.0. The value of m varied between 1.2 to 1.7. Seismic velocities (v) decrease as porosity increases. Porosity appears to be linearly related to log v. Several samples show anomalous relationship between porosity and resistivity. Most of these samples also show anomalous seismic velocities. The majority of these samples have coarse grains or large pores. The effect of saturation on P-wave velocity is small and can be observed in few samples. In these samples, seismic velocities decrease with increase in saturation at high saturation (100% to 85%), and show a reverse relationship at low saturation. Between 15% and 85% saturation in velocity is constant.

Keller, G.V.; Grose, L.T.; Pickett, G.R.

1978-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geothermal pilot study final report: creating an international geothermal energy community  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Pilot Study under the auspices of the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) was established in 1973 to apply an action-oriented approach to international geothermal research and development, taking advantage of the established channels of governmental communication provided by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The Pilot Study was composed of five substudies. They included: computer-based information systems; direct application of geothermal energy; reservoir assessment; small geothermal power plants; and hot dry rock concepts. The most significant overall result of the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study, which is now complete, is the establishment of an identifiable community of geothermal experts in a dozen or more countries active in development programs. Specific accomplishments include the creation of an international computer file of technical information on geothermal wells and fields, the development of studies and reports on direct applications, geothermal fluid injection and small power plants, and the operation of the visiting scientist program. In the United States, the computer file has aready proven useful in the development of reservoir models and of chemical geothermometers. The state-of-the-art report on direct uses of geothermal energy is proving to be a valuable resource document for laypersons and experts in an area of increasing interest to many countries. Geothermal fluid injection studies in El Salvador, New Zealand, and the United States have been assisted by the Reservoir Assessment Substudy and have led to long-range reservoir engineering studies in Mexico. At least seven small geothermal power plants are in use or have been planned for construction around the world since the Small Power Plant Substudy was instituted--at least partial credit for this increased application can be assigned to the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study. (JGB)

Bresee, J.C.; Yen, W.W.S.; Metzler, J.E. (eds.)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

Keller, J.G.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Research Program for Fiscal Year 1998. The Exploration Technology research area focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to expose the deep portions of known systems. The Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal and hot dry rock reservoirs. The Drilling Technology projects focus on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. The Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Direct use research covers the direct use of geothermal energy sources for applications in other than electrical production.

Keller, J.G.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Flow Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511312" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Office of Renewable Energy Technology Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division, FY 1983 Annual Operating Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are between 700 and 3400 guads of recoverable geothermal energy in the US. Hydrothermal, geopressure and hot dry rock are the three principal types of geothermal resources (in order of technological readiness) which can supply large amounts of energy for electric power production and direct heat applications. Hydrothermal resources include water and steam trapped in fractured or porous rocks. A hydrothermal system is classified as either hot-water or vapor-dominated (steam), according to the principal physical state of the fluid. Geopressured resources consist of water at moderately high temperatures at pressures higher than normal hydrostatic pressure. This water contains dissolved methane. Geopressured sources in sedimentary formations along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast are believed to be quite large. Geopressured formations also exist in sedimentary basins elsewhere in the US. Hot dry rock resources consist of relatively unfractured and unusually hot rocks at accessible depths that contain little or no water. To extract usable power from hot dry rock, the rock must be fractured and a confined fluid circulation system created. A heat transfer fluid is introduced, circulated, and withdrawn. The overall goal of the Geothermal Program is to build a technology base that will be used by the private sector to exploit geothermal resources which can supply large amounts of energy for electric power production and direct-heat applications.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6% of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the US public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99% of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98%. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future US energy markets. 7 figs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6% of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the US public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99% of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98%. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future US energy markets. 7 figs.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geothermal Program Review XI: proceedings. Geothermal Energy - The Environmental Responsible Energy Technology for the Nineties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers pertaining to current research and development of geothermal energy in the USA. The seven sections of the document are: Overview, The Geysers, Exploration and Reservoir Characterization, Drilling, Energy Conversion, Advanced Systems, and Potpourri. The Overview presents current DOE energy policy and industry perspectives. Reservoir studies, injection, and seismic monitoring are reported for the geysers geothermal field. Aspects of geology, geochemistry and models of geothermal exploration are described. The Drilling section contains information on lost circulation, memory logging tools, and slim-hole drilling. Topics considered in energy conversion are efforts at NREL, condensation on turbines and geothermal materials. Advanced Systems include hot dry rock studies and Fenton Hill flow testing. The Potpourri section concludes the proceedings with reports on low-temperature resources, market analysis, brines, waste treatment biotechnology, and Bonneville Power Administration activities. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockLithology HostRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the reservoir rock. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 14 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area S cont. Stillwater Geothermal Area V Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockLithology"

306

High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature Downhole Tools Project Description Geothermal energy offers an abundant, renewable source of power that could be used to ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. Currently, geothermal power in the United States is produced from relatively shallow wells that also contain naturally occurring water sources. These current geothermal power plants with near-ideal conditions for geothermal power production exist primarily in the western U.S. In order to expand the use of geothermal energy, new technologies are needed that will enable the utilization of the hot, dry rock located at depths up to 10 km. The introduction of water into these deep wells to create geothermal reservoirs is referred to as Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS).

307

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Geothermal Progress Monitor, report No. 13  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Progress Monitor (GPM) Issue No. 13 documents that most related factors favor the growth and geographic expansion of the US geothermal industry and that the industry is being technologically prepared to meet those challenges into the next century. It is the function of GPM to identify trends in the use of this resource and to provide a historical record of its development pathway. The information assembled for this issue of GPM indicates that trends in the use of geothermal energy in this country and abroad continue to be very positive. Favorable sentiments as well as pertinent actions on the part of both government and industry are documented in almost every section. The FEDERAL BEAT points up that the National Energy Strategy (NES) developed at the highest levels of the US government recognizes the environmental and energy security advantages of renewable energy, including geothermal, and makes a commitment to substantial diversification'' of US sources of energy. With the announcement of the construction of several new plants and plant expansions, the INDUSTRY SCENE illustrates industry's continued expectation tha the use of geothermal energy will prove profitable to investors. In DEVELOPMENT STATUS, spokesmen for both an investor-owned utility and a major geothermal developer express strong support for geothermal power, particularly emphasizing its environmental advantages. DEVELOPMENT STATUS also reports that early successes have been achieved by joint DOE/industry R D at The Geysers which will have important impacts on the future management of this mature field. Also there is increasing interest in hot dry rock. Analyses conducted in support of the NES indicate that if all the postulated technology developments occur in this field, the price of energy derived from hot dry rock in the US could drop.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fractured Geothermal Growth Induced by Heat Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Field testing of a hydraulically stimulated, hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system at the Fenton Hill site in northern New Mexico indicated that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area that were observed during energy extraction operations that caused substantial thermal drawdown in portions of the reservoir. These temporal increases suggest that augmentation of reservoir hear-production capacity in an HDR system may be possible. [DJE 2005

Tester, J.W.; Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Potter, R.M.; Robinson, B.A.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location General Us Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_General_Us_Region_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=510806"

312

Property:HostRockAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockAge HostRockAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockAge Property Type String Description Describes the age of the reservoir rock by epoch, era, or period per available data. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockAge" Showing 11 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Mesozoic + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Triassic + C Coso Geothermal Area + Mesozoic +

313

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Seismic Technology Adapted to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ...

314

UWC geothermal resource exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program was developed to explore the strength of the geothermal and hot dry rock (HDR) resource at the Montezuma Hot Springs at the United World College (UWC). The purpose of the UWC {number_sign}1 well is to obtain hydrologic, geologic, and temperature information for ongoing geothermal evaluation of the Montezuma Hot Springs area. If sufficient fluids are encountered, the hole will be cased with a 4 1/2 inch production casing and re-permitted as a geothermal low-temperature well. If no fluid is encountered, the well will be abandoned per Oil Conservation Division regulation. The objectives of the exploration are to evaluate the resource potential to provide space heating for the entire campus of the United World College, determine the effect of a well on the Hot Springs outflow, accurately measure the UWC heating loads versus time, evaluate the potential to support local thermal industry development, assess the feasibility of HDR development, and create an educational program from the collection of data derived from the research effort.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Location, age, and rock type of volcanic rocks younger than 5 million years in Arizona and New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the assessment of the Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy potential of Arizona and New Mexico, a compilation of the locations and ages of volcanic rocks less than 5 Myr was made. The locations of those rocks less than 3 Myr are shown on a map of the region. Because the compiled information has many uses in addition to geothermal exploration, the entire compilation is presented as a tabulation. The table is organized first by state and secondly by latitude and longitude within each state. Rock type, age and error, method of dating, and original reference are also given. The K-Ar dates have not been recalculated using the most recent decay constants for /sup 40/K. A few references gave only verbal descriptions of sample location; these locations were converted to approximate latitude and longitude.

Aldrich, M.J. Jr.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Crustal Rock Fracture Mechanics for Design and Control of Artificial Subsurface Cracks in Geothermal Energy Extraction Engineering ({Gamma}-Project)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently a significant role of artificial and/or natural cracks in the geothermal reservoir has been demonstrated in the literatures (Abe, H., et al., 1983, Nielson, D.L. and Hullen, J.B., 1983), where the cracks behave as fluid paths and/or heat exchanging surfaces. Until now, however, there are several problems such as a design procedure of hydraulic fracturing, and a quantitative estimate of fluid and heat transfer for reservoir design. In order to develop a design methodology of geothermal reservoir cracks, a special distinguished research project, named as ''{Lambda}-Project'', started at Tohoku University (5 years project, 1983-1988). In this project a basic fracture mechanics model of geothermal reservoir cracks is being demonstrated and its validation is being discussed both theoretically and experimentally. This paper descibes an outline of ''{Lambda}-Project''.

Abe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hideaki

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geothermal Environmental Impact Assessment: Subsurface Environmental Assessment for Four Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal systems are described for Imperial Valley and The Geysers, California; Klamath Falls, Oregon; and the Rio Grande Rift Zone, New Mexico; including information on location, area, depth, temperature, fluid phase and composition, resource base and status of development. The subsurface environmental assessment evaluates potential groundwater degradation, seismicity and subsidence. A general discussion on geothermal systems, pollution potential, chemical characteristics of geothermal fluids and environmental effects of geothermal water pollutants is presented as background material. For the Imperial Valley, all publicly available water quality and location data for geothermal and nongeothermal wells in and near the East Mesa, Salton Sea, Heber, Brawley, Dunes and Glamis KGRAs have been compiled and plotted. The geothermal fluids which will be reinjected range in salinity from a few thousand to more than a quarter million ppm. Although Imperial Valley is a major agricultural center, groundwater use in and near most of these KGRAs is minimal. Extensive seismicity and subsidence monitoring networks have been established in this area of high natural seismicity and subsidence. The vapor-dominated Geysers geothermal field is the largest electricity producer in the world. Groundwater in this mountainous region flows with poor hydraulic continuity in fractured rock. Ground and surface water quality is generally good, but high boron concentrations in hot springs and geothermal effluents is of significant concern; however, spent condensate is reinjected. High microearthquake activity is noted around the geothermal reservoir and potential subsidence effects are considered minimal. In Klamath Falls, geothermal fluids up to 113 C (235 F) are used for space heating, mostly through downhole heat exchangers with only minor, relatively benign, geothermal fluid being produced at the surface. Seismicity is low and is not expected to increase. Subsidence is not recognized. Of all geothermal occurrences in the Rio Grande Rift, the Valles Caldera is currently of primary interest. injection of geothermal effluent from hydrothermal production wells should remove any hydrologic hazard due to some potentially noxious constituents. Waters circulating in the LASL Hot Dry Rock experiment are potable. Seismic effects are expected to be minimal. Subsidence effects could develop.

Sanyal, Subir; Weiss, Richard

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geothermal Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Technologies Geothermal Technologies (Redirected from Geothermal Conversion Technologies) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermal Technologies Geothermal energy can be utilized for electricity or heating in more than one way. Regardless of the energy conversion, geothermal energy requires heat(in the form of rock), water, and flow; and every resources will have different values for each. Some resources have very high temperature rock with high porosity (allowing for flow) but little to know water (see Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Some resources have plenty of water, great flow, but the temperatures are not very high which are commonly used for direct use. Any combination of those 3 things can be found in nature, and for that reason there are different classifications of geothermal

319

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs utilize a variety of techniques to identify geothermal reservoirs as well

320

Cuttings Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Laughlin, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laughlin, Et Al., Laughlin, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Laughlin, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A few cores (see Table I), cuttings collected at 1.5- or 3-m intervals, and random samples from a "junk basket" run behind the drill bit provided material for characterizing the basement rocks. References A. W. Laughlin, A. C. Eddy, R. Laney, M. J. Aldrich Jr (1983) Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cuttings_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Laughlin,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511306"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geothermal development in Australia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

Burns, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creelman, R.A. [Creelman (R.A.) and Associates, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buckingham, N.W. [Glenelg Shire Council, Portland, VIC (Australia); Harrington, H.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1976, "Blowout o f a Geothermal Well", California Geology,in Rocks from Two Geothermal Areas'' , -- P1 anetary ScienceMonitoring Ground Movement in Geothermal Areas", Hydraul ic

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

SciTech Connect

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Commission decision on the Department of Water Resources' Application for Certification for the Bottle Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Application for Certification for the construction of a 55 MW geothermal power plant and related facilities in Lake County was approved subject to terms identified in the Final Decision. The following are covered: findings on compliance with statutory site-certification requirements; final environmental impact report; procedural steps; evidentiary bases; need, environmental resources; public health and safety; plant and site safety and reliability; socioeconomic, land use, and cultural concerns, and transmission tap line. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; PETROGRAPHY; BIOTITE; CALCITE; CLAYS; LIMESTONE; PYRITE; SANDSTONES; SEDIMENTS; SHALES; VOLCANIC ROCKS; ZEOLITES; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBONATE ROCKS; CARBONATES; CHALCOGENIDES; IDAHO; IGNEOUS ROCKS; INORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS; ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS; IRON COMPOUNDS; IRON SULFIDES; MICA; MINERALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PYRITES; ROCKS; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS;

326

Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Geothermal drilling technology update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a comprehensive geothermal drilling research program for the US Department of Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies. The program currently includes seven areas: lost circulation technology, hard-rock drill bit technology, high-temperature instrumentation, wireless data telemetry, slimhole drilling technology, Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) projects, and drilling systems studies. This paper describes the current status of the projects under way in each of these program areas.

Glowka, D.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Property:Geothermal/Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Type Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Geothermal/Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Pool and Spa + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Aquaculture + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Space Heating + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Pool and Spa + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Aquaculture + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Agricultural Drying + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Pool and Spa +

329

Geothermal energy program summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reviews Geothermal Energy Technology and the steps necessary to place it into service. Specific topics covered are: four types of geothermal resources; putting the resource to work; power generation; FY 1989 accomplishments; hard rock penetration; conversion technology; and geopressured brine research. 16 figs. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and with engineered heat exchanger surfaces for the flow systems, i.e. Hot Dry Rock (HDR) or Enhanced Geothermal Neumann boundary condition with prescribed flow at the four corner nodes of the rectangular cell 814 m ? 1490 m ? 814 m and is discretized into 29 ? 36 ? 29 orthogonal cells in x, y, and z direction

Stanford University

331

Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An exhaustive analysis of 3000 macroscopic fractures encountered in the geothermal Hot Dry Rock borehole, EPS-1, located inside the Rhine graben (Soultz-sous-Forets, France), was done on a continuous core section over a depth interval from 1420 to 2230 m: 97% of the macroscopic structures were successfully reorientated with a good degree of confidence by comparison between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are

332

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Heiken &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heiken & Heiken & Goff, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Heiken & Goff, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Development of a geologically-based model of the thermal and hydrothermal potential of the Fenton Hill HDR area. References Grant Heiken, Fraser Goff (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Heiken_%26_Goff,_1983)&oldid=511328

333

A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Details Activities (4) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: As part of the resource evaluation and exploration program conducted by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for the national Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, a regional magnetotelluric (MT) survey of New Mexico and Arizona is being performed. The MT lines are being located in areas where the results of analysis of residual gravity anomaly maps of Arizona and New Mexico, integrated with other geologic and geophysical studies indicate the greatest potential for HDR resources. The residual

334

Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapRockLithology CapRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CapRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the cap rock. Subproperties This property has the following 6 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Pages using the property "CapRockLithology" Showing 6 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + volcanic; lacustrine sediments + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + G Geysers Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + Overlapping a'a' and pahoehoe flows + L Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area + Metasedimentary Landslide Block; Hydrothermal Alteration Layer +

335

Geothermal Program Review VII: proceedings. DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an indepth review of its entire geothermal R and D program. The 2--3 day conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R and D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. This year's conference, Program Review 7, was held in San Francisco on March 21--23, 1989. As indicated by its title, ''DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace'', Program Review 7 emphasized developing technologies, concepts, and innovations having potential for commercial application in the foreseeable future. Program Review 7 was comprised of eight sessions including an opening session and a special presentation on the ''Role of Geothermal Energy in Minimizing Global Environmental Problems.'' The five technical sessions covered GTD-sponsored R and D in the areas of hydrothermal (two sessions), hot dry rock, geopressured, and magma. Presentations were made by the relevant field researchers, and sessions were chaired by the appropriate DOE Operations Office Geothermal Program Manager. The technical papers and commentary of invited speakers contained in these Proceedings have been compiled in the order in which they were presented at Program Review 7.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geothermal/Exploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Exploration Geothermal/Exploration < Geothermal(Redirected from Exploration Techniques) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Exploration General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (120) Geothermal springs along Yellowstone National Park's Firehole River in the cool air of autumn. The world's most environmentally sensitive geothermal features are protected by law. Geothermal Exploration searches the earth's subsurface for geothermal resources that can be extracted for the purpose of electricity generation. A geothermal resource is as commonly a volume of hot rock and water, but in the case of EGS, is simply hot rock. Geothermal exploration programs

337

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: US Geothermal Resources Review and Needs Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to lay the groundwork for an emerging process to assess U.S. geothermal resources that might be suitable for development as Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Interviews of leading geothermists indicate that doing that will be intertwined with updating assessments of U.S. higher-quality hydrothermal resources and reviewing methods for discovering ''hidden'' hydrothermal and EGS resources. The report reviews the history and status of assessment of high-temperature geothermal resources in the United States. Hydrothermal, Enhanced, and Hot Dry Rock resources are addressed. Geopressured geothermal resources are not. There are three main uses of geothermal resource assessments: (1) They inform industry and other interest parties of reasonable estimates of the amounts and likely locations of known and prospective geothermal resources. This provides a basis for private-sector decisions whether or not to enter the geothermal energy business at all, and for where to look for useful resources. (2) They inform government agencies (Federal, State, local) of the same kinds of information. This can inform strategic decisions, such as whether to continue to invest in creating and stimulating a geothermal industry--e.g., through research or financial incentives. And it informs certain agencies, e.g., Department of Interior, about what kinds of tactical operations might be required to support such activities as exploration and leasing. (3) They help the experts who are performing the assessment(s) to clarify their procedures and data, and in turn, provide the other two kinds of users with a more accurate interpretation of what the resulting estimates mean. The process of conducting this assessment brings a spotlight to bear on what has been accomplished in the domain of detecting and understanding reservoirs, in the period since the last major assessment was conducted.

Entingh, Dan; McLarty, Lynn

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy analysis of geothermal-electric systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Standard energy analysis was applied to 4 types of geothermal-electric technologies: liquid dominated, hot dry rock, geopressure, and vapor dominated. It was found that all are net energy producers. Expected uncertainties are not large enough to threaten this conclusion. Vapor dominated, the only technology in current commercial use to produce electricity in the US, has the highest energy ratio (13 +- 4). These results for energy ratio are equal to or less than some from other workers. In the case of liquid dominated, environmental control technology has a considerable energy requirement.

Herendeen, R.A.; Plant, R.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Characterizing Fractures in Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Fracture Characterization Technologies Project Description The proposed program will focus on predicting characteristics of fractures and their orientation prior to drilling new wells. It will also focus on determining the location of the fractures, spacing and orientation during drilling, as well as characterizing open fractures after stimulation to help identify the location of fluid flow pathway within the EGS reservoir. These systems are created by passively injecting cold water, and stimulating the permeation of the injected water through existing fractures into hot wet and hot dry rocks by thermo-elastic cooling shrinkage. The stimulated, existing fractures thus enhance the permeability of the hot rock formations, hence enabling better circulation of water for the purpose of producing the geothermal resource. The main focus of the project will be on developing better understanding of the mechanisms for the stimulation of existing fractures, and to use the information for better exploitation of the high temperature geothermal resources located in the northwest portion of the Geysers field and similar fields.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). Awardees (Company Institution) AltaRock Energy, Inc. Awardee Website http:www.altarockenergy.com Partner 1 University of Nevada at...

342

Recommendations for a US geothermal research plan. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary study team developed a comprehensive research program. Five- and ten-year program plans emphasize critical five-year milestones. Recommended plans are presented here under constraint of three different five-year budgets: $100, $300 and $500 million, respectively. Plans are detailed in six resource subprograms: high temperature water, moderate temperature water, hot dry rock, brine, geopressured, and dry steam. Also presented are plans for five subprograms common to all geothermal resources: exploration, assessment, drilling technology, environmental-social, and institutional. (MHR)

Burnham, J.B.; Bloomster, C.H.; Cohn, P.D.; Eliason, J.R.; Peterson, P.L.; Rohrmann, C.A.; Sandness, G.A.; Stewart, D.H.; Wallace, R.W.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Geothermal Program Review X: proceedings. Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- the Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R&D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R&D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year`s conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, ``Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,`` focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R&D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Environmental development plan: geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure that environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) considerations are addressed adequately in the technology decision making process, the Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies and evaluates EH and S concerns; defines EH and S research and related assessments to examine or resolve the concerns; provides a coordinated schedule with the technology program for required EH and S research and developement; and indicates the timing for Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Readiness Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports. This EDP for geothermal energy systems covers all current and planned activities of the DOE Geothermal Energy Systems. Hydrothermal convection systems, geopressured systems, and hot-dry-rock systems are covered. Environmental concerns and requirements for resolution of these concerns are discussed at length. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Geothermal resource requirements for an energy self-sufficient spaceport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the southwestern United States provide an opportunity for development of isolated spaceports with local energy self-sufficiency. Geothermal resources can provide both thermal energy and electrical energy for the spaceport facility infrastructure and production of hydrogen fuel for the space vehicles. In contrast to hydrothermal resources by which electric power is generated for sale to utilities, hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resources are more wide-spread and can be more readily developed at desired spaceport locations. This paper reviews a dynamic model used to quantify the HDR resources requirements for a generic spaceport and estimate the necessary reservoir size and heat extraction rate. The paper reviews the distribution of HDR resources in southern California and southern New Mexico, two regions where a first developmental spaceport is likely to be located. Finally, the paper discusses the design of a HDR facility for the generic spaceport and estimates the cost of the locally produced power.

Kruger, P.; Fioravanti, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Duchane, D.; Vaughan, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Geothermal regimes of the Clearlake region, northern California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first commercial production of power from geothermal energy, at The Geysers steamfield in northern California in June 1960, was a triumph for the geothermal exploration industry. Before and since, there has been a search for further sources of commercial geothermal power in The Geysers--Clear Lake geothermal area surrounding The Geysers. As with all exploration programs, these were driven by models. The models in this case were of geothermal regimes, that is, the geometric distribution of temperature and permeability at depth, and estimates of the physical conditions in subsurface fluids. Studies in microseismicity and heat flow, did yield geophysical information relevant to active geothermal systems. Studies in stable-element geochemistry found hiatuses or divides at the Stoney Creek Fault and at the Collayomi Fault. In the region between the two faults, early speculation as to the presence of steamfields was disproved from the geochemical data, and the potential existence of hot-water systems was predicted. Studies in isotope geochemistry found the region was characterized by an isotope mixing trend. The combined geochemical data have negative implications for the existence of extensive hydrothermal systems and imply that fluids of deep origin are confined to small, localized systems adjacent to faults that act as conduits. There are also shallow hot-water aquifers. Outside fault-localized systems and hot-water aquifers, the area is an expanse of impermeable rock. The extraction of energy from the impermeable rock will require the development and application of new methods of reservoir creation and heat extraction such as hot dry rock technology.

Amador, M. [ed.; Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Geothermal Literature Review At White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location White Mountains Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_White_Mountains_Area_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=510828

349

Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goff & Decker, 1983) Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_Geysers_Area_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=510809

350

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Decker, 1983) Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=511326"

351

Geothermal energy and the utility market -- the opportunities and challenges for expanding geothermal energy in a competitive supply market: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year's conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,'' focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geothermal energy and the utility market -- the opportunities and challenges for expanding geothermal energy in a competitive supply market: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year's conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,'' focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

354

Geothermal Energy Program Summary Document, FY 1982  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy is derived from the internal heat of the earth. Much of it is recoverable with current or near current technology. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural applications. Three principal types of geothermal resources are exploitable through the year 2000. In order of technology readiness, these resources are: hydrothermal; geopressured (including dissolved natural gas); and hot dry rock. In hydrothermal systems, natural water circulation moves heat from deep internal sources toward the earth's surface. Geothermal fluids (water and steam) tapped by drilling can be used to generate electricity or provide direct heat. Geopressured resources, located primarily in sedimentary basins along the Gulf Coast of Texas and of Louisiana, consist of water and dissolved methane at high pressure and at moderately high temperature. In addition to recoverable methane, geopressured resources provide thermal energy and mechanical energy derived from high fluid pressures, although methane offers the greatest immediate value. Commercial development of geopressured energy may begin in the mid-1980s. Economic feasibility depends on the amount of methane that a given well can produce, a highly uncertain factor at present.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geothermal Energy Program Summary Document, FY 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy is derived from the internal heat of the earth. Much of it is recoverable with current or near current technology. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural applications. Three principal types of geothermal resources are exploitable through the year 2000. In order of technology readiness, these resources are: hydrothermal; geopressured (including dissolved natural gas); and hot dry rock. In hydrothermal systems, natural water circulation moves heat from deep internal sources toward the earth's surface. Geothermal fluids (water and steam) tapped by drilling can be used to generate electricity or provide direct heat. Geopressured resources, located primarily in sedimentary basins along the Gulf Coast of Texas and of Louisiana, consist of water and dissolved methane at high pressure and at moderately high temperature. In addition to recoverable methane, geopressured resources provide thermal energy and mechanical energy derived from high fluid pressures, although methane offers the greatest immediate value. Commercial development of geopressured energy may begin in the mid-1980s. Economic feasibility depends on the amount of methane that a given well can produce, a highly uncertain factor at present.

None

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, the DOE Geothermal Program activities were split between Core Research and Industrial Development. The technical areas covered are: Exploration Technology, Drilling Technology, Reservoir Technology (including Hot Dry Rock Research and The Geyser Cooperation), and Conversion Technology (power plants, materials, and direct use/direct heat). Work to design the Lake County effluent pipeline to help recharge The Geysers shows up here for the first time. This Progress Report is another of the documents that are reasonable starting points in understanding many of the details of the DOE Geothermal Program. (DJE 2005)

None

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Analysis of cause and mechanism for injection-induced seismicity at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock from the Geysers Geothermal Field, California. Int. J.strain at The Geysers geothermal field. Ph.D. dissertation,Subsidence at The Geysers geothermal field, N. California

Rutqvist, Jonny; Oldenburg, Curtis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Characterizing the Mechanics of Fracturing from Earthquake Source Parameter and Multiplet Analyses: Application to the Soultz-sous-Forts Hot Dry Rock site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2000 and 2003, two massive hydraulic fracturing experiments were carried out at the European Geothermal Hot

Michelet, Sophie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

360

Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Maps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Property:Geothermal/DelatT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DelatT DelatT Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/DelatT" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 32 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 8 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 20 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 24 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 100 + Aqua Caliente Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 40 + Aqua Farms International Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 12 + Arrowhead Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 +

362

Determination of permeability of granitic rocks in GT-2 from hydraulic fracturing data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is currently conducting a study to determine the feasibility to extract geothermal energy from dry hot rock. The investigated concept calls for the creation of a hydraulic fracture in hot, impermeable rock. Heat will be exchanged subsequently at the fracture surface between the rock and a circulating fluid. The successful creation of hydraulic fractures in the granitic section of exploratory holes GT-1 and GT-2 yielded sufficient data to calculate the average permeability of the rock next to a fracture by means of the mathematical model. The calculated permeabilities were found to be in the microdarcy range and proved the granitic rock penetrated by GT-1 and GT-2 to be sufficiently impermeable to test the above concept. (auth)

Delisle, G.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The geothermal partnership: Industry, utilities, and government meeting the challenges of the 90's  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal community. This year's conference, Program Review IX, was held in San Francisco on March 19--21, 1991. The theme of this review was The Geothermal Partnership -- Industry, Utilities, and Government Meeting the Challenges of the 90's.'' The importance of this partnership has increased markedly as demands for improved technology must be balanced with available research resources. By working cooperatively, the geothermal community, including industry, utilities, DOE, and other state and federal agencies, can more effectively address common research needs. The challenge currently facing the geothermal partnership is to strengthen the bonds that ultimately will enhance opportunities for future development of geothermal resources. Program Review IX consisted of eight sessions including an opening session. The seven technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy and the progress associated with the Long Valley Exploratory Well. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Diagnostics-while drilling: Reducing the cost of geothermal-produced electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this document is to estimate the potential impact of proposed new Diagnostics-While-Drilling technology on the cost of electricity (COE) produced with geothermal energy. A cost model that predicts the COE was developed and exercised over the range of conditions found for geothermal plants in flashed-steam, binary, and enhanced-reservoir (e.g., Hot Dry Rock) applications. The calculations were repeated assuming that DWD technology is available to reduce well costs and improve well productivity. The results indicate that DWD technology would reduce the geothermal COE by 2--31%, depending on well depth, well productivity, and the type of geothermal reservoir. For instance, for a typical 50-MW, flashed-steam geothermal power plant employing 3-MW wells, 6,000-ft deep, the model predicts an electricity cost of 4.9 cents/kwh. With the DWD technology envisioned, the electricity cost could be reduced by nearly 20%, to less than 4 cents/kwh. Such a reduction in the cost of electricity would give geothermal power a competitive edge over other types of power at many locations across the US and around the world. It is thus believed that DWD technology could significantly expand the role of geothermal energy in providing efficient, environment-friendly electric generating capacity.

PRAIRIE,MICHAEL R.; GLOWKA,DAVID A.

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. (MHR)

Pratt, H.R.; Simonson, E.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modeling, design, and life performance prediction for energy production from geothermal reservoirs. August 1997 progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to both transfer existing Hot Dry Rock two-dimensional fractured reservoir analysis capability to the geothermal industry and to extend the analysis concepts to three dimensions. In this quarter, the primary focus has been on interaction with industry, development of the Geocrack3D model, and maintenance of Geocrack2D. It is important to emphasize that the modeling is complementary to current industry modeling, in that they focus on flow in fractured rock and on the coupled effect of thermal cooling, while a primary focus of current modeling technology is multi-phase flow.

Swenson, D.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Modeling, design, and life performance prediction for energy production from geothermal reservoirs. First quarter progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to both transfer existing Hot Dry Rock two-dimensional fractured reservoir analysis capability to the geothermal industry and to extend the analysis concepts to three dimensions. In this quarter, the primary focus has been on interaction with industry, development of the Geocrack3D model, and maintenance of Geocrack2D. It is important to emphasize that the modeling is complementary to current industry modeling, in that they focus on flow in fractured rock and on the coupled effect of thermal cooling, while a primary focus of current modeling technology is multi-phase flow.

Swenson, D.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Geothermal Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Print PDF Print PDF Geothermal Technologies Geothermal energy can be utilized for electricity or heating in more than one way. Regardless of the energy conversion, geothermal energy requires heat(in the form of rock), water, and flow; and every resources will have different values for each. Some resources have very high temperature rock with high porosity (allowing for flow) but little to know water (see Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Some resources have plenty of water, great flow, but the temperatures are not very high which are commonly used for direct use. Any combination of those 3 things can be found in nature, and for that reason there are different classifications of geothermal energy. It is possible for a resource to be technically capable of both electricity production and heating purposes, but the basic classifications

370

Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: San Emido Geothermal Energy North Project EA at San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant USG Nevada LLC Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Power Plant, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Production Wells Comments USG Nevada submitted Utilization POU on 7/25/2013 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office BLM Black Rock

372

Category:Relict Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Relict Geothermal Features Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Category:Relict Geothermal Features Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Relict Geothermal Features page? For detailed information on Relict Geothermal Features, click here. Pages in category "Relict Geothermal Features" The following 13 pages are in this category, out of 13 total. A Alunite Argillic-Advanced Argillic Alteration C Carbonate Deposition H Hydrothermal Alteration Hydrothermal Deposition H cont. Hydrothermally Altered Rock Hydrothermally Deposited Rock L Leach Capping

373

Geothermal technology development at Sandia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal technology development at Sandia consists of work in two major project areas - Hard Rock Penetration and Magma Energy Extraction. The Hard Rock Penetration Program is directed at reducing drilling costs for geothermal wells. Current activities are focused in three areas: borehole mechanics, rock penetration mechanics, and industry cost-shared research. The Magma Energy Extraction Program is investigating the engineering feasibility of utilizing crustal magma bodies as a source of energy. Work is divided into four major areas: geophysics, geochemistry/materials, drilling, and energy extraction.

Dunn, J.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

W. C. Maurer

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type ...

376

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Only weak hydrothermal alteration was noted in these rocks. Drillhole surveys and drilling rate data indicate that the geothermal system is structurally controlled and that the...

377

Basic research needed for the development of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Basic research needed to facilitate development of geothermal energy is identified. An attempt has been made to make the report representative of the ideas of productive workers in the field. The present state of knowledge of geothermal energy is presented and then specific recommendations for further research, with status and priorities, are listed. Discussion is limited to a small number of applicable concepts, namely: origin of geothermal flux; transport of geothermal energy; geothermal reservoirs; rock-water interactions, and geophysical and geochemical exploration.

Aamodt, R.L.; Riecker, R.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Geothermal/Water Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Water Use Geothermal/Water Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Water Use General Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers in northern California is the world's largest producer of geothermal power. The dry-steam field has successfully produced power since the early 1960s when Pacific Gas & Electric installed the first 11-megawatt plant. The dry steam plant consumes water by emitting water vapor into the atmosphere. Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways: The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second is using water for cooling (for some plants only).

379

Geothermal: About  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - About Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

380

Geothermal: Publications  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Publications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The word geothermal comes from the Greek words geo (earth) and therme (heat). So, geothermal energy is heat from within the Earth.

382

Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on Federal lands: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to predict the value of increased royalties that could be accrued through the year 2010 by the federal government as a result of the accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) geothermal research and development (RandD) program. The technology improvements considered in this study coincide with the major goals and objectives of the DOE program as set forth in Section 3.0 and will: allow the geothermal industry to maintain a long-term competitive posture in the more favorable fields; and permit it to become competitive where the resource is of lower quality. The study was confined to power generation from liquid-dominated hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. The technologies for exploiting the liquid-dominated, or hot water, fields for power generation are relatively new and still under development. Thus, each technology enhancement that permits greater economic use of the resource will potentially enhance royalty revenues. Potential royalty revenue from dry steam power production at The Geysers, direct use of geothermal fluids, and use of advanced geothermal technologies (i.e., hot dry rock, magma, and geopressured) has not been considered in this assessment. 12 refs.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Five year research plan, 1988--1992: Energy from the earth: Geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Consistent with national energy policy guidance, the plan concentrates on research and development (R and D) and limits system experiments to only those necessary to stimulate industrial confidence in the validity of research findings. A key strategy element is the continuation of the government/industry partnership which is critical to successful development of geothermal technology. The primary near-term research emphasis is the extension of hydrothermal technology options for reservoir identification, reservoir analysis, hard rock penetration, and flash and binary electric plants. The advanced geothermal resources--geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma--are longer-term and higher-risk focal points, and research in these areas centers on establishing a technology base that will allow industry to make prudent and timely investment decisions with respect to the use of these resources. 13 figs.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Strategic plan for the geothermal energy program  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy (natural heat in the Earth`s crust) represents a truly enormous amount of energy. The heat content of domestic geothermal resources is estimated to be 70,000,000 quads, equivalent to a 750,000-year supply of energy for the entire Nation at current rates of consumption. World geothermal resources (exclusive of resources under the oceans) may be as much as 20 times larger than those of the US. While industry has focused on hydrothermal resources (those containing hot water and/or steam), the long-term future of geothermal energy lies in developing technology to enable use of the full range of geothermal resources. In the foreseeable future, heat may be extracted directly from very hot rocks or from molten rocks, if suitable technology can be developed. The US Department of Energy`s Office of Geothermal Technologies (OGT) endorses a vision of the future in which geothermal energy will be the preferred alternative to polluting energy sources. The mission of the Program is to work in partnership with US industry to establish geothermal energy as a sustainable, environmentally sound, economically competitive contributor to the US and world energy supply. In executing its mission and achieving its long-term vision for geothermal energy, the Program has identified five strategic goals: electric power generation; direct use applications and geothermal heat pumps; international geothermal development; science and technology; and future geothermal resources. This report discusses the objectives of these five goals.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Geothermal/Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Environment Geothermal/Environment < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Environmental Impact Life-Cycle Assessments Environmental Regulations Regulatory Roadmap The Geysers - a dry steam geothermal field in California emits steam into the atmosphere. The impact that geothermal energy has on the environment depends on the type of cooling and conversion technologies used. Environmental impacts are often discussed in terms of: Water Consumption Geothermal power production utilizes water in two major ways. The first method, which is inevitable in geothermal production, uses hot water from an underground reservoir to power the facility. The second would be

386

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump...

387

Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-...

389

California/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California/Geothermal California/Geothermal < California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF California Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in California Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Alum Geothermal Project Ram Power Silver Peak, Nevada 64 MW64,000 kW 64,000,000 W 64,000,000,000 mW 0.064 GW 6.4e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Alum Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC Susanville, California 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Black Rock I Geothermal Project CalEnergy Generation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development North Shore Mono Lake Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region

390

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

391

Modeling, design, and life performance prediction for energy production from geothermal reservoirs. Quarterly progress report, October--December, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to maintain and transfer existing Hot Dry Rock two-dimensional fractured reservoir analysis capability to the geothermal industry and to extend the analysis concepts to three dimensions. In this quarter, the primary focus has been on interaction with industry, development of the Geocrack3D model, and maintenance of Geocrack2D. It is important to emphasize that the modeling is complementary to current industry modeling, in that the authors focus on flow in fractured rock and on the coupled effect of thermal cooling.

Swenson, D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Geothermal Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The first geothermal power generation in the world was started at Larderello, Italy in 1904. Then, New Zealand succeeded in the geothermal power generating country. These developments were then followed by the United States, Mexico, Japan and the Soviet Union, and at present, about 25 countries are utilizing geothermal power, or investigating geothermal resources.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Potential use of dry cooling in support of advanced energy generation systems  

SciTech Connect

Advanced energy technologies were investigated for filling the energy supply and demand gap, including fuel cells, thermionic converters, and fusion. Technologies that have the potential for supplying energy in the future are solar, geothermal, coal gasification and liquefaction, clean solid fuel from coal, and oil shale. Results are presented of an analysis of the advanced energy generation systems, the potential for using dry cooling, and the waste heat generation characteristics of the advanced technologies. The magnitude of the waste heat expected to be generated indicates the following percentages of total cooling requirements would be needed by advanced energy technologies: (a) 1% to 2% in 1985, (b) 17% to 40% in 2000, and (c) 24% to 76% in 2025. Dry cooling could be required for flashed steam and dry steam geothermal plants if balancing withdrawal and reinjection of the geothermal fluid becomes a requirement. Binary cycle geothermal plants and plants using the hot dry rocks geothermmal resource are even more likely to require dry cooling since these plants will need an outside source of water. Solar central tower plants have a high potential for the use of dry cooling since they are likely to be located in the Southwest where water availability problems are already apparent. The high water consumption associated with the projected synthetic fuel production levels indicates that dry cooling will be desirable, perhaps even mandatory, to achieve a high level of synthetic fuel production. In the year 2000, between 2.5 and 13 GW of electrical energy produced by advanced power generation systems may require dry cooling. In the year 2025, this requirement may increase to between 4.5 and 81 GW/sub e/.

Mayer, D.W.; Arnold, E.M.; Allemann, R.T.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Technology for Increasing Geothermal Energy Productivity. Computer Models to Characterize the Chemical Interactions of Goethermal Fluids and Injectates with Reservoir Rocks, Wells, Surface Equiptment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a research program we carried out over a five-year (3/1999-9/2004) period with funding from a Department of Energy geothermal FDP grant (DE-FG07-99ID13745) and from other agencies. The goal of research projects in this program were to develop modeling technologies that can increase the understanding of geothermal reservoir chemistry and chemistry-related energy production processes. The ability of computer models to handle many chemical variables and complex interactions makes them an essential tool for building a fundamental understanding of a wide variety of complex geothermal resource and production chemistry. With careful choice of methodology and parameterization, research objectives were to show that chemical models can correctly simulate behavior for the ranges of fluid compositions, formation minerals, temperature and pressure associated with present and near future geothermal systems as well as for the very high PT chemistry of deep resources that is intractable with traditional experimental methods. Our research results successfully met these objectives. We demonstrated that advances in physical chemistry theory can be used to accurately describe the thermodynamics of solid-liquid-gas systems via their free energies for wide ranges of composition (X), temperature and pressure. Eight articles on this work were published in peer-reviewed journals and in conference proceedings. Four are in preparation. Our work has been presented at many workshops and conferences. We also considerably improved our interactive web site (geotherm.ucsd.edu), which was in preliminary form prior to the grant. This site, which includes several model codes treating different XPT conditions, is an effective means to transfer our technologies and is used by the geothermal community and other researchers worldwide. Our models have wide application to many energy related and other important problems (e.g., scaling prediction in petroleum production systems, stripping towers for mineral production processes, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration strategies, global warming). Although funding decreases cut short completion of several research activities, we made significant progress on these abbreviated projects.

Nancy Moller Weare

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Electricity Production Photo of a geothermal power plant. This geothermal power plant generates electricity for the Imperial Valley in California. Geothermal power plants use steam produced from reservoirs of hot water found a few miles or more below the Earth's surface to produce electricity. The steam rotates a turbine that activates a generator, which produces electricity. There are three types of geothermal power plants: dry steam, flash steam, and binary cycle. Dry Steam Dry steam power plants draw from underground resources of steam. The steam is piped directly from underground wells to the power plant where it is directed into a turbine/generator unit. There are only two known underground resources of steam in the United States: The Geysers in northern California and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, where there's

396

Environmental research needs for geothermal resources development. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed analysis was conducted to determine the adequacy of the total research efforts regarding the potential environmental impacts related to the exploration, drilling, production, and transmission stages of vapor-dominated, liquid-dominated, geopressured, and hot-dry-rock geothermal resources. The following environmental considerations were selected and analyzed in detail: air emissions (hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, mercury, boron, radon, etc.); liquid emissions (brine, and toxic chemicals); land subsidence; seismic activity; and noise. Following the definition of the problem and the assessment of the past and ongoing research efforts, environmental research needs were then recommended based on: (1) the severity of the environmental problems as perceived by literature and contacts with the research community; (2) probability of occurrence; (3) and the research dependency for a solution to that particular problem. The recommended research needs consisted of: (1) an evaluation of the past and ongoing research efforts to ascertain gaps in knowledge for a particular pollutant, process, or control technology; (2) baseline studies of air, soil, water, and ecology around the existing geothermal facilities and in the locations scheduled for future geothermal development; (3) need for the development of appropriate models for predicting concentration and dispersion of pollutants; (4) development of predictive models for potential health and environmental effects associated with geothermal operations; and (5) development of appropriate control technology to destroy, remove or reduce harmful emissions in order to prevent the occurrence of environmental and health hazards and to comply with existing standards and criteria.

Carstea, D.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: areal geology; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; clastic rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravity methods; Idaho; igneous rocks; lithostratigraphy; magnetic methods; pyroclastics; Raft River Valley; resources; sedimentary rocks; seismic methods; stratigraphy; structural geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks

398

Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Geothermal programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a number of geothermal programs supported through two offices in the Department of Energy: the Office of Renewable Technologies, Geothermal Technologies Division, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Engineering, Mathematics and Geosciences. Within these programs, we are carrying out research in injection monitoring, optical instrumentation for geothermal wells, seismic imaging methods, geophysical and drilling investigations of young volcanic systems in California, and fundamental studies of the rock and mineral properties.

Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1976) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry rock geothermal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of geothermal energy for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best potential for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.

Hodge, D.S. [SUNY, Buffalo, NY (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

404

Property:Geothermal/Partner6Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partner6Website Partner6Website Jump to: navigation, search Property Name