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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Performance analysis of heat transfer processes from wet and dry surfaces : cooling towers and heat exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Performance Analysis of Heat Transfer Processes from Wet and Dry Surfaces: Cooling Towers and Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry… (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl{sub x}, UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH{sub x}, UErZrH, UO{sub 2}-stainless steel cermet, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified.

Guenther, R.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lund, A.L.; Gilbert, E.R. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Wet/dry cooling tower and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

6

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS F. NAJMABADI* University the trade- offs, to develop operational windows for chamber con- cepts, and to identify high the injection process; (d) for relatively low yield targets ( 250 MJ), an operational window with no buffer gas

California at San Diego, University of

7

Description and cost analysis of a deluge dry/wet cooling system.  

SciTech Connect

The use of combined dry/wet cooling systems for large base-load power plants offers the potential for significant water savings as compared to evaporatively cooled power plants and significant cost savings in comparison to dry cooled power plants. The results of a detailed engineering and cost study of one type of dry/wet cooling system are described. In the ''deluge'' dry/wet cooling method, a finned-tube heat exchanger is designed to operate in the dry mode up to a given ambient temperature. To avoid the degradation of performance for higher ambient temperatures, water (the delugeate) is distributed over a portion of the heat exchanger surface to enhance the cooling process by evaporation. The deluge system used in this study is termed the HOETERV system. The HOETERV deluge system uses a horizontal-tube, vertical-plate-finned heat exchanger. The delugeate is distributed at the top of the heat exchanger and is allowed to fall by gravity in a thin film on the face of the plate fin. Ammonia is used as the indirect heat transfer medium between the turbine exhaust steam and the ambient air. Steam is condensed by boiling ammonia in a condenser/reboiler. The ammonia is condensed in the heat exchanger by inducing airflow over the plate fins. Various design parameters of the cooling system have been studied to evaluate their impact on the optimum cooling system design and the power-plant/utility-system interface. Annual water availability was the most significant design parameter. Others included site meteorology, heat exchanger configuration and air flow, number and size of towers, fan system design, and turbine operation. It was concluded from this study that the HOETERV deluge system of dry/wet cooling, using ammonia as an intermediate heat transfer medium, offers the potential for significant cost savings compared with all-dry cooling, while achieving substantially reduced water consumption as compared to an evaporatively cooled power plant. (LCL)

Wiles, L.E.; Bamberger, J.A.; Braun, D.J.; Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.; Willingham, C.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Heat Transfer Performance of a Dry and Wet / Dry Advanced Cooling Tower Condenser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an EPRI-funded experimental evaluation of advanced air-cooled ammonia condensers for a phase. Change dry/wet cooling system for power plants. Two condenser surfaces with different air-side augmentation were tested in an ammonia phase change pilot plant (0.6 MWth) located at UCC/Linde. The first unit consisted of integral shaved-fin-extruded aluminum tubing designed for dry operation. Heat transfer and air-side pressure loss characteristics were measured under varying air face velocities (1 to 5 m/s) and initial temperature differences, ITD (11 to 33K). Measured overall heat transfer coefficients, U, ranged between 40 and 49 J /m2 S.K (based on air-side surface). The second configuration constituted an aluminum plate-fin/tube assembly, which was tested in both dry and wet (water deluge) modes at 1 to 4 m/s air face velocities and ITD's of 5 to 33K. Deluge rates varied from 1 to 6 m3/s per meter of core width. In the dry mode, U ranged from 42 to 63 J/m2 .S.K. Water deluge enhanced the heat rejection up to 4.5 times over dry operation.

Fricke, H. D.; Webster, D. J.; McIlroy, K.; Bartz, J. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for (1) cleaning, developing or etching, (2) rinsing, and (3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material. 5 figs.

Britten, J.A.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of ammonia as a working fluid for a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts considered in this study involve various arrangments of the binary geothermal power cycle with advanced dry cooling schemes. Brief descriptions of the binary cycle and advanced cooling schemes are included. Also included are descriptions of the base case concept and the ammonia working fluid concept. Performance and cost estimates were developed for a wet-cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet/dry cooled isobutane cycle plant, wet-cooled ammonia cycle plant, and a wet/dry cooled ammonia cycle plant. The performance and cost estimates were calculated using the GEOCOST computer code developed at PNL. Inputs for GEOCOST were calculated based on the Heber sites. The characteristics of the wet/dry cooling system were determined using the BNWGEO computer code developed at PNL. Results of the cooling system analysis are presented, followed by results of the geothermal plant analysis. Conclusions and comments also are included.

Drost, M.K.; Huber, H.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

SiC Fiber Strengths after Oxidation in Wet and Dry Air, Steam, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Data for SiC fiber strengths after oxidation in wet and dry air, steam, and low pO2 are reviewed. Oxidation and scale crystallization kinetics are  ...

15

The Wet and Dry Spells across India during 1951–2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of wet spells (WSs) and intervening dry spells (DSs) are extremely useful for water-related sectors. The information takes on greater significance in the wake of global climate change and climate-change scenario projections. The ...

Nityanand Singh; Ashwini Ranade

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Stable nitrogen isotope ratios in wet and dry nitrate deposition collected with an artificial tree  

SciTech Connect

Amounts of dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition and N isotope ratios in wet and dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition have been simultaneously determined by examining differences between precipitation collected by open funnels and throughfall collected beneath an artificial Christmas tree. Samples were collected in a forest clearing on Walker Branch Watershed, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. From mid-summer to early autumn, NO{sub 3}-N fluxes beneath the artificial tree were always greater than those measured in precipitation indicating the tree's effectiveness as a passive collector of dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition. Dry NO{sub 3}-N deposition averaged 60 {+-} 9% of total (wet and dry) deposition. The mean ({+-} SD) calculated {delta}{sup 15}N value for NO{sub 3}-N in dry deposition was + 5.6 {+-} 2.1{per_thousand} (n = 6 sampling periods ranging from 4 to 15 days). On average, this was {approx} 6{per_thousand} heavier than measured {delta}{sup 15}N values for NO{sub 3}-N in precipitation. The calculated {delta}{sup 15}N value for NO{sub 3}-N in dry deposition was consistent with that expected if NO{sub x} precursors to HNO{sub 3} vapor (the major constituent of dry deposition at this site) originated principally from coal combustion.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks I.N. Bindeman a,n , C.C. Lundstrom b , C. Bopp b , F. Huang b,c a Department of Geological Sciences, 1272 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA b Department of Geology, University of Illinois

Bindeman, Ilya N.

19

Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

Kerr, Kent

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Characteristics of Wet and Dry Spells over the Pacific Side of Central America during the Rainy Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the mean atmospheric conditions associated with synoptic-scale rainfall fluctuations over Central America during the rainy season. The study is based on composites of wet and dry spells; these composites are generated from ...

MalaquÍas Peña; Michael W. Douglas

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Chemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru Protective Layer of the Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography Reflector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Park, Physical Chemistry Chemical Y.B. He, et al. , JournalChemical Effect of Dry and Wet Cleaning of the Ru ProtectiveBerkeley, California 94720 Chemical Sciences Division,

Belau, Leonid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Midtropospheric Circulation Patterns Associated with Extreme Dry and Wet Episodes over Equatorial Eastern Africa during the Northern Hemisphere Spring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anomaly circulation patterns of contrasting wet and dry episodes over the equatorial eastern Africa (EEA) region are studied using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses. The study focuses on the Northern Hemisphere ...

Raphael E. Okoola

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

An Analysis of the Effect of Local Heat Advection on Evaporation over Wet and Dry Surface Strips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of local advection on evaporation and Bowen ratio over alternating crosswind infinite dry-warm and wet-cool surface strips (patches), by redistribution of surface heat, is analysed. The analysis shows that evaporation over the region ...

Ya Guo; Peter H. Schuepp

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Interferential Impact of ENSO and PDO on Dry and Wet Conditions in the U.S. Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) interference on the dry and wet conditions in the Great Plains of the United States has been examined using monthly observational datasets. It is shown ...

Zeng-Zhen Hu; Bohua Huang

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Well-balanced bicharacteristic-based scheme for multilayer shallow water flows including wet/dry fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present a new well-balanced finite volume scheme for two-dimensional multilayer shallow water flows including wet/dry fronts. The ideas, presented here for the two-layer model, can be generalized to a multilayer case in a ... Keywords: Bicharacteristics, Evolution galerkin, Finite volume method, Two-layer shallow water, Well-balance, Wet/dry front

M. Dudzinski; M. Luká?Ová-Medvid'Ová

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process  

SciTech Connect

This report includes major findings and outlook from the transformational electrode drying project performance period from January 6, 2012 to August 1, 2012. Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheating and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80°C vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 – 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.

Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M. (A123 Systems, Inc.)

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Impact of Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling on Concentrating Solar Power Plant Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the sensitivity of Rankine cycle plant performance to dry cooling and hybrid (parallel) wet/dry cooling combinations with the traditional wet-cooled model as a baseline. Plants with a lower temperature thermal resource are more sensitive to fluctuations in cooling conditions, and so the lower temperature parabolic trough plant is analyzed to assess the maximum impact of alternative cooling configurations. While low water-use heat rejection designs are applicable to any technology that utilizes a Rankine steam cycle for power generation, they are of special interest to concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies that are located in arid regions with limited water availability. System performance is evaluated using hourly simulations over the course of a year at Daggett, CA. The scope of the analysis in this paper is limited to the power block and the heat rejection system, excluding the solar field and thermal storage. As such, water used in mirror washing, maintenance, etc., is not included. Thermal energy produced by the solar field is modeled using NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM).

Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheating and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80°C vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 – 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.

Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M. (A123 Systems, Inc.)

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

Cooper, J.F.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

Particle size distributions of ground corn and DDGS from dry grind processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT. Ethanol production has increased in the past decade as a result of growth in the dry grind industry. In the dry grind process, the first step is grinding of corn. The particle size of the resulting ground corn can affect the fermentation process and the particle size of dried distillers ’ grains with solubles (DDGS), a coproduct of dry grind processing. Few data are available that characterize particle size distributions of ground corn or DDGS. The objective was to determine particle size distributions of ground corn and DDGS. Samples of ground corn and DDGS were obtained from nine dry grind plants; particle size distribution, geometric mean diameter (dgw) and geometric standard deviation (Sgw) were determined. The dgw of ground corn and of DDGS were not different among processing plants. The overall mean dgw of ground corn was not different from that of DDGS. Most of the ground corn (80 g/100 g) and DDGS (70 g/100 g) were recovered in the three largest particle size categories. The particle size distributions of ground corn were not correlated (r Corn, DDGS, Distillers dried grains with solubles, Ethanol. Corn is processed into ethanol by one of two major processes: dry grinding or wet milling. Wet milling is more complex than dry grinding because fiber and germ components are separated; this requires considerable equipment and capital. In the dry grind process,

K. D. Rausch; R. L. Belyea; M. R. Ellersieck; V. Singh; D. B. Johnston; M. E. Tumbleson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 2: Comparison of Wet and Dry Rankine Cycle Heat Rejection, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., regarding a system analysis comparing solar parabolic trough plants with wet and dry rankine cycle heat rejection.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

Dexter, W

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

34

Critically safe volume vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive enclosures  

SciTech Connect

A physical compact vacuum pickup device of critically safe volume and geometric shape is provided for use in radioactive enclosures, such as a small glove box, to facilitate manual cleanup of either wet or dry radioactive material. The device is constructed and arranged so as to remain safe when filled to capacity with plutonium-239 oxide. Two fine mesh filter bags are supported on the exterior of a rigid fine mesh stainless steel cup. This assembly is sealed within, and spaced from, the interior walls of a stainless steel canister. An air inlet communicates with the interior of the canister. A modified conventional vacuum head is physically connected to, and associated with, the interior of the mesh cup. The volume of the canister, as defined by the space between the mesh cup and the interior walls of the canister, forms a critically safe volume and geometric shape for dry radioactive particles that are gathered within the canister. A critically safe liquid volume is maintained by operation of a suction terminating float valve, and/or by operation of redundant vacuum check/liquid drain valves and placement of the air inlet.

Zeren, Joseph D. (390 Forest Ave., Boulder, CO 80304)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Critically safe volume vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive enclosures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A physical compact vacuum pickup device of critically safe volume and geometric shape is provided for use in radioactive enclosures, such as a small glove box, to facilitate manual cleanup of either wet or dry radioactive material. The device is constructed and arranged so as to remain safe when filled to capacity with plutonium-239 oxide. Two fine mesh filter bags are supported on the exterior of a rigid fine mesh stainless steel cup. This assembly is sealed within, and spaced from, the interior walls of a stainless steel canister. An air inlet communicates with the interior of the canister. A modified conventional vacuum head is physically connected to, and associated with, the interior of the mesh cup. The volume of the canister, as defined by the space between the mesh cup and the interior walls of the canister, forms a critically safe volume and geometric shape for dry radioactive particles that are gathered within the canister. A critically safe liquid volume is maintained by operation of a suction terminating float valve, and/or by operation of redundant vacuum check/liquid drain valves and placement of the air inlet. 5 figures.

Zeren, J.D.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Economic evaluation of four types of dry/wet cooling applied to the 5-MWe Raft River geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cost study is described which compared the economics of four dry/wet cooling systems to use at the existing Raft River Geothermal Plant. The results apply only at this site and should not be generalized without due consideration of the complete geothermal cycle. These systems are: the Binary Cooling Tower, evaporative condenser, Combin-aire, and a metal fin-tube dry cooling tower with deluge augmentation. The systems were evaluated using cooled, treated geothermal fluid instead of ground or surface water in the cooling loops. All comparisons were performed on the basis of a common plant site - the Raft River 5 MWe geothermal plant in Idaho. The Binary Cooling Tower and the Combin-aire cooling system were designed assuming the use of the isobutane/water surface condenser currently installed at the Raft River Plant. The other two systems had the isobutane ducted to the evaporative condensers. Capital credit was not given to the system employing the direct condensing process. The cost of the systems were estimated from designs provided by the vendors. The levelized energy cost range for each cooling system is listed below. The levelized energy cost reflects the incremental cost of the cooling system for the life of the plant. The estimates are presented in 1981 dollars.

Bamberger, J.A.; Allemann, R.T.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Dry Versus Wet Aging of Beef: Retail Cutting Yields and Palatability Evaluations of Steaks Using Alternative Cutting Styles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boneless ribeye rolls (n = 12) and boneless top sirloin butts (n = 12) were obtained from heavy weight carcasses (mean = 407.8 kg), assigned to one of two aging treatments (dry or wet) and aged for 35 days at a commercial aging facility. Cutting tests were performed at the end of the aging period to determine retail yields. Subprimals were fabricated using the Beef Alternative Merchandising cutting styles, isolating four specific muscles: M. spinalis thoracis, M. longissimus thoracis, M. gluteobiceps, and M. gluteus medius. Retail cutting tests showed wet-aged subprimals had higher (P < 0.0001) total saleable yield percentages with decreased cooler shrink and gross cut loss percentages. This resulted in wet-aged ribeye rolls and top sirloin butts yielding 1.5 times and 1.3 times more saleable product than dry-aged counterparts, respectively. In order to determine palatability characteristics, consumer sensory evaluations and trained panel evaluations were preformed. Palatability related to aging and muscle type resulted in significant differences. From a consumer standpoint, aging treatment influenced OLIKE, FLAV, FLEVEL, and BEEFLIKE but only through the interaction of aging treatment x muscle. Clearly, consumers rated the wet-aged, M. spinalis thoracis highest in each of the previously stated attributes. Aging also affected JUIC, whereas muscle type had a significant (P < 0.0001) effect on FLVBF, TEND, LEVTEND, JUIC, and LEVJUIC. As far as trained sensory attributes were concerned, a more concrete flavor profile of aged beef was obtained. In addition, dry-aged steaks had greater (P < 0.0001) cooking yield percentages when compared to wet-aged steaks.

Smith, Amanda 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Intraseasonal and Interannual Variability of Extreme Dry and Wet Events over Southeastern South America and the Subtropical Atlantic during Austral Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraseasonal and interannual variability of extreme wet and dry anomalies over southeastern Brazil and the western subtropical South Atlantic Ocean are investigated. Precipitation data are obtained from the Global Precipitation Climatology ...

Michel N. Muza; Leila M. V. Carvalho; Charles Jones; Brant Liebmann

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

On the Vertical Distribution of Mean Vertical Velocities in the Convective Regions during the Wet and Dry Spells of the Monsoon over Gadanki  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indian Mesosphere–Stratosphere–Troposphere (MST) radar observations of vertical distribution of mean vertical velocities w in convective regions during the wet and dry spells of the Indian summer monsoon over a tropical station at Gadanki, ...

K. N. Uma; K. Kishore Kumar; Siddarth Shankar Das; T. N. Rao; T. M. Satyanarayana

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Contrasting Conditions of Surface Water Balance in Wet Years and Dry Years as a Possible Land Surface-Atmosphere Feedback Mechanism in the West African Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate of West Africa, in particular the Sahel, is characterized by multiyear persistence of anomalously wet or dry conditions. Its Southern Hemisphere counterpart, the Kalahari, lacks the persistence that is evident in the Sahel even though ...

A. R. Lare; S. E. Nicholson

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Increase in Very Wet and Very Dry Months in the Tropics Linked...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

predictions of monthly precipitation from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) climate change simulations the authors show that the occurrence of very dry (<0.5 mmday)...

43

Effects of corn processing and dietary wet corn gluten feed on newly received and growing cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of corn processing with or without the inclusion of wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) on growth and performance were analyzed in two experiments. Treatments… (more)

Siverson, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process  

SciTech Connect

A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Table 9. Total U.S. proved reserves of wet natural gas and dry natural gas, 2001-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Total U.S. proved reserves of wet natural gas and dry natural gas, 2001-2011 : Total U.S. proved reserves of wet natural gas and dry natural gas, 2001-2011 billion cubic feet Revisions a Net of Sales b New Reservoir Proved d Change Net and and New Field Discoveries Total c Estimated Reserves from Adjustments Revisions Adjustments Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Discoveries Production 12/31 Prior Year Year (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) Wet Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 2001 1,849 -2,438 -589 2,715 17,183 3,668 2,898 23,749 20,642 191,743 5,233 2002 4,006 1,038 5,044 428 15,468 1,374 1,752 18,594 20,248 195,561 3,818 2003 2,323 -1,715 608 1,107 17,195 1,252 1,653 20,100 20,231 197,145 1,584 2004 170 825 995 1,975 19,068 790 1,244 21,102 20,017 201,200 4,055 2005 1,693 2,715 4,408 2,674 22,069 973 1,243 24,285 19,259 213,308 12,108 2006 946 -2,099 -1,153 3,178 22,834 425 1,197 24,456 19,373 220,416

46

A class of moving boundary problems arising in drying processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: drying processes, heat and mass transfer, moving boundary value problems, multiphase flows in porous media, quasilinear parabolic systems, wellposedness of solutions

M. Ilic

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Energy-efficient regenerative liquid desiccant drying process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the use of desiccants in conjunction with an open oop drying cycle and a closed loop drying cycle to reclaim the energy expended in vaporizing moisture in harvested crops. In the closed loop cycle, the drying air is brought into contact with a desiccant after it exits the crop drying bin. Water vapor in the moist air is absorbed by the desiccant, thus reducing the relative humidity of the air. The air is then heated by the used desiccant and returned to the crop bin. During the open loop drying cycle the used desiccant is heated (either fossil or solar energy heat sources may be used) and regenerated at high temperature, driving water vapor from the desiccant. This water vapor is condensed and used to preheat the dilute (wet) desiccant before heat is added from the external source (fossil or solar). The latent heat of vaporization of the moisture removed from the desiccant is reclaimed in this manner. The sensible heat of the regenerated desiccant is utilized in the open loop drying cycle. Also, closed cycle operation implies that no net energy is expended in heating drying air.

Ko, Suk M. (Huntsville, AL); Grodzka, Philomena G. (Huntsville, AL); McCormick, Paul O. (Athens, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DRY FLUE GAS CLEANING PROCESSES FOR ACHIEVING AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was mercury adsorption onto calcium sulfate (CaSO4), a byproduct of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wet., Powers K.W., and Pitoniak E.R. (2004) Method for Purifying Flue Gases from Combustion Sources. PatentCoupling of Advanced Oxidation and Adsorption Processes onto Silica-Titania Composites for Low

Columbia University

49

Transition of the Large-Scale Atmospheric and Land Surface Conditions from the Dry to the Wet Season over Amazonia as Diagnosed by the ECMWF Re-Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using 15-yr instantaneous European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis (ERA) data, the authors have examined the large-scale atmospheric conditions and the local surface fluxes through the transition periods from the dry to wet ...

Wenhong Li; Rong Fu

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cracking Condition of Cohesionless Porous Materials in Drying Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The invasion of air into porous systems in drying processes is often localized in soft materials, such as colloidal suspensions and granular pastes, and it typically develops in the form of cracks before ordinary drying begins. To investigate such processes, we construct an invasion percolation model on a deformable lattice for cohesionless elastic systems, and with this model we derive the condition under which cracking occurs. A Griffith-like condition characterized by a dimensionless parameter is proposed, and its validity is checked numerically. This condition indicates that the ease with which cracking occurs increases as the particles composing the material become smaller, as the rigidity of the system increases, and as the degree of heterogeneity characterizing the drying processes decreases.

So Kitsunezaki

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Mathematical modeling of wet magnesia flue gas desulphurization process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desulphurization of flue gases from various chemical industries in a techno-econo-enviro manner is a demanding technology. The concentrations of sulphur dioxide in and around these plants overshoot the danger point. In recent years, the process analysis ...

M. K. Mondal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Utilization of geothermal heat in tropical fruit-drying process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The power plant utilizes only the steam portion of the HGP-A well production. There are approximately 50,000 pounds per hour of 360/sup 0/F water produced (approximately 10 million Btu per hour) and the water is currently not used and is considered a waste. This tremendous resource could very well be used in applications such as food processing, food dehydration and other industrial processing that requires low-grade heat. One of the applications is examined, namely the drying of tropical fruits particularly the papaya. The papaya was chosen for the obvious reason that it is the biggest crop of all fruits produced on the Big Island. A conceptual design of a pilot plant facility capable of processing 1000 pounds of raw papaya per day is included. This facility is designed to provide a geothermally heated dryer to dehydrate papayas or other tropical fruits available on an experimental basis to obtain data such as drying time, optimum drying temperature, etc.

Chen, B.H.; Lopez, L.P.; King, R.; Fujii, J.; Tanaka, M.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Topsoe`s Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process: An alternative technology for recovering refinery sulfur  

SciTech Connect

The Topsoe Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process is a catalytic process which produces concentrated sulfuric acid from refinery streams containing sulfur compounds such as H{sub 2}S (Claus plant feed), Claus plant tail gas, SO{sub 2} (FCC off-gas, power plants), and spent sulfuric acid (alkylation acid). The WSA process recovers up to 99.97% of the sulfur value in the stream as concentrated sulfuric acid (93--98.5 wt%). No solid waste products or waste water is produced and no chemicals are consumed in the process. The simple process layout provides low capital cost and attractive operating economy. Twenty four commercial WSA plants have been licensed. The WSA process is explained in detail and comparisons with alternative sulfur management technology are presented. Environmental regulations applying to SO{sub x} abatement and sulfuric acid production plants are explained in the context of WSA plant operation.

Ward, J.W. [Haldor Topsoe, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Zipping Wetting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water droplets can completely wet micro-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The {\\it dynamics} of this rapid process is analyzed by ultra-high-speed imaging. Depending on the scales of the micro-structure, the wetting fronts propagate smoothly and circularly or -- more interestingly -- in a {\\it stepwise} manner, leading to a growing {\\it square-shaped} wetted area: entering a new row perpendicular to the direction of front propagation takes milliseconds, whereas once this has happened, the row itself fills in microseconds ({\\it ``zipping''}). Numerical simulations confirm this view and are in quantitative agreement with the experiments.

Sbragaglia, Mauro; Pirat, Christophe; Borkent, Bram M; Lammertink, Rob G H; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Relative Importance of Scavenging, Oxidation, and Ice-Phase Processes in the Production and Wet Deposition of Sulfate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative importance of various processes to sulfate production and wet deposition is examined by using a cloud-resolving model coupled with a sulfate chemistry submodel. Results using different versions of the model are then compared and ...

Vlado Spiridonov; Mladjen Curic

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Atmospheric Processes Associated with Summer Floods and Droughts in the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistent wet and dry events over the central United States are examined during summer. Composites based on selected persistent wet and dry events reveal common atmospheric processes and circulation features. During summer, heavy precipitation ...

Kingtse C. Mo; J. Nogues Paegle; R. Wayne Higgins

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid by solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect

The OPPA process offers three potential advantages over the DEPA-TOPO process. The OPPA extractant is much less expensive and has a higher extraction power for uranium than the DEPA-TOPO solvent. In addition it extracts U(IV), the prevailing oxidation state of uranium in wet-process phosphoric acid and this eliminates the liquor oxidation step required in the DEPA-TOPO process. However, the DEPA-TOPO solvent is known to be extremely stable and this process has been successfully demonstrated on a pilot-plant scale at phosphate plants. It is understood that several companies are planning to commercialize this process in the near future. On the other hand, the potentially more attractive OPPA process has not been proven in a pilot plant operation and some questions about the solubility and stability of the OPPA need to be answered. Because of the wide spread interest in this process, a program was started in cooperation with Mobil and Allied Chemical companies to study this extractant, to identify and isolate the material that solubilizes the mono- and diacids, and to determine the optimum concentration and ratios for uranium extraction. In addition, a long-term cyclic test is planned to better define solubility losses and stability of the extractant. Consideration will also be given to improving the recovery of uranium lost to the gypsum during calcination. 12 figures. (auth)

Hurst, F.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Microfracturing in Westerly granite experimentally extended wet and dry at temperatures to 800/degree/C and pressures to 200 MPa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microfracturing in Westerly granite specimens, extended wet and dry, at temperatures to 800/degree/C and confining pressures to 200 MPa, is analyzed with a view toward understanding why, in the brittle field, rock strengths decrease with increasing temperature. Intragranular (IGC) and grain-boundary cracks (GBC) are mapped in two dimensions on either side of the tensile macrofracture, using optical microscopy, to determine, quantitatively, crack lengths and densities and, qualitatively, crack widths and orientations are visually examined to aid in interpretation. Temperature and confining pressure tend to favor the development of different microfracture fabrics. Thermal stresses produce a random orientation of cracks while stresses resulting from the external differential loading of a specimen produce a preferred orientation of cracks parallel to the direction of sigma/sub 1/. In dry experiments, between 600/degree/ and 800/degree/C, both GBC and IGC densities increase with increasing temperature. The increase in crack abundance is responsible for the thermal weakening of the rock. With increasing temperature, GBC play a greater role in the deformational history leading to rock failure. 27 refs., 24 figs.

Hopkins, T.W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Enzymatic Enhancement of Water Removal In the Dry Grind Corn to Ethanol Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The removal of water from coproducts in the fuel ethanol process requires a significant energy input. The drying of the coproducts is responsible for as… (more)

Thomas, Ana Beatriz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction Processing eChapters Processing 88DDAD55B737C030383E11F3785E5D6C AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Algae Drying and Extraction fr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Aspects into the use of renewable energy sources in cereals drying process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing concern for environmental degradation, it is desirable to decrease energy consumption in all sectors. Thus, the paper presents the cereals drying process as an important energy consumer. The main input and output thermal components involved ... Keywords: gasification, grain drying process, renewable energy sources

Gaceu Liviu; Lepadatescu Badea

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

Shale, Correll C. (Morgantown, WV); Cross, William G. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

Uranium control in phosphogypsum. [In wet-process phosphoric acid production  

SciTech Connect

In wet-process phosphoric acid plants, both previous and recent test results show that uranium dissolution from phosphate rock is significantly higher when the rock is acidulated under oxidizing conditions than under reducing conditions. Excess sulfate and excess fluoride further enhance the distribution of uranium to the cake. Apparently the U(IV) present in the crystal lattice of the apatite plus that formed by reduction of U(IV) by FE(II) during acidulation is trapped or carried into the crystal lattice of the calcium sulfate crystals as they form and grow. The amount of uranium that distributes to hemihydrate filter cake is up to seven times higher than the amount that distributes to the dihydrate cake. About 60% of the uranium in hemihydrate cakes can be readily leached after hydration of the cake, but the residual uranium (20 to 30%) is very difficult to remove economically. Much additional research is needed to develop methods for minimizing uranium losses to calcium filter cakes.

Hurst, F.J.; Arnold, W.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The use of artificial neural network to predict exergetic performance of spray drying process: A preliminary study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feedforward artificial neural network (ANN) was applied to predict the exergetic performance of a microencapsulation process via spray drying. The exergetic data was obtained from drying experiments conducted at different inlet drying air temperatures, ... Keywords: Artificial neural network (ANN), Exergetic performance, Multilayer perceptron (MLP), Spray drying process

Mortaza Aghbashlo; Hossien Mobli; Shahin Rafiee; Ashkan Madadlou

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 7. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Wet Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstocks Douglas C. Elliott,* Gary G. Neuenschwander, Todd R. Hart, R. Scott catalyst, gasification of wet biomass can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas of the organic structure of biomass to gases has been achieved in the presence of a ruthenium metal catalyst

67

Numerical study of drying process and columnar fracture process in granules-water mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of three-dimensional prismatic cracks in the drying process of starch-water mixtures is investigated numerically. We assume that the mixture is an elastic porous medium which possesses a stress field and a water content field. The evolution of both fields are represented by a spring network and a phenomenological model with the water potential, respectively. We find that the water content distribution has a propagating front which is not explained by a simple diffusion process. The prismatic structure of cracks driven by the water content field is observed. The depth dependence and the coarsening process of the columnar structure are also studied. The particle diameter dependence of the scale of the columns and the effect of the crack networks on the dynamics of the water content field are also discussed.

Akihiro Nishimoto; Tsuyoshi Mizuguchi; So Kitsunezaki

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Induced-Draft Cooling Towers and Parallel Wet/Dry Cooling for Combined-Cycle Plants: Design Best Practices and Procurement Specifica tions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information and examples of best practices for the design and specification of wet and parallel (hybrid) cooling towers for combined-cycle applications. Two reference (template) specifications are includedone for totally wet cooling systems and one for parallel cooling systems with a wet cooling tower and air-cooled condensers (ACC) in parallel. These template specifications are intended to be the starting point from which the utility or developer can "customize" as needed to fit its...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

Investigation and design of wet-mill equipment and process technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??need to dry-mill the wheat into flour, and as a result, the total cost of conversion from wheat to bread is reduced. The resulting product… (more)

Smith, Lisa Noelle.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

KESSLER, S.F.

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 3 Aqueous Extraction of Corn Oil after Fermentation in the Dry Grind Ethanol Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 3 Aqueous Extraction of Corn Oil after Fermentation in the Dry Grind Ethanol Process Processing eChapters Processing 3B39554497A54B0ABD4FC50626B2833A AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

72

Baseline Costs and Performance of Fabric Drying Curing Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing of imports of textile products, especially apparel products, the domestic manufacturers must minimize their production costs in order to stay competitive. A knowledge of the different aspects of the costs associated with the total manufacturing cost will provide a means for better management of the production process. This study examined the efficiency and the costs for a number of thermal processing steps used in the manufacturing of textile products

2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

High-Throughput Dry Processes for Large-Area Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 1996, an interdisciplinary team began a three-year LDRD project to study the plasma processes of reactive ion etching and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on large-area silicon devices. The goal was to develop numerical models that could be used in a variety of applications for surface cleaning, selective etching, and thin-film deposition. Silicon solar cells were chosen as the experimental vehicle for this project because an innovative device design was identified that would benefit from immediate performance improvement using a combination of plasma etching and deposition processes. This report presents a summary of the technical accomplishments and conclusions of the team.

BUSS,RICHARD J.; HEBNER,GREGORY A.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.; YANG,PIN

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

High-intensity drying processes -- Impulse drying: Report 14 (progress report). Status of the pilot-scale research program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As of April 1998, the project was behind on schedule. This was as a result of the need for additional process development work. Work has focused on evaluating nip decompression and post-nip depressurization techniques as used on the Beloit X2 pilot paper machine. The authors have also concentrated on implementing impulse drying technology on Beloit`s No. 4 and No. 2 pilot paper machines. Experiments on Beloit`s X4 pilot paper machine demonstrated that roll coating durability problems have been solved. They also showed that further development work on sheet picking, implementation of delamination suppression techniques and CD temperature control are necessary in order to ensure success on the X4 machine. Experiments on the Beloit`s X2 pilot paper machine were carried out to resolve issues identified on the X4 machine. Two methods of implementing press nip decompression were investigated. The results confirmed that the technology can be used to increase impulse drying operating temperatures. The work also led to the development of techniques to minimize picking.

Orloff, D.I.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dry capture of SO/SUB/2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of dry sorbents into the flue gas stream is a much simpler process for SO/SUB/2 removal than wet scrubbing. The process may be economically attractive, however only for plants near to deposits of such minerals as nahcolite or trona. The mechanism of sulphur removal by these minerals is described and the prospects for their use in the western US are examined. The economics of dry injection for a hypothetical plant in Wisconsin are shown.

Moore, T.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Process, Techniques, and Successes in Welding the Dry Shielded Canister Welds of the TMI-2 Reactor Core Debris  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is operated by Bechtel-BWXT Idaho LLC (BBWI), which recently completed a very successful $100 million Three-Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) program for the Department of Energy (DOE). This complex and challenging program used an integrated multidisciplinary team approach that loaded, welded, and transported an unprecedented 25 dry shielded canisters (DSC) in seven months, and did so ahead of schedule. The program moved over 340 canisters of TMI-2 core debris that had been in wet storage into a dry storage facility at the INEEL. The main thrust of this paper is relating the innovations, techniques, approaches, and lessons learned associated to welding of the DSC's. This paper shows the synergism of elements to meet program success and shares these lessons learned that will facilitate success with welding of dry shielded canisters in other DOE complex dry storage programs.

Zirker, Laurence R; Rankin, Richard Allen; Ferrell, Larry Joseph

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Processes, Techniques, and Successes in Welding the Dry Shielded Canisters of the TMI-2 Reactor Core Debris  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is operated by Bechtel-BWXT Idaho LLC (BBWI), which recently completed a very successful $100 million Three-Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) program for the Department of Energy (DOE). This complex and challenging program used an integrated multidisciplinary team approach that loaded, welded, and transported an unprecedented 25 dry shielded canisters (DSC) in seven months, and did so ahead of schedule. The program moved over 340 canisters of TMI-2 core debris that had been in wet storage into a dry storage facility at the INEEL. The main thrust of this paper is relating the innovations, techniques, approaches, and lessons learned associated to welding of the DSC's. This paper shows the synergism of elements to meet program success and shares these lessons learned that will facilitate success with welding of dry shielded canisters in other DOE complex dry storage programs.

Zirker, L.R.; Rankin, R.A.; Ferrell, L.J.

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

PRODUCTION OF ELECTROLYTIC THORIUM CELL FEED BY A WET CHEMICAL METHOD. Process Report  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce a substantially oxide-free chloride. a specialized technique, based on the chemical characteristics of the ammonium thorium chloride complexes, has been found optimum. The procedure involves the formation of a solution of thorium chloride and ammonium chloride, evaporation of the solution to form a hydrated ammonium thorium chloride complex, dehydration of the complex by low-temperature drying, and ignition of the complex, after inter-mixture with an alkali chloride, to remove ammonium chloride and to form a thorium alkali chloride mixture for electrolysis. (L.T.W.)

Fisher, C.E.

1955-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

80

Imprinting the memory into paste and its visualization as crack patterns in drying process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the drying process of paste, we can imprint into the paste the order how it should be broken in the future. That is, if we vibrate the paste before it is dried, it remembers the direction of the initial external vibration, and the morphology of resultant crack patterns is determined solely by the memory of the direction. The morphological phase diagram of crack patterns and the rheological measurement of the paste show that this memory effect is induced by the plasticity of paste.

Akio Nakahara; Yousuke Matsuo

2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High-intensity drying processes -- Impulse drying: Report 15 (final report). Production of linerboard on a pilot paper machine, subsequent commercial converting trials and preliminary economic assessment  

SciTech Connect

In September 1998, 33{number_sign} liner was produced on the {number_sign}4 pilot machine under both single-felted wet pressing and impulse drying conditions. In October 1998, the pilot produced liner and commercial liner were converted to combined board and corrugated boxes at a commercial box plant. In January 1999, linerboard, medium, and combined board and box testing were completed. The pilot trials demonstrated that 33{number_sign} liner could be impulse dried at a reel speed of 380 m/min. Press dryness was improved by as much as 4 points, while CD STFI and CD ring crush were improved by more than 10%. Improvements to the smoothness of heated side of sheet were also realized. Commercial box plant converting trials demonstrated that impulse dried linerboard can be used to increase ECT and box compression strength by as much as 10%. As anticipated, print quality was found to be superior. A preliminary economic analysis was performed in which an impulse dryer would increase press dryness by 4 points and would allow the basis weight to be reduced by 10%. The economic model showed that the 4 points in dryness would translate to a 17% tonnage increase. Applying the 10% basis weight reduction resulted in an increase in productivity, on an area basis, of 30%. The pulp cost savings was found to outweigh any additional electric power costs.

Orloff, D.I.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 11 Dry Condensing Vacuum Systems for Deodorizers for Substantial Energy Savings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 11 Dry Condensing Vacuum Systems for Deodorizers for Substantial Energy Savings Processing eChapters Processing F2B58D30B351BCBE5723B760220C94BD AOCS Press   ...

83

Drying of fiber webs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

Warren, David W. (9253 Glenoaks Blvd., Sun Valley, CA 91352)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Drying of fiber webs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

Warren, D.W.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Problem 7-3: The air enters with a dry-bulb temperature of 50 o F and, at 50% relative humidity, with a wet-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with our Total Dry Scrubbing Systems. MWC or RDF facilities using conventional spray dryer/fabric filter slurry in the spray dryer without the likelihood of wall build up or moisture carry over. Since carbon are injected into the flue gas. The reactor tower is basically a vertical double annulus, which

86

Sensitivity analysis of a dry-processed Candu fuel pellet's design parameters  

SciTech Connect

Sensitivity analysis was carried out in order to investigate the effect of a fuel pellet's design parameters on the performance of a dry-processed Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) fuel and to suggest the optimum design modifications. Under a normal operating condition, a dry-processed fuel has a higher internal pressure and plastic strain due to a higher fuel centerline temperature when compared with a standard natural uranium CANDU fuel. Under a condition that the fuel bundle dimensions do not change, sensitivity calculations were performed on a fuel's design parameters such as the axial gap, dish depth, gap clearance and plenum volume. The results showed that the internal pressure and plastic strain of the cladding were most effectively reduced if a fuel's element plenum volume was increased. More specifically, the internal pressure and plastic strain of the dry-processed fuel satisfied the design limits of a standard CANDU fuel when the plenum volume was increased by one half a pellet, 0.5 mm{sup 3}/K. (authors)

Choi, Hangbok; Ryu, Ho Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Survey of Wet Electrostatic Precipitators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have found application since they were first installed for sulfuric acid collection on a smelter and patented by Dr. Frederick Cottrell in 1907–1908. Power generation applications typically use dry ESPs for collection of coal fly ash in nonsaturated flue gas streams. This report summarizes the physical installations, specifications, operating environments, and operational experience of wet ESPs currently operating in the United States on power generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved process of preparing Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) powders, and more particularly, to a process for preparing BSCCO powders that utilize freeze-drying. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution; grinding the flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the powder to form dry green precursor powders; denitrating the powders; and heating the powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders.

Balachandran, U.; Krishnaraj, P.; Eror, N.G.; Lelovic, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Characterization of DuPont 9015, aqueous processable dry film photoresist for printed wiring boards. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the evaluation of DuPont`s Riston 9015, fully aqueous processable dry film photoresist as a mask for gold plating, tin/lead plating, and print and etch patterning for printed circuit board products.

Goldammer, S.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Criticality safety evaluation report for the cold vacuum drying facility's process water handling system  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

NELSON, J.V.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

91

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2} Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains. 11 figs.

Balachandran, U.

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

93

Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Textile drying using solarized can dryers to demonstrate the application of solar energy to industrial drying or dehydration processes, Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has resulted in the installation of a solar energy collection system for providing process heat to a textile drying process. The solar collection subsystem uses 700 square meters (7500 square feet) of parabolic trough, single-axis tracking, concentrating collectors to heat water in a high temperature water (HTW) loop. The solar collectors nominally generate 193/sup 0/C (380/sup 0/F) water with the HTW loop at 1.9 x 10/sup 6/ Pa (275 psi). A steam generator is fueled with the HTW and produces 450 kg/hour (1000 pounds per hour) of process steam at the nominal design point conditions. The solar-generated process steam is at 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ Pa (75 psi) and 160/sup 0/C (321/sup 0/F). It is predicted that the solar energy system will provide 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ MJ/year (1.1 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/year) to the process. This is 46 percent of the direct isolation available to the collector field during the operational hours (300 days/year of the Fairfax mill. The process being solarized is textile drying using can dryers. The can dryers are part of a slashing operation in a WestPoint Pepperell mill in Fairfax, Alabama. Over 50 percent of all woven goods are processed through slashers and dried on can dryers. The collectors were fabricated by Honeywell at a pilot production facility in Minneapolis, Minnesota, under a 3000-square-meter (32,000-square-foot) production run. The collectors and other system components were installed at the site by the Bahnson Service Company and their subcontractors, acting as the project general contractor. System checkout and start-up was conducted. Preliminary system performance was determined from data collected during start-up. System design, fabrication and installation, data analysis, operation and maintenance procedures, and specifications and drawings are presented.

Mitchell, P.D.; Beesing, M.E.; Bessler, G.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 4 Drying and Cooling Collets from Expanders with Major Energy Savings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 4 Drying and Cooling Collets from Expanders with Major Energy Savings Processing eChapters Processing E501361D361B43D9C211A092D24F4F12 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapt

96

Self-oscillations on a partially wetted catalyst pellet in ? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and the vapor–gas phases on wetted and dry catalyst pellets, respectively. ... perature and flooding states of the catalyst pellet was first observed, which were ...

97

Simulation and optimization of hot dry rock geothermal energy conversion systems: process conditions and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is currently engaged in a field program aimed at designing and testing man-made geothermal reservoirs in hot granitic formations of low permeability created by hydraulic fracturing. A very important segment of the program is concerned with defining and optimizing several parameters related to the performance of the reservoir and their impact on the potential commercial feasibility of the hot dry rock technique. These include effective heat transfer area, permeation water loss, depth to the reservoir, geothermal temperature gradient, reservoir temperature, mass flow rate, and geochemistry. In addition, the optimization of the energy end use system (process or district heating, electricity or cogeneration) is directly linked to reservoir performance and associated costs. This problem has been studied using several computer modeling approaches to identify the sensitivity of the cost of power to reservoir and generation plant parameters. Also examined were a variety of important economic elements including rate of return on invested capital, discount or interest rates, taxes, cash flow, energy selling price, plant and reservoir lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, and royalties.

Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Evaluation of a dry process for conversion of U-AVLIS product to UF{sub 6}. Milestone U361  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technical and engineering evaluation has been completed for a dry UF{sub 6} production system to convert the product of an initial two-line U-AVLIS plant. The objective of the study has been to develop a better understanding of process design requirements, capital and operating costs, and demonstration requirements for this alternate process. This report summarizes the results of the study and presents various comparisons between the baseline and alternate processes, building on the information contained in UF{sub 6} Product Alternatives Review Committee -- Final Report. It also provides additional information on flowsheet variations for the dry route which may warrant further consideration. The information developed by this study and conceptual design information for the baseline process will be combined with information to be developed by the U-AVLIS program and by industrial participants over the next twelve months to permit a further comparison of the baseline and alternate processes in terms of cost, risk, and compatibility with U-AVLIS deployment schedules and strategies. This comparative information will be used to make a final process flowsheet selection for the initial U-AVLIS plant by March 1993. The process studied is the alternate UF{sub 6} production flowsheet. Process steps are (1) electron-beam distillation to reduce enriched product iron content from about 10 wt % or less, (2) hydrofluorination of the metal to UF{sub 4}, (3) fluorination of UF{sub 4} to UF{sub 6}, (4) cold trap collection of the UF{sub 6} product, (5) UF{sub 6} purification by distillation, and (6) final blending and packaging of the purified UF{sub 6} in cylinders. A preliminary system design has been prepared for the dry UF{sub 6} production process based on currently available technical information. For some process steps, such information is quite limited. Comparisons have been made between this alternate process and the baseline plant process for UF{sub 6} production.

NONE

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Opportunities for Utility-Owned CHP at Dry-Mill Fuel Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report quantifies opportunities to co-locate natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power (CHP) facilities with corn dry-mill fuel ethanol plants in the upper Midwest. It also evaluates the opportunity to generate renewable power by fueling the CHP plants with biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of the byproducts of the corn wet-milling process.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

Economics of dry FGD by sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly stringent pollution control requirements for new power plants have nearly doubled the cost of producing electricity. The capital, operating and maintenance costs of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are major, and considerable interest is currently being given to less expensive dry systems. One attractive alternative to wet scrubbing for FGD is to inject a dry, powdered reagent into the duct work between a coal-fired boiler and a FF (baghouse). The reagent (and fly ash) are collected on the fabric surface where the SO/sub 2//reagent contact occurs. The technical aspects of SO/sub 2/ removal using nahcolite and trona as sorbents have been investigated at laboratory-scale, demonstrated at full-scale, and are reported on briefly. These results indicate that injection of sodium based reagents is technically an attractive alternative to the many steps and processes involved in wet scrubbing. This paper summarizes a project to examine the economics of nahcolite/trona and furnace limestone injection FGD and compare them to those of the more advanced spray dryer FGD systems. Uncertainties in material handling, pulverization, and waste disposal were investigated and designs were produced as a basis for cost estimating.

Naulty, D.J.; Hooper, R.; Keeth, R.J.; McDowell, D.A.; Muzio, L.J.; Scheck, R.W.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Wet Stacks Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The expense of fluegas reheat has led to increased application of less expensive wet stacks downstream of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) systems. Good data is necessary to properly design the wet stack system or serious problems can occur. This design guide summarizes all the latest information and provides guidance on developing detailed design specifications.

1997-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

Water Treatment For Wet Electrostatic Precipitators: Conceptual Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pilot testing has shown that replacement of the last field of a small dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with a single wet field can significantly reduce outlet particulate emissions from coal-fired power plants. This report summarizes a pilot wet ESP performance test, cost projections from an economic study, and results from a study of the water use and chemistry issues that need to be resolved to make the wet ESP technology an attractive option for electric utilities.

1997-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

106

Demonstration of a Last Field Wet ESP Conversion -- Installation Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the conversion of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) on Unit 3 at Mirant's (formerly Potomac Electric Power Company's) Dickerson Generating Station to hybrid, dry-wet operation. This Tailored Collaboration project was undertaken to determine, at full scale, if the conversion of a single field of a conventional dry ESP to wet operation could significantly reduce particulate emissions and provide reliable operation with an acceptable level of maintenance. Specifically, the performan...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

107

A PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS USING FLUID-BED DRYING AND VOLATILITY TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

A process scheme for the recovery of uranium from fuel elements has been developed. The scheme combines continuous fluid-bed drying and fluoride volatility techniques after initial dissolution of the fuel element in the appropriate aqueous system, hence the designation ADF, Aqueous Dry Fluorination Process. The application of this process to the recovery of uranium from highly enriched, low uranium-zirconium alloy plate-type fuels is described. ln the process, the feed solution is sprayed horizontally through a two-fluid nozzle and is atomized directly in the heated fluidized bed. The spray droplets are dried on the fluidized particles and form a dense coating. Excessive particle growth was limited by the use of air attrition-jets inserted directly in the bed. Aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions containing l.2 to 3.6 M zirconiuni, 0.007 to 0.03 M uranium, and free acid concentrations from 1 to about l0 M were successfully processed in a 6-in.-diameter Inconel fluid-bed spray dryer. Rates equivalent to about 3.l kg/hr of zirconium were achieved, 160 ml/min with the most concentrated feed solution. Experiments were successfully carried out from 240 to 450 deg C. A new design for a two-fluid nozzle was developed. Extensive work was done to identify the various zirconium fluoride compounds formed. The granular dryer product was subsequently fluorinated at temperatures to 600 deg C in fluid beds and to 700 deg C in static beds to remove the uranium as the volatile hexafluoride. About 90 to 95% uranium removal was consistently achieved near 600 deg C. The relatively low uranium recovery under these conditions is a disadvantage for the application to zirconium-base fuels. It was found necessary to resort to static beds and higher temperatures to achieve greater removal. Since the fluorine attack on nickel, the material of construction, is prohibitive at temperatures above 600 deg C, a disposable fluorinator concept for use with static beds is described. Results of corrosion studies are reported. A preliminary chemical flowsheet with a design capacity of 1l00 kg of uranium (93% enriched) annually is presented. (auth)

Levitz, N.; Barghusen, J.; Carls, E.; Jonke, A.A.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Dust Emission from Wet and Dry Playas in the Mojave Desert, USA 1811 Published in 2007 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Earth Surf. Process. Landforms 32, 18111827 (2007)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, they precipitate minerals such as halite (NaCl), trona (NaH[CO3]·Na2[CO3]·2H2O), thenardite (Na2SO4) and burkeite table are sometimes fluffy and contain abundant efflorescent salt minerals (halite, thenardite, trona and trona) commonly occur in a limited area (about 50 hectares) in the east-central part of Franklin Lake

109

Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine [Ohio University, Athens, OH (US). Ohio Coal Research Center

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Application of solar energy to industrial drying or dehydration processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of a solar energy system to the Lawrence, Kansas alfalfa dehydration plant, owned by the Western Alfalfa Corporation, is an attractive opportunity to demonstrate the feasibility of using solar energy to supply industrial process heat. The work undertaken for this project is reviewed. The design parameters of the dehydrator, including the energy consumed by the plant, the airflow requirements of the dehydrator, and the interface between the dehydrator and the solar array are discussed. The design of the collector array, the selection of solar collectors, the calculation of collector areas for the array, and the simulations of the system performance are addressed. Discussions of the detailed engineering drawings and specifications of the array construction, duct work, air handling equipment, system controls, and data monitoring, and acquisition systems are presented. The results of the contractors' bids based on these drawings and specifications are given. An economic analysis of the solar system using the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory format is presented. Finally, the impact of the solar system on the process energy requirements and on the operation of the plant are discussed. (WHK)

Not Available

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Catalytic gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet biomass (water hyacinth, banana trees, cattails, green algae, kelp, etc.) grows rapidly and abundantly around the world. As a biomass crop, aquatic species are particularly attractive because their cultivation does not compete with land-based agricultural activities designed to produce food for consumption or export. However, wet biomass is not regarded as a promising feed for conventional thermochemical conversion processes because the cost associated with drying it is too high. This research seeks to address this problem by employing water as the gasification medium. Prior work has shown that low concentrations of glucose (a model compound for whole biomass) can be completely gasified in supercritical water at 600{degrees}C and 34.5 Wa after a 30 s reaction time. Higher concentrations of glucose (up to 22% by weight in water) resulted in incomplete conversion under these conditions. The gas contained hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, propane, and traces of other hydrocarbons. The carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are easily converted to hydrogen by commercial technology available in most refineries. This prior work utilized capillary tube reactors with no catalyst. A larger reactor system was fabricated and the heterogeneous catalytic gasification of glucose and wet biomass slurry of higher concentration was studied to attain higher conversions.

Antal, M.J. Jr.; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Xu, Xiaodong [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Processes Controlling the Mean Tropical Pacific Precipitation Pattern. Part II: The SPCZ and the Southeast Pacific Dry Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of the South Pacific convergence zone (SPCZ) is addressed by focusing on the dry (and cool) zone bounded by it and the coast of South America through numerical experiments. As shown in a companion paper, this dry zone is due, to a ...

Ken Takahashi; David S. Battisti

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

114

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg{sub evap} to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg[sub evap] to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Spray type wet scrubber  

SciTech Connect

A spray type wet scrubber includes a plurality of spray nozzles installed in parallel banks across the path of gas stream within the scrubber body, and partition walls held upright in grating fashion to divide the path of gas stream into a plurality of passages, each of which accommodates one of the spray nozzles.

Atsukawa, M.; Tatani, A.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2003 and June 30, 2003 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for concentration of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Grade 1 sodium bicarbonate performed similarly to grade 5 sodium bicarbonate in fixed bed testing in that activity improved after the first carbonation cycle and did not decline over the course of 5 cycles. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that sodium bicarbonate sorbents produced by calcination of sodium bicarbonate are superior to either soda ash or calcined trona. Energy requirements for regeneration of carbon dioxide sorbents (either wet or dry) is of primary importance in establishing the economic feasibility of carbon dioxide capture processes. Recent studies of liquid amine sorption processes were reviewed and found to incorporate conflicting assumptions of energy requirements. Dry sodium based processes have the potential to be less energy intensive and thus less expensive than oxygen inhibited amine based systems. For dry supported sorbents, maximizing the active fraction of the sorbent is of primary importance in developing an economically feasible process.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Douglas P. Harrison

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Spent Fuel Drying System Test Results (Dry-Run in Preparation for Run 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of a test ''dry-run'' conducted prior to the eighth and last of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister6513U. The system used for the dry-run test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 4.0 and discussed Section 5.0.

BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

Development of a catalytic system for gasification of wet biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification system is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory that can be used with high-moisture biomass feedstocks. The system operates at 350 C and 205 atm using a liquid water phase as the processing medium. Since a pressurized system is used, the wet biomass can be fed as a slurry to the reactor without drying. Through the development of catalysts, a useful processing system has been produced. This paper includes assessment of processing test results of different catalysts. Reactor system results including batch, bench-scale continuous, and engineering-scale processing results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of this catalytic gasification system to biomass. The system has utility both for direct conversion of biomass to fuel gas or as a wastewater cleanup system for treatment of unconverted biomass from bioconversion processes. By the use of this system high conversion of biomass to fuel gas can be achieved. Medium-Btu is the primary product. Potential exists for recovery/recycle of some of the unreacted inorganic components from the biomass in the aqueous byproduct stream.

Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J.; Phelps, M.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Droughts and Persistent Wet Spells over the United States and Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Droughts and persistent wet spells over the United States and northwest Mexico have preferred regions of occurrence and persistence. Wet or dry conditions that persist more than 1 yr tend to occur over the interior United States west of 90°–95°W ...

Kingtse C. Mo; Jae E. Schemm

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alternating Wet and Dry Episodes over California and Intraseasonal Oscillations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NCEP–NCAR reanalysis together with the outgoing longwave radiation anomalies (OLRAs) and a gridded daily precipitation over the United States were used to analyze precipitation over California on intraseasonal timescales. The intraseasonal (...

Kingtse C. Mo

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Dynamics of Wet and Dry Years in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a theoretical framework for describing interannual climatic variability over West Africa. The dynamical theory of zonally symmetrical thermally direct circulations suggests that a meridional monsoon circulation must develop ...

Elfatih A. B. Eltahir; Cuiling Gong

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally ...  

A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The ...

125

Galaxy formation from dry and hydro simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of dry and wet merging on the Scaling Laws (SLs) of elliptical galaxies (Es) are discussed. It is found that the galaxy SLs, possibly established at high redshift by the fast collapse of gas-rich and clumpy stellar distributions in preexisting dark matter halos following the cosmological SLs, are compatible with a (small) number of galaxy mergers at lower redshift.

Ciotti, L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wet-limestone scrubbing fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article examines important concepts of wet-limestone scrubbing. It also addresses the topic of by-product disposal. 3 refs., 1 fig.

Buecker, B.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Revised Wet Stack Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 14 years, the design of wet stacks around the world has been guided by the original EPRI Wet Stacks Design Guide (1996). Since that time, the number of wet stack installations has grown considerably, and a wealth of practical real-world operating and maintenance experience has been obtained. The laws of physics have not changed, and most of the information presented in 1996 is just as valid today as it was when originally published. What has changed is the power-generation ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Process for treating moisture laden coal fines  

SciTech Connect

A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

Davis, Burl E. (New Kensington, PA); Henry, Raymond M. (Gibsonia, PA); Trivett, Gordon S. (South Surrey, CA); Albaugh, Edgar W. (Birmingham, AL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

131

Dynamic wetting and heat transfer behaviour of aluminium droplets impinging and solidifying on copper substrates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present work describes an experimental set-up built to simulate dynamic wetting and heat transfer occurring in many rapid solidification processes. Tests were performed with… (more)

Leboeuf, Sébastien

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High strength air-dried aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

The TEES process cleans waste and produces energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification system is under development that can be used with most types of wet organic wastes. The system operates at 350{degrees}C and 205 atm using a liquid water phase as the processing medium. Since a pressurized system is used, the wet waste can be fed as a solution or slurry to the reactor without drying. Through the development of catalysts, a useful processing system has been produced. The system has utility both for direct conversion of high-moisture biomass to fuel gas or as a wastewater cleanup system for wet organic wastes including unconverted biomass from bioconversion processes. By the use of this system >99% conversions of organic waste to medium-Btu fuel gas can be achieved.

Elliott, D.C.; Silva, L.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Roles of Dry Convection, Cloud-Radiation Feedback Processes and the Influence of Recent Improvements in the Parameterization of Convection in the GLA GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the simulated July circulation to modifications in the parameterization of dry and moist convection, evaporation from failing raindrops, and cloud-radiation interaction is examined with the GLA (Goddard Laboratory for ...

Y. Sud; A. Molod

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Glossary Term - Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deuteron Previous Term (Deuteron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Electron) Electron Dry Ice A block of dry ice sublimating on a table. Dry ice is the solid form of carbon dioxide...

136

Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG...

138

Report on Biomass Drying Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using dry fuel provides significant benefits to combustion boilers, mainly increased boiler efficiency, lower air emissions, and improved boiler operation. The three main choices for drying biomass are rotary dryers, flash dryers, and superheated steam dryers. Which dryer is chosen for a particular application depends very much on the material characteristics of the biomass, the opportunities for integrating the process and dryer, and the environmental controls needed or already available.

Amos, W. A.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hydrogen incorporation into III-V nitrides during processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is readily incorporated into GaN and related alloys during wet and dry etching, chemical vapor deposition of dielectric overlayers, boiling in water and other process steps, in addition to its effects during MOCVD or MOMBE growth. The hydrogen is bound at defects or impurities and passivates their electrical activity. Reactivation occurs at 450-550{degrees}C, but evolution from the crystal requires much higher temperatures ({ge} 800{degrees}C).

Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Vartuli, C.B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Specs add confidence in use of wet welding. [Underwater welding  

SciTech Connect

Underwater wet welding can now be utilized with the same confidence as dry welding, provided certain guidelines are followed. A new electrode is discussed that has been delivering exceptionally high quality welds by a diving firm in Houston. With the issuance of the American Welding Society's specifications (ANS/LAWS D3.6-83) much of the confusion surrounding underwater welding should be eliminated. The new specifications establish the levels of quality for underwater welding and gives everyone in the business a common language.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a , Eric Blond1, b , Alain Gasser1 Forbach, France a damintode.kolani@univ-orleans.fr, b eric.blond@univ-orleans.fr Keywords: coal, drying: drying process and pyrolysis of coal. A heat and mass transfer model was developed to simulate the drying

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization State of the Art Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies, including circulating dry scrubbers (CDS), spray dryer absorbers (SDA), and the Alstom Novel Integrated Desulfurization (NID) technology. These can all be considered “semi-dry” technologies, as the flue gas is cooled and humidified as part of each of these processes. This report also discusses a completely dry FGD technology, dry sorbent injection (DSI), which is ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

Determination of freeze-drying behaviors of apples by artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freeze drying is the best drying technology regarding quality of the end product but it is an expensive method and the high costs of process limit its application to industrial scale. At the same time, the freeze-drying process is based on different ... Keywords: ANN, Apple, Drying, Freeze drying, Modeling

Tayfun Menlik; Mustafa Bahad?r Özdemir; Volkan Kirmaci

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Drying Results of K-Basin Fuel Element 6513U (Run 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the eighth of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 6513U. This element (referred to as Element 6513U) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 6513U was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0 and discussed in Section 6.0.

BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 1164M (run 6)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the sixth of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 1164 M. This element (referred to as Element 1164M) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 1164M was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0, and discussed in Section 6.0.

Oliver, B.M.; Klinger, G.S.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 5744U (Run 4)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basins have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the fourth of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 5744U. This element (referred to as Element 5744U) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 5744U was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0, and discussed in Section 6.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Drying Results of K-Basin Fuel Element 2660M (Run 7)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the seventh of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 2660M. This element (referred to as Element 2660M) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 2660M was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0, and discussed in Section 6.0.

B.M. Oliver; G.S. Klinger; J. Abrefah; S.C. Marschman; P.J. MacFarlan; G.A. Ritter

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

148

,"California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

149

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

150

Wet Corn Milling Energy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

307 307 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Christina Galitsky, Ernst Worrell and Michael Ruth Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency July 2003 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

151

Hanford Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Multi-Canister Overpack...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that was designed to dry the irradiated fuel rods which were previously stored underwater in the K-Basins. Upon completion of the drying process in the CVDF, the MCOs,...

152

Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Transporting Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements for Shipping Dry Ice IATA PI 904 Source: Reg of the Day from ERCweb 2006 Environmental Resource Center | 919-469-1585 | webmaster@ercweb.com http:...

154

Combined Corex/DRI technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasible steelmaking alternative, the Corex/direct reduction/electric arc furnace combination, provides an economic route for the production of high quality steel products. This combination is a major step into a new generation of iron and steel mills. These mills are based on the production of liquid steel using noncoking coal and comply with the increasing demands of environmental protection. The favorable production costs are based on: Utilization of Corex and DRI/HBI plants; Production of hot metal equal to blast furnace quality; Use of low cost raw materials such as noncoking coal and lump ore; Use of process gas as reducing agent for DRI/HBI production; and Use of electric arc furnace with high hot metal input as the steelmaking process. The high flexibility of the process permits the adjustment of production in accordance with the strategy of the steel mills. New but proven technologies and applications of the latest state of art steelmaking process, e.g., Corex, in conjunction with DRI production as basic raw material for an electric arc furnace, will insure high quality, high availability, optimized energy generation at high efficiency rates, and high product quality for steelmaking.

Flickenschild, A.J.; Reufer, F. [Deutsche Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau GmbH, Dusseldorf (Germany); Eberle, A.; Siuka, D. [Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau, Linz (Austria)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

2009 Update on Mercury Capture by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update presents results of four research and development projects focused on understanding and enhancing mercury emissions control associated with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology. The first project was directed at characterizing partitioning of elemental and oxidized mercury species in solid, liquid, and gas phases within process streams involved in an operating commercial system. The second project explored dewatering options with an objective of producing low-mercury-conten...

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Quantifying the ENSO-Related Shifts in the Intensity and Probability of Drought and Wet Periods in Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper quantifies the impact of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the intensity and occurrence probability of dry and wet periods in Iran during boreal autumn and winter. Three phases (warm, cold, and neutral) were defined based on ...

M. J. Nazemosadat; A. R. Ghasemi

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Survey of hybrid solar heat pump drying systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar drying is in practice since the ancient time for preservation of food and agriculture crops. The objective of most drying processes is to reduce the moisture content of the product to a specified value. Solar dryers used in agriculture for food ... Keywords: coefficient of performance (COP), direct expansion SAHD, drying chamber, heat pump, solar assisted heat pumps dryer (SAHPD), solar fraction

R. Daghigh; K. Sopian; M. H. Ruslan; M. A. Alghoul; C. H. Lim; S. Mat; B. Ali; M. Yahya; A. Zaharim; M. Y. Sulaiman

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of a simulation model in predicting the drying parameters for deep-bed paddy drying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation model for deep-bed batch drying of paddy was developed to predict the profiles of grain moisture content, grain temperature, air temperature and air humidity during the drying process. In order to evaluate the validity of this model, a laboratory-scale ... Keywords: Deep-bed, Energy optimization, Paddy, Simulation model

Dariush Zare; Guangnan Chen

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 1990 (Run 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100-Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basins have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuels in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first of those tests (Run 1), which was conducted on an N-Reactor inner fuel element (1990) that had been stored underwater in the K-West Basin (see Section 2.0). This fuel element was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The testing was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 3.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in Section 4.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 5.0. These results are further discussed in Section 6.0.

Marschman, S.C.; Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

162

Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic...

163

Table 3. Wet natural gas production and resources (trillion cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR, including reserve

164

Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

165

Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

166

Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

167

Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

168

Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

169

Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

170

Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

171

Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

172

Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

173

New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

174

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

175

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

176

Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

177

Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

178

Breakdown in the Wetting Transparency of Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a theory to model the van der Waals interactions between liquid and graphene, including quantifying the wetting behavior of a graphene-coated surface. Molecular dynamics simulations and contact angle measurements ...

Shih, Chih-Jen

179

Wetting of a Chemically Heterogeneous Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theories for inhomogeneous fluids have focused in recent years on wetting, capillary conden- sation, and solvation forces for model systems where the surface(s) is(are) smooth homogeneous parallel plates, cylinders, or spherical drops. Unfortunately natural systems are more likely to be hetaogeneous both in surt%ce shape and surface chemistry. In this paper we discuss the conse- quences of chemical heterogeneity on wetting. Specifically, a 2-dimensional implementation of a nonlocal density functional theory is solved for a striped surface model. Both the strength and range of the heterogeneity are varied. Contact angles are calculated, and phase transitions (both the wetting transition and a local layering transition) are located. The wetting properties of the surface ase shown to be strongly dependent on the nature of the surface heterogeneity. In addition highly ordered nanoscopic phases are found, and the operational limits for formation of ordered or crystalline phases of nanoscopic extent are discussed.

Frink, L.J.D.; Salinger, A.G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking  

SciTech Connect

Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Freeze drying method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Freeze drying apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

dry natural gas production - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Dry natural gas production: The process of producing consumer-grade natural gas. Natural gas withdrawn from reservoirs is reduced by volumes used at the production ...

184

TIP Project Brief100019 Atmospheric Spray Freeze Dried ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. TIP Project Brief – 100019/11H003 Manufacturing Atmospheric Spray Freeze Dried Powder Process Advancement and Scale-Up ...

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON PROCESSING AND HANDLING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Battle, DuPont White Pigments and Mineral Products, Edge Moor Plant, Edge Moor, ... PHYSICAL EXAMINATION AND HANDLING OF WET AND DRY C60: K. ... part of a modern ironmaking blast furnace with high pulverised coal injection, ...

186

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

187

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 3128W (run 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An N-Reactor outer fuel element that had been stored underwater in the Hanford 100 Area K-East Basin was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments. These studies are part of a series of tests being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the drying behavior of N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel elements removed from both the K-West and K-East Basins. The drying test series was designed to test fuel elements that ranged from intact to severely damaged. The fuel element discussed in this report was removed from an open K-East canister (3128W) during the first fuel selection campaign conducted in 1995, and has remained in wet storage in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building) since that time. Although it was judged to be breached during in-basin (i.e., K-Basin) examinations, visual inspection of this fuel element in the hot cell indicated that it was likely intact. Some scratches on the coating covering the cladding were identified before the furnace test. The drying test was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System located in G-Cell within the PTL. This test system is composed of three basic systems: the in-cell furnace equipment, the system gas loop, and the analytical instrument package. Element 3128W was subjected to the drying processes based on those proposed under the Integrated Process Strategy, which included a hot drying step. Results of the Pressure Rise and Gas Evolution Tests suggest that most of the free water in the system was released during the extended CVD cycle (68 hr versus 8 hr for the first run). An additional {approximately}0.34 g of water was released during the subsequent HVD phase, characterized by multiple water release peaks, with a principle peak at {approximately}180 C. This additional water is attributed to decomposition of a uranium hydrate (UO{sub 4}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O/UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) coating that was observed to be covering the surface of the fuel element to a thickness of {approximately}1.6 mg/cm{sup 2}. A limited quantity of hydrogen ({approximately}9 mg) was also released during HVD, mainly at temperatures above 300 C, likely from hydride decomposition.

Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Marshman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Flament, T.A. [Numatec Hanford Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Combined Grinding and Drying of Biomass in One Operation Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First American Scientific Corporation (FASC) has developed a unique and innovative grinder/dryer called KDS Micronex. The KS (Kinetic Disintegration System) combines two operations of grinding and drying into a single operation which reduces dependence on external heat input. The machine captures the heat of comminution and combines it will centrifugal forces to expedite moisture extraction from wet biomass. Because it uses mechanical forces rather than providing direct heat to perform the drying operation, it is a simpler machine and uses less energy than conventional grinding and drying operations which occur as two separate steps. The entire compact unit can be transported on a flatbed trailer to the site where biomass is available. Hence, the KDS Micronex is a technology that enables inexpensive pretreatment of waste materials and biomass. A well prepared biomass can be used as feed, fuel or fertilizer instead of being discarded. Electricity and chemical feedstock produced from such biomass would displace the use of fossil fuels and no net greenhouse gas emissions would result from such bio-based operations. Organic fertilizers resulting from the KS Micronex grinding/drying process will be pathogen-free unlike raw animal manures. The feasibility tests on KS during Phase I showed that a prototype machine can be developed, field tested and the technology demonstrated for commercial applications. The present KDS machine can remove up to 400 kg/h of water from a wet feed material. Since biomass processors demand a finished product that is only 10% moist and most raw materials like corn stover, bagasse, layer manure, cow dung, and waste wood have moisture contents of the order of 50%, this water removal rate translates to a production rate of roughly half a ton per hour. this is too small for most processors who are unwilling to acquire multiple machines because of the added complexity to the feed and product removal systems. The economics suffer due to small production rates, because the labor costs are a much larger fraction of the production cost. The goal for further research and development work is to scale up the KDS technology incorporating findings from Phase I into a machine that has superior performance characteristics.

Sokhansanj, S.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

190

Gelcasting compositions having improved drying characteristics and machinability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gelcasting composition has improved drying behavior, machinability and shelf life in the dried and unfired state. The composition includes an inorganic powder, solvent, monomer system soluble in the solvent, an initiator system for polymerizing the monomer system, and a plasticizer soluble in the solvent. Dispersants and other processing aides to control slurry properties can be added. The plasticizer imparts an ability to dry thick section parts, to store samples in the dried state without cracking under conditions of varying relative humidity, and to machine dry gelcast parts without cracking or chipping. A method of making gelcast parts is also disclosed.

Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Walls, Claudia A. H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, L.G.

1979-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wet powder seal for gas containment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

Enhanced Mercury Removal by Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results from testing conducted in 2005 as part of three EPRI co-funded projects that are aimed at enhancing the capture of mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers when scrubbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first project is co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, "Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD," as well as by two...

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fate of Mercury in Wet FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a bench-scale, laboratory investigation of the fate of flue gas mercury species in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers that are used for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control in coal-fired power plants. Data collected in the EPA mercury Information Collection Request (ICR), and in research projects sponsored by EPRI show that most wet scrubbers used for SO2 control achieve high removals of oxidized mercury and little or no elemental mercury removal. However, some scru...

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dry piston coal feeder  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a solids feeder for feeding dry coal to a pressurized gasifier at elevated temperatures substantially without losing gas from the gasifier by providing a lock having a double-acting piston that feeds the coals into the gasifier, traps the gas from escaping, and expels the trapped gas back into the gasifier.

Hathaway, Thomas J. (Belle Meade, NJ); Bell, Jr., Harold S. (Madison, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Factors affecting quality of dried low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The chemical and physical properties of coal are strongly affected by the upgrading process employed. For high-moisture coals, upgrading involves thermal dehydration to improve the calorific value of the coal on mass basis. This study evaluates the feasibility of upgrading a low-rank/grade coal using the oven drying method. The objective of this research work is to study the drying characteristics of low-rank coals and to understand the factors affecting the quality of dried low-rank coals. This article describes laboratory experiments conducted on the characterization of the low-rank coals before and after the drying process. The results on drying kinetics, re-absorption of coal samples, and proximate analysis of coal samples before and after drying are discussed. It was found that the upgrading process produced coal with better heating value and combustion characteristics than those of the raw coal samples.

Karthikeyan, M.; Kuma, J.V.M.; Hoe, C.S.; Ngo, D.L.Y. [National University of Singapore, (Singapore)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

International Journal of Machine Tools & Manufacture 47 (2007) 22732281 Near dry electrical discharge machining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discharge machining C.C. Kao, Jia Tao, Albert J. ShihÃ? Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann. The dielectric strength, defined as the maximum electric field strength that the dielectric fluid can withstand and kerosene-based oil are two commonly used dielectric fluids in conventional wet EDM. Dry EDM uses gas

Shih, Albert J.

199

Crop residue conversion to biogas by dry fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple 'dry fermentation' process has been developed that may enable economical conversion of drier crop residues to biogas. Results from two years of process definition and scale-up to a 110 m/sup 3/ prototype show that biogas production rates exceeding those necessary to make the dry fermentor competitive have been achieved. 13 refs.

Jewell, W.J.; Dell'Orto, S.; Fanfoni, K.J.; Fast, S.J.; Jackson, D.A.; Kabrick, R.M.; Gottung, E.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Water Vapor Transfer over the Southwest Pacific: Mean Patterns and Variations during Wet and Dry Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean water vapor transfer of the Southwest Pacific, as determined from radiosonde records near the 170°E meridional transect, is computed for the 1960–73 period. Emphasis is placed on defining average patterns, then examining variations that ...

M. M. Khatep; B. B. Fitzharris; W. E. Bardsley

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Critically safe vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vacuum pickup of critically safe quantity and geometric shape is used in cleanup of radioactive materials. Collected radioactive material is accumulated in four vertical, parallel, equally spaced canisters arranged in a cylinder configuration. Each canister contains a filter bag. An upper intake manifold includes four 90 degree spaced, downward facing nipples. Each nipple communicates with the top of a canister. The bottom of each canister communicates with an exhaust manifold comprising four radially extending tubes that meet at the bottom of a centrally located vertical cylinder. The top of the central cylinder terminates at a motor/fan power head. A removable HEPA filter is located intermediate the top of the central cylinder and the power head. Four horizontal bypass tubes connect the top of the central cylinder to the top of each of the canisters. Air enters the vacuum cleaner via a hose connected to the intake manifold. Air then travels down the canisters, where particulate material is accumulated in generally equal quantities in each filter bag. Four air paths of bag filtered air then pass radially inward to the bottom of the central cylinder. Air moves up the central cylinder, through the HEPA filter, through a vacuum fan compartment, and exits the vacuum cleaner. A float air flow valve is mounted at the top of the central cylinder. When liquid accumulates to a given level within the central cylinder, the four bypass tubes, and the four canisters, suction is terminated by operation of the float valve.

Zeren, Joseph D. (390 Forest Ave., Boulder, CO 80304)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

QUANTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND ENTEROCOCCI LEVELS IN WET WEATHER AND DRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, FL 32611, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 31 July 2009 Received experiments were performed with large intact soil columns (4.3 cm Ã? 80 cm). A glass wool with 8 m pore size were smaller than 8 m after passing through the glass wool filter. Filters with pore sizes of 0

Pitt, Robert E.

203

An experimental study of OH uptake by surfaces of tropospheric importance under dry and wet conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of relative humidity (RH) on OH uptake by surfaces of tropospheric importance was investigated. Due to diffusion limitation conditions, experiments were performed with parallel reactors packed with beads and ...

Park, Jong-Ho, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The City of Guelph Wet-Dry Recycling Center Alexander N. Themelis, Research Associate,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in mind the topography and soil analysis, prevailing wind direction as well as all adjacent occupancy and hydrasorter which is a simple jig sorter for glass, aluminum, and heavy cup separation - small nonferrous i

Columbia University

205

A Theoretical Study of the Wet Removal of Atmospheric Pollutants. Part I: The Redistribution of Aerosol Particles Captured through Nucleation and Impaction Scavenging by Growing Cloud Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical model is formulated which allows the processes that control the wet deposition of atmospheric pollutants to be included in cloud dynamic models. The model considers the condensation process and the collision-coalescence process ...

A. I. Flossmann; W. D. Hall; H. R. Pruppacher

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Cost analysis of an ammonia dry cooling system with a Chicago Bridge and Iron peak shaving system  

SciTech Connect

A study was performed to determine the potential for reducing the cost associated with dry cooling by using an ammonia dry cooling system augmented with the Chicago Bridge and Iron (CP and I) peak shaving system. The cost analysis of an all-dry ammonia cooling system operating in conjunction with a peak shaving system is documented. The peak shaving system utilizes the excess cooling capability available at night to cool water to be used for supplemental cooling during the following day. The analysis consisted of determining the incremental cost of cooling for the CB and I system and comparing this cost to the incremental cost of cooling for both dry and wet/dry systems for a consistent set of design conditions and assumptions. The wet/dry systems were analyzed over a range of water usages. The basis of the comparisons was a cooling system designed for installations with a 650 mWe (gross) coal-fired power plant. From results of the study it was concluded that: the CB and I system shows a substantial economic advantage when compared with an all-dry cooling system; the CB and I system appears to be competitive with wet/dry cooling systems using about 2 to 3% water; and the CB and I system demonstrates a clear economic advantage when compared to both dry and wet/dry concepts for a winter peaking utility where the excess generation is assumed to displace both base-loaded coal-fired power generation and oil-fired gas turbine peaking units.

Drost, M.K.; Johnson, B.M.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Wet-Etch Figuring Optical Figuring by Controlled Application of Liquid Etchant  

SciTech Connect

WET-ETCH FIGURING (WEF) is an automated method of precisely figuring optical materials by the controlled application of aqueous etchant solution. This technology uses surface-tension-gradient-driven flow to confine and stabilize a wetted zone of an etchant solution or other aqueous processing fluid on the surface of an object. This wetted zone can be translated on the surface in a computer-controlled fashion for precise spatial control of the surface reactions occurring (e.g. chemical etching). WEF is particularly suitable for figuring very thin optical materials because it applies no thermal or mechanical stress to the material. Also, because the process is stress-free the workpiece can be monitored during figuring using interferometric metrology, and the measurements obtained can be used to control the figuring process in real-time--something that cannot be done with traditional figuring methods.

Britten, J

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

208

Predictive modeling of reactive wetting and metal joining.  

SciTech Connect

The performance, reproducibility and reliability of metal joints are complex functions of the detailed history of physical processes involved in their creation. Prediction and control of these processes constitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy and reactive wetting. Understanding this process requires coupling strong molecularscale chemistry at the interface with microscopic (diffusion) and macroscopic mass transport (flow) inside the liquid followed by subsequent cooling and solidification of the new metal mixture. The final joint displays compositional heterogeneity and its resulting microstructure largely determines the success or failure of the entire component. At present there exists no computational tool at Sandia that can predict the formation and success of a braze joint, as current capabilities lack the ability to capture surface/interface reactions and their effect on interface properties. This situation precludes us from implementing a proactive strategy to deal with joining problems. Here, we describe what is needed to arrive at a predictive modeling and simulation capability for multicomponent metals with complicated phase diagrams for melting and solidification, incorporating dissolutive and composition-dependent wetting.

van Swol, Frank B.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International 1 is heading a research team to develop an innovative process for CO 2 capture that employs a dry, regenerable sorbent. The process is cyclic in that the sorbent...

210

Theoretical and experimental analysis of desiccant wheel performance for low humidity drying system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drying process is influenced by three main factors temperature, flow rate and humidity, resulting in the drying process of hot air required in accordance with the character of materials with low humidity, so it can speed up the drying process. Malaysia ... Keywords: desiccant wheel, temperature and humidity, water evaporation

Tri Suyono; Sohif Mat; Muhammad Yahya; Muhd. Hafiz Ruslan; Azami Zaharim; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The impact of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities have made decisions to decommission nuclear plants. Other utilities are currently investigating the economic and technical feasibility of decommissioning versus continued operations. As a result, assessments are being made to determine the impact of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning. This assessment is being made on a comparison of wet and dry storage (including modifications to current wet storage systems). Not only are the capital and operating costs of the equipment or modifications being evaluated, but staffing levels, interference with other decommissioning activities, and the ability to eventually transfer the fuel to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all factor into the assessments. In the case of the Rancho Seco nuclear generating station, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) developed three objectives related to spent-fuel disposition to support the safe and economical closure of the plant. These objectives are as follows: 1. Minimize occupational and public radiation exposure. 2. Minimize decommissioning costs, including the need to maintain the spent-fuel pool. 3. Prepare the fuel for DOE acceptance. These rather universal goals are being met for Rancho Seco through the use of a canister-based spent-fuel storage and transportation system, the NUHOMS system. This paper discusses the economic and technical impacts of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning, more specifically as it relates to the decommissioning of the Rancho Seco plant.

Bowser, R.C.; Taylor, M. Jr. (Pacific Nuclear, San Jose, CA (United States)); Miller, K.R. (Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Herald, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET) Place Chennai, India Zip 601 302 Sector Wind energy...

215

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

216

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)

217

Method of drying articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: (a) Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and (b) contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores. 3 figs.

Janney, M.A.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Method of drying articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: a. Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and b. contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores.

Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

OXIDE NANOPARTICLES AND NANOSTRUCTURED COATINGS BY WET CHEMICAL PROCESSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ultrafiltration membranes derived from carboxylate­alumoxane nanoparticles, C. D. Jones, M. Fidalgo, M. R. Wiesner

Verweij, Henk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Enzymatic corn wet milling: engineering process and cost model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Edna C Ramírez; David B Johnston; Andrew J Mcaloon; Vijay Singh; Open Access; Edna C Ramírez; David B Johnston; Andrew J Mcaloon; Vijay Singh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Stacker-reclaimer scheduling in a dry bulk terminal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dry bulk terminal acts as a multi-modal interface for transhipping iron ores. Stacker-reclaimers are the dedicated equipments in storage yard for iron ore handling. Both unloading and loading processes are supported by stacker-reclaimers in most cases. ... Keywords: dry bulk terminal, genetic algorithm, lower bound, stacker-reclaimer scheduling

Dayong Hu; Zhenqiang Yao

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Scaling of the normal coefficient of restitution for wet impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thorough understanding of the energy dissipation in the dynamics of wet granular matter is essential for a continuum description of natural phenomena such as debris flow, and the development of various industrial applications such as the granulation process. The coefficient of restitution (COR), defined as the ratio between the relative rebound and impact velocities of a binary impact, is frequently used to characterize the amount of energy dissipation associated. We measure the COR by tracing a freely falling sphere bouncing on a wet surface with the liquid film thickness monitored optically. For fixed ratio between the film thickness and the particle size, the dependence of the COR on the impact velocity and various properties of the liquid film can be characterized with the Stokes number, defined as the ratio between the inertia of the particle and the viscosity of the liquid. Moreover, the COR for infinitely large impact velocities derived from the scaling can be analyzed by a model considering the energy dissipation from the inertia of the liquid film.

Thomas Mueller; Frank Gollwitzer; Christof Kruelle; Ingo Rehberg; Kai Huang

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Phospho-gypsum recovery process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for treating phospho-gypsum waste product which is produced in the manufacture of phosphoric acid by the wet-acid process in which suitable phosphate rock is treated with sulforic acid to product phosphoric acid and in which a mixture of phospho-gypsum waste product and carbonaceous material is heated to produce gaseous SO/sub 2/, P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ containing materials and HF containing materials. The improvement comprises drying a mixture of phospho-gypsum waste product and carbonaceous material, removing a first gaseous stream containing water, acids and fluorine, separating the fluorine from the first gaseous stream by reacting with lime or limestone to produce fluorspar, recovering the fluorspar, calcining the dried phospho-gypsum under reducing conditions to produce a second gaseous stream containing SO/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ with substantially no fluorine values, and utilizing the second gaseous stream in a sulfuric acid manufacturing plant.

Wilson, E.K. Sr.; Spigolon, S.J.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluation of the Accuracy with Which Dry Deposition Can Be Measured with Current Micrometeorological Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By reviewing the physics of the processes leading to dry deposition in the atmospheric surface layer, a number of corrections and possible errors in the determination of the dry deposition fluxes are identified. The concept of deposition velocity ...

J. A. Businger

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

Murison, Julie; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Herminghaus, Stephan; Schröter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

Julie Murison; Benoît Semin; Jean-Christophe Baret; Stephan Herminghaus; Matthias Schröter; Martin Brinkmann

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

Enhanced Control of Mercury by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems - Site 2 Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installation...

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

229

Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery in Fractional-Wet Systems: A Pore-Scale Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a technology that could potentially increase the tertiary recovery of oil from mature oil formations. However, the efficacy of this technology in fractional-wet systems is unknown, and the mechanisms involved in oil mobilization therefore need further investigation. Our MEOR strategy consists of the injection of ex situ produced metabolic byproducts produced by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2 (which lower interfacial tension (IFT) via biosurfactant production) into fractional-wet cores containing residual oil. Two different MEOR flooding solutions were tested; one solution contained both microbes and metabolic byproducts while the other contained only the metabolic byproducts. The columns were imaged with X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) after water flooding, and after MEOR, which allowed for the evaluation of the pore-scale processes taking place during MEOR. Results indicate that the larger residual oil blobs and residual oil held under relatively low capillary pressures were the main fractions recovered during MEOR. Residual oil saturation, interfacial curvatures, and oil blob sizes were measured from the CMT images and used to develop a conceptual model for MEOR in fractional-wet systems. Overall, results indicate that MEOR was effective at recovering oil from fractional-wet systems with reported additional oil recovered (AOR) values between 44 and 80%; the highest AOR values were observed in the most oil-wet system.

Armstrong, Ryan T.; Wildenschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. After describing the industry's trends, structure and production and the process's energy use, we examine energy-efficiency opportunities for corn wet millers. Where available, we provide energy savings and typical payback periods for each measure based on case studies of plants that have implemented it. Given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the industry while maintaining the quality of the products produced. Further research on the economics of the measures and their applicability to different wet milling practices is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fabrication of inverse micro/nano pyramid structures using soft UV-NIL and wet chemical methods for residual layer removal and Si-etching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we present a novel and simple fabrication method for micro- and nano-scale inverse pyramidal structures by a combination of soft UV-NIL and wet chemical etchings. The unique feature of our method is the absence of a RIE process, which is ... Keywords: Micro/nano inverse pyramids, Nanoimprint, Residual layer etching with wet chemical

J. W. Kim, U. Plachetka, C. Moormann, H. Kurz

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Method for the wet quenching of coke  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for the wet quenching of coke is disclosed wherein hot coke is sprayed from above with quenching water, the steam generated by the heat of the coke is condensed by a spray of condensation water from the top of the quenching tower, and the hot condensate-water mixture is collected at the bottom of the quenching tower and recirculated to the top of the tower where it is sprayed between quenching operations to be cooled by a counterflowing stream of air. The cooled condensate water mixture is suitable for reuse as the condensation spray water.

Blase, M.; Flockenhaus, C.; Wagener, D.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Data Assimilation of Tropopause Height Using Dry Intrusion Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article investigates the problem of initializing upper-level potential vorticity by using the detection of dry intrusions that can be seen in water vapor images. First, a satellite image processing technique has been developed for the ...

Yann Michel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ionizing wet scrubber for air pollution control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution control equipment manufacturers are continually developing sophisticated systems designed to dramatically reduce plant emissions. One such system, the ionizing wet scrubber (IWS), has demonstrated outstanding air pollution control characteristics while meeting the challenge of energy efficiency. The IWS system removes fine solid and liquid particulate down to 0.05 micron at high collection efficiencies and low energy comsumption. It also simultaneously removes noxious, corrosive and odor-bearing gases from flue gas streams as well as coarse particulate matter above 1 micron in diameter. Due to its simplified design and low pressure drop, operating energy costs of the IWS are only a fraction of those for alternative air pollution control equipment. Pressure drop through a single-stage IWS is only 0.5 to 1.5 in. Water (125 to 374 pa) column and is controlled primarily by pressure drop through the wet scrubber section. Total system energy usage is approximately 2.0-2.5 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min (0.7-0.9 kw/m/sup 3//min) for a single-stage IWS and 4.0-5.0 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min for a two-stage installation. These energy requirements represent a significant savings as opposed to other air pollution control systems such as Venturi scrubbers.

Sheppard, S.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Proceedings: 1986 Joint Symposium on Dry SO2 and Simultaneous SO2/NOx Control Technologies, Volume 1: Sorbents, Process Research, an d Dispersion; Volume 2: Economics, Power Plant and Commercial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental sorbent research, postfurnace injection, system impacts, and commercial applications were among the topics discussed at the second symposium on dry sorbent injection technologies. Injection of these sorbents offers an SO2 emissions control alternative that is potentially simpler and cheaper than conventional flue gas desulfurization systems.

1986-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

Procession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UEE 2008 Ziermann, Martin 2004 Macht und Architektur: ZweiP ROCESSION Martin Stadler EDITORS W ILLEKE W ENDRICHFull Citation: Stadler, Martin, 2008, Procession. In Jacco

Stadler, Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are processed to complex final shapes by investment casting. Iron-nickel-base superalloys are not customarily investment cast. Investment casting permits intricate internal cooling

239

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

240

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

242

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

243

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

244

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

245

,"Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

246

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

247

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

248

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

249

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

250

,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annua...

251

,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

252

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

253

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

254

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)...

255

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)...

256

,"Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

257

,"Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",2011...

258

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

259

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

260

,"Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

262

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

263

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

264

,"California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

265

,"California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

266

,"California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

267

,"California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

268

,"California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

269

,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

270

,"California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

271

,"California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

272

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

273

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

274

,"Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

275

,"North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

276

,"Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

277

,"Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

278

,"Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

279

,"Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

280

,"Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annual",20...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NETL: Control Technology - Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Mercury Control URS Corporation will demonstrate the use of an additive in wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to prevent oxidized mercury that...

282

,"Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Lates...

283

Wetting Properties of Molten Silicon with Graphite Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The wetting behavior of molten-silicon/refractory-materials system is important in ... Electrorefining of Metallurgical Grade Silicon in Molten Salts.

284

,"Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

285

,"Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

286

,"Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

287

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200...

288

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters...

289

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

290

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

291

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic...

292

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

293

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

294

,"Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

295

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

296

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

297

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

298

,"Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

299

,"Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

300

,"Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

302

,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic...

303

,"Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

304

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

305

,"Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

306

,"Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

307

,"Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8A Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

308

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

309

,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

310

,"Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 5 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

311

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

312

,"Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7B Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

313

,"Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

314

,"Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

315

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

316

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

317

,"Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

318

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

319

,"Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 7C Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

320

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

,"Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 8 Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion...

322

,"Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 6 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

323

,"Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

324

,"Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

325

,"Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas - RRC District 10 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

326

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mercury Emissions Control in Wet FGD Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) and McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) have had a continuing program over the past decade for characterizing and optimizing mercury control in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. These efforts have led to the characterization of mercury emissions control at two utility installations and full-scale demonstration (55 MW and 1300 MW) of the effect of a mercury control performance enhancement additive for wet FGD systems. This paper presents the results of the mercury emissions control testing conducted at these two sites. The performance is related to EPA Information Collection Request (ICR) data from an FGD system supplier’s perspective, highlighting the need to consider the effects of system design and operation when evaluating mercury emissions control performance.

Paul S. Nolan; Babcock Wilcox; Kevin E. Redinger; Babcock Wilcox; Gerald T. Amrhein; Gregory A. Kudlac

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

M. Clark Dale

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Antimicrobial product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for controlling a plant disease caused by a plant pathogenic bacterium is disclosed. The composition comprises an activity for inhibiting the growth of the plant pathogenic bacterium and is extracted in an aqueous solvent from particles of malted cereal grain. The composition is used either in dry or wet form by application to plant parts, such as potato seed pieces, that are to be protected from the pathogenic bacteria.

Barrett, Karen B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Antimicrobial product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for controlling a plant disease caused by a plant pathogenic bacterium is disclosed. The composition comprises an activity for inhibiting the growth of the plant pathogenic bacterium and is extracted in an aqueous solvent from particles of malted cereal grain. The composition is used either in dry or wet form by application to plant parts, such as potato seed pieces, that are to be protected from the pathogenic bacteria. 6 figs.

Barrett, K.B.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement for natural gas in textile drying. The Georgia Tech updraft gasifier was used for the experimental program. During preliminary tests, the 1 million Btu/hr pilot plant produced clean burning gas which appeared viable for drying textiles. The gasifier was coupled to a modified textile drying oven and a series of tests were carried out to assess product degradation of white, colored, and chemically treated fabrics.

McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description Dry ice (solid) is put into the bulb of a pipette, plastic pipette 1 ice cube sized piece of dry ice Butter knife (or some object to break dry ice) Gloves (surgical gloves will not work, they must protect hands from dry ice) Safety glasses for demonstrator

336

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

Storms, E.K.

1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Case Study of High-Impact Wet Snowfall in Northwest Germany (25–27 November 2005): Observations, Dynamics, and Forecast Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate numerical weather prediction of intense snowfall events requires the correct representation of dynamical and physical processes on various scales. In this study, a specific event of high-impact wet snowfall is examined that occurred in ...

Claudia Frick; Heini Wernli

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NEWTON: Preventing Tire Dry Rot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preventing Tire Dry Rot Preventing Tire Dry Rot Name: Millard Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: MD Country: USA Date: Spring 2013 Question: My dad has a classic car, and because it gets driven very little each year, the tires dry rot before he can get much tread wear on them. What could be used to protect the tires from dry rot and cracking? Replies: Hi Millard, Thanks for the question. I would recommend keeping the car on blocks so that there is no weight on the tires. Additionally, I would recommend that no electrical equipment (motors, switches, and other things that spark) be used around the car. The sparks generate ozone and ozone can cause rubber items such as tires, belts, and hoses to crack. I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have more questions. Thanks Jeff Grell

340

DRI Companies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DRI Companies DRI Companies Jump to: navigation, search Name DRI Companies Place Irvine, California Zip 92614 Sector Solar Product US-based residential and commercial installer of turnkey solar systems, through subsidiary iDRI Energy. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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341

Abrasives for Dry Blast Cleaning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The materials used in dry abrasive blast cleaning can be categorized as metallic grit, metallic shot, sand, glass, and miscellaneous. Hardness, density, size, and shape are important considerations in choosing an abrasive for a specific

342

California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,881 1980's 1,792 1,424 1,230 1,120 1,006 1990's 911 901 799 817 808 736 610 570 453 355 2000's 754 842 796 759 767 799 780 686 621 612 2010's 503 510 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

343

Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,112 1,073 739 634 564 610 1990's 461 477 350 337 230 313 293 290 350 419 2000's 400 468 436 456 321 265 305 261 220 164 2010's 131 118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 TX, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

344

Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,820 1,100 1,218 1,002 1,042 1990's 812 875 691 789 820 714 626 613 473 541 2000's 592 627 428 448 333 370 386 327 248 215 2010's 279 468 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

345

California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8 1980's 6 12 22 22 29 1990's 6 5 4 2 4 3 2 2 5 19 2000's 5 5 6 7 2 1 5 4 3 4 2010's 3 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet

346

Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 13 1980's 23 25 1990's 25 23 30 46 56 44 38 30 28 27 2000's 29 26 31 32 32 29 18 20 19 29 2010's 38 48 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

347

California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 234 1980's 166 256 254 243 235 1990's 194 60 63 65 63 59 49 56 44 77 2000's 91 85 91 83 87 90 90 83 57 57 2010's 66 82 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31 Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

348

Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 142 1980's 146 181 47 50 63 52 95 53 56 48 1990's 50 62 82 87 56 37 40 13 22 13 2000's 23 64 80 120 98 118 120 226 263 271 2010's 353 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

349

Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 432 1980's 282 165 158 396 364 395 522 477 749 686 1990's 844 805 780 763 780 699 715 594 548 777 2000's 717 631 772 823 767 714 801 926 886 799 2010's 742 684 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

350

Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 26 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

351

Hot-dry-rock energy: review of environmental aspects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the production of energy contained in hot dry rock (HDR) is surveyed here. In general, careful siting and timing and routine control measures should be adequate to prevent significant environmental harm; sites of particular ecological or visual and recreational value, however, may require more extensive (and more expensive) precautions such as using multiwell pads to reduce land disturbance and dry or wet and dry cooling towers to reduce or eliminate the consumptive use of water. The most important uncertainty among the environmental concerns is the seismic response of HDR formations to short-duration fluid injections at pressures above fracture thresholds; continued monitoring at HDR development sites is necessary. The direct socioeconomic impacts of HDR development should be relatively minor, owing to its capital-intensive nature. Of greater potential importance are the indirect jobs resulting from such development, which could cause significant demographic (and thus fiscal and social) impacts in sparsely populated regions. However, such indirect growth is not expected to begin until a large, stable HDR industry is established in a region, and thus its impacts are expected to be permanent rather than transient.

O'Banion, K.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Drying of pulverized material with heated condensible vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for drying pulverized material utilizes a high enthalpy condensable vapor such as steam for removing moisture from the individual particles of the pulverized material. The initially wet particulate material is tangentially delivered by a carrier vapor flow to an upper portion of a generally vertical cylindrical separation drum. The lateral wall of the separation drum is provided with a plurality of flow guides for directing the vapor tangentially therein in the direction of particulate material flow. Positioned concentrically within the separation drum and along the longitudinal axis thereof is a water-cooled condensation cylinder which is provided with a plurality of collection plates, or fines, on the outer lateral surface thereof. The cooled collection fines are aligned counter to the flow of the pulverized material and high enthalpy vapor mixture to maximize water vapor condensation thereon. The condensed liquid which includes moisture removed from the pulverized materials then flows downward along the outer surface of the coolant cylinder and is collected and removed. The particles travel in a shallow helix due to respective centrifugal and vertical acceleration forces applied thereto. The individual particles of the pulverized material are directed outwardly by the vortex flow where they contact the inner cylindrical surface of the separation drum and are then deposited at the bottom thereof for easy collection and removal. The pulverized material drying apparatus is particularly adapted for drying coal fines and facilitates the recovery of the pulverized coal. 2 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1984-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hanford spent nuclear fuel cold vacuum drying test specification and test plan  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the test plan and test specification for SNF cold vacuum drying proof of concept, CVD process equipment validation, and proof of performance testing.

McCracken, K.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development of Mercury Oxidation Catalyst for Enhanced Mercury Capture by Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recent progress on a mercury control technology development program co-funded by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), and several EPRI-member companies. The mercury control process under development uses catalysts installed downstream of the air heater and particulate control device to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

Efficient Processing of Ultramafic Ni Ores: Challenges and Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, NEW TECHNOLOGY IMPLEMENTATION IN METALLURGICAL PROCESSES ... DRI-based Continuous Steelmaking: From Theory to Practice.

356

Noranda/Teniente Copper Bath Smelting Process Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, NEW TECHNOLOGY IMPLEMENTATION IN METALLURGICAL PROCESSES ... DRI-based Continuous Steelmaking: From Theory to Practice.

357

Production of low-fat tortilla chips using alternative methods of drying before frying  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tortilla chips were prepared from commercial nixtamalized dry masa flour. They were baked, sun dried and then fried in fresh soybean oil. Control chips were not sun-dried before frying. A commercial batch fryer was used. The effect of solar drying of the tortilla chips on the rate of moisture loss, oil absorption, texture, microstructure, and the physical properties of tortilla chips during and after drying was analyzed. The results indicated that the final oil content of the sun-dried tortilla chips was significantly lower than the control treatment. As a result of solar drying, the structure of the tortilla chips was tighter before frying, but expanded significantly during frying. The difference in the temperature profile at the center of tortilla chips during frying was analyzed. The results showed a clear difference in the length of the plateau, and the boiling point of water during the frying process, Tortilla pieces were also prepared from nixtamalized masa flour, and dried under impinging hot air. The effect of different drying conditions on the drying rate, texture, shrinkage profile and microstructure was analyzed. The results indicated that I drying rate was mostly affected by the air temperature, texture was crispier at higher air temperatures; shrinkage of the piece was higher at lower convective heat transfer coefficient, and microstructure looked smoother at higher air temperature A process to produce low-fat tortilla chips with good flavor and texture using convection-oven-baking, air impingement drying and frying was suggested and validated.

Lujan Acosta, Francisco Javier

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Dry Regenerable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Regenerable Sorbents Dry Regenerable Sorbents Project No.: FC26-07NT43089 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Schematic of RTI’s Dry Carbonate Process Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International completed two projects, NT43089 and NT40923, to investigate the use of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3 or soda ash) as an inexpensive, dry, and regenerable sorbent for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in the Dry Carbonate Process. In this process, Na2CO3 reacts with CO2 and water to form sodium bicarbonate at the temperature of the flue gas exhaust; the sorbent is then regenerated at modest temperatures (~120°C) to yield a concentrated stream of CO2 for sequestration or other use. The regenerated sorbent is recycled to the absorption step for subsequent CO2 capture. See schematic of RTI's Dry Carbonate Process.

359

Ensiling wet distillers grains with other feeds. SDSU Extension Extra 4029  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last century, livestock producers have relied heavily on highly valued crops to feed their cattle. Corn grain and silage, alfalfa hay and silage as well as other highly productive crops have been used extensively. Changes in oil prices have sparked interest into renewable energy alternatives. Ethanol production from corn has gained popularity in the Midwest resulting in increased availability of corn distillers grains. Corn distillers grains are an excellent feed for ruminants. They can usually be purchased as wet (40-70 % moisture) or dry. They supply approximately 10 % more energy than corn grain, and approximately 30 % protein, 10 % fat and 1 % phosphorus. These are highly priced nutrients and thus desirable in a feed, although they might pose a challenge when formulating diets. When distillers grains

A. D. Garcia; K. F. Kalscheur

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dry cleaning of Turkish coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study dealt with the upgrading of two different type of Turkish coal by a dry cleaning method using a modified air table. The industrial size air table used in this study is a device for removing stones from agricultural products. This study investigates the technical and economical feasibility of the dry cleaning method which has never been applied before on coals in Turkey. The application of a dry cleaning method on Turkish coals designated for power generation without generating environmental pollution and ensuring a stable coal quality are the main objectives of this study. The size fractions of 5-8, 3-5, and 1-3 mm of the investigated coals were used in the upgrading experiments. Satisfactory results were achieved with coal from the Soma region, whereas the upgrading results of Hsamlar coal were objectionable for the coarser size fractions. However, acceptable results were obtained for the size fraction 1-3 mm of Hsamlar coal.

Cicek, T. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Profile Optimization for Wet-Printed Polymer Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a spin-coated film. In the next chapter, a dry printing method will be introduced, which has superior

363

Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

364

Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

365

Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7C Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved...

366

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)...

367

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basin and Cold Vacuum K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) was to observe the operations associated with processing a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) of "found fuel" (small quantities of spent fuel discovered during cleanup of the reactor burial grounds) at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The found fuel MCO was transported from the K West Basin on the Hanford

368

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) was to observe the operations associated with processing a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) of "found fuel" (small quantities of spent fuel discovered during cleanup of the reactor burial grounds) at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The found fuel MCO was transported from the K West Basin on the Hanford

369

Safeguards and nonproliferation aspects of a dry fuel recycling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory undertook an independent assessment of the proliferation potentials and safeguardability of a dry fuel recycling technology, whereby spent pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuels are used to fuel canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors. Objectives of this study included (1) the evaluation of presently available technologies that may be useful to safeguard technology options for dry fuel recycling (2) and identification of near-term and long-term research needs to develop process-specific safeguards requirements. The primary conclusion of this assessment is that like all other fuel cycle alternatives proposed in the past, the dry fuel recycle entails prolfferation risks and that there are no absolute technical fixes to eliminate such risks. This study further concludes that the proliferation risks of dry fuel recycling options are relatively minimal and presently known safeguards systems and technologies can be modified and/or adapted to meet the requirements of safeguarding such fuel recycle facilities.

Pillay, K.K.S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 307 1980's 265 265 325 344 256 254 261 243 220 233 1990's 228 220 196 135 145 109 120 129 116 233 2000's 244 185 197 173 188 269 208 211 150 168 2010's 178 172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

371

Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 837 1980's 1,308 1,336 870 921 825 884 823 801 834 889 1990's 920 848 875 684 727 792 806 769 789 851 2000's 892 907 914 1,068 1,002 998 1,069 1,067 1,014 993 2010's 959 792 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

372

Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 51 1980's 122 89 81 108 77 91 98 97 101 68 1990's 86 66 61 53 55 53 51 42 52 67 2000's 70 85 94 112 130 161 195 219 197 312 2010's 302 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

373

Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 765 1980's 916 1,040 832 775 690 632 567 488 249 237 1990's 241 192 160 120 134 133 255 287 183 260 2000's 186 168 159 139 107 98 90 73 78 53 2010's 73 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

374

New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 211 1980's 208 262 226 295 387 367 457 410 351 364 1990's 354 331 329 264 240 195 229 223 217 212 2000's 320 311 315 365 324 346 361 365 360 196 2010's 271 245 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

375

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 207 163 104 115 163 188 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 103 108 108 115 112 146 154 174 2000's 204 195 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of

376

Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 786 1980's 1,186 1,247 789 813 748 793 725 704 733 821 1990's 834 782 814 631 672 739 755 727 737 784 2000's 822 822 820 956 872 837 874 848 817 681 2010's 657 522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

377

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

378

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

379

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Acquisitions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

380

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Adjustments...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

382

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

383

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

384

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Extensions...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

385

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

386

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

387

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

388

California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 249 1980's 307 1,110 1,249 1,312 1,252 1990's 1,229 995 987 976 1,077 1,195 1,151 498 437 488 2000's 500 490 459 456 412 776 756 752 702 731 2010's 722 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

389

Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 733 1980's 883 758 719 824 774 689 577 569 491 432 1990's 408 437 352 328 357 326 347 281 228 227 2000's 214 159 214 269 193 153 192 179 148 77 2010's 72 77 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

390

Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,269 1,351 1,478 1,209 1,273 1990's 1,019 1,082 845 946 988 862 783 743 571 661 2000's 721 772 512 527 394 433 442 392 934 728 2010's 386 519 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

391

Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 156 1980's 180 193 74 81 77 77 136 66 84 87 1990's 72 76 93 96 67 69 68 44 39 67 2000's 42 83 100 134 110 132 139 241 272 349 2010's 363 393 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

392

North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 485 1980's 594 654 696 673 643 650 610 578 593 625 1990's 650 533 567 585 568 518 512 531 501 475 2000's 487 495 524 497 465 508 539 572 603 1,213 2010's 1,869 2,652 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

393

North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 284 1980's 355 401 448 416 376 319 317 302 327 312 1990's 316 290 301 311 293 255 257 274 240 225 2000's 223 225 209 181 145 165 182 155 119 143 2010's 152 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

394

Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 34 12 27 31 14 25 41 13 28 39 1990's 22 14 11 9 11 32 28 31 17 54 2000's 19 19 20 14 12 14 19 15 9 78 2010's 10 104 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

395

Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,038 1980's 1,374 1,228 1,060 959 867 710 691 691 616 581 1990's 573 572 624 502 611 879 824 850 794 713 2000's 652 488 561 450 362 384 347 365 223 362 2010's 334 318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

396

Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 166 1980's 194 184 174 194 189 157 150 145 157 145 1990's 67 136 133 93 85 104 89 56 38 41 2000's 39 30 38 37 40 46 44 37 12 20 2010's 29 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

397

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

398

Results of WetNet PIP-2 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second WetNet Precipitation Intercomparison Project (PIP-2) evaluates the performance of 20 satellite precipitation retrieval algorithms, implemented for application with Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave (PMW) ...

E. A. Smith; J. E. Lamm; R. Adler; J. Alishouse; K. Aonashi; E. Barrett; P. Bauer; W. Berg; A. Chang; R. Ferraro; J. Ferriday; S. Goodman; N. Grody; C. Kidd; D. Kniveton; C. Kummerow; G. Liu; F. Marzano; A. Mugnai; W. Olson; G. Petty; A. Shibata; R. Spencer; F. Wentz; T. Wilheit; E. Zipser

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Spatial Coherence and Predictability of Indonesian Wet Season Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall from 63 stations across Indonesia is examined for the period 1950–98 to determine the spatial coherence of wet season anomalies. An example of almost unrelated anomalies at two neighboring stations is presented. Principal component ...

Malcolm Haylock; John McBride

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Source apportionment of wet sulfate deposition in eastern North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of long distance transport of air pollutants (Fay and Rosenzweig, 1980) has been adapted for the estimation of long term (e.g. annual) wet sulfate deposition in eastern N. America. The model parameters ...

Fay, James A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

Leeper, S.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Impact of Initial Soil Wetness on Seasonal Atmospheric Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the importance of initial soil wetness in seasonal predictions with dynamical models. Two experiments are performed, each consisting of two ensembles of global climate model integrations initialized from early June ...

M. J. Fennessy; J. Shukla

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 0 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2000's 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

404

California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec.

405

California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 73 1980's 107 227 217 258 267 1990's 240 179 149 147 110 94 115 58 52 48 2000's 76 50 56 55 47 49 55 53 3 9 2010's 3 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore California Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

406

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

407

Comparison of small mammal species diversity near wastewater outfalls, natural streams, and dry canyons  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilizes water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to compare nocturnal small mammal communities at wet areas created by wastewater outfalls with communities in naturally created wet and dry areas. Thirteen locations within LANL boundaries were selected for small mammal mark-recapture trapping. Three of these locations lacked surface water sources and were classified as {open_quotes}dry,{close_quotes} while seven sites were associated with wastewater outfalls ({open_quotes}outfall{close_quotes} sites), and three were located near natural sources of surface water ({open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} sites). Data was collected on site type (dry, outfall or natural), location, species trapped, and the tag number of each individual captured. This data was used to calculate mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity at each type of site. When data from each type of site was pooled, there were no significant differences in these variables between dry, outfall, and natural types. However, when data from individual sites was compared, tests revealed significant differences. All sites in natural areas were significantly higher than dry areas in daily mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity. Most outfall sites were significantly higher than dry areas in all three variables tested. When volume of water from each outfall site was considered, these data indicated that the number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity of nocturnal small mammals were directly related to the volume of water at a given outfall.

Raymer, D.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biggs, J.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on three tasks associated with the EPRI project, Air Toxics Control by Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Systems. The first task is an investigation of the factors that influence and control the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at which a limestone forced oxidation FGD system operates. Both a literature review and a numerical analysis of full-scale wet FGD data were conducted. Results from this task are presented and discussed in Section 2 of the ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with a Powder River Basin coal to measure the effects of fluidization velocity and drying temperature on rate of drying in a batch drying process. Comparisons to computational results using the batch bed drying model show good agreement. Comparisons to drying results with North Dakota lignite at the same process conditions confirm the lignite dries slightly more rapidly than the PRB. Experiments were also carried out to determine the effects of inlet air humidity on drying rate. The specific humidity ranged from a value typical for air at temperatures near freezing to a value for 30 C air at 90 percent relative humidity. The experimental results show drying rate is strongly affected by inlet air humidity, with the rate decreasing with more humid inlet air. The temperature of the drying process also plays a strong role, with the negative impacts of high inlet moisture being less of a factor in a higher temperature drying process. Concepts for coal drying systems integrated into a power plant were developed. These make use of hot circulating cooling water from the condenser, steam extraction from the turbine cycle and thermal energy extracted from hot flue gas, in various combinations. Analyses are under way to calculate the effects of drying system design and process conditions on unit performance, emissions, and cooling tower makeup water.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade increasing concern over the potential environmental impact associated with the emissions of both gaseous and particulate pollutants has resulted in the promulgation of strict regulatory standards governing such emissions. In this regard, particular attention has been placed upon the control of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from major fuel burning installations. The provisions of the 1977 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which relate to the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) have made consideration of this problem of significant additional importance in the context of increased coal utilization. There exist three general methods for the control of sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime or limestone into the firebox, or a spray dryer operated with nonregenerable alkaline sorbents coupled with a fabric filter collector. Equipment requirements, SO2 removal criteria, general economics, and potential applications of these latter two approaches within category (3) will be discussed.

Schwartz, M. H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

DRI Renewable Energy Center (REC) (NV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to utilize a flexible, energy-efficient facility, called the DRI Renewable Energy Experimental Facility (REEF) to support various renewable energy research and development (R&D) efforts, along with education and outreach activities. The REEF itself consists of two separate buildings: (1) a 1200-ft2 off-grid capable house and (2) a 600-ft2 workshop/garage to support larger-scale experimental work. Numerous enhancements were made to DRI's existing renewable power generation systems, and several additional components were incorporated to support operation of the REEF House. The power demands of this house are satisfied by integrating and controlling PV arrays, solar thermal systems, wind turbines, an electrolyzer for renewable hydrogen production, a gaseous-fuel internal combustion engine/generator set, and other components. Cooling needs of the REEF House are satisfied by an absorption chiller, driven by solar thermal collectors. The REEF Workshop includes a unique, solar air collector system that is integrated into the roof structure. This system provides space heating inside the Workshop, as well as a hot water supply. The Workshop houses a custom-designed process development unit (PDU) that is used to convert woody biomass into a friable, hydrophobic char that has physical and chemical properties similar to low grade coal. Besides providing sufficient space for operation of this PDU, the REEF Workshop supplies hot water that is used in the biomass treatment process. The DRI-REEF serves as a working laboratory for evaluating and optimizing the performance of renewable energy components within an integrated, residential-like setting. The modular nature of the system allows for exploring alternative configurations and control strategies. This experimental test bed is also highly valuable as an education and outreach tool both in providing an infrastructure for student research projects, and in highlighting renewable energy features to the public.

Hoekman, S. Kent; Broch, Broch; Robbins, Curtis; Jacobson, Roger; Turner, Robert

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Field emission characteristics of SnO2/CNTs composites prepared by microwave-assisted wet impregnation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SnO2/CNT composites were prepared by microwave-assisted wet impregnation at 60°C. The process was optimized by varying the microwave power and reaction time. Raman analysis showed the typical features of the rutile phase of as-synthesized ...

Sreejarani K. Pillai; Sarah C. Motshekga; Suprakas Sinha Ray; John Kennedy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Powder treatment process  

SciTech Connect

(1) A process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder.

Weyand, John D. (Greensburg, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Powder treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are: (1) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder. 2 figs.

Weyand, J.D.

1988-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

Keynote: Implementing New Technology in Metallurgical Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Keynote: Implementing New Technology in Metallurgical Processes: Building ... DRI-based Continuous Steelmaking: From Theory to Practice.

416

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Map of the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Zone of the United States. The zone contains the eastern side of California and follows the US border to cover the western half of Texas. The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a series of best practices and case studies to help builders improve whole-house energy performance in buildings found in hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. Best Practice Guides New Construction Case Studies Improvements to Existing Homes Case Studies Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates - Volume 9 New Construction Case Studies Arizona Project: Gordon Estates - Phoenix Builder: Mandalay Homes Profile: Fourteen homes in this subdivision achieved Challenge Home

419

Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility operations manual  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Flash drying protects standby plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes how special fast-drying technique provides effective corrosion protection for units that will be in standby for a short time. The Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) has developed a technique for rapidly drying out its boilers as an effective corrosion prevention measure, even for units which will be out of service for a short time. The JEA has several steam generating units that are not in continual service. These units, whether on standby or in extended cold storage, must be maintained if they are to operate reliably when they are needed. JEA uses dehumidification as the primary method to reduce corrosion in these standby units. Engineers at JEA believe it is better to reduce the amount of water retained in standby boilers than to add inhibiting chemicals to retained water for corrosion protection.

Mallard, R.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 11 14 12 19 17 13 17 19 19 22 1990's 8 10 8 6 47 27 24 26 20 29 2000's 27 25 25 25 19 30 36 34 34 32 2010's 111 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

422

Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 122 99 86 64 90 81 69 62 69 57 1990's 53 45 55 59 117 110 119 112 106 100 2000's 93 96 102 92 88 87 50 110 1 7 2010's 30 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

423

Comparisons of sensible and latent heat fluxes using surface and aircraft data over adjacent wet and dry surfaces  

SciTech Connect

In June 1991, a field study of surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over heterogeneous surfaces was carried out near Boardman, Oregon (Doran et al., 1992). The object of the study was to develop improved methods of extrapolating from local measurements of fluxes to area-averaged values suitable for use in general circulation models (GCMs) applied to climate studies. A grid element in a GCM is likely to encompass regions whose fluxes vary significantly from one surface type to another. The problem of integrating these fluxes into a single, representative value for the whole element is not simple, and describing such a flux in terms of flux-gradient relationships, as is often done, presents additional difficulties.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Baldocchi, D.D.; Crawford, T.L.; Dobosy, R.J.; Meyers, T.J. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Effect of and Correction for Different Wet-Bulb and Dry-Bulb Response in Thermocouple Psychrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast-responding thermocouple psychrometers are often used in atmospheric boundary-layer turbulence measurements for the computation of heat and moisture fluxes. Small size, low cost, ease of interchange-ability and the use of the familiar ...

W. J. Shaw; J. E. Tillman

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Comparison of matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma using laser ablation and solution nebulization for dry and wet plasma conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Office of Environmental Waste Management and OfficeOffice of Basic Energy Science, Chemical Science Division and by the Environmental Management

Chan, George C.-Y.; Chan, Wing-Tat; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Solar drying studies in a low humidity environment  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive field performance data are reported for a solar cabinet dryer under low humidity conditions of local harmattan season. The field data collected provide a frame of reference for similar data on dryer performance gathered under the normal local conditions of high relative humidity. The relative humidity, it is found, plays a most decisive role in the entire drying process.

Mojola, O.O.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

ARM - Campaign Instrument - dri-air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send Campaign Instrument : Desert Research Institute Airborne Aerosol Instruments (DRI-AIR) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Airborne Observations Campaigns Aerosol IOP ...

429

MHK Technologies/WET NZ | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NZ NZ < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WET NZ.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technology New Zealand WET NZ Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The WET NZ device is planned to have a modular generation capability of up to 500 kW with onboard controls that will be able to accurately forecast incoming waves and adjust the response to changing wave patterns The device will be largely sub surface so that as much of the device as possible interacts directly with the wave energy Technology Dimensions

430

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson; Santosh Gangwal; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Margaret Williams; Douglas P. Harrison

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Mathematical modelling of brown seaweed drying curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple solution on one-term exponential models is used in the analysis of raw data obtained from the drying experiment. The values of the parameters a, n and the constant k for the models are determined using a plot of curve drying models. Three different ... Keywords: brown seaweed, drying curves, mathematical models

Ahmad Fudholi; Mohd Hafidz Ruslan; Lim Chin Haw; Sohif Mat; Mohd Yusof Othman; Azami Zaharim; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Dry Cooling: Perspectives on Future Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total number of dry-cooled power plants in the United States has increased significantly in recent years. This is because nonutility generators are using dry-cooling systems to meet environmental protection and water conservation requirements. A survey shows that utility planners expect that dry cooling could become an important cooling-system option for new utility plants.

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long-Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev. 0 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign O.K. Chopra, D. Diercks, R. Fabian, D. Ma, V. Shah, S-W Tam, and Y.Y. Liu Argonne National Laboratory June 30, 2012 FCRD-USED-2012-000119 ANL-12/29 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

435

Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

SOLAR UPGRADE OF METHANE USING DRY REFORMING IN DIRECT CONTACT BUBBLE REACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR UPGRADE OF METHANE USING DRY REFORMING IN DIRECT CONTACT BUBBLE REACTOR Khalid Al-Ali 1 process of a solar reformer of dry methane reforming was proposed to operate in a temperature range of 600:2:2 fulfills our requirements for the direct contact bubble reactor of the solar reformer, in which a CO2-rich

Recanati, Catherine

440

Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46,803 46,620 44,319 42,192 41,404 41,554 1990's 41,411 39,288 38,141 37,847 39,020 39,736 41,592 41,108 40,793 43,350 2000's 45,419 46,462 47,491 48,717 53,275 60,178 65,805 76,357 81,843 85,034 2010's 94,287 104,454 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

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441

Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,511 1980's 1,776 2,042 1,803 1,603 1,496 1,364 1,304 1,223 1,146 1,108 1990's 1,129 1,061 873 800 653 667 634 583 662 681 2000's 620 663 746 748 692 758 816 958 1,035 922 2010's 858 868 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Mississippi Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

442

Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 35,971 35,867 34,584 32,852 32,309 32,349 1990's 32,412 30,729 29,474 29,967 31,071 31,949 33,432 33,322 33,429 35,470 2000's 38,585 40,376 41,104 42,280 46,728 53,175 58,736 68,827 74,284 76,272 2010's 84,157 90,947 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

443

California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,961 1980's 3,345 2,660 2,663 2,546 2,507 1990's 2,400 2,213 2,093 1,982 1,698 1,619 1,583 1,820 1,879 2,150 2000's 2,198 1,922 1,900 1,810 2,006 2,585 2,155 2,193 1,917 2,314 2010's 2,282 2,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

444

Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,516 1980's 951 1,265 1,430 1,882 1,576 1,618 1,562 1,650 2,074 1,644 1990's 1,722 1,631 1,533 1,722 1,806 1,488 1,702 1,861 1,848 1,780 2000's 1,740 1,782 2,225 2,497 2,371 2,793 3,064 3,377 3,594 7,018 2010's 14,068 26,719 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

445

Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 504 1980's 536 561 592 600 647 806 883 940 957 1,015 1990's 1,047 1,187 1,126 1,036 1,025 1,102 1,046 1,429 1,295 1,530 2000's 1,837 1,950 1,999 1,971 1,982 2,240 2,369 2,588 2,846 2,919 2010's 2,785 2,128 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

446

Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 502 1980's 525 547 580 581 630 793 866 921 938 993 1990's 1,039 1,177 1,118 1,030 978 1,075 1,022 1,403 1,275 1,501 2000's 1,810 1,925 1,974 1,946 1,963 2,210 2,333 2,554 2,812 2,887 2010's 2,674 2,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

447

Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 16,316 10,943 10,724 10,826 11,171 1990's 10,597 9,969 9,060 8,615 9,165 8,890 9,038 9,020 8,569 8,667 2000's 8,704 9,245 8,520 8,952 9,235 10,091 10,149 9,651 10,581 19,898 2010's 28,838 29,906 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

448

GPS Meteorology: Mapping Zenith Wet Delays onto Precipitable Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging networks of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers can be used in the remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The time-varying zenith wet delay observed at each GPS receiver in a network can be transformed into an estimate of the ...

Michael Bevis; Steven Businger; Steven Chiswell; Thomas A. Herring; Richard A. Anthes; Christian Rocken; Randolph H. Ware

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 633 1980's 502 796 965 845 786 753 761 717 686 617 1990's 703 674 613 636 715 730 749 785 665 1,180 2000's 1,645 2,428 3,070 3,514 4,445 4,608 6,660 7,846 9,390 11,100 2010's 12,587 9,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

450

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,411 6,191 6,956 6,739 6,745 6,504 1990's 6,884 6,305 6,353 6,138 5,739 5,674 5,240 4,799 4,452 4,507 2000's 5,030 5,404 4,967 4,235 3,258 2,807 2,360 2,173 1,937 1,822 2010's 1,456 1,015 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

451

West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,593 1980's 2,437 1,881 2,169 2,238 2,173 2,104 2,207 2,210 2,299 2,244 1990's 2,243 2,513 2,293 2,408 2,569 2,514 2,722 2,887 2,925 2,952 2000's 2,929 2,777 3,477 3,376 3,489 4,553 4,638 4,865 5,243 6,066 2010's 7,134 10,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

452

Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,334 1980's 1,551 1,252 1,200 1,353 1,193 1,064 1,242 1,571 1,434 1,443 1990's 1,330 1,404 1,290 1,218 1,379 1,344 2,125 2,256 2,386 2,313 2000's 2,772 3,032 3,311 3,488 3,154 2,961 3,117 3,691 3,253 2,805 2010's 2,975 2,549 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

453

California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,842 1980's 5,137 4,084 3,893 3,666 3,513 1990's 3,311 3,114 2,892 2,799 2,506 2,355 2,193 2,390 2,332 2,505 2000's 2,952 2,763 2,696 2,569 2,773 3,384 2,935 2,879 2,538 2,926 2010's 2,785 3,042 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

454

Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,676 13,334 12,852 12,620 12,912 1990's 12,151 11,363 10,227 9,541 10,145 9,891 10,077 10,036 9,480 9,646 2000's 9,512 10,040 9,190 9,538 9,792 10,679 10,710 10,292 11,816 20,970 2010's 29,517 30,545 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Louisiana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

455

Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 601 1980's 668 494 481 529 419 375 665 1,002 943 1,011 1990's 922 967 938 890 1,022 1,018 1,778 1,975 2,158 2,086 2000's 2,558 2,873 3,097 3,219 2,961 2,808 2,925 3,512 3,105 2,728 2010's 2,903 2,472 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

456

Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 1,923 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

457

Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 2,446 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Virginia Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

458

West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,669 1980's 2,559 1,944 2,252 2,324 2,246 2,177 2,272 2,360 2,440 2,342 1990's 2,329 2,672 2,491 2,598 2,702 2,588 2,793 2,946 2,968 3,040 2000's 3,062 2,825 3,498 3,399 3,509 4,572 4,654 4,881 5,266 6,090 2010's 7,163 10,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

459

Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,725 1980's 1,796 1,821 1,974 2,081 2,240 2,032 2,011 2,018 2,000 1,782 1990's 1,739 1,672 1,752 1,555 1,610 1,566 1,472 1,479 1,332 1,546 2000's 1,584 1,619 1,654 1,666 1,837 1,967 2,271 3,306 5,628 10,872 2010's 14,181 16,374 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

460

Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,824 1980's 10,065 10,443 10,128 10,183 9,981 9,844 11,093 11,089 10,530 10,509 1990's 10,004 9,946 10,302 9,872 9,705 9,093 8,145 7,328 6,862 6,248 2000's 5,682 5,460 5,329 5,143 5,003 4,598 4,197 4,248 3,795 3,500 2010's 3,937 3,747 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,657 1980's 2,970 2,969 3,345 3,200 2,932 2,928 3,008 2,912 3,572 4,290 1990's 4,249 5,329 5,701 5,817 5,948 6,520 7,009 6,627 7,436 8,591 2000's 9,877 11,924 13,251 14,707 13,956 15,796 16,141 20,642 22,159 22,199 2010's 23,001 23,633 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

462

Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 181 1980's 200 259 206 173 208 167 190 219 177 236 1990's 510 682 762 1,162 1,088 1,072 1,055 533 772 781 2000's 960 1,025 1,097 1,186 1,293 1,326 1,541 1,838 2,010 1,882 2010's 2,371 2,518 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

463

Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,834 1980's 9,413 9,659 10,155 10,728 11,014 11,229 10,393 10,572 10,903 11,276 1990's 10,433 10,433 11,305 11,387 11,351 12,712 13,084 14,321 14,371 14,809 2000's 17,211 19,399 21,531 22,716 23,640 24,722 24,463 30,896 32,399 36,748 2010's 36,526 36,930 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

464

Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,559 1980's 1,602 1,637 1,800 1,887 2,051 1,875 1,861 1,873 1,843 1,637 1990's 1,672 1,536 1,619 1,462 1,525 1,462 1,383 1,423 1,294 1,505 2000's 1,545 1,589 1,616 1,629 1,797 1,921 2,227 3,269 5,616 10,852 2010's 14,152 16,328 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

465

Preliminary Study of California Wintertime Model Wet Bias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used in both short-range (days) and long-range (years) simulations to explore the California wintertime model wet bias. California is divided into four regions (the coast, central ...

Hung-Neng S. Chin; Peter M. Caldwell; David C. Bader

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Wet-Bulb Temperature from Relative Humidity and Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equation is presented for wet-bulb temperature as a function of air temperature and relative humidity at standard sea level pressure. It was found as an empirical fit using gene-expression programming. This equation is valid for relative ...

Roland Stull

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 322 1980's 414 1,337 1,466 1,570 1,519 1990's 1,469 1,174 1,136 1,123 1,187 1,289 1,266 556 489 536 2000's 576 540 515 511 459 825 811 805 705 740 2010's 725 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Natural Gas Reserves Summary

469

Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 732 1980's 683 870 708 960 714 754 716 639 1,002 1,037 1990's 744 660 606 540 586 498 523 950 1,101 1,165 2000's 1,037 1,024 1,047 1,047 1,184 1,148 1,048 1,029 987 1,456 2010's 2,332 5,227 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

470

Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 680 1980's 659 658 1990's 4,159 5,437 5,840 5,166 4,842 4,886 5,062 4,983 4,615 4,338 2000's 4,241 3,931 3,891 4,313 4,127 3,977 3,945 4,016 3,360 2,919 2010's 2,686 2,522 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

471

Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,058 1980's 4,828 4,373 4,188 3,883 4,120 3,131 2,462 2,983 2,910 2,821 1990's 2,466 2,924 3,002 3,492 3,326 3,310 3,216 2,957 2,768 2,646 2000's 2,564 2,309 2,157 2,081 2,004 1,875 1,447 1,270 1,139 1,090 2010's 1,021 976 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

472

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,037 1980's 4,434 4,230 4,058 3,964 3,808 3,716 3,404 3,229 3,033 2,899 1990's 2,775 2,703 2,511 2,425 2,130 2,018 1,864 2,012 2,016 2,021 2000's 2,413 2,298 2,190 2,116 2,306 2,831 2,470 2,430 2,249 2,609 2010's 2,447 2,685 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

473

Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 693 1980's 682 683 1990's 4,184 5,460 5,870 5,212 4,898 4,930 5,100 5,013 4,643 4,365 2000's 4,269 3,958 3,922 4,345 4,159 4,006 3,963 4,036 3,379 2,948 2010's 2,724 2,570 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

474

Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,360 2,391 2,128 1,794 1,741 1990's 1,554 1,394 1,167 926 980 1,001 1,039 1,016 911 979 2000's 807 796 670 586 557 588 561 641 1,235 1,072 2010's 679 639 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

475

Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,580 1980's 13,407 13,049 12,153 11,553 10,650 10,120 9,416 9,024 8,969 8,934 1990's 8,492 7,846 7,019 6,219 6,558 6,166 6,105 6,137 5,966 5,858 2000's 5,447 5,341 4,395 3,874 3,557 3,478 3,473 3,463 2,916 2,969 2010's 2,995 2,615 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec.

476

A Theoretical Study of the Wet Removal of Atmospheric Pollutants. Part II: The Uptake and Redistribution Of (NH4)2SO4 Particles and SO2 Gas Simultaneously Scavenged by Growing Cloud Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical model has been formulated which allows the processes which control the wet deposition of atmospheric aerosol particles and pollutant gases to be included in cloud dynamic models. The cloud considered in the model was allowed to grow ...

A. I. Flossmann; H. R. Pruppacher; J. H. Topalian

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Development of a Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Sorbent-Based Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO 2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants Background Currently available commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from flue gas streams are costly and energy intensive. RTI International is heading a research team to continue development and scale-up of an innovative process for CO 2 capture that has significant potential to be less expensive and less energy intensive than conventional technologies. The "Dry Carbonate Process" utilizes a dry,

478

SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Catalytic cracking process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Anisotropic wetting and de-wetting of drops on substrates patterned with polygonal posts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results showing how water drops, produced by ink-jet printing, spread on surfaces patterned with lattices of diamond or triangular posts. Considering post widths typically ~7 m and lattice spacings between 15-40 m, we observe drop shapes with 3,4 and 6-fold symmetry, depending on both the symmetry of the lattice and the shape of the posts. This is a result of the different mechanisms of interface pinning and depinning which depend on the direction of the contact line motion with respect to the post shape. Lattice Boltzmann simulations are used to describe these mechanisms in detail for triangular posts. We also follow the motion of the contact line as the drops evaporate showing that they tend to return to their original shape. To explain this we show that the easy direction for movement is the same for spreading and drying drops. We compare the behaviour of small drops with that of larger drops created by jetting several drops at the same position. We find that the contact line motion is unexpectedly insensitive to drop volume, even when a spherical cap of fluid forms above the posts. The findings are relevant to microfluidic applications and to the control of drop shapes in ink-jet printing.

Robert J. Vrancken; Matthew L. Blow; Halim Kusumaatmaja; Ko Hermans; An M. Prenen; Cees W. M. Bastiaansen; Dirk J. Broer; Julia M. Yeomans

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry process wet" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

The Impact of Wet Soil and Canopy Temperatures on Daytime Boundary–Layer Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of very wet soil and canopy temperatures on the surface sensible heat flux, and on related daytime boundary-layer properties is evaluated. For very wet soils, two winter situations are considered, related to significant changes in soil ...

M. Segal; J. R. Garratt; G. Kallos; R. A. Pielke

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Comparison of Soil Wetness Indices for Inducing Functional Similarity of Hydrologic Response across Sites in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comparative ability of four soil wetness indices to normalize soil moisture dependence of rootzone fluxes across a range of sites in Illinois is investigated. The soil wetness indices examined are various transformations of the water stored ...

Jennifer A. Saleem; Guido D. Salvucci

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of 12/31 (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feet) Feet) Data Series: Dry Natural Gas Wet NG Wet Nonassociated NG Wet Associated-Dissolved NG Natural Gas Liquids Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 211,085 237,726 244,656 272,509 304,625 334,067 1925-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 15,360 14,439 13,546 12,552 11,765 10,420 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 811 805 704 739 724 710 1977-2011 Gulf of Mexico 14,549 13,634 1992-2007 Louisiana & Alabama 11,824 11,090 10,450 9,362 8,896 8,156 1981-2011 Texas 2,725 2,544 2,392 2,451 2,145 1,554 1981-2011 Alaska 10,245 11,917 7,699 9,101 8,838 9,424 1977-2011

484

Liquid Desiccant Drying of Thermoreversibly Gelcast Bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Liquid Desiccant Drying of Thermoreversibly Gelcast Bodies. Author(s), Noah O Shanti, Katherine T Faber. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Noah ...

485

,"Utah Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

486

ARM - Campaign Instrument - dri-gnd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send Campaign Instrument : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments (DRI-GND) Instrument Categories Aerosols Campaigns Aerosol IOP Download Data Southern...

487

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump...

488

Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes ... successfully tested as a replacement for barrier bricks in several reduction cell technology types ...

489

Cold vacuum drying system conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the activities involved in the removal of the SNF from the leaking basins and to place it in stable dry storage.

Bradshaw, F.W.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

,"Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

491

,"Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

492

,"Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production ",52,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

493

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

494

,"Ohio Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

495

,"California Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

496

Propane earth materials drying techniques and technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A feasibility study for the use of propane as a subbase drying technique. Michael Blahut (1) Dr. Vernon Schaefer (2) Dr. Chris Williams (3) The… (more)

Blahut, Michael Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

,"Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301981" ,"Release Date:","81...

498

,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

499

3.1.1.2 Feed Processing and Handling DL2 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This milestone report is the deliverable for our Feed Processing and Handling project. It includes results of wet biomass feedstock analysis, slurry pumping information, fungal processing to produce a lignin-rich biorefinery residue and two subcontracted efforts to quantify the amount of wet biomass feedstocks currently available within the corn processing and paper processing industries.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Wend, Christopher F.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

500

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the third Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. A description is given of the equipment, instrumentation and procedures being used for the fluidized bed drying experiments. Laboratory data are presented on the effects of bed depth on drying rate. These show that drying rate decreased strongly with an increase in bed depth as the settled bed depth varied from 0.25 to 0.65 m. These tests were performed with North Dakota lignite having a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) top size, constant inlet air and heater surface temperatures, constant rate of heat addition per unit initial mass of wet coal and constant superficial air velocity. A theoretical model of the batch dryer is described. This model uses the equations for conservation of mass and energy and empirical data on the relationship between relative humidity of the air and coal moisture content at equilibrium. Outputs of the model are coal moisture content, bed temperature, and specific humidity of the outlet air as functions of time. Preliminary comparisons of the model to laboratory drying data show very good agreement.

Edward K. Levy; Hugo Caram; Zheng Yao; Gu Feng

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z