National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for dry holes drilled

  1. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,225 1950's 3,077 3,255 3,520 3,401 3,512 3,699 3,574 3,605 3,631 3,844 1960's 3,889 3,782 4,239 4,143 4,207 4,446 3,900 3,901 4,311 4,437 1970's 4,714 4,633 4,725 4,851 4,599 4,415 4,439 4,662 4,600 4,517 1980's 4,214 4,226 4,184 3,974 4,205 4,306 4,236 4,390 4,704 4,684 1990's 4,755 4,629

  2. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,658 1950's 3,733 4,059 4,334 4,447 4,408 4,498 4,425 4,488 4,449 4,602 1960's 4,575 4,799 4,790 4,933 4,980 5,007 5,117 5,188 5,589 5,739 1970's 5,700 5,796 5,882 5,808 5,649 5,674 5,607 5,605 5,812 5,716 1980's 5,533 5,582 5,367 4,800 5,178 5,317 5,447 5,294 5,748 5,579 1990's 5,685 5,658 5,480

  3. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library Big Hole Drilling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Big Hole Drilling NNSANFO Language Options U.S. DOENNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - Big Hole Drilling The need to drill large-diameter holes at the Nevada National ...

  4. Method and apparatus of assessing down-hole drilling conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Johnson, Monte L.; Bartholomew, David B.; Fox, Joe

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for use in assessing down-hole drilling conditions are disclosed. The apparatus includes a drill string, a plurality of sensors, a computing device, and a down-hole network. The sensors are distributed along the length of the drill string and are capable of sensing localized down-hole conditions while drilling. The computing device is coupled to at least one sensor of the plurality of sensors. The data is transmitted from the sensors to the computing device over the down-hole network. The computing device analyzes data output by the sensors and representative of the sensed localized conditions to assess the down-hole drilling conditions. The method includes sensing localized drilling conditions at a plurality of points distributed along the length of a drill string during drilling operations; transmitting data representative of the sensed localized conditions to a predetermined location; and analyzing the transmitted data to assess the down-hole drilling conditions.

  5. Study of the radon released from open drill holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacer, J C

    1981-06-01

    The radon emanating from three open drill holes was measured at a site of known uranium mineralization in the Red Desert of south central Wyoming. The radon flux from the soil and drill holes was measured by the accumulator method with activated charcoal cartridges. The surface soil was found to release radon at an average rate of 0.41 atoms/cm/sup 2//sec; the radon emanating from the holes was more variable than that from the soil. The three holes studied released an average of 47 atoms/cm/sup 2//sec of radon. This average is equivalent to the radon released to the atmosphere by 14.5 ft/sup 2/ of soil. The data indicate that the radon emanated from an open drill hole is not as significant as other possible activities at a drill site (i.e. digging a trench or drilling a hole) or from household activities involving the usage of water.

  6. Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  7. Hole cleaning imperative in coiled tubing drilling operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rameswar, R.M.; Mudda, K.

    1995-09-01

    Annular flow modeling in coiled tubing applications is essential for optimizing mud rheology and keeping the hole clean. Cuttings transport in coiled tubing drilling must be optimized, particularly the modeling of hole cleaning capabilities. The effects of two different muds in contrasting geometries on hold cleaning efficiency are considered, with the simulation performed using Petrocalc 14. Coiled tubing is widely used to drill new vertical and horizontal wells, and in re-entry operations. Horizontal well problems are subsequently modeled, where annular eccentricities can range anywhere from concentric to highly offset, given the highly buckled or helically deflected states of many drill coils.

  8. A SMALL-ANGLE DRILL-HOLE WHIPSTOCK

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielsen, D.E.; Olsen, J.L.; Bennett, W.P.

    1963-01-29

    A small angle whipstock is described for accurately correcting or deviating a drill hole by a very small angle. The whipstock is primarily utilized when drilling extremely accurate, line-of-slight test holes as required for diagnostic studies related to underground nuclear test shots. The invention is constructed of a length of cylindrical pipe or casing, with a whipstock seating spike extending from the lower end. A wedge-shaped segment is secured to the outer circumference of the upper end of the cylinder at a position diametrically opposite the circumferential position of the spike. Pin means are provided for affixing the whipstock to a directional drill bit and stem to alloy orienting and setting the whipstock properly in the drill hole. (AEC)

  9. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Big Hole Drilling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underground Testing Perfected Big-Hole Drilling Technology Photo - Rowan Drilling Company's On July 26, 1957, a safety experiment called "Pascal A" was detonated in an unstemmed hole. Although the test was not spectacular, it does hold the distinction of being the first nuclear test in the world to be detonated underground. From 1957 to 1992, 533 contained tests and nine unstemmed tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). If the depths of all the 36-inch diameter holes

  10. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  11. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  12. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  13. Archaeological studies at Drill Hole U20az Pahute Mesa, Nye county, Nevada. [Contains bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, A.H.; Hemphill, M.L.; Henton, G.H.; Lockett, C.L.; Nials, F.L.; Pippin, L.C.; Walsh, L.

    1991-07-01

    During the summer of 1987, the Quaternary Sciences Center (formerly Social Science Center) of the Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada System, conducted data recovery investigations at five archaeological sites located near Drill Hole U20az on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. These sites were among 12 recorded earlier during an archaeological survey of the drill hole conducted as part of the environmental compliance activities of the Department of Energy (DOE). The five sites discussed in this report were considered eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and were in danger of being adversely impacted by construction activities or by effects of the proposed underground nuclear test. Avoidance of these sites was not a feasible alternative; thus DRI undertook a data recovery program to mitigate expected adverse impacts. DRI's research plan included controlled surface collections and excavation of the five sites in question, and had the concurrence of the Nevada Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology and the Advisory Council of Historic Preservation. Of the five sites investigated, the largest and most complex, 26Ny5207, consists of at least three discrete artifact concentrations. Sites 26Ny5211 and 26Ny5215, both yielded considerable assemblages. Site 26Ny5206 is very small and probably is linked to 26Ny5207. Site 26Ny5205 contained a limited artifact assemblage. All of the sites were open-air occurrences, and, with one exception contained no or limited subsurface cultural deposits. Only two radiocarbon dates were obtained, both from 26Ny5207 and both relatively recent. While the investigations reported in the volume mitigate most of the adverse impacts from DOE activities at Drill Hole U20az, significant archaeological sites may still exist in the general vicinity. Should the DOE conduct further activities in the region, additional cultural resource investigations may be required. 132 refs., 71 figs., 44 tabs.

  14. Small drill-hole, gas mini-permeameter probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molz, III, Fred J.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Castle, James W.

    2002-12-03

    The distal end of a basic tube element including a stopper device with an expandable plug is positioned in a pre-drilled hole in a rock face. Rotating a force control wheel threaded on the tube element exerts force on a sleeve that in turn causes the plug component of the stopper means to expand and seal the distal end of the tube in the hole. Gas under known pressure is introduced through the tube element. A thin capillary tube positioned in the tube element connects the distal end of the tube element to means to detect and display pressure changes and data that allow the permeability of the rock to be determined.

  15. Small drill-hole, gas mini-permeameter probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molz, III, Fred J.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Castle, James W.

    2002-01-01

    The distal end of a basic tube element including a stopper device with an expandable plug is positioned in a pre-drilled hole in a rock face. Rotating a force control wheel threaded on the tube element exerts force on a sleeve that in turn causes the plug component of the stopper means to expand and seal the distal end of the tube in the hole. Gas under known pressure is introduced through the tube element. A thin capillary tube positioned in the tube element connects the distal end of the tube element to means to detect and display pressure changes and data that allow the permeability of the rock to be determined.

  16. High Temperature Tools and Sensors, Down-hole Pumps and Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for High Temperature Tools and Sensors, Down-hole Pumps and Drilling.

  17. Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  18. Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Heat Flow From Four New...

  19. Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Results Of An...

  20. Selected stratigraphic data for drill holes located in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    Stratigraphic data are presented in tabular form for 72 holes drilled in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, between 1950 and 1993. Three pairs of data presentations are included for each hole: depth to formation tops, formation thicknesses, and formation elevations are presented in both field (English) and metric units. Also included for each hole, where available, are various construction data (hole depth, hole diameter, surface location coordinates) and certain information of hydrogeologic significance (depth to water level, top of zeolitization). The event name is given for holes associated with a particular nuclear test. An extensive set of footnotes is included, which indicates data sources and provides other information. The body of the report describes the stratigraphic setting of Frenchman Flat, gives drill-hole naming conventions and database terminology, and provides other background and reference material.

  1. Geothermal reservoir assessment based on slim hole drilling. Volume 1, Analytical Method: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, H.J.

    1993-12-01

    The Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole (SOH) program was supplied by the State of Hawaii to drill six, 4,000 foot scientific observation holes on Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii to confirm and stimulate geothermal, resource development in Hawaii. After a lengthy permitting process, three SOHs, totaling 18,890 feet of mostly core drilling were finally drilled along the Kilauea East Rift Zone (KERZ) in the Puna district on the Big Island. The SOH program was highly successful in meeting the highly restrictive permitting conditions imposed on the program, and in developing slim hole drilling techniques, establishing subsurface geological conditions, and initiating an assessment and characterization of the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii - even though permitting specifically prohibited pumping or flowing the holes to obtain data of subsurface fluid conditions. The first hole, SOH-4, reached a depth of 2,000 meters, recorded a bottom hole temperature of 306.1 C, and established subsurface thermal continuity along the KERZ between the HGP-A and the True/Mid-Pacific Geothermal Venture wells. Although evidence of fossil reservoir conditions were encountered, no zones with obvious reservoir potential were found. The second hole SOH-1, was drilled to a depth of 1,684 meters, recorded a bottom hole temperature of 206.1 C, effectively doubled the size of the Hawaii Geothermal Project -- Abbott/Puna Geothermal Venture (HGP-A/PGV) proven/probable reservoir, and defined the northern limit of the HGP-A/PGV reservoir. The final hole, SOH-2, was drilled to a depth of 2,073 meters, recorded a bottom hole temperature of 350.5 C, and has sufficient indicated permeability to be designated as a potential ''discovery.''

  2. Geothermal reservoir assessment based on slim hole drilling. Volume 2: Application in Hawaii: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, H.J.

    1993-12-01

    The Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole (SOH) program was planned, funded, and initiated in 1988 by the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, an institute within the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Initial funding for the SOH program was $3.25 million supplied by the State of Hawaii to drill six, 4,000 foot scientific observation holes on Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii to confirm and stimulate geothermal resource development in Hawaii. After a lengthy permitting process, three SOHs, totaling 18,890 feet of mostly core drilling were finally drilled along the Kilauea East Rift Zone (KERZ) in the Puna district on the Big Island. The SOH program was highly successful in meeting the highly restrictive permitting conditions imposed on the program, and in developing slim hole drilling techniques, establishing subsurface geological conditions, and initiating an assessment and characterization of the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii - - even though permitting specifically prohibited pumping or flowing the holes to obtain data of subsurface fluid conditions. The first hole, SOH-4, reached a depth of 2,000 meters, recorded a/bottom hole temperature of 306.1 C, and established subsurface thermal continuity along the KERZ between the HGP-A and the True/Mid-Pacific Geothermal Venture wells. Although evidence of fossil reservoir conditions were encountered, no zones with obvious reservoir potential were found. The second hole SOH-1, was drilled to a depth of 1,684 meters, recorded a bottom hole temperature of 206.1 C, effectively doubled the size of the Hawaii Geothermal Project-Abbott/Puna Geothermal Venture (HGP-A/PGV) proven/probable reservoir, and defined the northern limit of the HGP-A/PGV reservoir. The final hole, SOH-2, was drilled to a depth of 2,073 meters, recorded a bottom hole temperature of 350.5 C, and has sufficient indicated permeability to be designated as a potential discovery.

  3. Geology of the USW SD-7 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, C.A.; Engstrom, D.A.

    1996-09-01

    The USW SD-7 drill hole is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the Systematic Drilling Program, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Yucca Mountain site has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-7 drill hole is located near the southern end of the potential repository area and immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility. The hole is not far from the junction of the Main Test Level drift and the proposed South Ramp decline. Drill hole USW SD-7 is 2675.1 ft (815.3 m) deep, and the core recovered nearly complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. Core was recovered from much of the underlying Calico Hills Formation, and core was virtually continuous in the Prow Pass Tuff and the Bullfrog Tuff. The SD-7 drill hole penetrated the top several tens of feet into the Tram Tuff, which underlies the Prow Pass and Bullfrog Tuffs. These latter three units are all formations of the Crater Flat Group, The drill hole was collared in welded materials assigned to the crystal-poor middle nonlithophysal zone of the Tiva Canyon Tuff; approximately 280 ft (85 m) of this ash-flow sheet was penetrated by the hole. The Yucca Mountain Tuff appears to be missing from the section at the USW SD-7 location, and the Pah Canyon Tuff is only 14.5 ft thick. The Pah Canyon Tuff was not recovered in core because of drilling difficulties, suggesting that the unit is entirely nonwelded. The presence of this unit is inferred through interpretation of down-hole geophysical logs.

  4. Geology of the USW SD-12 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, C.A.; Engstrom, D.A.

    1996-11-01

    Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the {open_quotes}Systematic Drilling Program,{close_quotes} as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and the core recovered essentially complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. A virtually complete section of the Calico Hills Formation was also recovered, as was core from the entire Prow Pass Tuff formation of the Crater Flat Group.

  5. Drilling Complete on Australian Hot Dry Rock Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first commercial attempt to create a commercial geothermal power plant using hot dry rock technology reached a crucial milestone on January 22, when a production well successfully reached its target depth.

  6. INTEGRATED DRILLING SYSTEM USING MUD ACTUATED DOWN HOLE HAMMER AS PRIMARY ENGINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John V. Fernandez; David S. Pixton

    2005-12-01

    A history and project summary of the development of an integrated drilling system using a mud-actuated down-hole hammer as its primary engine are given. The summary includes laboratory test results, including atmospheric tests of component parts and simulated borehole tests of the hammer system. Several remaining technical hurdles are enumerated. A brief explanation of commercialization potential is included. The primary conclusion for this work is that a mud actuated hammer can yield substantial improvements to drilling rate in overbalanced, hard rock formations. A secondary conclusion is that the down-hole mud actuated hammer can serve to provide other useful down-hole functions including generation of high pressure mud jets, generation of seismic and sonic signals, and generation of diagnostic information based on hammer velocity profiles.

  7. Effects of Process Parameters on Ultrasonic Micro-Hole Drilling in Glass and Ruby

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schorderet, Alain; Deghilage, Emmanuel; Agbeviade, Kossi

    2011-05-04

    Brittle materials such as ceramics, glasses and oxide single crystals find increasing applications in advanced micro-engineering products. Machining small features in such materials represents a manufacturing challenge. Ultrasonic drilling constitutes a promising technique for realizing simple micro-holes of high diameter-to-depth ratio. The process involves impacting abrasive particles in suspension in a liquid slurry between tool and work piece. Among the process performance criteria, the drilling time (productivity) is one of the most important quantities to evaluate the suitability of the process for industrial applications.This paper summarizes recent results pertaining to the ultrasonic micro-drilling process obtained with a semi-industrial 3-axis machine. The workpiece is vibrated at 40 kHz frequency with an amplitude of several micrometers. A voice-coil actuator and a control loop based on the drilling force impose the tool feed. In addition, the tool is rotated at a prescribed speed to improve the drilling speed as well as the hole geometry. Typically, a WC wire serves as tool to bore 200 {mu}m diameter micro-holes of 300 to 1,000 {mu}m depth in glass and ruby. The abrasive slurry contains B4C particles of 1 {mu}m to 5 {mu}m diameter in various concentrations.This paper discusses, on the basis of the experimental results, the influence of several parameters on the drilling time. First, the results show that the control strategy based on the drilling force allows to reach higher feed rates (avoiding tool breakage). Typically, a 8 um/s feed rate is achieved with glass and 0.9 {mu}m/s with ruby. Tool rotation, even for values as low as 50 rpm, increases productivity and improves holes geometry. Drilling with 1 {mu}m and 5 {mu}m B4C particles yields similar productivity results. Our future research will focus on using the presented results to develop a model that can serve to optimize the process for different applications.

  8. Drill string splined resilient tubular telescopic joint for balanced load drilling of deep holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, W.R.

    1981-08-04

    A drill string splined resilient tubular telescopic joint for balanced load deep well drilling comprises a double acting damper having a very low spring rate upon both extension and contraction from the zero deflection condition. Preferably the spring means itself is a double acting compression spring means wherein the same spring means is compressed whether the joint is extended or contracted. The damper has a like low spring rate over a considerable range of deflection, both upon extension and contraction of the joint, but a gradually then rapidly increased spring rate upon approaching the travel limits in each direction. Stacks of spring rings are employed for the spring means, the rings being either shaped elastomer-metal sandwiches or, preferably, roller belleville springs. The spline and spring means are disposed in an annular chamber formed by mandrel and barrel members constituting the telescopic joint. The spring rings make only such line contact with one of the telescoping members as is required for guidance therefrom, and no contact with the other member. The chamber containing the spring means, and also containing the spline means, is filled with lubricant, the chamber being sealed with a pressure seal at its lower end and an inverted floating seal at its upper end. Magnetic and electrical means are provided to check for the presence and condition of the lubricant. To increase load capacity the spring means is made of a number of components acting in parallel.

  9. Drill string splined resilient tubular telescopic joint for balanced load drilling of deep holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, W.R.

    1984-03-06

    A drill string splined resilient tubular telescopic joint for balanced load deep well drilling comprises a double acting damper having a very low spring rate upon both extension and contraction from the zero deflection condition. Stacks of spring rings are employed for the spring means, the rings being either shaped elastomer-metal sandwiches or, preferably, roller Belleville springs. The spline and spring means are disposed in an annular chamber formed by mandrel and barrel members constituting the telescopic joint. The chamber containing the spring means, and also containing the spline means, is filled with lubricant, the chamber being sealed with a pressure seal at its lower end and an inverted floating seal at its upper end. A prototype includes of this a bellows seal instead of the floating seal at the upper end of the tool, and a bellows in the side of the lubricant chamber provides volume compensation. A second lubricant chamber is provided below the pressure seal, the lower end of the second chamber being closed by a bellows seal and a further bellows in the side of the second chamber providing volume compensation. Modifications provide hydraulic jars.

  10. Modeling and Adhesive Tool Wear in Dry Drilling of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-17

    One of the challenges in aeronautic drilling operations is the elimination of cutting fluids while maintaining the quality of drilled parts. This paper therefore aims to increase the tool life and process quality by working on relationships existing between drilling parameters (cutting speed and feed rate), coatings and tool geometry. In dry drilling, the phenomenon of Built-Up Layer is the predominant damage mechanism. A model fitting the axial force with the cutting parameters and the damage has been developed. The burr thickness and its dispersion decrease with the feed rate. The current diamond coatings which exhibit a strong adhesion to the carbide substrate can limit this adhesive layer phenomenon. A relatively smooth nano-structured coating strongly limits the development of this layer.

  11. The electron beam hole drilling of silicon nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howitt, D. G.; Chen, S. J.; Gierhart, B. C.; Smith, R. L.; Collins, S. D.

    2008-01-15

    The mechanism by which an intense electron beam can produce holes in thin films of silicon nitride has been investigated using a combination of in situ electron energy loss spectrometry and electron microscopy imaging. A brief review of electron beam interactions that lead to material loss in different materials is also presented. The loss of nitrogen and silicon decreases with decreasing beam energy and although still observable at a beam energy of 150 keV ceases completely at 120 keV. The linear behavior of the loss rate coupled with the energy dependency indicates that the process is primarily one of direct displacement, involving the sputtering of atoms from the back surface of the specimen with the rate controlling mechanism being the loss of nitrogen.

  12. Drilling fluids and lost circulation in hot dry rock geothermal wells at Fenton Hill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G.; Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.; Baroid, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling activities at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico encountered problems in designing drilling fluids that will reduce catastrophic lost circulation. Four wells (GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3) penetrated 733 m (2405 ft) of Cenozoic and Paleozoic sediments and Precambrian crystalline rock units to +4572 m (+15,000 ft). The Cenozoic rocks consist of volcanics (rhyolite, tuff, and pumice) and volcaniclastic sediments. Paleozoic strata include Permian red beds (Abo Formation) and the Pennsylvanian Madera and Sandia Formations, which consist of massive limestones and shales. Beneath the Sandia Formation are igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age. The drilling fluid used for the upper sedimentary formations was a polymeric flocculated bentonite drilling fluid. Severe loss of circulation occurred in the cavernous portions of the Sandia limestones. The resultant loss of hydrostatic head caused sloughing of the Abo and of some beds within the Madera Formation. Stuck pipe, repetitive reaming, poor casing cement jobs and costly damage to the intermediate casing resulted. The Precambrian crystalline portion of the EE-2 and EE-3 wells were directionally drilled at a high angle, and drilled with water as the primary circulating fluid. Due to high temperatures (approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F) BHT) and extreme abrasiveness of the deeper part of the Precambrian crystalline rocks, special problems of corrosion inhibition and of torque friction were incurred.

  13. U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Dollars per Foot) Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Real Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 61.83 60.39 61.71 58.22 58.11 59.64 64.51 66.84 67.56 67.15 1970's 68.42 65.82 68.82 70.65 83.31 97.34 100.66 109.49 123.76 136.64 1980's 142.52 159.51 173.34 127.81 106.27 108.09 107.90 80.21 92.78 93.63 1990's 93.23 97.86

  14. Appraisal of coal resources from uranium drill-hole logs, southern San Juan basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, S.C.

    1984-04-01

    Geophysical logs from uranium drill holes in the Grants region are a valuable source of information on coal resources. Coal occurs in the southern San Juan basin of New Mexico in the Upper Cretaceous Gallup Sandstone, Crevasse Canyon Formation, and Menefee Formation. Uranium has been mined from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation that underlies the coal-bearing Cretaceous formations and is separated from them by approximately 1000 ft (300 m) of section. Permission was obtained from Santa Fe Mining, Inc., Pathfinder Mines Corp., and Ranchers Exploration and Development Corp. to examine their uranium drill logs for information on coal. Over 1400 logs spudded above the base of the Gallup formation were examined, and depth to coal, coal thickness, and coal stratigraphic horizon were determined for coal beds at least 3 ft (1 m) thick. Coal isopachs have been drawn, and depth from the surface to the first coal have been contoured for the Crevasse Canyon and Menefee Formations. Data from an earlier study, which used geophysical logs from petroleum test borings, has been incorporated. The relationship between the coal resources determined from uranium drill holes and known coal deposits and mines in the southern San Juan basin is discussed.

  15. Method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological structures from a vertical bore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, David A.; Barker, Clark R.; Keith, H. Dean

    1982-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological strata from a vertical position. The geological structures intended to be penetrated in this fashion are coal seams, as for in situ gasification or methane drainage, or in oil-bearing strata for increasing the flow rate from a pre-existing well. Other possible uses for this device might be for use in the leaching of uranium ore from underground deposits or for introducing horizontal channels for water and steam injections.

  16. Unique aspects of drilling and completing hot-dry-rock geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Rowley, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Drilling operations at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site have led to numerous developments needed to solve the problems caused by a very harsh downhole environment. A pair of deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures were in excess of 600/sup 0/F (300/sup 0/C). The wells were directionally drilled, inclined at 35/sup 0/, one above the other, in a direction orthogonal to the least principal stress field. The well site is near the flank of a young silicic composite volcano in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. The completion of this pair of wells is unique in reservoir development. The lower well was planned as a cold water injector which will be cooled by the introduced water from the static geothermal gradient to about 80/sup 0/F (25/sup 0/C). The upper well will be heated during production to over 500/sup 0/F (250/sup 0/C). The well pair is designed to perform as a closed loop heat-extraction system connected by hydraulic fractures with a vertical spacing of 1200 ft between the wells. These conditions strongly constrain the drilling technique, casing design, cement formulation, and cementing operations.

  17. U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Thousand Dollars per Well) Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 54.9 54.5 58.6 55.0 55.8 60.6 68.4 72.9 81.5 88.6 1970's 94.9 94.7 106.4 117.2 138.7 177.8 191.6 227.2 280.0 331.4 1980's 367.7 453.7 514.4 371.7 326.5 349.4 364.6 279.6 354.7 362.2 1990's 383.6 421.5 382.6 426.8 483.2

  18. U.S. Nominal Cost per Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) U.S. Nominal Cost per Dry Well Drilled (Thousand Dollars per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 44.0 45.2 50.8 48.2 48.5 53.1 56.9 61.5 66.2 70.2 1970's 80.9 86.8 94.9 105.8 141.7 177.2 190.3 230.2 281.7 339.6 1980's 376.5 464.0 515.4 366.5 329.2 372.3 389.2 259.1 366.4 355.4 1990's 367.5 441.2 357.6 387.7 491.5 481.2 541.0 655.6 973.2 1,115.5 2000's 1,075.4 1,620.4 1,673.4 2,065.1 1,977.3 2,392.9

  19. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Dollars per Foot) Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 13.01 12.85 13.31 12.69 12.86 13.44 14.95 15.97 16.83 17.56 1970's 18.84 19.03 20.76 22.50 28.93 36.99 40.46 46.81 56.63 67.70 1980's 77.02 94.30 108.73 83.34 71.90 75.35 76.88 58.71 70.23 73.55 1990's 76.07 82.64 70.27 75.30 79.49 87.22

  20. U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) U.S. Nominal Cost per Foot of Dry Wells Drilled (Dollars per Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10.56 10.56 11.20 10.58 10.64 11.21 12.34 12.87 12.88 13.23 1970's 15.21 16.02 17.28 19.22 26.76 33.86 36.94 43.49 52.55 64.60 1980's 73.70 90.03 104.09 79.10 67.18 73.69 76.53 51.05 66.96 67.61 1990's 67.49 83.05 67.82 72.56 86.60 84.60 95.74 115.09 157.79 182.99 2000's 181.83 271.63 284.17 345.94 327.91

  1. Mineralogy of drill holes J-13, UE-25A No. 1, and USW G-1 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.

    1986-09-01

    The mineralogy of drill holes J-13, UE-25A No. 1, and USW G-1 was previously determined using qualitative and semiquantitative techniques, and most of the available data were neither complete nor accurate. New quantitative x-ray diffraction data were obtained for rocks from all three of these drill holes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These quantitative analyses employed both external and internal standard x-ray powder diffraction methods and permitted the precise determination of all phases commonly found in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain, including glass and opal-CT. These new data supplant previous analyses and include numerous additional phases. New findings of particular importance include better constraints on the distribution of the more soluble silica polymorphs, cristobalite and opal-CT. Opal-CT was associated solely with clinoptilolite-bearing horizons, and cristobalite disappearance coincided with the appearance of analcime in USW G-1. Unlike previous analyses, we identified significant amounts of smectite in drill hole J-13. We found no evidence to support previous reports of the occurrence of erionite or phillipsite in these drill holes.

  2. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    per Well) Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 3,473 1950's 3,445 3,706 3,983 4,004 4,004 4,161 4,079 4,126 4,110 4,275 1960's 4,248 4,311 4,524 4,552 4,598 4,723 4,573 4,616 5,053 5,195 1970's 5,265 5,305 5,377 5,403 5,191 5,073 5,014 5,120 5,183 5,071 1980's 4,791 4,827 4,691 4,320 4,631 4,733 4,763

  3. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells (Thousand Feet) Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 100,821 1950's 117,183 122,802 128,518 133,581 148,408 156,976 158,943 147,864 131,820 137,441 1960's 136,345 135,191 141,018 129,164 131,923 125,678 107,215 93,518 94,012 99,642 1970's 95,026 85,358 92,875 92,605 102,059 125,817 133,365 157,917 173,472 181,702

  4. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Thousand Feet) Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 34,798 1950's 40,175 49,344 55,615 60,664 59,601 69,206 74,337 69,181 61,484 63,253 1960's 55,831 54,442 53,616 53,485 55,497 49,204 55,709 47,839 50,958 57,466 1970's 43,530 41,895 44,956 45,618 51,315 54,677 53,617 57,949 65,197 63,096 1980's 74,288 101,808 88,856 69,690 80,853

  5. U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 135,619 1950's 157,358 172,146 184,133 194,245 208,009 226,182 233,280 217,045 193,304 200,694 1960's 192,176 189,633 194,634 182,649 187,420 174,882 162,924 141,357 144,970 157,108 1970's 138,556 127,253 137,831 138,223

  6. U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 43,754 1950's 50,977 63,093 70,730 73,862 75,790 85,103 90,190 83,167 74,643 79,476 1960's 77,361 74,716 77,253 76,307 81,360 76,629 69,636 61,142 64,737 71,364 1970's 58,074 54,685 58,556 55,761 62,899 69,220 68,977 76,728 85,788 81,642 1980's 99,575 134,934 123,746 105,222 119,860

  7. Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald S. Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-01-22

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin including alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

  8. U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 17,315 1950's 20,020 24,370 26,999 26,582 29,998 31,883 32,143 29,747 27,343 30,800 1960's 33,826 31,423 35,030 33,460 36,782 36,548 26,552 22,960 23,162 25,446 1970's 22,951 20,186 22,475 21,190 24,296 28,772 31,008 35,905 39,493 39,130 1980's 49,326 65,720 63,066 56,233 61,236 52,784 30,636 26,842 25,438 20,152

  9. U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells (Thousand Feet) U.S. Footage Drilled for Dry Exploratory Wells (Thousand Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 26,439 1950's 30,957 38,723 43,731 47,280 45,792 53,220 58,047 53,420 47,300 48,676 1960's 43,535 43,293 42,223 42,847 44,578 40,081 43,084 38,182 41,575 45,918 1970's 35,123 34,499 36,081 34,571 38,603 40,448 37,969 40,823 46,295 42,512 1980's 50,249 69,214 60,680 48,989 58,624 47,604 30,325 26,746 27,079 21,947 1990's 20,752

  10. Fracture-coating minerals in the Topopah Spring Member and upper tuff of Calico Hills from drill hole J-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos, B.

    1989-02-01

    Fracture-lining minerals from drill core in the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff and the tuff of Calico Hills from water well J-13 were studied to identify the differences between these minerals and those seen in drill core USW G-4. In USW G-4 the static water level (SWL) occurs below the tuff of Calico Hills, but in J-13 the water table is fairly high in the Topopah Spring Member. There are some significant differences in fracture minerals between these two holes. In USW G-4 mordenite is a common fracture-lining mineral in the Topopah Spring Member, increasing in abundance with depth. Euhedral heulandite >0.1 mm in length occurs in fractures for about 20 m above the lower vitrophyre. In J-13, where the same stratigraphic intervals are below the water table, mordenite is uncommon and euhedral heulandite is not seen. The most abundant fracture coating in the Topopah Spring Member in J-13 is drusy quartz, which is totally absent in this interval in USW G-4. Though similar in appearance, the coatings in the vitrophyre have different mineralogy in the two holes. In USW G-4 the coatings are extremely fine grained heulandite and smectite. In J-13 the coatings are fine-grained heulandite, chabazite, and alkali feldspar. Chabazite has not been identified from any other hole in the Yucca Mountain area. Fractures in the tuff of Calico Hills have similar coatings in core from both holes. In J-13, as in USW G-4, the tuff matrix of the Topopah Spring Member is welded and devitrified and that of the tuff of Calico Hills is zeolitic. 11 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Distributed downhole drilling network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Fox, Joe; Pixton, David S.

    2006-11-21

    A high-speed downhole network providing real-time data from downhole components of a drilling strings includes a bottom-hole node interfacing to a bottom-hole assembly located proximate the bottom end of a drill string. A top-hole node is connected proximate the top end of the drill string. One or several intermediate nodes are located along the drill string between the bottom-hole node and the top-hole node. The intermediate nodes are configured to receive and transmit data packets transmitted between the bottom-hole node and the top-hole node. A communications link, integrated into the drill string, is used to operably connect the bottom-hole node, the intermediate nodes, and the top-hole node. In selected embodiments, a personal or other computer may be connected to the top-hole node, to analyze data received from the intermediate and bottom-hole nodes.

  12. Horizontal slim-hole drilling with coiled tubing; An operator's experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, A.B. Jr.; Faahel, R.A.; Chaffin, M.G.; Pulis, K.H. )

    1992-10-01

    What is believed to be the first horizontal well drilled with directionally controlled coiled tubing recently was completed in the Austin Chalk formation. an existing well was sidetracked out of 4 1/2-in. casing with a conventional whipstock. an average build rate of 15[degrees]/100 ft was achieved in the curve, and a 1,458-ft vertical section was drilled with 2-in. coiled tubing, downhole mud motors, wireline steering tools, a mechanical downhole orienting tool, and 3 7/8-in. bits. This paper discusses the orienting and directional tools and techniques developed during this operation. It also describes improvements made for the second well.

  13. Drilling equipment to shrink

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, S.

    2000-01-01

    Drilling systems under development will take significant costs out of the well construction process. From small coiled tubing (CT) drilling rigs for North Sea wells to microrigs for exploration wells in ultra-deepwater, development projects under way will radically cut the cost of exploratory holes. The paper describes an inexpensive offshore system, reeled systems drilling vessel, subsea drilling rig, cheap exploration drilling, laser drilling project, and high-pressure water jets.

  14. Structure in continuously cored, deep drill holes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, with notes on calcite occurrence; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, W.J.

    1992-12-01

    A study of more than 22,000 feet of core from five deep drill holes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, provided data on the attitude and vertical distribution of faults and fractures, the sense of fault displacement, and the occurrence of calcite. The study was done mainly to look for evidence of fault flattening at depth, but no consistent downward decrease in dip of faults was found, and no increase in strata rotation was evident with increasing depth. In the two drill holes located near prominent faults that dip toward the holes (USW G-3 and G-2), an apparent increase in the frequency of faults occurs below the tuffs and lavas of Calico Hills. Some of this increase occurs in brittle lavas and flow breccias in the lower part of the volcanic section. In the two holes presumed to be relatively removed from the influence of important faults at depth, the vertical distribution of faults is relatively uniform. Calcite occurs mainly in two general zones, voids in welded portions of the Paintbrush Tuff, and in a deeper zone, mostly below 3,500 feet. Calcite is least abundant in USW G-4, which may reflect the fewer faults and fractures encountered in that drill hole.

  15. Drill-hole data, drill-site geology, and geochemical data from the study of Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of southeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.; Schmidt, T.G.; Inlow, D.; Flurkey, A.J.; Kratochvil, A.L.; Coolidge, C.M.; Sever, C.K.; Quimby, W.F.

    1981-02-01

    This volume is presented as a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential of Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 3: Uranium Assessment for Precambrian Pebble Conglomerates in Southeastern Wyoming. Volume 1 summarized the geologic setting and geologic and geochemical characteristics of uranium-bearing conglomerates in Precambrian metasedimentary rocks of southeastern Wyoming. Volume 3 is a geostatistical resource estimate of U and Th in quartz-pebble conglomerates. This volume contains supporting geochemical data, lithologic logs from 48 drill holes in Precambrian rocks of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre, and drill site geologic maps and cross-sections from most of the holes.

  16. Hydromechanical drilling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, David A.

    1978-01-01

    A hydromechanical drilling tool which combines a high pressure water jet drill with a conventional roller cone type of drilling bit. The high pressure jet serves as a tap drill for cutting a relatively small diameter hole in advance of the conventional bit. Auxiliary laterally projecting jets also serve to partially cut rock and to remove debris from in front of the bit teeth thereby reducing significantly the thrust loading for driving the bit.

  17. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duran, E.L.; Lundin, R.L.

    1988-06-20

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation. 3 figs.

  18. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duran, Edward L.; Lundin, Ralph L.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation.

  19. Method of deep drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, Stirling A.

    1984-01-01

    Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

  20. Mineralogic variation in drill holes USW NRG-6, NRG-7/7a, SD-7, SD-9, SD-12, and UZ{number_sign}14: New data from 1996--1997 analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipera, S.J.; Vaniman, D.T.; Bish, D.L.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-05-30

    New quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) mineralogic data have been obtained for samples from drill holes NRG-6, NRG-7/7A, SD-7, SD-9, SD- 12, and UZ{number_sign}14. In addition, new QXRD analyses were obtained on samples located in a strategic portion of drill hole USW H-3. These data improve our understanding of the mineral stratigraphy at Yucca Mountain, and they further constrain the 3-D Mineralogic Model of Yucca Mountain. Some of the unexpected findings include the occurrence of the zeolite chabazite in the vitric zone of USW SD-7, broad overlap of vitric and zeolitic horizons (over vertical ranges up to 70 m), and the previously unrecognized importance of the bedded tuft beneath the Calico Hills Formation as a subunit with generally more extensive zeolitization than the Calico Hills Formation in the southern part of the potential repository area. Reassessment of data from drill hole USW H-5 suggests that the zeolitization of this bedded unit occurs in the northwestern part of the repository exploration block as well. Further analyses of the same interval in USW H-3, however, have not permitted the same conclusion to be reached for the southwestern part of the repository block because of the much poorer quality of the cuttings in H-3 compared with those from H-5. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) chemical data for drill holes USW SD-7, 9, and 12 show that the zeolitic horizons provide a >10 million year record of retardation of Sr transport, although the data also show that simplistic models of one-dimensional downward flow in the unsaturated zone (UZ) are inadequate. Complex interstratification of zeolites and glass, with highly variable profiles between drill cores, point to remaining problems in constructing detailed mineral stratigraphies. However, the new data in this report provide important information for constructing bounding models of zeolite stratigraphy for transport calculations.

  1. Drilling fluid filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Garner, Kory

    2007-01-23

    A drilling fluid filter for placement within a bore wall of a tubular drill string component comprises a perforated receptacle with an open end and a closed end. A hanger for engagement with the bore wall is mounted at the open end of the perforated receptacle. A mandrel is adjacent and attached to the open end of the perforated receptacle. A linkage connects the mandrel to the hanger. The linkage may be selected from the group consisting of struts, articulated struts and cams. The mandrel operates on the hanger through the linkage to engage and disengage the drilling fluid filter from the tubular drill string component. The mandrel may have a stationary portion comprising a first attachment to the open end of the perforated receptacle and a telescoping adjustable portion comprising a second attachment to the linkage. The mandrel may also comprise a top-hole interface for top-hole equipment.

  2. Coiled-tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leising, L.J.; Newman, K.R.

    1993-12-01

    For several years, CT has been used to drill scale and cement in cased wells. Recently, CT has been used (in place of a rotary drilling rig) to drill vertical and horizontal open holes. At this time, < 30 openhole CT drilling (CTD) jobs have been performed. However, there is a tremendous interest in this technique in the oil industry; many companies are actively involved in developing CTD technology. This paper discusses CTD applications and presents an engineering analysis of CTD. This analysis attempts to define the limits of what can and cannot be done with CTD. These limits are calculated with CT and drilling models used for other applications. The basic limits associated with CTD are weight and size, CT force and life, and hydraulic limits. Each limit is discussed separately. For a specific application, each limit must be considered.

  3. Proposed Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  4. Proposed Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  5. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2015-07-07

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for advancing a borehole. High power laser drilling system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam through the electrical motor.

  6. Drill drive mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dressel, Michael O.

    1979-01-01

    A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

  7. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Benoit, 1984...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Basis Several core holes were also drilled in the caldera's west moat by Phillips Petroleum Company in 1982, including: PLV-1, drilled to approximately 711 m depth...

  8. Horizontal drilling improves recovery in Abu Dhabi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhairy, A.A. ); Farid, E.A. )

    1993-09-13

    Both onshore and offshore Abu Dhabi, horizontal wells have increased productivity three to four times more than that from vertical and deviated wells in the same reservoirs. Horizontal drilling technology was first applied in Abu Dhabi in February 1988, and through March 1993, 48 wells have been horizontally drilled. During the 5 years of horizontal drilling, the experience gained by both operating company and service company personnel has contributed to a substantial improvement in drilling rate, and hence, a reduction in drilling costs. The improvements in drilling and completions resulted from the following: The horizontal drilling and completion operations were analyzed daily, and these follow-up analyses helped optimize the planning of subsequent wells. The bits and bottom hole assemblies were continuously analyzed for optimum selections. Steerable drilling assemblies were found very effective in the upper sections of the wells. The paper describes drilling activities onshore and offshore, completion design, and the outlook for future well drilling.

  9. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Urban, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Core Holes Activity Date 1986 - 1986 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis After several temperature-gradient holes were drilled in 1982 to the...

  10. Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes twenty-three gold exploration holes were drilled by Newcrest Resources, Inc. during 2005 and 2006 along...

  11. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes MULTI-STAGE DRILLING Once a hole is drilled the natural-state pressure distribution with depth is essentially...

  12. Status Report A Review of Slimhole Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Tao; Carroll, Herbert B.

    1994-09-01

    This 1994 report reviews the various applications of slimhole technology including for exploration in remote areas, low-cost development wells, reentering existing wells, and horizontal and multilateral drilling. Advantages of slimholes to regular holes are presented. Limitations and disadvantages of slimholes are also discussed. In 1994, slimhole drilling was still an ongoing development technology. (DJE 2005)

  13. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, Steve H.; Pigott, William R.

    1997-01-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  14. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1997-12-30

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area. 3 figs.

  15. Downhole control -- The key to coiled tubing drilling efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    Coiled tubing drilling has experienced dramatic growth in recent years. Originally a step-child, the technique now claims built-for-purpose equipment and promises cost-effective drilling with little damage to formations. The paper describes a bottom hole assembly and an orienting tool designed to be used to control coiled tubing drilling.

  16. Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy & Drilling Technology - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Reasearch Facility Geomechanics and Drilling ...

  17. Slim Holes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are typically drilled using a diamond coated bit, core samples are often collected, and reservoir properties measured. Slim holes can range from 3-6'' in diameter and be...

  18. Drill string enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Douglas K.; Kuhns, Douglass J.; Wiersholm, Otto; Miller, Timothy A.

    1993-01-01

    The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

  19. Drill string enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

    1993-03-02

    The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

  20. Computational Approach to Photonic Drilling of Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samant, Anoop N; Daniel, Claus; Chand, Ronald H; Blue, Craig A; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2009-01-01

    The ability of lasers to carry out drilling processes in silicon carbide ceramic was investigated in this study. A JK 701 pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used for drilling through the entire depth of silicon carbide plates of different thicknesses. The laser parameters were varied in different combinations for a well controlled drilling through the entire thickness of the SiC plates. A drilling model incorporating effects of various physical phenomena such as decomposition, evaporation induced recoil pressure, and surface tension was developed. Such comprehensive model was capable of advance prediction of the energy and time required for drilling a hole through any desired depth of material.

  1. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Shallow temperature gradient drilling began at the CMAGR in January of 2010. 13 temperature...

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Notes The Navy recently completed a temperature gradient hole (TGH) drilling campaign. Results suggest multiple resources may exist on HAD lands. To further define the...

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (1993) Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThermalGr...

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Basis Thermal gradient holes were drilled in an effort to determine the feasibility of commercial geothermal energy generation at Blue Mountain Notes Ten temperature...

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L. Trowbridge Grose, John C. Murray, Catherine K. Skokan (1979) Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Additional References Retrieved...

  7. Initial results from VC-1, First Continental Scientific Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from VC-1, First Continental Scientific Drilling Program Core Hole in Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  8. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    consisting of several holes including: The CH8-10 thermal-gradient holes drilled by the U.S. Geological Survey prior to 1978 to relatively shallow depths ranging from about 55 to...

  9. Balanced pressure techniques applied to geothermal drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dareing, D.W.

    1981-08-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate balanced pressure drilling techniques for use in combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling. Drilling techniques evaluated are: aerated drilling mud, parasite tubing, concentric drill pipe, jet sub, and low density fluids. Based on the present state of the art of balanced pressure drilling techniques, drilling with aerated water has the best overall balance of performance, risk, availability, and cost. Aerated water with a 19:1 free air/water ratio reduce maximum pressure unbalance between wellbore and formation pressures from 1000 psi to 50 psi. This pressure unbalance is within acceptable operating limits; however, air pockets could form and cause pressure surges in the mud system due to high percent of air. Low density fluids used with parasite tubing has the greatest potential for combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling, when performance only is considered. The top portion of the hole would be aerated through the parasite tube at a 10:1 free air/mud ratio and the low density mud could be designed so that its pressure gradient exactly matches the formation pore pressure gradient. The main problem with this system at present is the high cost of ceramic beads needed to produce low density muds.

  10. Optimizing drilling performance using a selected drilling fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judzis, Arnis; Black, Alan D.; Green, Sidney J.; Robertson, Homer A.; Bland, Ronald G.; Curry, David Alexander; Ledgerwood, III, Leroy W.

    2011-04-19

    To improve drilling performance, a drilling fluid is selected based on one or more criteria and to have at least one target characteristic. Drilling equipment is used to drill a wellbore, and the selected drilling fluid is provided into the wellbore during drilling with the drilling equipment. The at least one target characteristic of the drilling fluid includes an ability of the drilling fluid to penetrate into formation cuttings during drilling to weaken the formation cuttings.

  11. Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1976-08-31

    Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

  12. Rotary blasthole drilling update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-02-15

    Blasthole drilling rigs are the unsung heroes of open-pit mining. Recently manufacturers have announced new tools. Original equipment manufactures (OEMs) are making safer and more efficient drills. Technology and GPS navigation systems are increasing drilling accuracy. The article describes features of new pieces of equipment: Sandvik's DR460 rotary blasthole drill, P & H's C-Series drills and Atlas Copco's Pit Viper PV275 multiphase rotary blasthole drill rig. DrillNav Plus is a blasthole navigation system developed by Leica Geosystems. 5 photos.

  13. Batch drilling program cuts time, costs for Liuhua development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, G.E.; Hall, K.H.; Mu, H.C.

    1996-08-12

    The efficiency of batch drilling operations and the appropriate use of technology, teamwork, and thorough planning helped cut several days off the time to drill each of 10 subsea wells for the Liuhua 11-1 development project in the South China Sea. The overall development program calls for drilling and completing 20 subsea horizontal wells. The rig-of-opportunity phase was the initial phase of this development and used a contract rig to establish the subsea wellhead array and initiate drilling of the development wells. The wellhead array was the first critical step. It was the foundation for the building block construction process used to create Liuhua`s subsea production system on the seabed. The paper discusses conductor operations, batch drilling operations, surface hole section, intermediate and production hole sections, the ten wells, application of technology, and overall results.

  14. Potter Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 94063 Product: Potter Drilling was founded in 2004 to develop and commercialize novel drilling technology. References: Potter Drilling1 This article is a stub. You can...

  15. Well drilling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvis, Robert L.; Newsom, Melvin M.

    1977-01-01

    Well drilling rates may be increased by impelling projectiles to fracture rock formations and drilling with rock drill bits through the projectile fractured rock.

  16. Further advances in coiled-tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, E.; Brinkhorst, J.; Voelker, H.; Burge, P.; Ewen, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    The use of coiled tubing to drill horizontal re-entry wells has received considerable interest in the industry over the last two years. The benefit of being able to drill at balance, safely and in a controlled manner, using nitrogen to reduce down hole pressure while drilling highly depleted reservoirs, provides an advantage over conventional techniques, particularly in reducing impairment to the formation. The paper describes such a horizontal re-entry drilled in the shallow depleted water flooded reservoir Barenburg in Northern Germany. The entire program was executed with no intervention from a conventional rig or workover hoist. A special structure to be positioned over the well to support the coiled tubing injector head and to provide a work platform had to be constructed for this type of operation. A dedicated mast for lifting of pipe and down hole tools was placed on the substructure. The development of a surface controlled orienting tool and an adjustable motor provided excellent directional capabilities on a 2 3/8 in. coiled tubing. This program represents a significant extension of the capabilities of drilling with coiled tubing.

  17. Test report for drill string seal pressure test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, J.F.

    1996-02-06

    A basic question was asked concerning the drill string which is used in rotary Mode coring operations: ``...what is the volume leak rate loss in a drill rod string under varying condiditons of the joint boxes and pins being either dry or coated with lubricant...``. A Variation of this was to either have an o-ring installed or absent on the drill rod that was grooved on the pin. A series of tests were run with both the o-ring grooved Longyear drill rod and the plain pin end rod manufactured by Diamond Drill. Test results show that drill rod leakage of both types is lowered dramatically when thread lubricant is applied to the threaded joints and the joints made up tight. The Diamond Drill rod with no o-ring groove has virtually no leakage when used with thread lubricant and the joints are properly tightened.

  18. Core Drilling Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

  19. Drilling Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Drilling Best Practices lunch presentation by Douglas Blankenship at the 2012 Peer Review Meeting on May 9, 2012.

  20. Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Perry

    2009-04-30

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), in partnership with Dennis Tool Company (DTC), has worked to develop an advanced drill bit system to be used with microhole drilling assemblies. One of the main objectives of this project was to utilize new and existing coiled tubing and slimhole drilling technologies to develop Microhole Technology (MHT) so as to make significant reductions in the cost of E&P down to 5000 feet in wellbores as small as 3.5 inches in diameter. This new technology was developed to work toward the DOE's goal of enabling domestic shallow oil and gas wells to be drilled inexpensively compared to wells drilled utilizing conventional drilling practices. Overall drilling costs can be lowered by drilling a well as quickly as possible. For this reason, a high drilling rate of penetration is always desired. In general, high drilling rates of penetration (ROP) can be achieved by increasing the weight on bit and increasing the rotary speed of the bit. As the weight on bit is increased, the cutting inserts penetrate deeper into the rock, resulting in a deeper depth of cut. As the depth of cut increases, the amount of torque required to turn the bit also increases. The Counter-Rotating Tandem Motor Drilling System (CRTMDS) was planned to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) resulting in the reduction of the drilling cost. The system includes two counter-rotating cutter systems to reduce or eliminate the reactive torque the drillpipe or coiled tubing must resist. This would allow the application of maximum weight-on-bit and rotational velocities that a coiled tubing drilling unit is capable of delivering. Several variations of the CRTDMS were designed, manufactured and tested. The original tests failed leading to design modifications. Two versions of the modified system were tested and showed that the concept is both positive and practical; however, the tests showed that for the system to be robust and durable, borehole diameter should be substantially larger than

  1. HydroPulse Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.J. Kolle

    2004-04-01

    Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

  2. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denninger, Kate; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Bell, Sean; Jacobs, Amelia; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Tilley, Mitch; Quick, Ralph

    2015-09-02

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling. This study of drilling operations seeks opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies. The scope of this study included analyzing 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'Perfect Well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.) and poor data collection practices An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate figures for analysis. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/ equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averaged 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million was spent on non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells, compared with only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry using Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time services, and official glossary terms to describe rig operations, and advanced drilling rigs/technology.

  3. Crosswell Imaging Technology & Advanced DSR Navigation for Horizontal Directional Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Stolarczyk

    2008-08-08

    The objective of Phase II is to develop and demonstrate real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of drill strings during horizontal drilling operations applicable to both short and long holes. The end product of Phase II is a functional drill-string assembly outfitted with a commercial version of Drill String Radar (DSR). Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate a dual-phase methodology of in-seam drilling, imaging, and structure confirmation. This methodology, illustrated in Figure 1, includes: (1) Using RIM to image between drill holes for seam thickness estimates and in-seam structures detection. Completed, February 2005; and (2) Using DSR for real-time MWD guidance and navigation of drillstrings during horizontal drilling operations. Completed, November 2008. As of November 2008, the Phase II portion of Contract DE-FC26-04NT42085 is about 99% complete, including milestones and tasks original outlined as Phase II work. The one percent deficiency results from MSHA-related approvals which have yet to be granted (at the time of reporting). These approvals are pending and are do not negatively impact the scope of work or project objectives.

  4. Microhole Wireless Steering While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Macpherson; Thomas Gregg

    2007-12-31

    A background to Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies (CT-BHA) is given, and the development of a bi-directional communications and power module (BCPM)component is described. The successful operation of this component in both the laboratory and field environment is described. The primary conclusion of this development is that the BCPM component operates as anticipated within the CT-BHA, and significantly extends the possibility of drilling with coiled tubing in the microhole environment.

  5. Slim Holes for Small Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, John T.

    1999-08-06

    Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

  6. Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    obtained from cuttings in this particular geologic setting. References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake...

  7. Drilling Report- First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Rowley, Et Al., 1987) Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1986) Density Log At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Rowley, Et Al.,...

  8. Geothermal Drilling Organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.

    1999-07-07

    The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

  9. Drilling Best Practices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drilling Best Practices Douglas Blankenship Sandia National Laboratories Lunch Presentation May 9, 2012 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or ...

  10. Training and Drills

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    The volume offers a framework for effective management of emergency response training and drills. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  11. Remote drill bit loader

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dokos, J.A.

    1997-12-30

    A drill bit loader is described for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned. 5 figs.

  12. Remote drill bit loader

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dokos, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A drill bit loader for loading a tapered shank of a drill bit into a similarly tapered recess in the end of a drill spindle. The spindle has a transverse slot at the inner end of the recess. The end of the tapered shank of the drill bit has a transverse tang adapted to engage in the slot so that the drill bit will be rotated by the spindle. The loader is in the form of a cylinder adapted to receive the drill bit with the shank projecting out of the outer end of the cylinder. Retainer pins prevent rotation of the drill bit in the cylinder. The spindle is lowered to extend the shank of the drill bit into the recess in the spindle and the spindle is rotated to align the slot in the spindle with the tang on the shank. A spring unit in the cylinder is compressed by the drill bit during its entry into the recess of the spindle and resiliently drives the tang into the slot in the spindle when the tang and slot are aligned.

  13. Sidetracking technology for coiled tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leising, L.J.; Hearn, D.D.; Rike, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    Coiled tubing (CT) drilling is a rapidly growing new technology that has been used for shallow new wells and reentry applications. A new market has evolved as being a major application for CT drilling. This market is through-tubing drilling. The lower cost of mobilization of a coiled tubing unit (CTU) to an offshore platform or Arctic wellsite vs. a rotary rig provides additional economic incentive. In addition, the ease of drilling 4-3/4-in. and smaller boreholes with CT is an advantage in a region which does not have an established practice of slimhole drilling. The remaining key enabling technology for viable through-tubing drilling is the ability to sidetrack in casing below the tubing tail. The three technologies (cement sidetracking, whipstock in cement, and through-tubing whipstock) that have been developed for sidetracking are described in this paper. A mathematical model of forces, penetration rates, and torques for window milling with the cement sidetracking technique is presented. Window milling has been a {open_quotes}seat of the pants{close_quotes} operation in the past, to the authors` knowledge, this is the first published work on the mechanics of window milling. The analysis has shed much light on the interaction between motor bending stiffness, motor bend angle, and allowable advance rates for {open_quotes}time drilling.{close_quotes} The results from several yard tests are presented, and indicate some of the problems associated with sidetracking. The photographs of the sectioned hole/window illustrate the ledges caused downhole from {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes} bottomhole assembly (BHA) changes. The cement sidetrack technique has been successfully applied many times in the field, and the results of one of these field applications is presented.

  14. Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Leslie

    2008-12-31

    Advanced Composite Products and Technology, Inc. (ACPT) has developed composite drill pipe (CDP) that matches the structural and strength properties of steel drill pipe, but weighs less than 50 percent of its steel counterpart. Funding for the multiyear research and development of CDP was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy through the Natural Gas and Oil Projects Management Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Composite materials made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin offer mechanical properties comparable to steel at less than half the weight. Composite drill pipe consists of a composite material tube with standard drill pipe steel box and pin connections. Unlike metal drill pipe, composite drill pipe can be easily designed, ordered, and produced to meet specific requirements for specific applications. Because it uses standard joint connectors, CDP can be used in lieu of any part of or for the entire steel drill pipe section. For low curvature extended reach, deep directional drilling, or ultra deep onshore or offshore drilling, the increased strength to weight ratio of CDP will increase the limits in all three drilling applications. Deceased weight will reduce hauling costs and increase the amount of drill pipe allowed on offshore platforms. In extreme extended reach areas and high-angle directional drilling, drilling limits are associated with both high angle (fatigue) and frictional effects resulting from the combination of high angle curvature and/or total weight. The radius of curvature for a hole as small as 40 feet (12.2 meters) or a build rate of 140 degrees per 100 feet is within the fatigue limits of specially designed CDP. Other properties that can be incorporated into the design and manufacture of composite drill pipe and make it attractive for specific applications are corrosion resistance, non-magnetic intervals, and abrasion resistance coatings. Since CDP has little or no electromagnetic force

  15. Guiding drilling operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) was the overriding theme at this year's Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) exhibition and conference, with the emphasis more on drilling rather than production methods. A wide range of electronic aids to improve accuracy and speed in drilling operations - from calculators to computers - is described.

  16. Advanced drilling systems study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

  17. Coiled tubing used for slim hole re-entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traonmilin, E. ); Newman, K. )

    1992-02-17

    A coiled tubing unit with slim hole tools successfully re-entered and cored an existing Elf Aquitaine vertical well in the Paris basin in France. This experiment proved that coiled tubing could be used to drill, core, and test a slim hole well. Elf Aquitaine studied the use of coiled tubing for drilling inexpensive exploration wells in the Paris basin. As a result of this study, Elf believed that coiled tubing exploration drilling could significantly reduce exploration costs. This paper reports on a number of questions raised by this study: Can coiled tubing be used effectively to drill slim open hole How would the drilling rate compare with that of a conventional drilling rig If the rate were too slow, coiled tubing might not be economical. Can a straight vertical well be drilled Coiled tubing pipe has a residual curvature from bending over the reel and gooseneck. Will this curvature make it impossible to drill straight Can the coiled tubing also be used to take cores Once the hole is drilled, can it be tested with coiled tubing

  18. Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of drilling for the purpose of determining the physical properties and boundaries of a reservoir. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Exploration drilling is an...

  19. Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    be made and then locations for further drilling can be narrowed down. Once a confident reservoir model is made Development Drilling methods can be employed. A geothermal well...

  20. Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Oglesby

    2008-12-01

    An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

  1. Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project. High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbank, Brian D.; Smith, Nicole

    2015-06-10

    The Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project – High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling ran from January 29, 2010 to September 30, 2013. During Phase 1 of the project, collection of all geophysical surveys was completed as outlined in the Statement of Project Objectives. In addition, a 5000-foot full sized exploration well was drilled by Ormat, and preexisting drilling data was discovered for multiple temperature gradient wells within the project area. Three dimensional modeling and interpretation of results from the geophysical surveys and drilling data gave confidence to move to the project into Phase 2 drilling. Geological and geophysical survey interpretations combined with existing downhole temperature data provided an ideal target for the first slim-hole drilled as the first task in Phase 2. Slim-hole 35-34 was drilled in September 2011 and tested temperature, lithology, and permeability along the primary range-bounding fault zone near its intersection with buried northwest-trending faults that have been identified using geophysical methods. Following analysis of the results of the first slim-hole 35-34, the second slim hole was not drilled and subsequent project tasks, including flowing differential self-potential (FDSP) surveys that were designed to detail the affect of production and injection on water flow in the shallow aquifer, were not completed. NGP sold the Crump project to Ormat in August 2014, afterwards, there was insufficient time and interest from Ormat available to complete the project objectives. NGP was unable to continue managing the award for a project they did not own due to liability issues and Novation of the award was not a viable option due to federal award timelines. NGP submitted a request to mutually terminate the award on February 18, 2015. The results of all of the technical surveys and drilling are included in this report. Fault interpretations from surface geology, aeromag

  2. Slim Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    slim hole 12-33, was drilled to a total depth of 297 m during April 2001. Continuous core was taken from 152 m to total depth. Numerous open fractures were also observed in...

  3. Subsurface drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casper, William L.; Clark, Don T.; Grover, Blair K.; Mathewson, Rodney O.; Seymour, Craig A.

    2008-10-07

    A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

  4. Drilling Productivity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Drilling Productivity Report Report Background and Methodological Overview August 2014 Updated March 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report: Report Background and Methodological Overview i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data,

  5. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  6. While drilling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayes, James C.; Araya, Mario A.; Thorp, Richard Edward

    2007-02-20

    A while drilling system and method for determining downhole parameters is provided. The system includes a retrievable while drilling tool positionable in a downhole drilling tool, a sensor chassis and at least one sensor. The while drilling tool is positionable in the downhole drilling tool and has a first communication coupler at an end thereof. The sensor chassis is supported in the drilling tool. The sensor chassis has a second communication coupler at an end thereof for operative connection with the first communication coupler. The sensor is positioned in the chassis and is adapted to measure internal and/or external parameters of the drilling tool. The sensor is operatively connected to the while drilling tool via the communication coupler for communication therebetween. The sensor may be positioned in the while drilling tool and retrievable with the drilling tool. Preferably, the system is operable in high temperature and high pressure conditions.

  7. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilley, Mitch; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Quick, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling; however, there are opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies used. The scope of this drilling operational study included 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'perfect well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.), poor data collection, and difficult to ascertain handwriting. An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate analysis figures. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averages 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million would be lost due to non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells and only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry. It is the use of Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. However, a work-flow must also be established in order for there to be an efficient drilling program. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time

  8. Method and apparatus for water jet drilling of rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, David A.; Mazurkiewicz, Marian; Bushnell, Dwight J.; Blaine, James

    1978-01-01

    Rock drilling method and apparatus utilizing high pressure water jets for drilling holes of relatively small diameter at speeds significantly greater than that attainable with existing drilling tools. Greatly increased drilling rates are attained due to jet nozzle geometry and speed of rotation. The jet nozzle design has two orifices, one pointing axially ahead in the direction of travel and the second inclined at an angle of approximately 30.degree. from the axis. The two orifices have diameters in the ratio of approximately 1:2. Liquid jet velocities in excess of 1,000 ft/sec are used, and the nozzle is rotated at speeds up to 1,000 rpm and higher.

  9. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    . An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified

  10. The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-11-01

    During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  11. Methods and apparatus for removal and control of material in laser drilling of a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-01-28

    The removal of material from the path of a high power laser beam during down hole laser operations including drilling of a borehole and removal of displaced laser effected borehole material from the borehole during laser operations. In particular, paths, dynamics and parameters of fluid flows for use in conjunction with a laser bottom hole assembly.

  12. Geologic aspects of horizontal drilling in self-sourcing reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illich, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Horizontal drilling techniques provide a way to exploit hydrocarbon reserves that are either noneconomic or only marginally economic using vertical drilling techniques. A significant fraction of these reserves is contained in reservoirs that are self-sourcing or in reservoirs that are closely associated with their resources. Most formations drilled as horizontal targets are self-sourcing. The Austin Chalk, Niobrara, Mesaverde, and Bakken are examples of horizontally drilled, self-sourcing reservoir systems. In formations like the Bakken or Austin Chalk, the close relationship between reservoir and source makes risks associated with migration and accumulation less important. Reservoirs of this kind can contain oil or gas and often have little or no associated water. They can be matrix-dominated reservoirs, dual-porosity reservoirs (Mesaverde), or fractured reservoirs (Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara). Fractured, self-sourcing reservoirs also can possess matrix characteristics that contribute increased recovery efficiency. Most reservoirs drilled horizontally possess matrix characteristics that contribute increased recovery efficiency. Most reservoirs drilled horizontally possess highly heterogeneous reservoir systems. Characterization of the style of reservoir heterogeneity in self-sourcing systems is important if the favorable properties of horizontally oriented bore holes are to be realized. Production data and rock mechanics considerations are important in horizontal drilling ventures. Examples of the use of these data for the purpose of defining reservoir characteristics are discussed. Knowledge of lateral changes in reservoir properties is essential if we are to recover known reserves efficiently.

  13. Drilling technology/GDO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy is sponsoring two programs related to drilling technology. The first is aimed at development of technology that will lead to reduced costs of drilling, completion, and logging of geothermal wells. This program has the official title ''Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics.'' The second program is intended to share with private industry the cost of development of technology that will result in solutions to the near term geothermal well problems. This program is referred to as the ''Geothermal Drilling Organization''. The Hard Rock Penetration Mechanics Program was funded at $2.65M in FY85 and the GDO was funded at $1.0M in FY85. This paper details the past year's activities and accomplishments and projects the plans for FY86 for these two programs.

  14. Drying '84

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baunack, F.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: mechanism of water sorption-desorption in polymers; progress in freeze drying; on drying of materials in through circulation system; safety aspects of spray drying; dewatering process enhanced by electroosmosis; pressure drop and particle circulation studies in modified slot spouted beds; and experience in drying coal slurries.

  15. Category:Drilling Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Drilling Techniques page? For detailed information on Drilling...

  16. Deep Water Drilling to Catalyze the Global Drilling Fluids Market...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Deep Water Drilling to Catalyze the Global Drilling Fluids Market Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs John55364's picture Submitted by John55364(100) Contributor 13 May, 2015 -...

  17. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2007-02-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRILLING FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett

    2003-08-01

    The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24-month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a ''removable filtercake'' has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed.

  19. Combination drilling and skiving tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, William J.

    1989-01-01

    A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

  20. Preliminary Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Preliminary locations for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or resource confirmation wells based on compilation of geological, geophysical and geochemical data prior to carrying out the DOE-funded reflection seismic survey.

  1. Preliminary Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Preliminary locations for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or resource confirmation wells based on compilation of geological, geophysical and geochemical data prior to carrying out the DOE-funded reflection seismic survey.

  2. Pros and cons of hydraulic drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using hydraulic drilling are discussed. The low maintenance, energy efficiency, drilling speeds, and operating costs are the main advantages of the hydraulic drills. The economics and maintenance of air drills are also compared.

  3. Geochemical Mud Logging of geothermal drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonani, F.B.; Guidi, M.; Johnson, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The experience and results described in the present paper were developed over nearly two decades, with a major R&D project around 1980. The expression Geochemical Mud Logging (GML) has ill defined meaning in the geothermal industry, and ought to be specified. We refer here to GML as featuring mud and formation fluid tracer(s) and temperature as the bare essentials and with specified accuracies. Air and water logging are expected to be less demanding with regard to analysis accuracy, but are not discussed in this report. During application of GML to several drill holes with low formation permeabilities and under conditions of high temperature and high mud weight, GML as specified, revealed unexpected influx of formation brine. Such influx was a recurring feature that has been referenced to individual fractures and reflects both fracture size and permeability. As a consequence, continuous or subcontinuous sampling of mud systems appears more cost effective than trying to keep up with cumulative changes of bulk mud composition; although, the latter approach is more sensitive to extremely low rate, steady, inflow of formation fluid into the mud system. It appears, that based on this influx of formation fluid, permeability can be estimated well before mud losses are detected and/or drill strings are stuck. The main advantages of GML are: (1) the capability to assess formation temperature and permeability in nearly real time, resulting in (a) assessments of undisturbed formation and (b) having data in hand for holes lost during drilling operations and (2) being effective under conditions of very high temperatures where electrical logs are very costly and less reliable. Estimated cost for GML is $1500 per day (1982) based on assessments of R&D operations. However, extrapolating to larger scale services and to different operating conditions is indeed difficult. GML cost is probably the only significant point of controversy with regard to GML being a viable evaluation tool.

  4. Geologic report on the Sand Wash Drilling Project, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, T.E.; Wayland, T.E.

    1981-09-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling Project comprises twenty-seven (27) drill holes located in Moffat and Routt Counties, northwest Colorado, having an aggregate depth of 26,107.5 feet (7957.6 m). The holes penetrate the Browns Park Formation of Miocene age, which is a tuffaceous continental sandstone deposited in fluvial, eolian, and lacustrine environments. Partly based on project drilling results, uranium potential resource estimates for this formation in the $50/lb U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ forward-cost category have been increased by 34,476 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (35,036 metric tons). Three areas between Maybell and Craig, Colorado, considered favorable for uranium occurrences were verified as favorable by project drilling, and a fourth favorable area northwest of Maybell has been expanded. In addition, project drilling results indicate two new favorable areas, one north and northwest and one south of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Anomalous radioactivity was detected in drill holes in all six study areas of the project. The most important factor in concentrating significant amounts of uranium in the target formation appears to be the availability of gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons and/or hydrogen sulfide gas as reductants. Where subjacent formations supply these reductants to the Browns Park Formation, project drilling encountered 0.05 percent to 0.01 percent uranium concentrations. Potential, though unproven, sources of these reductants are believed to underlie parts of all six project study areas.

  5. Drilling subsurface wellbores with cutting structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansure, Arthur James; Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona

    2010-11-30

    A system for forming a wellbore includes a drill tubular. A drill bit is coupled to the drill tubular. One or more cutting structures are coupled to the drill tubular above the drill bit. The cutting structures remove at least a portion of formation that extends into the wellbore formed by the drill bit.

  6. Horizontal drilling spurs optimism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouse, P.C. )

    1991-02-01

    1990 proved to be an exciting year for horizontal wells. This budding procedure appears to be heading for the mainstream oil and gas market, because it can more efficiently recover hydrocarbons from many reservoirs throughout the world. This paper reports on an estimated 1,000 wells that were drilled horizontally (all laterals) in 1990, with the Austin Chalk formation of Texas accounting for about 65% of all world activity. The Bakken Shale play in Montana and North Dakota proved to be the second most active area, with an estimated 90 wells drilled. Many operators in this play have indicated the bloom may be off the Bakken because of poor results outside the nose of the formation, further complicated by some of the harshest rock, reservoir and completion problems posed to horizontal technology.

  7. 1983 temperature gradient and heat flow drilling project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    During the Summer of 1983, a three-hole drilling program was carried out to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The general locations of the project areas are shown. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens - Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  8. Drill bit assembly for releasably retaining a drill bit cutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, David A.; Raymond, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A drill bit assembly is provided for releasably retaining a polycrystalline diamond compact drill bit cutter. Two adjacent cavities formed in a drill bit body house, respectively, the disc-shaped drill bit cutter and a wedge-shaped cutter lock element with a removable fastener. The cutter lock element engages one flat surface of the cutter to retain the cutter in its cavity. The drill bit assembly thus enables the cutter to be locked against axial and/or rotational movement while still providing for easy removal of a worn or damaged cutter. The ability to adjust and replace cutters in the field reduces the effect of wear, helps maintains performance and improves drilling efficiency.

  9. Microhole Smart Steering and Logging While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Macpherson; Mathias Moeller; Thomas Gregg; Roland Chemali

    2006-06-30

    A background to Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies (CT-BHA) is given, and the development of a resistivity measurement component, and a rib-steering motor component, is described. The successful operation of these components in both the laboratory and field environment is described. The primary conclusion of this development is that both components operate as anticipated within the CT-BHA, and significantly extend the possibility of drilling with coiled tubing in the microhole environment.

  10. Exploration Drilling and Technology Demonstration At Fort Bliss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Ben; Moore, Joe; Segall, Marylin; Nash, Greg; Simmons, Stuart; Jones, Clay; Lear, Jon; Bennett, Carlon

    2014-02-26

    The Tularosa-Hueco basin in south-central New Mexico has long been known as an extensional area of high heat flow. Much of the basin is within the Fort Bliss military reservation, which is an exceptionally high value customer for power independent of the regional electric grid and for direct use energy in building climate control. A series of slim holes drilled in the 1990s established the existence of a thermal anomaly but not its practical value. This study began in 2009 with a demonstration of new exploration drilling technology. The subsequent phases reported here delivered a useful well, comparative exploration data sets and encouragement for further development. A production-size well, RMI56-5, was sited after extensive study of archival and newly collected data in 2010-2011. Most of 2012 was taken up with getting state and Federal authorities to agree on a lead agency for permitting purposes, getting a drilling permit and redesigning the drilling program to suit available equipment. In 2013 we drilled, logged and tested a 924 m well on the McGregor Range at Fort Bliss using a reverse circulation rig. Rig tests demonstrated commercial permeability and the well has a 7-inch slotted liner for use either in production or injection. An August 2013 survey of the completed well showed a temperature of 90 C with no reversal, the highest such temperature in the vicinity. The well’s proximity to demand suggests a potentially valuable resource for direct use heat and emergency power generation. The drilling produced cuttings of excellent size and quality. These were subjected to traditional analyses (thin sections, XRD) and to the QEMScan™ for comparison. QEMScan™ technology includes algorithms for determining such properties of rocks as density, mineralogy, heavy/light atoms, and porosity to be compared with direct measurements of the cuttings. In addition to a complete cuttings set, conventional and resistivity image logs were obtained in the open hole before

  11. Characterizing the Weeks Island Salt Dome drilling of and seismic measurements from boreholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.; Harding, R.S.; Jacobson, R.D.; Finger, J.T.; Keefe, R.; Neal, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    A sinkhole 36 ft across, 30 ft deep was first observed in the alluvium over the Weeks Island Salt Dome (salt mine converted for oil storage by US Strategic Petroleum Reserve) May 1992. Four vertical, two slanted boreholes were drilled for diagnostics. Crosswell seismic data were generated; the velocity images suggest that the sinkhole collapse is complicated, not a simple vertical structure. The coring operation was moderately difficult; limited core was obtained through the alluvium, and the quality of the salt core from the first two vertical wells was poor. Core quality improved with better bit selection, mud, and drilling method. The drilling fluid program provided fairly stable holes allowing open hole logs to be run. All holes were cemented successfully (although it took 3 attempts in one case).

  12. Apparatus in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Dahlgren, Scott; Hall, Jr., Tracy H.; Fox, Joe; Pixton, David S.

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable spirally welded metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube.

  13. An innovative drilling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nees, J.; Dickinson, E.; Dickinson, W.; Dykstra, H.

    1991-05-01

    The principal project objectives were the following: To demonstrate the capability of the Ultrashort Radius Radial System to drill and complete multiple horizontal radials in a heavy oil formation which had a production history of thermal operations. To study the effects that horizontal radials have on steam placement at specific elevations and on reducing gravity override. To demonstrate that horizontal radials could be utilized for cyclic production, i.e. for purposes of oil production as well as for steam injection. Each of these objectives was successfully achieved in the project. Early production results indicate that radials positively influenced cyclic performance. This report documents those results. 15 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Drilling Methods | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Provided by Technique Lithology: StratigraphicStructural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Drilling Methods: No definition has been provided for this term....

  15. Development Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iceland.1 Best Practices Developmental drilling should only begin once a dependable reservoir model has been established and there is a good amount of certainty that the...

  16. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  17. Geothermal drilling problems and their impact on cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    Historical data are presented that demonstrate the significance of unexpected problems. In extreme cases, trouble costs are the largest component of well costs or severe troubles can lead to abandonment of a hole. Drilling experiences from US geothermal areas are used to analyze the frequency and severity of various problems. In addition, average trouble costs are estimated based on this analysis and the relationship between trouble and depth is discussed. The most frequent drilling and completion problem in geothermal wells is lost circulation. This is especially true for resources in underpressured, fractured formations. Serious loss of circulation can occur during drilling - because of this, the producing portions of many wells are drilled with air or aerated drilling fluid and the resulting corrosion/erosion problems are tolerated - but it can also affect the cementing of well casing. Problems in bonding the casing to the formation result from many other causes as well, and are common in geothermal wells. Good bonds are essential because of the possibility of casing collapse due to thermal cycling during the life of the well. Several other problems are identified and their impacts are quantified and discussed.

  18. Reducing the risk, complexity and cost of coiled tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, L.

    1999-07-01

    Drilling vertical well extensions with coiled tubing, particularly in the underbalanced state, exploits the inherent strengths of coiled tubing including: The ability to enter slim holes against a live well head; The use of small equipment that is fast to rig up and down; and The ability to trip quickly and maintain a steady pressure downhole with continuous circulation. Coiled tubing has successfully been used to deepen hundreds of wells, yet this application has only received sporadic attention. There are some very important technical considerations when drilling non-directionally with coiled tubing that must be addressed to ensure a commercially successful job. A recent vertical drilling job carried out in Western Australia illustrates the critical engineering aspects of an underbalanced, non-directional, coiled tubing drilling job. This job was completed for Arc Energy in April 1999 and produced a well that stabilized at 1.1 MMcfd, where three other wells drilled conventionally into these zones had shown only trace amounts of hydrocarbon.

  19. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors John A. Musgrave, Fraser E. Goff, Lisa Shevenell, Patricio E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce, Gary Luedemann, Sammy Garcia,...

  20. Test plan for sonic drilling at the Hanford Site in FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, G.W.

    1993-07-08

    This test plan describes the field demonstration of the sonic drilling system being conducted as a coordinated effort between the VOC-Arid ID (Integrated Demonstration) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride ERA (Expedited Response Action) programs at Hanford. The purpose of this test is to evaluate the Water Development Corporation`s drilling system, modify components as necessary and determine compatible drilling applications for the sonic drilling method for use at facilities in the DOE complex. The sonic demonstration is being conducted as the first field test under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) which involves the US Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Hanford Company and Water Development Corporation. The sonic drilling system will be used to drill a 45 degree vadose zone well, two vertical wells at the VOC-Arid ID site, and several test holes at the Drilling Technology Test Site north of the 200 Area fire station. Testing at other locations will depend on the performance of the drilling method. Performance of this technology will be compared to the baseline drilling method (cable-tool).

  1. Flexible shaft and roof drilling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blanz, John H.

    1981-01-01

    A system for drilling holes in the roof of a mine has a flexible shaft with a pair of oppositely wound, coaxial flat bands. One of the flat bands defines an inner spring that is wound right handed into a helical configuration, adjacent convolutions being in nesting relationship to one another. The other flat band defines an outer spring that is wound left handed into a helical configuration about the inner band, adjacent convolutions being nesting relationship with one another. A transition member that is configured to hold a rock bit is mounted to one end of the flexible shaft. When torque and thrust are applied to the flexible shaft by a driver, the inner spring expands outwardly and the outer spring contracts inwardly to form a relatively rigid shaft.

  2. Activity plan: Directional drilling and environmental measurements while drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.A.

    1998-07-16

    This activity plan describes the testing of directional drilling combined with environmental measurements while drilling at two Hanford Site locations. A cold test is to be conducted at the 105A Mock Tank Leak Facility in the 200 East Area. A hot test is proposed to be run at the 216-B-8 tile field north of the 241-B Tank Farm in 200 East Area. Criteria to judge the success, partial success or failure of various aspects of the test are included. The TWRS program is assessing the potential for use of directional drilling because of an identified need to interrogate the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tanks. Because every precaution must be taken to assure that investigation activities do not violate the integrity of the tanks, control of the drill bit and ability to follow a predetermined drill path are of utmost importance and are being tested.

  3. Preliminary results and status report of the Hawaiian Scientific Observation Hole program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Harry J.; Deymonaz, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI), an institute within the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa has drilled three Scientific Observation Holes (SOH) in the Kilauea East Rift Zone to assess the geothermal potential of the Big Island of Hawaii, and to stimulate private development of the resource. The first hole drilled, SOH-4, reached a depth of 2,000 meters and recorded a bottom hole temperature of 306 C. Although evidence of fossil reservoir conditions were encountered, no zones with obvious reservoir potential were found. The second hole, SOH- 1, was drilled to a depth of 1,684 meters, recorded a bottom hole temperature of 206.1 C and effectively defined the northern limit of the Hawaii Geothermal Project-Abbott--Puna Geothermal Venture (HGP-A/PGV) reservoir. The final hole, SOH-2, was drilled to a depth of 2,073 meters, recorded a bottom hole temperature of 350.5 C and has sufficient indicated permeability to be designated as a potential ''discovery''. The SOH program was also highly successful in developing slim hole drilling techniques and establishing subsurface geological conditions.

  4. U.S. Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 12,597 1950's 14,799 17,026 17,759 18,449 18,930 20,452 22,111 20,156 18,162 18,589 1960's...

  5. U.S. Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 5,369 1950's 6,507 7,487 7,669 7,816 8,541 8,620 8,993 8,252 7,530 8,012 1960's 8,697 8,309...

  6. U.S. Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1940's 7,228 1950's 8,292 9,539 10,090 10,633 10,389 11,832 13,118 11,904 10,632 10,577 1960's 9,515...

  7. U.S. Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, DC 20585 OMB No. 1905-0174 Form Expires: 09/30/2017 Version No. : 2015.01 FORM EIA-821 ANNUAL FUEL OIL AND KEROSENE SALES REPORT REFERENCE YEAR 2014 This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly

  8. U.S. Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 538 411 431 367 454 477 530 601 502 551 501 589 1974 490 486 492 532 570 556 608 617 590 622 644 626 1975 624 453 572 551 543 539 623 595 611 689 638 691 1976 679 523 596 538 501 535 526 548 574 593 572 587 1977 549 480 566 527 586 570 593 590 682 716 695 729 1978 653 537 629 624 624 645 699 678 689 765 701 721 1979 572 471 527 530 561 603 612 712 679 732 714 724 1980 724 614 617 629 683 757 772 839 845 845 838 918 1981 1,014 812 914 919

  9. Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

  10. Relating horsepower to drilling productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Givens, R.; Williams, G.; Wingfield, B.

    1996-12-31

    Many technological advancements have been made in explosive products and applications over the last 15 years resulting in productivity and cost gains. However, the application of total energy (engine horsepower) in the majority of rotary drilling technology, has remained virtually unchanged over that period. While advancements have been made in components, efficiency, and types of hydraulic systems used on drills, the application of current hydraulic technology to improve drilling productivity has not been interactive with end users. This paper will investigate how traditional design assumptions, regarding typical application of horsepower in current rotary drill systems, can actually limit productivity. It will be demonstrated by numeric analysis how changing the partitioning of available hydraulic energy can optimize rotary drill productivity in certain conditions. Through cooperative design ventures with drill manufacturers, increased penetration rates ranging from 20% to 100% have been achieved. Productivity was increased initially on some rigs by careful selection of optional hydraulic equipment. Additional gains were made in drilling rates by designing the rotary hydraulic circuit to meet the drilling energies predicted by computer modeling.

  11. Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into

  12. Subsea well template for directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, R.G.

    1988-07-05

    A method is described for drilling widely spaced boreholes into a hydrocarbon producing subsea formation comprising the steps of: positioning a subsea drilling template on the bottom of a body of water, the subsea drilling template including laterally disposed, substantially cylindrical drilling guides having a longitudinal axis wherein at least one of the drilling guides has its longitudinal axis disposed at an angle of less than 90/sup 0/ relative to a horizontal plane passing through the subsea drilling template; mooring a drilling vessel floating on the surface of the body of water in a first position relative to the subsea drilling template using a plurality of mooring catenaries; extending a drill string from the floating vessel to the subsea template, the drill string passing into the one of the drilling guides along its longitudinal axis which is disposed at an angle of less than 90/sup 0/; drilling a borehole below the template into the hydrocarbon producing subsea formation; repositioning the drilling vessel to another position relative to the subsea template by adjusting the mooring catenaries; extending the drill string from the vessel into another of the drilling guides; drilling another borehole below the template; and repeating the steps of repositioning the drilling vessel, extending the drill string and drilling the widely spaced boreholes.

  13. OM300 Direction Drilling Module

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    MacGugan, Doug

    2013-08-22

    OM300 – Geothermal Direction Drilling Navigation Tool: Design and produce a prototype directional drilling navigation tool capable of high temperature operation in geothermal drilling Accuracies of 0.1° Inclination and Tool Face, 0.5° Azimuth Environmental Ruggedness typical of existing oil/gas drilling Multiple Selectable Sensor Ranges High accuracy for navigation, low bandwidth High G-range & bandwidth for Stick-Slip and Chirp detection Selectable serial data communications Reduce cost of drilling in high temperature Geothermal reservoirs Innovative aspects of project Honeywell MEMS* Vibrating Beam Accelerometers (VBA) APS Flux-gate Magnetometers Honeywell Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) High-temperature electronics Rugged High-temperature capable package and assembly process

  14. Results from shallow research drilling at Inyo Domes, Long Valley Caldera, California and Salton Sea geothermal field, Salton Trough, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, L.W.; Eichelberger, J.C.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Newmark, R.L.; Vogel, T.A.

    1987-09-01

    This report reviews the results from two shallow drilling programs recently completed as part of the United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The purpose is to provide a broad overview of the objectives and results of the projects, and to analyze these results in the context of the promise and potential of research drilling in crustal thermal regimes. The Inyo Domes drilling project has involved drilling 4 shallow research holes into the 600-year-old Inyo Domes chain, the youngest rhyolitic event in the coterminous United States and the youngest volcanic event in Long Valley Caldera, California. The purpose of the drilling at Inyo was to understand the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of silicic magma as it intrudes the upper crust. This behavior, which involves the response of magma to decompression and cooling, is closely related to both eruptive phenomena and the establishment of hydrothermal circulation. The Salton Sea shallow research drilling project involved drilling 19 shallow research holes into the Salton Sea geothermal field, California. The purpose of this drilling was to bound the thermal anomaly, constrain hydrothermal flow pathways, and assess the thermal budget of the field. Constraints on the thermal budget links the local hydrothermal system to the general processes of crustal rifting in the Salton Trough.

  15. Jack-up rig for marine drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, S. R.

    1981-05-26

    This invention relates to a mobile drilling platform of the jack -up type equipped with a special system which allows the said drilling platform to work as a drilling derrick and alternatively as a hoisting crane rig for marine service.

  16. Alpine Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Logo: Alpine Geothermal Drilling Name: Alpine Geothermal Drilling Address: PO Box 141 Place: Kittredge, Colorado Zip: 80457 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Geothermal...

  17. Directional Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Directional Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Directional Drilling Systems Loading map... "format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","t...

  18. Category:Exploration Drilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Exploration Drilling page? For detailed information on...

  19. Percussive Hammer Enables Geothermal Drilling | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Percussive Hammer Enables Geothermal Drilling Percussive Hammer Enables Geothermal Drilling May 14, 2015 - 7:00pm Addthis Through funding by the Energy Department, Sandia National ...

  20. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Niobrara Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  1. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Utica Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  2. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Permian Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  3. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Marcellus Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  4. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Eagle Ford Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling Productivity ...

  5. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feetday Haynesville Region Rig count rigs drilling data through May projected production through July June 2016 Drilling ...

  6. Establishing nuclear facility drill programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of DOE Handbook, Establishing Nuclear Facility Drill Programs, is to provide DOE contractor organizations with guidance for development or modification of drill programs that both train on and evaluate facility training and procedures dealing with a variety of abnormal and emergency operating situations likely to occur at a facility. The handbook focuses on conducting drills as part of a training and qualification program (typically within a single facility), and is not intended to included responses of personnel beyond the site boundary, e.g. Local or State Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, etc. Each facility is expected to develop its own facility specific scenarios, and should not limit them to equipment failures but should include personnel injuries and other likely events. A well-developed and consistently administered drill program can effectively provide training and evaluation of facility operating personnel in controlling abnormal and emergency operating situations. To ensure the drills are meeting their intended purpose they should have evaluation criteria for evaluating the knowledge and skills of the facility operating personnel. Training and evaluation of staff skills and knowledge such as component and system interrelationship, reasoning and judgment, team interactions, and communications can be accomplished with drills. The appendices to this Handbook contain both models and additional guidance for establishing drill programs at the Department`s nuclear facilities.

  7. Geothermal drilling in Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez A., Bernardo

    1982-08-10

    The number of characteristics of the different wells that have been drilled in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field to date enable one to summarize the basic factors in the applied technology, draw some conclusions, improve systems and procedures, and define some problems that have not yet been satisfactorily solved, although the existing solution is the best now available. For all practical purposes, the 100 wells drilled in the three areas or blocks into which the Cerro Prieto field has been divided have been completed. Both exploratory and production wells have been drilled; problems of partial or total lack of control have made it necessary to abandon some of these wells, since they were unsafe to keep in production or even to be used for observation and/or study. The wells and their type, the type of constructed wells and the accumulative meters that have been drilled for such wells are summarized.

  8. Logging with coiled tubing less effective than with drill pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Den Bosch, R. )

    1994-01-31

    Coiled tubing offered neither economic nor operational advantages over drill pipe for conveying logging tools in open hole shallow horizontal wells in Germany. In the past 2 years, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GMbH (MEEG) participated in completing eight shallow horizontal wells. These were medium-to-short radius wells at measured depths of between 850 and 2,000 m. The average horizontal section was 350 m. The logging tools were conveyed by coiled tubing or drill pipe. MEEG attempted to log five wells with coiled tubing-conveyed tools, four with 1 1/2-in. tubing. Total depth was reached reliably in only one well, the shallowest and with the shortest horizontal section. Simulation programs were unreliable for calculating the downhole forces of the coil/tool combination or predicting possible helical lockups. In wells with drill pipe-conveyed logs, the tool combination could always be pushed to total depth, and the operations were generally faster and cost less than logging with coiled tubing. Also, drill pipe allowed longer and heavier tool strings. For reliable operations, coiled tubing needs to be more rigid, rig-up/rig-down times need to be improved, and the simulation programs must be more reliable for predicting downhole lock-up.

  9. The DOE Thermal Regimes Drilling Program through 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    In response to strong endorsement from the scientific community, in the form of a report by the Continental Scientific Drilling Committee of the National Academy of Sciences (CSDC, 1984), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the DOE undertook a program of investigations of young magmatic intrusions and their associated thermal systems. To date, the effort has encompassed the first phases of a program to investigate the roots of active hydrothermal systems and has also investigated the thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior of geologically recent (less than 600 years) magmatic extrusions. Shallow to intermediate-depth holes have been drilled and cored into hydrothermal systems in the silicic Valles and Long Valley calderas and at the crustal spreading center of the Salton Trough. These projects are briefly summarized here and are covered in greater detail in the accompanying appendices.

  10. Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

    2007-06-30

    Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the

  11. Rotary steerable motor system for underground drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, William E.; Perry, Carl A.; Wassell, Mark E.; Barbely, Jason R.; Burgess, Daniel E.; Cobern, Martin E.

    2008-06-24

    A preferred embodiment of a system for rotating and guiding a drill bit in an underground bore includes a drilling motor and a drive shaft coupled to drilling motor so that drill bit can be rotated by the drilling motor. The system further includes a guidance module having an actuating arm movable between an extended position wherein the actuating arm can contact a surface of the bore and thereby exert a force on the housing of the guidance module, and a retracted position.

  12. Rotary steerable motor system for underground drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, William E.; Perry, Carl A.; Wassell, Mark E.; Barbely, Jason R.; Burgess, Daniel E.; Cobern, Martin E.

    2010-07-27

    A preferred embodiment of a system for rotating and guiding a drill bit in an underground bore includes a drilling motor and a drive shaft coupled to drilling motor so that drill bit can be rotated by the drilling motor. The system further includes a guidance module having an actuating arm movable between an extended position wherein the actuating arm can contact a surface of the bore and thereby exert a force on the housing of the guidance module, and a retracted position.

  13. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  14. NNSA Small Business Week Day 2: United Drilling, Inc. | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Today's profile highlights United Drilling, Inc., a small minority-owned business based in Roswell, N.M. United Drilling drills oil, gas, water, geothermal, and environmental wells ...

  15. Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems Project objective: Development of drilling systems ...

  16. Esmeralda Energy Company, Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008. Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, DOE GRED III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deymonaz, John; Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Nash, Gregory D.; Schriener, Alex

    2008-01-22

    The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project (ESDP) was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included detailed geologic mapping; 3-D modeling; compilation of a GIS database; and production of a conceptual geologic model followed by the successful drilling of the 2,938 foot deep 17-31 slimhole (core hole), which encountered commercial geothermal temperatures (327⁰ F) and exhibits an increasing, conductive, temperature gradient to total depth; completion of a short injection test; and compilation of a detailed geologic core log and revised geologic cross-sections. Results of the project greatly increased the understanding of the geologic model controlling the Emigrant geothermal resource. Information gained from the 17-31 core hole revealed the existence of commercial temperatures beneath the area in the Silver Peak Core Complex which is composed of formations that exhibit excellent reservoir characteristics. Knowledge gained from the ESDP may lead to the development of a new commercial geothermal field in Nevada. Completion of the 17-31 core hole also demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of deep core drilling as an exploration tool and the unequaled value of core in understanding the geology, mineralogy, evolutional history and structural aspects of a geothermal resource.

  17. Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Macune

    2008-06-30

    The original objective of the project, to deliver an integrated 3 1/8-inch diameter Measurement While Drilling (MWD) and Logging While Drilling (LWD) system for drilling small boreholes using coiled tubing drilling, has been achieved. Two prototype systems have been assembled and tested in the lab. One of the systems has been successfully tested downhole in a conventional rotary drilling environment. Development of the 3 1/8-inch system has also lead to development and commercialization of a slightly larger 3.5-inch diameter system. We are presently filling customer orders for the 3.5-inch system while continuing with commercialization of the 3 1/8-inch system. The equipment developed by this project will be offered for sale to multiple service providers around the world, enabling the more rapid expansion of both coiled tubing drilling and conventional small diameter drilling. The project was based on the reuse of existing technology whenever possible in order to minimize development costs, time, and risks. The project was begun initially by Ultima Labs, at the time a small company ({approx}12 employees) which had successfully developed a number of products for larger oil well service companies. In September, 2006, approximately 20 months after inception of the project, Ultima Labs was acquired by Sondex plc, a worldwide manufacturer of downhole instrumentation for cased hole and drilling applications. The acquisition provided access to proven technology for mud pulse telemetry, downhole directional and natural gamma ray measurements, and surface data acquisition and processing, as well as a global sales and support network. The acquisition accelerated commercialization through existing Sondex customers. Customer demand resulted in changes to the product specification to support hotter (150 C) and deeper drilling (20,000 psi pressure) than originally proposed. The Sondex acquisition resulted in some project delays as the resistivity collar was interfaced to a

  18. Coiled tubing drilling: Real time MWD with dedicated powers to the BHA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leismer, D.; Williams, B.; Pursell, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes and analyzes the development and ongoing field trials of a Real Time MWD Coiled Tubing Drilling System. The new system holds great promise for advancing the state of coiled tubing drilling for certain applications. The system is designed for through-tubing, short radius re-entry and drilling highly deviated wells as horizontal laterals to a geologic target with minimum wellbore tortuosity. Currently, 4-1/2-in production tubing is the smallest re-entry candidate. Real time MWD and Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) control is achieved by the use of a combination hydraulic and electric umbilical internal to the coiled tubing (CT), allowing continuous data collection and selective surface control of the BHA components. This communication line allows orientation in 10{degree} increments (or less) while drilling, applies weight-on-bit and operates a reusable circulating valve. In addition, the umbilical provides real-time monitoring of weight-on-bit, circulating pressures of the drilling fluid internal and external to the BHA, dedicated hydraulic system bottom hole pressure, downhole temperature and survey data from logging equipment.

  19. Acoustic data transmission through a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-04-21

    Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

  20. Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall; David R. , Fox; Joe

    2007-04-03

    A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

  1. Drilling a high-angle exploration sidetrack downdip along bedding, Gobe main prospect, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, J.A.; Valenti, G.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Gobe 4X sidetrack exploration well was drilled in a remote area of the Southern Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea using an innovative sidetrack technique for delineating hydrocarbons. After gas was encountered in the Gobe 4X straight hole, a nonconventional sidetrack was drilled down dip along the bedding plane of the reservoir sand and determined the gas-oil contact and the oil-water contact with a single wellbore thereby establishing the limits of the oil band. This was accomplished despite a difficult well trajectory, high deviation angle, large stepout and limited structural information.

  2. Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Geothermal Drilling and Logging Applications Georgia Bettin Doug Blankenship Presenter: Doug Blankenship Sandia National Laboratories Drilling Systems Project ...

  3. Engineering report on drilling in the Sand Wash Basin, Colorado. [In support of NURE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callihan, M C

    1980-01-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Drilling project was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. This project consisted of 27 drill holes ranging in depth from 110 feet (33.5 m) to 1,995 feet (608.1 m). A total of 25,514 feet (7,471.9 m) was rotary drilled, and 1,593.5 feet (485.7 m) were cored resulting in a total of 26,107.5 feet (7,957.6 m) drilled for the project. The objective of the project was to provide comprehensive subsurface geologic data relevant to uranium mineralization. This was accomplished by drilling in major outcrop areas of the Browns Park Formation in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado. The project began May 18, 1979; drilling was completed November 4, 1979. Most site restoration and cleanup was completed during the fall of 1979 with the remainder to be completed during the spring of 1980.

  4. Optical coherence tomography guided dental drill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DaSilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A dental drill that has one or multiple single mode fibers that can be used to image in the vicinity of the drill tip. It is valuable to image below the surface being drilled to minimize damage to vital or normal tissue. Identifying the boundary between decayed and normal enamel (or dentine) would reduce the removal of viable tissue, and identifying the nerve before getting too close with the drill could prevent nerve damage. By surrounding a drill with several optical fibers that can be used by an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) to image several millimeters ahead of the ablation surface will lead to a new and improved dental treatment device.

  5. Filter for a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael; McPherson, James

    2007-12-04

    A filter for a drill string comprises a perforated receptacle having an open end and a perforated end and first and second mounting surfaces are adjacent the open end. A transmission element is disposed within each of the first and second mounting surfaces. A capacitor may modify electrical characteristics of an LC circuit that comprises the transmission elements. The respective transmission elements are in communication with each other and with a transmission network integrated into the drill string. The transmission elements may be inductive couplers, direct electrical contacts, or optical couplers. In some embodiments of the present invention, the filter comprises an electronic component. The electronic component may be selected from the group consisting of a sensor, a router, a power source, a clock source, a repeater, and an amplifier.

  6. Conformable apparatus in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Fox, Joe

    2007-08-28

    An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube. The metal tube may be adapted to stretch as the drill pipes stretch.

  7. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO -

  8. The IEA's role in advanced geothermal drilling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, Eddie Ross; Jelacic, Allan; Finger, John Travis; Tyner, Craig E.

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes an 'Annex', or task, that is part of the International Energy Agency's Geothermal Implementing Agreement. Annex 7 is aimed at improving the state of the art in geothermal drilling, and has three subtasks: an international database on drilling cost and performance, a 'best practices' drilling handbook, and collaborative testing among participating countries. Drilling is an essential and expensive part of geothermal exploration, production, and maintenance. High temperature, corrosive fluids, and hard, fractured formations increase the cost of drilling, logging, and completing geothermal wells, compared to oil and gas. Cost reductions are critical because drilling and completing the production and injection well field can account for approximately half the capital cost for a geothermal power project. Geothermal drilling cost reduction can take many forms, e.g., faster drilling rates, increased bit or tool life, less trouble (twist-offs, stuck pipe, etc.), higher per-well production through multilaterals, and others. Annex 7 addresses all aspects of geothermal well construction, including developing a detailed understanding of worldwide geothermal drilling costs, understanding geothermal drilling practices and how they vary across the globe, and development of improved drilling technology. Objectives for Annex 7 include: (1) Quantitatively understand geothermal drilling costs and performance from around the world and identify ways to improve costs, performance, and productivity. (2) Identify and develop new and improved technologies for significantly reducing the cost of geothermal well construction. (3) Inform the international geothermal community about these drilling technologies. (4) Provide a vehicle for international cooperation, collaborative field tests, and data sharing toward the development and demonstration of improved geothermal drilling technology.

  9. Slant hole completion test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

  10. CFPL installs products pipeline with directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    Central Florida Pipeline Company (CFPL), a subsidiary of GATX Terminals Corp., Tampa, FL, has used directional drilling under seven water bodies in Hillsborough, Polk and Osceola Counties in constructing its new pipeline from Tampa to Orlando. Primary reason for using directional drilling is to protect the environment by minimizing water turbidity while the 16-inch diameter, 109-mile refined petroleum products pipeline is being installed. Total cost of the project is pegged at $68.5 million. Directional drilling enabled the pipe to be placed about 20 feet below the bottom of: The Alafia River in Riverview with 999 feet drilled; Port Sutton Channel near the Port of Tampa with 2,756 feet drilled; Reedy Creek Swamp at the intersection of Interstate 4 and Highway 192 which had 1,111 feet drilled; Wetland {number_sign}70 southwest of Lake Wales with 1,575 feet drilled; Peace River south of Bartow had 2,470 feet drilled; Bonnet Creek west of Kissimmee had 693 feet drilled. Shingle Creek near the borders of Osceola and Orange Counties with 1,700 feet drilled. This paper reviews the design plans for construction and the emergency response plans should a rupture occur in the line.

  11. Subsea BOP stack built for Caspian drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-16

    This paper reports that Shaffer Inc. completed construction of a multi-million dollar subsea drilling system for Caspmorneftegas, an operating company in the Republic of Azerbaijan. The subsea stack will be installed on the semisubmersible drilling rig Shelf 7 currently under construction in Astrakan in the Soviet Union. Shelf 7 will drill wells in the Caspian Sea, one of the most prolific production areas in the Soviet Union.

  12. Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  13. Newberry exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.; Hickox, C.E.

    1997-11-01

    During July--November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5,360 feet exploratory slimhole (3.895 inch diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: over 4,000 feet of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.

  14. Innovative website for drilling waste management. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: US Department of Energy (US) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; WELL DRILLING; EXPLORATION; WASTE ...

  15. MMW Drilling & Lining | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    MMW Drilling & Lining presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. mmwdrillingpeer2013.pdf (1 MB) More Documents & Publications Microhole Arrays ...

  16. Columbia Gas preserves wetlands with directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luginbuhl, K.K.; Gartman, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper reviews the use of directional drilling to install a 12 inch natural gas pipeline near Avon, Ohio. As a result of increased demand, the utility decided that it would need additional lines for pressure control with the only feasible route being through a forested and scrub/shrub wetland. This paper reviews the permitting requirements along with the directional drilling design and operation. Unfortunately during drilling, bentonite drilling fluids came to the surface requiring remedial action procedures. The paper then provides a detailed clean up strategy and makes recommendations on how to prevent such a break through in the future.

  17. Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2005-07-05

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

  18. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2006-02-21

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force, urging them closer together."

  19. Drill pipe inside blowout preventer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, R.A.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes an inside blowout preventer for use in a drill string comprising in combination: a valve body having upper and lower ends for connection to the drill string; a longitudinal passage extending through the body with an upper inlet and a lower outlet for the passage of fluid, having an upper section tapering gradually to a central section with a larger flow area and a lower section tapering gradually downwardly from the central section to a smaller flow area portion; a ball seat located in the upper section and facing toward the outlet. The length of the upper section is substantially greater than the diameter of the seat; a ball storage member having an upper end containing a concave socket facing the inlet for snugly receiving the ball and located in the central section of the longitudinal passage, in case of upward flow from the outlet to the inlet of sufficient velocity, the ball being movable from the socket to the seat; and a generally tooth-shaped guide member projecting upwardly from an edge of the socket for guiding the ball into the socket.

  20. NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T.H.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established the Extreme Drilling Laboratory to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 ft. This paper details the challenges of ultradeep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL's research and development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Its physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480°F around a single drill cutter. This simulator is not yet operational; therefore, the results will be limited to the identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL's test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Laboratory's studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

  1. NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established an Extreme Drilling Lab to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 feet. This paper details the challenges of ultra-deep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL’s Research and Development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Their physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480 °F around a single drill cutter. This simulator will not yet be operational by the planned conference dates; therefore, the results will be limited to identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL’s test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Lab’s studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

  2. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-06-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of {approximately} {minus}8 m ({minus}27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of {approximately}1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of {approximately} {minus}21 m ({minus}70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned.

  3. HIGH-POWER TURBODRILL AND DRILL BIT FOR DRILLING WITH COILED TUBING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Radtke; David Glowka; Man Mohan Rai; David Conroy; Tim Beaton; Rocky Seale; Joseph Hanna; Smith Neyrfor; Homer Robertson

    2008-03-31

    Commercial introduction of Microhole Technology to the gas and oil drilling industry requires an effective downhole drive mechanism which operates efficiently at relatively high RPM and low bit weight for delivering efficient power to the special high RPM drill bit for ensuring both high penetration rate and long bit life. This project entails developing and testing a more efficient 2-7/8 in. diameter Turbodrill and a novel 4-1/8 in. diameter drill bit for drilling with coiled tubing. The high-power Turbodrill were developed to deliver efficient power, and the more durable drill bit employed high-temperature cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. This project teams Schlumberger Smith Neyrfor and Smith Bits, and NASA AMES Research Center with Technology International, Inc (TII), to deliver a downhole, hydraulically-driven power unit, matched with a custom drill bit designed to drill 4-1/8 in. boreholes with a purpose-built coiled tubing rig. The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory has funded Technology International Inc. Houston, Texas to develop a higher power Turbodrill and drill bit for use in drilling with a coiled tubing unit. This project entails developing and testing an effective downhole drive mechanism and a novel drill bit for drilling 'microholes' with coiled tubing. The new higher power Turbodrill is shorter, delivers power more efficiently, operates at relatively high revolutions per minute, and requires low weight on bit. The more durable thermally stable diamond drill bit employs high-temperature TSP (thermally stable) diamond cutters that can more effectively drill hard and abrasive rock. Expectations are that widespread adoption of microhole technology could spawn a wave of 'infill development' drilling of wells spaced between existing wells, which could tap potentially billions of barrels of bypassed oil at shallow depths in mature producing areas. At the same time, microhole coiled tube

  4. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  5. Offshore multiple well drilling and production apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, K.G.; Masciopinto, A.J.

    1980-03-11

    A modular multiple well drilling and production template structure is combined with a production riser base module to provide an underwater apparatus which allows a plurality of wells to be drilled, completed and produced by operations carried out from a single vessel or platform without remote installation of flowlines.

  6. Multi-gradient drilling method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maurer, William C.; Medley, Jr., George H.; McDonald, William J.

    2003-01-01

    A multi-gradient system for drilling a well bore from a surface location into a seabed includes an injector for injecting buoyant substantially incompressible articles into a column of drilling fluid associated with the well bore. Preferably, the substantially incompressible articles comprises hollow substantially spherical bodies.

  7. Laboratory development and field application of a novel water-based drill-in fluid for geopressured horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, J.W.; Harrison, J.C.; Hale, A.H.

    1996-12-31

    Research has identified a novel water-based drill-in fluid for drilling and completing geopressured horizontal wells. This fluid has a unique combination of properties which make it especially suitable for geopressured applications. They include the use of calcium and/or zinc bromide as a base brine, minimal concentration of calcium carbonate as bridging material, low plastic viscosity, tight fluid loss control, good filter cake properties, and excellent return permeability. This drill-in fluid has been used successfully to drill a 1,200 foot production interval, 4.75 inch diameter wellbore in the Gulf of Mexico with a system weight of 13.2 lbm/gal, bottom hole temperature of 185{degrees} F., and a 1400 to 1700 psi overbalance. The system functioned very well in both the drilling and completion operations. Fluid rheology was easily maintainable and the hole conditions were excellent without torque or drag problems. Initial production data suggests that the well is producing at expected rates with low drawdown pressure.

  8. Evolution of coiled tubing drilling technology accelerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, J.; Adam, B.

    1993-09-01

    This paper reviews the status of coiled tubing technology in oil and gas drilling operations. The paper starts with a description of current coiled tubing technology and provides a cost comparison between conventional and coiled tubing drilling. The results show that offshore operations are already competitive while onshore operations will still lag behind conventional drilling methods. A list of known coiled tubing drilling operations is provided which gives the current borehole diameters and depths associated with this technology. The paper then goes on to provide the advantages and disadvantages of the technology. The advantages include improved well control, a continuous drillstring, reduced mobilization costs, simplified logging and measurement-while drilling measurements, and less tripping required. The disadvantages include high friction with the borehole wall, downhole motors required, limited drillhole size, and fatigued or damaged sections of the tubing cannot be removed. Finally, a review of the reliability of this technology is provided.

  9. Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF MUD HAMMER DRILLING PERFORMANCE - A PROGRAM TO BENCHMARK THE VIABILITY OF ADVANCED MUD HAMMER DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnis Judzis

    2002-10-01

    This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF MUD HAMMER DRILLING PERFORMANCE -- A PROGRAM TO BENCHMARK THE VIABILITY OF ADVANCED MUD HAMMER DRILLING contract for the quarter starting July 2002 through September 2002. Even though we are awaiting the optimization portion of the testing program, accomplishments include the following: (1) Smith International agreed to participate in the DOE Mud Hammer program. (2) Smith International chromed collars for upcoming benchmark tests at TerraTek, now scheduled for 4Q 2002. (3) ConocoPhillips had a field trial of the Smith fluid hammer offshore Vietnam. The hammer functioned properly, though the well encountered hole conditions and reaming problems. ConocoPhillips plan another field trial as a result. (4) DOE/NETL extended the contract for the fluid hammer program to allow Novatek to ''optimize'' their much delayed tool to 2003 and to allow Smith International to add ''benchmarking'' tests in light of SDS Digger Tools' current financial inability to participate. (5) ConocoPhillips joined the Industry Advisors for the mud hammer program. (6) TerraTek acknowledges Smith International, BP America, PDVSA, and ConocoPhillips for cost-sharing the Smith benchmarking tests allowing extension of the contract to complete the optimizations.

  11. Communication adapter for use with a drilling component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Hall; Jr.; H. Tracy; Bradford, Kline; Rawle, Michael

    2007-04-03

    A communication adapter is disclosed that provides for removable attachment to a drilling component when the drilling component is not actively drilling and for communication with an integrated transmission system in the drilling component. The communication adapter comprises a data transmission coupler that facilitates communication between the drilling component and the adapter, a mechanical coupler that facilitates removable attachment of the adapter to the drilling component, and a data interface.

  12. European Geothermal Drilling Experience-Problem Areas and Case...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Drilling Experience-Problem Areas and Case Studies Baron, G.; Ungemach, P. 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; BOREHOLES; DRILLING; EVALUATION; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; ITALY;...

  13. The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    increase the cost of drilling, logging, and completing geothermal wells, compared to oil and gas. Cost reductions are critical because drilling and completing the production...

  14. Property:ExplorationPermit-PreDrilling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not involving drilling (pre-drilling exploration). RAPIDGeothermalExplorationNew Mexico + No permit required if the activity does not significantly damage or alter the land....

  15. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    full-scale laboratory investigations Michael S. Bruno 58 GEOSCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; ROCK DRILLING; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ROCK MECHANICS; ROTARY DRILLING; WELL...

  16. Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geotechnical Drilling in New-Zealand Citation SonicSampDrill. Geotechnical...

  17. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project objective: Build and demonstrate a working prototype ...

  18. Pressure sensor and Telemetry methods for measurement while drilling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pressure sensor and Telemetry methods for measurement while drilling in geothermal wells Pressure sensor and Telemetry methods for measurement while drilling in geothermal wells ...

  19. Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and Logging Applications Evaluation of Emerging Technology for Geothermal Drilling and Logging Applications Evaluation of ...

  20. Advanced Drilling Systems for EGS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drilling Systems for EGS Advanced Drilling Systems for EGS Project objectives: Apply Novateks Stinger and JackBit technology in the development of an innovative; durable ...

  1. Type A Accident Investigation of the June 21, 2001, Drilling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 21, 2001, Drilling Rig Operator Injury at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, August 2001 Type A Accident Investigation of the June 21, 2001, Drilling Rig Operator ...

  2. Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions of EGS Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions of EGS DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - ...

  3. Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems David W. Raymond, PI ... Objective - Develop fit-for-purpose EGS drilling solutions for geothermal exploration and ...

  4. Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS Drilling Systems Technology Development and Field Trials of EGS ...

  5. Development of a Low-Cost Rotary Steerable Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roney Nazarian

    2012-01-31

    The project had the goal to develop and commercialize a low-cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures to reduce operating costs by a minimum of 50% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50% over the currently offered systems. The LCRSS system developed under this project does reduce operating costs by 55% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50%. The developed product is not commercializable in its current form. The overall objective was to develop and commercialize a low cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures (20,000 psi/150 C) while reducing the operating costs by 50% and the lost-in-hole charges by 50% over the currently available systems. The proposed reduction in costs were to be realized through the significant reduction in tool complexity, a corresponding increase in tool reliability as expressed in the mean-time between failure (MTBF), and a reduction in the time and costs required to service tools after each field operation. Ultimately, the LCRSS system was to be capable of drilling 7 7/8 in. to 9 5/8 in. borehole diameters. The project was divided into three Phases, of which Phases I & II were previously completed and reported on, and are part of the case file. Therefore, the previously reported information is not repeated herein. Phase III included the fabrication of two field ready prototypes that were to be subjected to a series of drilling tests at GTI Catoosa, DOE RMOTC, and at customer partnering wells, if possible, as appropriate in the timing of the field test objectives to fully exercise all elements of the LCRSS. These tests were conducted in an iterative process based on a performance/reliability improvement cycle with the goal of demonstrating the system met all aspects required for commercial viability. These tests were conducted to achieve continuous runs of 100+ hours with well trajectories that fully

  6. Bakken shale typifies horizontal drilling success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibman, P.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Given the favorable production response that has been obtained from horizontal drilling in vertical- fractured reservoirs such as the Bakken shale and, more recently, the Austin chalk, industry interest in this technology has mushroomed in the U.S. Indeed, it is difficult to find a good-sized oil company these days that is not involved in a horizontal drilling project or is giving it serious consideration. In response to growing evidence of successful field applications, the realization is dawning on the investment community that horizontal drilling represents a significant technological development with positive implications for both the exploration and production business, and the oilfield services industry.

  7. Final Technical Report for “A Heliportable Sonic Drilling Platform for Microhole Drilling and Exploration”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucon, Peter

    2008-05-05

    The Phase I objectives were fully achieved the execution of a program that included the: • Development of a comprehensive model of the sonic drill technology and interaction of the dynamic drilling parameters with the impedance of the earth. • Operation and measurement of the sonic drilling process in the field at full scale. • Comparison of the analytical and experimental results to form an objective and quantified approach to describe the fundamental phenomena and to develop a methodology for automated control of the sonic drilling process. • Conceptual design of a modular sonic drilling system that can be transported to remote sites by helicopter. As a result, the feasibility of a commercially viable sonic drilling technology that can produce microholes up to 1,500 feet in depth, and that is field deployable to remote, environmentally sensitive sites via a helicopter, has been demonstrated.

  8. Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This handbook focuses on the complex process of drilling a geothermal well, including techniques and hardware that have proven successful for both direct use and electricity generation around the world.

  9. Sidetracking technology for coiled-tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leising, L.J.; Doremus, D.M.; Hearn, D.D.; Rike, E.A.; Paslay, P.R.

    1996-05-01

    Coiled-tubing (CT) drilling is a rapidly growing new technology that has been used for shallow new wells and re-entry applications. Through-tubing drilling has evolved as a major application for CT drilling. The remaining key enabling technology for viable through-tubing drilling is the ability to sidetrack in casing below the tubing tail. This paper describes the three technologies developed for sidetracking and presents a mathematical model of forces, penetration rates, and torques for window milling with the cement-sidetracking (CS) technique. Window milling has been a seat of the pants operation in the past. To the authors` knowledge, this is the first published work on the mechanics of window milling. The results from several yard tests and one field test are presented and show some of the problems associated with sidetracking.

  10. Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    research and development (R&D) to improve oil and gas drilling in ever-deeper waters with ... resources - coal, oil, and natural gas - for clean, affordable, and reliable energy. ...