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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

DRY FLUORINE SEPARATION METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Preparation and separation of U/sup 233/ by irradiation of ThF/sub 4/ is described. During the neutron irradiation to produce Pa/sup 233/ a fluorinating agent such as HF, F/sub 2/, or HF + F/sub 2/ is passed through the ThF/sub 4/ powder to produce PaF/sub 5/. The PaF/sub 5/, being more volatile, is removed as a gas and allowed to decay radioactively to U/sup 233/ fluoride. A batch procedure in which ThO/sub 2/ or Th metal is irradiated and fluorinated is suggested. Some Pa and U fluoride volatilizes away. Then the remainder is fluorinated with F/sub 2/ to produce very volatile UF/sub 6/ which is recovered. (T.R.H.)

Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

1959-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

2

Crop residue conversion to biogas by dry fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple 'dry fermentation' process has been developed that may enable economical conversion of drier crop residues to biogas. Results from two years of process definition and scale-up to a 110 m/sup 3/ prototype show that biogas production rates exceeding those necessary to make the dry fermentor competitive have been achieved. 13 refs.

Jewell, W.J.; Dell'Orto, S.; Fanfoni, K.J.; Fast, S.J.; Jackson, D.A.; Kabrick, R.M.; Gottung, E.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Economic analysis of wind-powered crop drying. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in crop drying. Drying of corn, soybeans, rice, peanuts, tobacco, and dehydrated alfalfa were addressed.

Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Use of geothermal heat for crop drying and related agricultural applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Observations led to the selection of the alfalfa dehydration industry for in-depth analysis of the application of moderate-temperature geothermal heat. Six geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A low-temperature conveyor dryer using geothermal water to supply all required heat was chosen for site-specific analysis, the retrofitting of a large alfalfa dehydration plant within the Heber KGRA in the Imperial Valley, California. Even in the most favorable scenario--sharing a geothermal pipeline with the neighboring fertilizer plant--geothermal retrofitting would increase the price of the alfalfa ''dehy'' about 40 percent. The geothermal brine is estimated to cost $2.58/million Btu's compared with a 1977 natural gas cost of $1.15. Capital cost for heat exchangers and the new dryers is estimated at $3.3 million. The Heber plant appeared to offer the only good opportunity for geothermal retrofitting of an existing alfalfa dehydration plant. Construction of new plants at geothermal resource sites cannot be justified due to the uncertain state of the ''dehy'' industry. Use of geothermal heat for drying other crops may be much more promising. The potato dehydration industry, which is concentrated in the geothermal-rich Snake River Valley of Idaho, appears to offer good potential for geothermal retrofitting; about 4.7 x 10{sup 12}Btu's are used annually by plants within 50 miles of resources. Drying together at the geothermal wellhead several crops that have interlocking processing seasons and drying-temperature requirements may be quite attractive. The best ''multicrop drying center'' site identified was at Power Ranch Wells, Arizona; 34 other sites were defined. Agricultural processing applications other than drying were investigated briefly.

Gordon, T.J.; Wright, T.C.; Fein, E.; Munson, T.R.; Richmond, R.C.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Analysis and development of a solar energy regenerated desiccant crop drying facility: Phase I. Final report, July 1976--April 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study to verify the technical feasibility of the regenerated desiccant crop drying concept, characterize its performance, investigate design requirements, and define a pilot facility for further evaluating the operational and energy-conservative characteristics of the drying system are documented. The pilot facility defined in this study will be a use R and D tool of sufficient size to permit a meaningful evaluation of the system and to provide the necessary criteria for development of full-scale systems. The principal finding of the study is that the regenerated desiccant crop drying concept is technically feasible and has the capability to achieve a drying efficiency of approximately twice that of conventional crop drying systems. When using a fossil fuel energy source, energy savings will be approximately 40 to 50%. With solar energy input, the total fossil fuel savings could be 70 to 90%. The economic feasibility of the system appears promising. As with other new energy conserving systems that are presently capital-intensive, the economic viability of the system will be dependent on future capital cost reductions, on the future price of fossil fuels, and on the specific application of the system. Regarding system applications, it was concluded that the regenerated desiccant drying system, with or without the use of solar energy, will be economically best suited for a large central processing application, where it can receive a maximum amount of use and will benefit from economy-of-scale cost considerations. The basic study recommendations are: (1) additional R and D activities should be conducted to identify and evaluate means for achieving system cost reductions, and (2) the Mobile Pilot Facility program should be initiated.

Ko, S.M.; Merrifield, D.V.; Fletcher, J.W.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING  

SciTech Connect

Numerous advanced coal cleaning processes have been developed in recent years that are capable of substantially reducing both ash- and sulfur-forming minerals from coal. However, most of the processes involve fine grinding and use water as the cleaning medium; therefore, the clean coal products must be dewatered before they can be transported and burned. Unfortunately, dewatering fine coal is costly, which makes it difficult to deploy advanced coal cleaning processes for commercial applications. As a means of avoiding problems associated with the fine coal dewatering, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed a dry coal cleaning process in which mineral matter is separated from coal without using water. In this process, pulverized coal is subjected to triboelectrification before being placed in an electric field for electrostatic separation. The triboelectrification is accomplished by passing a pulverized coal through an in-line mixer made of copper. Copper has a work function that lies between that of carbonaceous material (coal) and mineral matter. Thus, coal particles impinging on the copper wall lose electrons to the metal thereby acquiring positive charges, while mineral matter impinging on the wall gain electrons to acquire negative charges. The charged particles then pass through an electric field where they are separated according to their charges into two or more products depending on the configuration of the separator. The results obtained at NETL showed that it is capable of removing more than 90% of the pyritic sulfur and 70% of the ash-forming minerals from a number of eastern U.S. coals. However, the BTU recoveries were less than desirable. The laboratory-scale batch triboelectrostatic separator (TES) used by NETL relied on adhering charged particles on parallel electrode surfaces and scraping them off. Therefore, its throughput will be proportional to the electrode surface area. If this laboratory device is scaled-up as is, it would suffer from low throughput capacities and high maintenance requirements. In general, surface area-based separators (e.g., shaking tables, magnetic drum separator, electrodynamic separator, etc.) have lower throughput capacities than volume-based separators (e.g., flotation cell, dense-medium bath, cyclones, etc.) by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the electrodes of the laboratory unit need to be cleaned frequently, creating a high maintenance requirement if it is scaled-up to a commercial unit. The bench-scale continuous TES unit developed at NETL, on the other hand, separates positively and negatively charged particles by splitting the gaseous stream containing these particles in an electric field by means of a flow splitter, so that the oppositely charged particles can be directed into different compartments. This device is fundamentally different from the laboratory unit in that the former is a surface area-based separator, while the latter is a volume-based separator. The bench-scale unit is referred to as an entrained flow separator by the in-house researchers at NETL. Thus, the entrained flow TES unit is a significant improvement over the laboratory unit with regard to throughput capacity. In the present work, the entrained flow separator concept will be utilized for developing a proof-of concept (POC) separator that can be scaled-up to commercial size units. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop a bench-scale separator that can achieve high Btu recoveries while maintaining the high degree of separation efficiencies. It is the objective of the present investigation to develop an efficient separator by studying the mechanisms of triboelectrification and investigating better ways of separating the charged particles. An important criterion for developing efficient separators is that they not only provide high separation efficiencies but also have high throughput capacities, which are essential ingredients for successful commercialization.

R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; E.S. Yan; A.D. Walters

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Dry beneficiation of coal using an air dense-medium fluidised bed separator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mining of coal in arid regions has led to calls for research in to the field of dry beneficiation, not only for its lower… (more)

Kretzschmar, Simon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Potential for crop drying with geothermal hot water resources in the western United States: alfalfa, a case study. Report 305-100-02  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results of engineering, economic, and geographic analysis of the use of low-temperature geothermal heat for the commercial drying of grains, grasses, fruits, vegetables and livestock products in the United States are reported. Alfalfa (lucerne) dehydration was chosen for detailed process and cost study. Six different geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A conveyor type that could utilize geothermal hot water for its entire heat requirement proved to be the most economical. A capital cost estimate for an all-geothermal alfalfa dehydration plant near the Heber Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Imperial Valley, California was prepared. The combined cost for heat exchangers and dryer is about $1.6 million. Output is about 11 metric tons per hour. Acreage, production and dollar value data for 22 dryable crops were compiled for the areas surrounding identified hydrothermal resources in 11 western states. The potential magnitude of fossil fuel use that could be replaced by geothermal heat for drying these crops will be estimated.

Wright, T.C.

1977-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Dry halide method for separating the components of spent nuclear fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a nonaqueous, single method for processing multiple spent nuclear fuel types by separating the fission- and transuranic products from the nonradioactive and fissile uranium product. The invention has four major operations: exposing the spent fuels to chlorine gas at temperatures preferably greater than 1200.degree. C. to form volatile metal chlorides; removal of the fission product chlorides, transuranic product chlorides, and any nickel chloride and chromium chloride in a molten salt scrubber at approximately 400.degree. C.; fractional condensation of the remaining volatile chlorides at temperatures ranging from 164.degree. C. to 2.degree. C.; and regeneration and recovery of the transferred spent molten salt by vacuum distillation. The residual fission products, transuranic products, and nickel- and chromium chlorides are converted to fluorides or oxides for vitrification. The method offers the significant advantages of a single, compact process that is applicable to most of the diverse nuclear fuels, minimizes secondary wastes, segregates fissile uranium from the high level wastes to resolve potential criticality concerns, segregates nonradioactive wastes from the high level wastes for volume reduction, and produces a common waste form glass or glass-ceramic.

Christian, Jerry Dale (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Thomas Russell (Rigby, ID); Kessinger, Glen F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Weed Management in Pulse Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During At harvest #12;GoldSky ­ Crop Rotation · 9 Months: alfalfa, barley, canola, chickpea, dry bean PEA CAMELINA CANOLA BARLEY GOLDSKY Crop Rotation Study #12;GoldSky Crop Rotation Study ­ Herbicide #12;0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Lentil Canola Camelina Barley Field Pea Oat VisualDamage(%) GoldSky 1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

11

HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 Floral Crops: Insects 5-19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In order to use a pesticide safely and effectively, the product label should be read thoroughly each time. Effective application of pesticides depends on: proper timing, favorable treatment conditions of temperature;HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2012 5-20 Floral Crops: Insects · Apply pesticides when foliage is dry

Liskiewicz, Maciej

12

Crop Physiology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this chapter, we review the physiology of switchgrass from seed dormancy till the effects of water and nutrients stress on grown plants. These characteristics are presented and discussed mainly at the canopy and whole-plant level with emphasis on the agro-physiology of the species in view of the possible contribution of crop physiology to agricultural development. Switchgrass is noted for the variable degrees of seed dormancy regulated by endogenous and exogenous factors that determine the successful seedling establishment. Plant growth rates are determined by temperature while the reproductive phase is controlled mainly by photoperiod. There is also evidence that some physiological attributes, such as photosynthesis, transpiration, and water use efficiency differ between tetraploid, hexaploid and octaploid ecotypes. But despite these differences, in general switchgrass combines important attributes of efficient use of nutrients and water with high yields thanks to its ability to acquire resources from extended soil volumes, especially at deep layers. Moreover at canopy level, resources capture and conservation are determined by morpho-physiological characteristics (C{sub 4} photosynthetic pathway, stomatal control of transpiration, high leaf area index, low light extinction coefficient) that enhance radiation use efficiency and reduce carbon losses. However, specific information on switchgrass physiology is still missing, in particular deeper understanding of physiological principles controlling the water and nutrients acquisition mechanisms and allocation under suboptimal growing conditions. The physiology of tillering and root respiration are also factors that need further investigation.

Zegada-Lizarazu, Walter [University of Bologna; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Monti, Andrea [University of Bologna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Biomass resource potential using energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Economic Analysis of Energy Crop Production in the U.S. - Location, Quantities, Price, and Impacts on Traditional Agricultural Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

POLYSYS is used to estimate US locations where, for any given energy crop price, energy crop production can be economically competitive with conventional crops. POLYSYS is a multi-crop, multi-sector agricultural model developed and maintained by the University of Tennessee and used by the USDA-Economic Research Service. It includes 305 agricultural statistical districts (ASD) which can be aggregated to provide state, regional, and national information. POLYSYS is being modified to include switchgrass, hybrid poplar, and willow on all land suitable for their production. This paper summarizes the preliminary national level results of the POLYSYS analysis for selected energy crop prices for the year 2007 and presents the corresponding maps (for the same prices) of energy crop production locations by ASD. Summarized results include: (1) estimates of energy crop hectares (acres) and quantities (dry Mg, dry tons), (2) identification of traditional crops allocated to energy crop production and calculation of changes in their prices and hectares (acres) of production, and (3) changes in total net farm returns for traditional agricultural crops. The information is useful for identifying areas of the US where large quantities of lowest cost energy crops can most likely be produced.

Walsh, M.E.; De La Torre Ugarte, D.; Slinsky, S.; Graham, R.L.; Shapouri, H.; Ray, D.

1998-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

15

Freeze drying method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Freeze drying apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Survey of hybrid solar heat pump drying systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar drying is in practice since the ancient time for preservation of food and agriculture crops. The objective of most drying processes is to reduce the moisture content of the product to a specified value. Solar dryers used in agriculture for food ... Keywords: coefficient of performance (COP), direct expansion SAHD, drying chamber, heat pump, solar assisted heat pumps dryer (SAHPD), solar fraction

R. Daghigh; K. Sopian; M. H. Ruslan; M. A. Alghoul; C. H. Lim; S. Mat; B. Ali; M. Yahya; A. Zaharim; M. Y. Sulaiman

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Microbially derived crop protection products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Project: Microbially derived crop protection productstransferred into major crop plants. Following greenhouseMicrobial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products " A

Torok, Tamas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sorghums as energy crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The botanical, physiological, and agronomic characteristics of sorghum are described. Integration concepts to improve sorghum prospects are discussed as follows: multiple sweet sorghum crops each year, integration with sugarcane, integration with sugar beets, integration with starch crops, sweet stemmed grain sorghum, and integration with lignocellulosic crops. (MHR)

Lipinsky, E.S.; Kresovich, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Cover Crops for the Garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosynthesis. When the cover crops decompose, the nitrogenthe nodules becomes available for growing crops to draw on.to a fall planting of cover crops. Cover crops are grown not

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Battery separators  

SciTech Connect

Novel, improved battery separators carrying a plurality of polymeric ribs on at least one separator surface. The battery separators are produced by extruding a plurality of ribs in the form of molten polymeric rib providing material onto the surface of a battery separator to bond the material to the separator surface and cooling the extruded rib material to a solidified state. The molten polymeric rib providing material of this invention includes a mixture or blend of polypropylenes and an ethylene propylene diene terpolymer.

Battersby, W. R.

1984-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Glossary Term - Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deuteron Previous Term (Deuteron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Electron) Electron Dry Ice A block of dry ice sublimating on a table. Dry ice is the solid form of carbon dioxide...

25

The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance page 17 ReferencesR.A. Kramer. “Experience with Crop Insurance Programs in theUnited States. ” Crop Insurance for Agricultural

LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Shimshack, J. P.; Wu, S. Y.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Spatial Patterns Confound Experiments in Orchard Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

patterns differ among sites, crops, and process of interest,currently lacking in the tree crops, specifically, and thecommonly used in tree crop experiments and in fertilizer

Rosenstock, Todd S; Plant, Richard E; Brown, Patrick H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy-efficient regenerative liquid desiccant drying process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the use of desiccants in conjunction with an open oop drying cycle and a closed loop drying cycle to reclaim the energy expended in vaporizing moisture in harvested crops. In the closed loop cycle, the drying air is brought into contact with a desiccant after it exits the crop drying bin. Water vapor in the moist air is absorbed by the desiccant, thus reducing the relative humidity of the air. The air is then heated by the used desiccant and returned to the crop bin. During the open loop drying cycle the used desiccant is heated (either fossil or solar energy heat sources may be used) and regenerated at high temperature, driving water vapor from the desiccant. This water vapor is condensed and used to preheat the dilute (wet) desiccant before heat is added from the external source (fossil or solar). The latent heat of vaporization of the moisture removed from the desiccant is reclaimed in this manner. The sensible heat of the regenerated desiccant is utilized in the open loop drying cycle. Also, closed cycle operation implies that no net energy is expended in heating drying air.

Ko, Suk M. (Huntsville, AL); Grodzka, Philomena G. (Huntsville, AL); McCormick, Paul O. (Athens, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Legume Crop Genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will present this technical theme in a manner that should help many readers answer the question, "What is genomics?" And finally, this book should help readers formulate an opinion on the question, "Why is genomic research needed?" Legume Crop Ge

29

Crop Insurance Terms and Definitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication is a glossary of terms used by the crop insurance industry. There are definitions for terms used in crop insurance documents and for terms pertaining to coverage levels, farming, reports, units and parties to contracts.

Stokes, Kenneth; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe; Barnaby, G. A. Art

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

30

Battery separators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel, improved battery separator and process for making the separator. Essentially, the separator carries a plurality of polymeric ribs bonded to at least one surface and the ribs have alternating elevated segments of uniform maxiumum heights and depressed segments along the length of the ribs.

Le Bayon, R.; Faucon, R.; Legrix, J.

1984-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

32

Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Doyle, Edward F. (Dedham, MA); DiBella, Francis A. (Roslindale, MA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Crop to wild introgression in lettuce: following the fate of crop genome segments in backcross populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

article as: Uwimana et al. : Crop to wild introgression infollowing the fate of crop genome segments in backcrossto the wild parent reduces the crop genome content in amount

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Crop specific micronutrient formulations for limited resource situation for horticultural crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management in horticultural crops, but this approach is nothectares under horticultural crops are managed in about 2.2monitoring was done for crops (mango, banana, orange) for

Muthaia, Edward Raja Dr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Conservation tillage and cover cropping influence soil properties in San Joaquin Valley cotton-tomato crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STNO Fertilizer Cover crop Total Harvest Balance . . . . . .conservation tillage, cover crop CTNO: conservation tillagestandard tillage, cover crop STNO: standard tillage only

Veenstra, Jessica; Horwath, William; Mitchell, Jeffrey; Munk, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Char separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Particulates removed from the flue gases produced in a fluidized-bed furnace are separated into high-and low-density portions. The low-density portion is predominantly char, and it is returned to the furnace or burned in a separate carbon burnup cell. The high-density portion, which is predominantly limestone products and ash, is discarded or reprocessed. According to another version, the material drained from the bed is separated, the resulting high-and low-density portions being treated in a manner similar to that in which the flue-gas particulates are treated.

Matthews, Francis T. (Poquonock, CT)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

Skarstrom, C.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Potential supply and cost of biomass from energy crops in the TVA region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and supply structures of energy crop markets have not been established. Establishing the likely price and supply of energy crop biomass in a region is a complex task because biomass is not an established commodity as are oil, natural gas, and coal. In this study, the cost and supply of short-rotation woody crop (SRWC) and switchgrass biomass for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) region-a 276-county area that includes portions of 11 states in the southeastern United States - are projected. Projected prices and quantities of biomass are assumed to be a function of the amount and quality of crop and pasture land available in a region, expected energy crop yields and production costs on differing soils and land types, and the profit that could be obtained from current conventional crop production on these same lands. Results include the supply curves of SRWC and switchgrass biomass that are projected to be available from the entire region, the amount and location of crop and pasture land that would be used, and the conventional agricultural crops that would be displaced as a function of energy crop production. Finally, the results of sensitivity analysis on the projected cost and supply of energy crop biomass are shown. In particular, the separate impacts of varying energy crop production costs and yields, and interest rates are examined.

Graham, R.L.; Downing, M.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Global Seed and Crop Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adventitious presence deserves discussion to understand whether farmers engaged in conventional, organic, and transgenic agriculture can coexist as neighbors using known and practical agronomic practices. When a farmer buys and sows certified seed of his or her chosen crop variety, the crop starts with the highest degree of purity deemed commercially achievable, which then becomes increasingly less pure as various

L. Kershen; Alan Mchughen; Earl Sneed; Centennial Professor; Law Biotechnology Specialist; Thomas Parker Redick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ISOTOPE SEPARATORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

Bacon, C.G.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrient removal and net costs weigh on decisions to use crop residues as biofuel feedstocks. Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Inform Archives Crop residues as feedstock for rene

44

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breeding program for cassava. Crop Sci 1998; 38: 325-332. [opportunities for an ancient crop. seventh regional cassavaCassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Jansson

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Transporting Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements for Shipping Dry Ice IATA PI 904 Source: Reg of the Day from ERCweb 2006 Environmental Resource Center | 919-469-1585 | webmaster@ercweb.com http:...

46

Cover Crops for the Garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matter for your soil or compost pile. Organic matter is thatin the spring or made into compost, cover crops will act asgathered up and added to your compost pile. The first method

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Innovative Separations Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reprocessing used nuclear fuel (UNF) is a multi-faceted problem involving chemistry, material properties, and engineering. Technology options are available to meet a variety of processing goals. A decision about which reprocessing method is best depends significantly on the process attributes considered to be a priority. New methods of reprocessing that could provide advantages over the aqueous Plutonium Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) and Uranium Extraction + (UREX+) processes, electrochemical, and other approaches are under investigation in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Separations Campaign. In an attempt to develop a revolutionary approach to UNF recycle that may have more favorable characteristics than existing technologies, five innovative separations projects have been initiated. These include: (1) Nitrogen Trifluoride for UNF Processing; (2) Reactive Fluoride Gas (SF6) for UNF Processing; (3) Dry Head-end Nitration Processing; (4) Chlorination Processing of UNF; and (5) Enhanced Oxidation/Chlorination Processing of UNF. This report provides a description of the proposed processes, explores how they fit into the Modified Open Cycle (MOC) and Full Recycle (FR) fuel cycles, and identifies performance differences when compared to 'reference' advanced aqueous and fluoride volatility separations cases. To be able to highlight the key changes to the reference case, general background on advanced aqueous solvent extraction, advanced oxidative processes (e.g., volumetric oxidation, or 'voloxidation,' which is high temperature reaction of oxide UNF with oxygen, or modified using other oxidizing and reducing gases), and fluorination and chlorination processes is provided.

J. Tripp; N. Soelberg; R. Wigeland

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Conservation Reserve Program as a Means to Subsidize Bioenergy Crop Prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), enacted in the 1985 Farm Bill, removes environmentally sensitive cropland from production in exchange for annual rental payments from the federal government. To reduce the cost of the program, economic use of CRP acres in exchange for reduced rental payments were proposed, but not implemented in the 1995 Farm Bill. This paper examines the potential impact an economic use policy would have on the market prices of bioenergy crops if they were permitted to be harvested from CRP acres. The analysis shows that at average yields of 11.25 dry Mg/ha/yr (5 dry tons/ac/yr) and total production of 9.1 million dry Mg (10 million dry tons) subsidized farmgate prices of as low as $16.5/dry Mg ($15/dry ton) for switchgrass and $24.2/dry Mg ($22/dry ton) for short-rotation woody crops can be achieved. Furthermore, the government can reduce the cost of the CRP resulting in a potential win-win situation.

Walsh, M.E.; Becker, D.; Graham, R.L.

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Global crop yield losses from recent warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

Lobell, D; Field, C

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Effect of continuous cropping on changes in crop productivity nutrient budgets and soil properties with and without FYM under pearl millet - mustard – cowpea cropping sequence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KKM. In: Soil fertility and crop production under long-termfertilization for sustaining crop productivity at Punjabimportant factors that limit crop yield. Addition of organic

PATEL, KISHORBHAI PARSOTTAM; Swarnkar, Puspkant K; Singh, Mahavir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Particle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

Moosmuller, Hans (Reno, NV); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Reno, NV); Arnott, W. Patrick (Reno, NV)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

53

Fuels from sugar crops. Second quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Substantial progress was made on both the agricultural and the processing aspects of the fuels from biomass research program. Despite droughts and hurricanes, yields on narrow row spacings show substantial gains over conventional spacings at all locations for both sugarcane and sweet sorghum. The biomass gains are most pronounced (40% to 100% increase) for Louisiana sugarcane and for sweet sorghum in Louisiana and Texas (50 to 100% gains). Although biomass increases are smaller in Florida, early ripening and possible soil conservation effects cause interest in close spacing in Florida to be maintained. The concept of integrating sweet sorghum production with sugarcane production could expand the area available for extensive sugar crop production by a factor of 10 or more. Sugar beets and sweet sorghum mesh together well from an agronomic viewpoint and the introduction of the Canadian Separator Equipment Process may make feasible integration of the processing of these crops. Evaluation of U.S. and Brazilian ethanol technology indicates that ethanol can be made quite economically in locations with long sugarcane processing seasons (e.g., Hawaii and Puerto Rico). The Melle Process practiced in Brazil appears to make possible extremely short fermentation times (10 to 16 hours, compared with 24 to 30 hours for U.S. practices). The primary key to reducing processing costs lies in increasing the concentration of ethanol in the fermented mash, not reduction in fermentation time. Suggestions for appropriate improvements have been made and the Reports of Invention filed with DOE's patent office. Five appendices are included.

Lipinsky, E.S.; Kresovich, S.; McClure, T.A.; Helper, E.W.; Lawhon, W.T.

1977-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Examining the Interaction of Growing Crops with Local Climate Using a Coupled Crop–Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines to what extent crops and their environment should be viewed as a coupled system. Crop impact assessments currently use climate model output offline to drive process-based crop models. However, in regions where local climate is ...

Tom Osborne; Julia Slingo; David Lawrence; Tim Wheeler

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Miscanthus: A Review of European Experience with a Novel Energy Crop  

SciTech Connect

Miscanthus is a tall perennial grass which has been evaluated in Europe over the past 5-10 years as a new bioenergy crop. The sustained European interest in miscanthus suggests that this novel energy crop deserves serious investigation as a possible candidate biofuel crop for the US alongside switchgrass. To date, no agronomic trials or trial results for miscanthus are known from the conterminous US, so its performance under US conditions is virtually unknown. Speculating from European data, under typical agricultural practices over large areas, an average of about 8t/ha (3t/acre dry weight) may be expected at harvest time. As with most of the new bioenergy crops, there seems to be a steep ''learning curve.'' Establishment costs appear to be fairly high at present (a wide range is reported from different European countries), although these may be expected to fall as improved management techniques are developed.

Scurlock, J.M.O.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Miscanthus: A Review of European Experience with a Novel Energy Crop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Miscanthus is a tall perennial grass which has been evaluated in Europe over the past 5-10 years as a new bioenergy crop. The sustained European interest in miscanthus suggests that this novel energy crop deserves serious investigation as a possible candidate biofuel crop for the US alongside switchgrass. To date, no agronomic trials or trial results for miscanthus are known from the conterminous US, so its performance under US conditions is virtually unknown. Speculating from European data, under typical agricultural practices over large areas, an average of about 8t/ha (3t/acre dry weight) may be expected at harvest time. As with most of the new bioenergy crops, there seems to be a steep ''learning curve.'' Establishment costs appear to be fairly high at present (a wide range is reported from different European countries), although these may be expected to fall as improved management techniques are developed.

Scurlock, J.M.O.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Despite benefits, commercialization of transgenic horticultural crops lags  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. Gianessi is Director, Crop Protection Research Institute,differ- ent folks in tree crops: What works and what doesBiotechnology of floriculture crops — scientific questions

Clark, David; Klee, Harry; Dandekar, Abhaya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Survey of glucosinolate variation in leaves of Brassica rapa crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1), representing most major crops of B. rapa, were sampledgsl-containing vegetable crops included in human diet. A fewbeen surveyed in several crops such as broccoli, broccoli

Yang, Bo; Quiros, Carlos F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Biological and cultural controls . . . Nonpesticide alternatives can suppress crop pests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternatives can suppress crop pests Nicholas J. Mills Kentsuppression of major arthropod crop pests in California. Wevines, and ?eld and row crops. For example, a historic suc-

Mills, Nicholas J.; Daane, Kent M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Blueberry research launches exciting new California specialty crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Estimated highbush blueberry crop, 2004 State Growers whoin spearhead- ing specialty crops research and efforts tonew California specialty crop Manuel Jimenez Francis

Jimenez, Manuel; Carpenter, Francis; Molinar, Richard H.; Wright, Kathryn; Day, Kevin R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ial divers ity- based new crop protection products andicultural production of major crop plan ts and industrialand insect pests major crop plants. If the of cell- free

Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A Statistical Profile of Horticultural Crop Farm Industries in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Profile of Horticultural Crop Farm Industries in Californiaproject funded by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation,Williams. “Model- ing Farm-Level Crop Insurance Demand with

Lee, Hyunok; Blank, Steven C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Dry piston coal feeder  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a solids feeder for feeding dry coal to a pressurized gasifier at elevated temperatures substantially without losing gas from the gasifier by providing a lock having a double-acting piston that feeds the coals into the gasifier, traps the gas from escaping, and expels the trapped gas back into the gasifier.

Hathaway, Thomas J. (Belle Meade, NJ); Bell, Jr., Harold S. (Madison, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Energy analysis of selected crops in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Energy analyses were made for the production of rice, corn and sugarcane crops in Thailand. All on-farm production activities from land preparation to harvesting were included. Energy inputs and yields for all crops were low. The energy returns for all three crops vary from 8 to 9 kilocalories for every kilocalorie put in.

Singh, G.; de Los Reyes, A.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C. Flynn and Pete Smith #12;Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends Helen C or boundaries. #12;3Greenhouse gas budgets of crop production ­ current and likely future trends About

Levi, Ran

66

Olefin separation membrane and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane and process are disclosed for separating unsaturated hydrocarbons from fluid mixtures. The membrane and process differ from previously known membranes and processes, in that the feed and permeate streams can both be dry, the membrane need not be water or solvent swollen, and the membrane is characterized by a selectivity for an unsaturated hydrocarbon over a saturated hydrocarbon having the same number of carbon atoms of at least about 20, and a pressure-normalized flux of said unsaturated hydrocarbon of at least about 5{times}10{sup {minus}6}cm{sup 3}(STP)/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s{center_dot}cmHg, said flux and selectivity being measured with a gas mixture containing said unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, and in a substantially dry environment. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Research to develop improved production methods for woody and herbaceous biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) has led the nation in developing short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) and herbaceous energy crops (HEC) as feedstocks for renewable energy. Over the past 15 years, the BFDP has examined the performance of 154 woody species and 35 herbaceous species in field trials across the US. One result of this effort to date has been the prescription of silvicultural systems for hybrid poplars and hybrid willows and agricultural systems for switchgrass. Selected clones of woody species are producing dry weight yields in research plots on agricultural land that are 3 to 7 times greater than those obtained from mixed species stands on forest land, and at least 2 times the yields of southern plantation pines. Selected switchgrass varieties are producing dry weight yields 2 to 7 times greater than average forage grass yields on similar sites. Crop development research is continuing efforts to translate this potential, in a sustainable manner, to larger, more geographically diverse acreage. Research on environmental aspects of biomass crop production are aimed at developing sustainable systems that will contribute to the biodiversity of agricultural landscapes. Systems integration aims to understand all factors affecting bringing the crop to market. Factors affecting price and potential supplies of biomass crops are being evaluated at regional and national scales. Scale-up studies, feasibility analysis and demonstrations are establishing actual costs and facilitating the commercialization of integrated biomass systems. Information management and dissemination activities are facilitating the communication of results among a community of researchers, policymakers, and potential users and producers of energy crops.

Ferrell, J.E. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biofuels Systems Div.; Wright, L.L.; Tuskan, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Drying of fiber webs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

Warren, David W. (9253 Glenoaks Blvd., Sun Valley, CA 91352)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Drying of fiber webs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

Warren, D.W.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Method of drying articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: (a) Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and (b) contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores. 3 figs.

Janney, M.A.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Method of drying articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: a. Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and b. contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores.

Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The effect of drying temperature on the composition of biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compositional quality of different lignocellulosic feedstocks influences their performance and potential demand at a biorefinery. Many analytical protocols for determining the composition or performance characteristics of biomass involve a drying step, where the drying temperature can vary depending on the specific protocol. To get reliable data, it is important to determine the correct drying temperature to vaporize the water without negatively impacting the compositional quality of the biomass. A comparison of drying temperature between 45 degrees C and 100 degrees C was performed using wheat straw and corn stover. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra were taken of the dried samples and compared using principal component analysis (PCA). Carbohydrates were analyzed using quantitative saccharification to determine sugar degradation. Analysis of variance was used to determine if there was a significant difference between drying at different temperatures. PCA showed an obvious separation in samples dried at different temperatures due to sample water content. However, quantitative saccharification data shows, within a 95% confidence interval, that there is no significant difference in sugar content for drying temperatures up to 100 degrees C for wheat straw and corn stover.

Houghton, T.P.; Stevens, D.N.; Wright, C.T.; Radtke, C.W.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18-673389 Keywords: cassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolicRecently, cassava-derived bioethanol production has beenbenefits compared to other bioethanol- producing crops in

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

CropEnergies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name CropEnergies Place Mannheim, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany Zip 68165 Sector Biofuels Product A German biofuels company focused on bioethanol production for use as...

79

Seasonality and Its Effects on Crop Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding crop seasonality can improve a producer's marketing skills and options. The causes of seasonality and its effects on price changes are discussed.

Tierney Jr., William I.; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Metal oxide membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Webster, Elizabeth T. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Plainsboro, NJ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Metal oxide membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for formation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation. 4 figs.

Anderson, M.A.; Webster, E.T.; Xu, Q.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Short rotation Wood Crops Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the technical progress of research projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program for the year ending September 30, 1989. The primary goal of this research program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, is the development of a viable technology for producing renewable feedstocks for conversion to biofuels. One of the more significant accomplishments was the documentation that short-rotation woody crops total delivered costs could be $40/Mg or less under optimistic but attainable conditions. By taking advantage of federal subsidies such as those offered under the Conservation Reserve Program, wood energy feedstock costs could be lower. Genetic improvement studies are broadening species performance within geographic regions and under less-than-optimum site conditions. Advances in physiological research are identifying key characteristics of species productivity and response to nutrient applications. Recent developments utilizing biotechnology have achieved success in cell and tissue culture, somaclonal variation, and gene-insertion studies. Productivity gains have been realized with advanced cultural studies of spacing, coppice, and mixed-species trials. 8 figs., 20 tabs.

Wright, L.L.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fly ash-amended compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homemade organic compost prepared from lawn grass clippings was amended with fine fly ash collected from a coal-fired power plant (SRS 484.D. Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC) to investigate its usefulness as a manure in enhancing nutrient uptake and increasing dry matter yield in selected agricultural crops. Three treatments were compared: five crops (mustard, collard, string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant) were each grown on three kinds of soil: soil alone, soil amended with composted grass clippings, and soil amended with the mixed compost of grass clippings and 20% fly ash. The fly ash-amended compost was found to be effective in enhancing the dry matter yield of collard greens and mustard greens by 378% and 348%, respectively, but string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant did not show any significant increase in dry matter yield. Analysis of the above-ground biomass of these last three plants showed they assimilated high levels of boron, which is phytotoxic; and this may be the reason for their poor growth. Soils treated with fly ash-amended compost often gave higher concentrations than the control for K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, and B in the Brassica crops. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Menon, M.P.; Sajwan, K.S.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable feedstock resources. The Department of Energy is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soil conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row crops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different biomass crops for selected wildlife species is also under study. To date, these studies have shown that in comparison with row crops biomass plantings of both grass and tree crops increased biodiversity of birds; however, the habitat value of tree plantations is not equivalent to natural forests. The effects on native wildlife of establishing multiple plantations across a landscape are being studied. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing biomass feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the probable effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Growing Energy Biomass crops as a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide our heat, electricity and liquid transport fuels. It is widely agreed that wind, wave, tidal carbon emissions set by the Kyoto Protocol are to be met. Biomass from crop plants can make an important of research activities aimed at the sustainable production of biomass from energy crops for heat and power

Rambaut, Andrew

87

Response of Peanuts to Irrigation Management at Different Crop Growth Stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past irrigation research on peanuts has shown that when the plant is exposed to soil moisture stress at different crop growth stages, different responses seem to exist between the Spanish and the Florunner peanut varieties. The Spanish peanuts appear more susceptible to soil moisture stress during the blooming and pegging stage, while the Florunners seem more susceptible during the late maturation stage. The objective of this experiment was to determine the optimum irrigation schedule for peanuts at different crop growth stages for the Spanish and the Florunner varieties. The yield of the two varieties was evaluated under seven different irrigation treatments including a "no stress" check treatment and a dryland treatment. Each treatment had a different schedule of either irrigating or stressing the peanut plant during one or more of three crop growth stages. The three crop growth stages were: (1) pegging; (2) early maturation; and (3) late maturation. Rainfall during the vegetative and blooming stage ensured adequate moisture for both of the crop growth stages. Evapotranspiration was monitored throughout the life cycle for both peanut varieties. The evapotranspiration was determined using a soil moisture balance equation. Plant growth in the form of dry matter accumulation and leaf area index was also studied for the Spanish variety. No significant differences in the leaf area index existed between the treatments. The dry matter growth analysis showed that an irrigation during the pegging stage resulted in a faster pod weight accumulation during the early maturation stage than if no irrigation occurred during that stage. The yield and evapotranspiration results showed that differences existed between the two peanut varieties. First, for the Spanish variety, the results indicated that soil moisture is needed during the pegging stage to obtain near maximum yields. Treatments with an irrigation during the pegging stage had a greater evapotranspiration and larger yields, than the treatments without an irrigation during this stage. Second, if an irrigation is made during the pegging stage, an additional irrigation during the early maturation stage is unnecessary. Third, an irrigation during the late maturation stage will increase yield if dry climatic conditions normally exist during this stage. In the case of the Florunner variety, the yield results indicated that moisture stress should occur in no more than one of the crop growth stages if yield reductions are to be minimized. Also, an adequate supply of soil moisture during the late maturation stage is absolutely necessary in order to obtain maximum yields for Florunner peanuts. Treatments which had an irrigation during the late maturation stage had a steady evapotranspiration rate during this crop growth stage and had near maximum yields. Treatments which showed a decrease in the evapotranspiration rate during the late maturation stage produced a significantly lower yield.

Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Dahmen, P.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Anisotropic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7--25 C and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10--30 C. 2 figs.

Gollan, A.Z.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Short Rotation Crops in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

responders anticipated that energy will comprise 25% or less of the utilization of single-stem short-rotation woody crops between now and 2010. The only exception was a response from California where a substantial biomass energy market does currently exist. Willows (Salix species) are only being developed for energy and only in one part of the United States at present. Responses from herbaceous crop researchers suggested frustration that markets (including biomass energy markets) do not currently exist for the crop, and it was the perception of many that federal incentives will be needed to create such markets. In all crops, responses indicate that a wide variety of research and development activities are needed to enhance the yields and profitability of the crops. Ongoing research activities funded by the U.S. Department of Energy?s Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program are described in an appendix to the paper.

Wright, L.L.

1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

90

Rust disease continues to threaten California garlic crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

threaten California garlic crop Steven T. Koike u Richard F.severely damaged the garlic crop in Califor- nia. Thestudy, it infected allium crops such as gar- lic, onion and

Koike, Steven T.; Smith, Richard; Davis, R. Michael; Nunez, J. Joe; Voss, Ron E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

New crop coefficients developed for high-yield processing tomatoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after planting Fig. 2. Daily crop coefficients with daysFor all years, seasonal crop ETc ranged from 20.8 to 29.64. Relationship between average crop coefficient and canopy

Hanson, Blaine R.; May, Donald M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

When crop transgenes wander in California, should we worry?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modi?ed herbicide- tolerant crops. J Applied Ecol 40:2–16.No 421. Gressel J. 2005. Crop Ferality and Volunteerism.Can genetically engineered crops become weeds? Biotechnology

Ellstrand, Norman C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Weather-based yield forecasts developed for 12 California crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precipitation on California crop yields. Climatic Change. InG. 1999. Understanding crop statis- tics. www.usda.gov/nass/developed for 12 California crops by David B. Lobell,

Lobell, David; Cahill, Kimberly Nicholas; Field, Christopher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pharmaceutical crops have a mixed outlook in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8:18–25. Ellstrand NC. 2006. When crop transgenes wander inM, Van Acker R. 2005. Can crop transgenes be kept on aEconomics of Pharmaceuti- cal Crops: Potential Bene?ts and

Marvier, Michelle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Buffers between grazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sheep and the edge of a food crop was adequate to preventgrazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety Thedomestic animals and the crop edge is adequate to minimize

Hoar, Bruce R; Atwill, Edward R; Carlton, Lesa; Celis, Jorge; Carabez, Jennifer; Nguyen, Tran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

An Approach to Crop-Hail Insurance Rate Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hailstorms are meteorological events that have a considerably adverse impact on crop production. Variation of these events in time and space, in turn, influence crop-hail insurance rate structure. Crop-hail insurance companies normally review ...

J. C. Neill

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Water use of tall and dwarf crop plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

height in a spring wheat. Crop Science 34(No. 6); \\ i i *O F T A L L AND D W A R F CROP PLANTS By J . Giles Wainesbetween water application, crop yields, and management

Waines, J. Giles; Ehdaie, Bahman

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. R. Linden. 2004. Crop and soil productivity responseresistance in cowpea. Crop Science 40:611-618. Enache A. J.McGiffen. 2000. Cowpea cover crop mulch for weed control in

Bachie, Oli Gurmu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Analysis of the impact of energy crops on water quality. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report consists of two separate papers. The first, ``The potential use of agricultural simulation models in predicting the fate of nitrogen and pesticides applied to switchgrass and poplars,`` describes three models (CREAMS, GLEAMS, and EPIC) for the evaluation of the relationships which determine water quality in the agroecosystem. Case studies are presented which demonstrate the utility of these models in evaluating the potential impact of alternative crop management practices. The second paper, ``Energy crops as part of a sustainable landscape,`` discusses concepts of landscape management and the linkage among agricultural practices and environmental quality.

Hatfield, J.L.; Gale, W.J.

1993-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Nitrogen supply from fertilizer and legume cover crop in the transition to no-tillage for irrigated row crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

152–155 CTIC (2004) National crop residue management survey.15 labeled legume cover crop. Soil Sci Soc Am J 53:822–827fertilizer and legume cover crop in the transition to no-

Doane, Timothy A.; Horwath, William R.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Jackson, Jim; Miyao, Gene; Brittan, Kent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Yin-An (Opelika, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NETL: Control Technology: ElectroCore Separator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ElectroCore Separator ElectroCore Separator LSR Technologies and its subcontractors designed and installed a 8,500 m3/hr (5,000 acfm) Advanced ElectroCore system and a dry sulfur scrubber to test it using an exhaust gas slipstream at Alabama Power Company's Gaston Steam Plant. Shakedown is scheduled for August 15, 2001. The exhaust gas will be from Unit #4 of a 270 MWe sub-critical, pulverized coal boiler burning a low-sulfur bituminous coal. The Advanced ElectroCore system will consist of a conventional upstream ESP, a dry SO2 scrubber, a particle precharger and an Advanced ElectroCore separator. Particle concentrations and size distributions will be measured at the ESP inlet, at the dry scrubber outlet and at the ElectroCore outlet. The concentration of 12 common HAPs will be measured at these locations as well. For purposes of project organization and monitoring, the work will be divided into nine (9) tasks described below.

103

Short Rotation Crops in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The report is based primarily on the results of survey questions sent to approximately 60 woody and 20 herbaceous crop researchers in the United States and on information from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program. Responses were received from 13 individuals involved in woody crops research or industrial commercialization (with 5 of the responses coming from industry). Responses were received from 11 individuals involved in herbaceous crop research. Opinions on market incentives, technical and non-technical barriers, and highest priority research and development areas are summarized in the text. Details on research activities of the survey responders are provided as appendices to the paper. Woody crops grown as single-stem systems (primarily Populus and Eucalyptus species) are perceived to have strong pulp fiber and oriented strand board markets, and the survey responders anticipated that energy will comprise 25% or less of the utilization of single-stem short-rotation woody crops between now and 2010. The only exception was a response from California where a substantial biomass energy market does currently exist. Willows (Salix species) are only being developed for energy and only in one part of the United States at present. Responses from herbaceous crop researchers suggested frustration that markets (including biomass energy markets) do not currently exist for the crop, and it was the perception of many that federal incentives will be needed to create such markets. In all crops, responses indicate that a wide variety of research and development activities are needed to enhance the yields and profitability of the crops. Ongoing research activities funded by the U.S. Department of Energy?s Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program are described in an appendix to the paper.

Wright, L.L.

1998-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s PETRO Project, short for “Plants Engineered to Replace Oil,” aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Bioenergy: What`s in it for the grower? The cost of producing dedicated energy crops. Comparisons with conventional crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dedicated energy crops must be at least as profitable as conventional crops that could be grown on a given site before farmers will produce energy crops on that site. This report concentrates on the cost of producing dedicated energy crops and compare those costs to the profitability of conventional crops. This comparison allows one to estimate a breakeven price, that is, a price for which the profitability of dedicated energy crops is equivalent to the profitability of conventional crops. Switchgrass and hybrid poplar have been chosen as representative herbaceous and woody crop species for the estimation.

Walsh, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Battery separator material  

SciTech Connect

A novel, improved battery separator material particularly adaptable for use in maintenance free batteries. The battery separator material includes a diatomaceous earth filler, an acrylate copolymer binder and a combination of fibers comprising polyolefin, polyester and glass fibers.

Bodendorf, W. J.

1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Actinide separations conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the abstracts for 55 presentations given at the fourteenth annual Actinide Separations Conference. (JDL)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Spent Fuel Drying System Test Results (Dry-Run in Preparation for Run 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of a test ''dry-run'' conducted prior to the eighth and last of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister6513U. The system used for the dry-run test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 4.0 and discussed Section 5.0.

BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement for natural gas in textile drying. The Georgia Tech updraft gasifier was used for the experimental program. During preliminary tests, the 1 million Btu/hr pilot plant produced clean burning gas which appeared viable for drying textiles. The gasifier was coupled to a modified textile drying oven and a series of tests were carried out to assess product degradation of white, colored, and chemically treated fabrics.

McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description Dry ice (solid) is put into the bulb of a pipette, plastic pipette 1 ice cube sized piece of dry ice Butter knife (or some object to break dry ice) Gloves (surgical gloves will not work, they must protect hands from dry ice) Safety glasses for demonstrator

111

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

Bioeconomy Crop Initiative (Prince Edward Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Bioeconomy Crop Initiative is being offered by the P.E.I. Department of Agriculture through the Agricultural Flexibility Fund, a cost-sharing agreement between the Government of Canada and the...

113

Optimizing Crop Insurance under Climate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the selection of optimal crop insurance under climate variability and fluctuating market prices. A model was designed to minimize farmers’ expected losses (including insurance costs) while using the conditional-value-at-risk ...

Juan Liu; Chunhua Men; Victor E. Cabrera; Stan Uryasev; Clyde W. Fraisse

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a biomass for biofuel production and some of its economiceconomic viability of biofuel production is the efficiencybiofuel; metabolic engineering; China Abstract Cassava is ranking as fifth among crops in global starch production.

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Conservation tillage and cover cropping influence soil properties in San Joaquin Valley cotton-tomato crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 147 TREATMENTS CTCC: conservation tillage, covercrop CTNO: conservation tillage only STCC: standard tillage,1.24bc 1.35d * CTCC = conservation tillage, cover crop; CTNO

Veenstra, Jessica; Horwath, William; Mitchell, Jeffrey; Munk, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable resources. The DOE is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water, and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soils conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row drops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different crops for wildlife species is also considered. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Risk in agriculture : a study of crop yield distributions and crop insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture is a business fraught with risk. Crop production depends on climatic, geographical, biological, political, and economic factors, which introduce risks that are quantifiable given the appropriate mathematical ...

Gayam, Narsi Reddy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NEWTON: Preventing Tire Dry Rot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preventing Tire Dry Rot Preventing Tire Dry Rot Name: Millard Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: MD Country: USA Date: Spring 2013 Question: My dad has a classic car, and because it gets driven very little each year, the tires dry rot before he can get much tread wear on them. What could be used to protect the tires from dry rot and cracking? Replies: Hi Millard, Thanks for the question. I would recommend keeping the car on blocks so that there is no weight on the tires. Additionally, I would recommend that no electrical equipment (motors, switches, and other things that spark) be used around the car. The sparks generate ozone and ozone can cause rubber items such as tires, belts, and hoses to crack. I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have more questions. Thanks Jeff Grell

119

DRI Companies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DRI Companies DRI Companies Jump to: navigation, search Name DRI Companies Place Irvine, California Zip 92614 Sector Solar Product US-based residential and commercial installer of turnkey solar systems, through subsidiary iDRI Energy. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Abrasives for Dry Blast Cleaning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The materials used in dry abrasive blast cleaning can be categorized as metallic grit, metallic shot, sand, glass, and miscellaneous. Hardness, density, size, and shape are important considerations in choosing an abrasive for a specific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Drying of pulverized material with heated condensible vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for drying pulverized material utilizes a high enthalpy condensable vapor such as steam for removing moisture from the individual particles of the pulverized material. The initially wet particulate material is tangentially delivered by a carrier vapor flow to an upper portion of a generally vertical cylindrical separation drum. The lateral wall of the separation drum is provided with a plurality of flow guides for directing the vapor tangentially therein in the direction of particulate material flow. Positioned concentrically within the separation drum and along the longitudinal axis thereof is a water-cooled condensation cylinder which is provided with a plurality of collection plates, or fines, on the outer lateral surface thereof. The cooled collection fines are aligned counter to the flow of the pulverized material and high enthalpy vapor mixture to maximize water vapor condensation thereon. The condensed liquid which includes moisture removed from the pulverized materials then flows downward along the outer surface of the coolant cylinder and is collected and removed. The particles travel in a shallow helix due to respective centrifugal and vertical acceleration forces applied thereto. The individual particles of the pulverized material are directed outwardly by the vortex flow where they contact the inner cylindrical surface of the separation drum and are then deposited at the bottom thereof for easy collection and removal. The pulverized material drying apparatus is particularly adapted for drying coal fines and facilitates the recovery of the pulverized coal. 2 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1984-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Report on Biomass Drying Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using dry fuel provides significant benefits to combustion boilers, mainly increased boiler efficiency, lower air emissions, and improved boiler operation. The three main choices for drying biomass are rotary dryers, flash dryers, and superheated steam dryers. Which dryer is chosen for a particular application depends very much on the material characteristics of the biomass, the opportunities for integrating the process and dryer, and the environmental controls needed or already available.

Amos, W. A.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

123

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 1957–81. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Evaluation of Salmonella disinfection strategies for pre-slaughter broiler crop decontamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the following studies was to evaluate selected potential decontamination methods for ability to reduce the incidence of Salmonella recovery from broiler crops during pre-slaughter feed withdrawal. The efficacy of prolonged lactose administration in drinking water was evaluated with regard to ability to inhibit ,Salmonella persistence in the broiler crop prior to pre-slaughter feed withdrawal. Several candidate disinfectants were evaluated for potential to disinfect Salmonella in the presence of organic material, simulating the environment of the broiler crop. In this study, an apparent synergistic combination of citric acid and d-Limonene was discovered and further evaluated for ability to remove Salmonella from broiler crops prior to feed withdrawal. Lactose (2.5%) was administered in drinking water for 5-11 d, in 7 separate experiments. A significant reduction (P crops following feed withdrawal was detected in only 1 experiment. Additionally, the incidence of Salmonella recovery from the ceca was not significantly impacted. Consistent with previously published reports, Salmonella recovery was reduced in broilers not subjected to feed withdrawal. Employing a rapid assay system containing high amounts of organic material, selected candidate disinfectants were screened for Salmonella reduction efficacy. The combination of citric acid and d-Limonene at relatively low concentrations displayed marked killing ability in this assay system. When the two compounds were encapsulated, market age broilers voluntarily consumed the capsules readily. Voluntary ingestion of these capsules by adult broilers during the final 45 min of an 8 h feed withdrawal resulted in a significantly (P crops, suggesting that ante mortem crop disinfection for improving food safety is

Barnhart, Eric Thomas

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

DRI Renewable Energy Center (REC) (NV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to utilize a flexible, energy-efficient facility, called the DRI Renewable Energy Experimental Facility (REEF) to support various renewable energy research and development (R&D) efforts, along with education and outreach activities. The REEF itself consists of two separate buildings: (1) a 1200-ft2 off-grid capable house and (2) a 600-ft2 workshop/garage to support larger-scale experimental work. Numerous enhancements were made to DRI's existing renewable power generation systems, and several additional components were incorporated to support operation of the REEF House. The power demands of this house are satisfied by integrating and controlling PV arrays, solar thermal systems, wind turbines, an electrolyzer for renewable hydrogen production, a gaseous-fuel internal combustion engine/generator set, and other components. Cooling needs of the REEF House are satisfied by an absorption chiller, driven by solar thermal collectors. The REEF Workshop includes a unique, solar air collector system that is integrated into the roof structure. This system provides space heating inside the Workshop, as well as a hot water supply. The Workshop houses a custom-designed process development unit (PDU) that is used to convert woody biomass into a friable, hydrophobic char that has physical and chemical properties similar to low grade coal. Besides providing sufficient space for operation of this PDU, the REEF Workshop supplies hot water that is used in the biomass treatment process. The DRI-REEF serves as a working laboratory for evaluating and optimizing the performance of renewable energy components within an integrated, residential-like setting. The modular nature of the system allows for exploring alternative configurations and control strategies. This experimental test bed is also highly valuable as an education and outreach tool both in providing an infrastructure for student research projects, and in highlighting renewable energy features to the public.

Hoekman, S. Kent; Broch, Broch; Robbins, Curtis; Jacobson, Roger; Turner, Robert

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Utilization of geothermal heat in tropical fruit-drying process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The power plant utilizes only the steam portion of the HGP-A well production. There are approximately 50,000 pounds per hour of 360/sup 0/F water produced (approximately 10 million Btu per hour) and the water is currently not used and is considered a waste. This tremendous resource could very well be used in applications such as food processing, food dehydration and other industrial processing that requires low-grade heat. One of the applications is examined, namely the drying of tropical fruits particularly the papaya. The papaya was chosen for the obvious reason that it is the biggest crop of all fruits produced on the Big Island. A conceptual design of a pilot plant facility capable of processing 1000 pounds of raw papaya per day is included. This facility is designed to provide a geothermally heated dryer to dehydrate papayas or other tropical fruits available on an experimental basis to obtain data such as drying time, optimum drying temperature, etc.

Chen, B.H.; Lopez, L.P.; King, R.; Fujii, J.; Tanaka, M.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.

Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M.; Jacobson, J.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited  

SciTech Connect

By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

2011-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

Isotope separation by photochromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

Suslick, Kenneth S. (Stanford, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Soil-to-Crop Transfer Factors of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides and Stable Elements for Long-Term Dose Assessment  

SciTech Connect

A soil-to-crop transfer factor, TF, is a key parameter that directly affects the internal dose assessment for the ingestion pathway, however, obtaining TFs of various long-lived radionuclides occurred during operation of nuclear power plants is difficult because most of them could not be found in natural environments. In this study, therefore, we collected crops and their associated soils throughout Japan and measured more than 50 elements to obtain TFs under equilibrium conditions. The TFs were calculated for 42 elements (Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tl, Pb, Th and U) from their concentrations in both crop and soil samples. The TF is defined as the concentration of an isotope in a crop (in Bq/kg or mg/kg dry weight) divided by the concentration of the isotope in soil (in Bq.kg or mg/kg dry weight). Probability distributions of TFs for 62 upland field crops were usually log-normal type so that geometric means (GMs) were calculated. The values for the elements of interest from the viewpoint of long-term dose assessment were 2.5E-02 for Se, 7.9E-02 for Sr, 3.1E-03 for Cs, 4.2E-04 for Th and 4.6E-04 for U. Leafy vegetable showed the highest TFs for all the elements among the crop groups. It was clear that these data were usually within the 95% confidence limits of TFs compiled by IAEA in Technical Report Series 364. (authors)

Uchida, S.; Tagami, K. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Comparative Advantage in Bangladesh Crop Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses data from 1996/97 through 1998/99 to examine the relative efficiency of production of crops in Bangladesh and their comparative advantage in international trade as measured by net economic profitability (the profitability using economic, rather than financial costs and prices), and the domestic resource cost ratio, (the amount of value of non-tradable domestic resources used in production divided by the value of tradable products). The economic profitability analysis demonstrates that Bangladesh has a comparative advantage in domestic production of rice for import substitution. However, at the export parity price, economic profitability of rice is generally less than economic profitability of many non-rice crops, implying that Bangladesh has more profitable options other than production for rice export. Several non-cereal crops, including vegetables, potatoes and onions have financial and economic returns that are as high as or higher than those of High Yielding Variety (HYV) rice. The relatively minor role in cropping systems of these crops despite their higher returns, can largely be attributed to high price risks associated with marketing, suggesting the need for further development of agro-processing industries, rural infrastructure, and marketing networks. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.

Quazi Shahabuddin; Paul Dorosh; Ashok Gulati; K. M. Rahman; M. K. Mujeri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Relational separation logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a Hoare-style logic for specifying and verifying how two pointer programs are related. Our logic lifts the main features of separation logic, from an assertion to a relation, and from a property about a single program to a relationship ... Keywords: Program verification, Relational reasoning, Schorr—Waite graph marking algorithm, Separation logic

Hongseok Yang

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Method for separating isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

Jepson, B.E.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have created opportunities for the use of crops and crop residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels 2 Soybeans Soybean acreage is on the increase in Pennsylvania For more information about using Pennsylvania crops as biofuels, contact: GREG ROTH PROFESSOR OF AGRONOMY

Lee, Dongwon

137

Dry cleaning of Turkish coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study dealt with the upgrading of two different type of Turkish coal by a dry cleaning method using a modified air table. The industrial size air table used in this study is a device for removing stones from agricultural products. This study investigates the technical and economical feasibility of the dry cleaning method which has never been applied before on coals in Turkey. The application of a dry cleaning method on Turkish coals designated for power generation without generating environmental pollution and ensuring a stable coal quality are the main objectives of this study. The size fractions of 5-8, 3-5, and 1-3 mm of the investigated coals were used in the upgrading experiments. Satisfactory results were achieved with coal from the Soma region, whereas the upgrading results of Hsamlar coal were objectionable for the coarser size fractions. However, acceptable results were obtained for the size fraction 1-3 mm of Hsamlar coal.

Cicek, T. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation membrane useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is chosen from the group consisting of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R.sub.2 is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) ›PMP!. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Morisato, Atsushi (Tokyo, JP)

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

139

Separators for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Separators for flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation membrane is described which is useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula shown in the accompanying diagram, wherein R{sub 1} is chosen from the group consisting of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R{sub 2} is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP]. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Morisato, Atsushi

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Energy Crops Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crops Company Crops Company Jump to: navigation, search Name The Energy Crops Company Place Cobham, United Kingdom Zip KT11 2LA Sector Biomass Product Distributor of pellets and installer of biomass heating equipment in Surrey, UK. Coordinates 41.739891°, -79.322189° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.739891,"lon":-79.322189,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

143

Top Crop Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crop Wind Farm Crop Wind Farm Facility Top Crop Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon-EDPR Developer Horizon-EDPR Location Grundy/Livingston/La Salle Counties IL Coordinates 41.159826°, -88.637381° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.159826,"lon":-88.637381,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

Signature Region of Interest using Auto cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach for signature region of interest pre-processing was presented. It used new auto cropping preparation on the basis of the image content, where the intensity value of pixel is the source of cropping. This approach provides both the possibility of improving the performance of security systems based on signature images, and also the ability to use only the region of interest of the used image to suit layout design of biometric systems. Underlying the approach is a novel segmentation method which identifies the exact region of foreground of signature for feature extraction usage. Evaluation results of this approach shows encouraging prospects by eliminating the need for false region isolating, reduces the time cost associated with signature false points detection, and addresses enhancement issues. A further contribution of this paper is an automated cropping stage in bio-secure based systems.

Al-Mahadeen, Bassam; AlTarawneh, Islam H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Efficacy and Timing of Fungicides, Bactericides, and Biologicals for Decidous Tree Fruit, Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strawberry, and Vine Crops—2008 University of California —NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2008 (Updated 2/19/08)crops .

Adaskaveg, Jim; Gubler, Doug; Michailides, Themis; Holtz, Brent

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

W.: Auto Cropping for Digital Photographs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an effective approach to the nearly untouched problem, still photograph auto cropping, which is one of the important features to automatically enhance photographs. To obtain an optimal result, we first formulate auto cropping as an optimization problem by defining an energy function, which consists of three sub models: composition sub model, conservative sub model and penalty sub model. Then, particle swarm optimization (PSO) is employed to obtain the optimal solution by maximizing the objective function. Experimental results and user studies over hundreds of photographs show that the proposed approach is effective and accurate in most cases, and can be used in many practical multimedia applications. 1.

Mingju Zhang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NeSmith, 1991. Temperature and crop development, p.5–29. In:Using reference evapotranspiration and crop coefficientsto estimate crop evapotranspiration for agronomic crops,

Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The multi layered approach for AGM separators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present absorbent glass mat separate is an offspring of the filtration medium and special paper industries. In these industries, the traditional method of manufacturing micro-glass mats, was to blend two or more types of fibers together in an aqueous acidic solution and deposit this blend onto a moving endless wire or onto a roto-former, another version of an endless wire. The sheet acquires consistency as the water is withdrawn, it is then pressed and dried against heated drums. The methods of fiber dispersion and deposition can be changed so that the different constituent fiber types of an AGM separator are processed separately in distinct and separate layers. This fiber segregation results in changes to some key characteristics of the separator and brings some very definite advantages to the VRLA battery performance. Various key characteristics of the battery are enhanced, such as its ability to deliver higher currents at the higher discharge rates. This paper sets out some basic principles for the manufacturer of wet laid microglass fiber mats. Also important AGM characteristics, such as wicking, porosity/pore size and stratification are analyzed in light of the multilayered AGM design. These characteristics are radically modified and as a consequence the VRLA battery high rate and cycling performances are equally affected.

Ferreira, A.L. [AMER-SIL S.A., Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method of producing a dimensionally stable battery separator  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for producing a dimensionally stable battery separator characterized by grafting acrylic acid and/or methacrylic acid onto a polyethylene film, treating the resulting membrane with an aqueous alkaline solution, and drying the treated membrane under application of tension.

Ishigaki, I.; Machi, S.; Murata, K.; Senoo, K.; Sugo, T.; Tanso, S.

1981-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Preplant 1,3-D treatments test well for perennial crop nurseries, but challenges remain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 26-month June-budded crop if soil has been previouslyfruit and nut nursery crops in the United States. Outlooktest well for perennial crop nurseries, but challenges

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. (1982). Assessment of crop loss from ozone. Journal of1984). Assessing impacts of ozone on agricultural crops: II.crop yield functions and alternative exposure statistics.

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark; McCubbin, Donald; Kim, H.J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Conventional and molecular assays aid diagnosis of crop diseases and fungicide resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orchards in California. Crop Protec Ma Z, Yoshimura MA,assays aid diagnosis of crop diseases and fungicidemonitor, diagnose and quantify crop pathogens. We have also

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Integrated nutrient managment for sustainable production of sorghum-wheat crop sequeence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rhizosperic environment and crop productivity. A reviewpaol) is the most important crop sequence of India occupyingMore over sorghum-wheat crop sequence is an exhaustive

Bhale, Vilas Madhukar Dr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Pigeonpea genomics initiative (PGI): an international effort to improve crop productivity of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to improve crop productivity of pigeonpea (CajanusMallikarjuna International Crops Research Institute for thean important food legume crop in the semi-arid regions of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Outlook Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives:Research Plant Pathologist, Crops Pathology and GeneticsS Jack Kelly Clark pecialty crop farms and nurseries in

Browne, Greg T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of Agricultural Crop Production using the Life Cyclefield with the harvested crops and the nutrients supplied bysee Fig. 1). Supply of crop residues & organic fertilizer

Brentrup, Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Weighing lysimeters aid study of water relations in tree and vine crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ross D, Smith M. 1998. Crop evapotranspiration: Guidelinesfor computing crop water requirements. FAO Irrigation andJ, Trout T, et al. 2000. Crop coefficients for mature peach

Johnson, R. Scott; Williams, Larry E.; Ayars, James E.; Trout, Tom J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effect of Organic Farming on Soil Fertility , Yield and Quality of Crops in the Tropics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the most essential crops in organic farming systems.Among the various vegetable crops grown in Kerala, cowpeahealth, yield, and quality of crops under organic farming.

Bhaskaran, Usha Pankajam; Krishna, Devi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Access to intellectual property is a major obstacle to developing transgenic horticultural crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies for targeted crop applications in sub- Saharanof genetically engineered crop variet- ies — such as publictransgenic horticultural crops Gregory D. Graff Brian D.

Graff, Gregory D.; Wright, Brian D.; Bennett, Alan B.; Zilberman, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. T. Tingey, Assessment of Crop Loss From Air Pollutants,,Assessing Impacts of Ozone on Agricultural Crops: II.Crop Yield Functions and Alternative Exposure Statistics",

Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James; Kim, Jin; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Crop rotation and genetic resistance reduce risk of damage from Fusarium wilt in lettuce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReVIEW Article Crop rotation and genetic resistance reduceon lettuce, not on any other crops tested (Hubbard and Gerikapproach that includes crop rotation to reduce soil inoculum

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduced feed intake. Biomass crop sustainability flexibilityEM, Davis RM. 2005. Mustard crops ineffective in soil-bornefor selective weed control. Crop Prot Ramirez-Villapudua J,

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

responses of switchgrass crops to nitrogen fertilizer haveproduction systems for biomass energy crops. Because it canas forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may be well

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds, Hay, and Winegrapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Agriculture. “State Organic Crop and Acreage Report. ”Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds,Market Potential for Organic Crops in California: Almonds,

Brodt, Sonja; Klonsky, Karen; Thrupp, Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Density derived estimates of standing crop and net primary production in the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates of standing crop and net primary production in thevariables of standing crop and net primary production (NPP)southern California. Standing crop was much more strongly

Reed, Daniel; Rassweiler, Andrew; Arkema, Katie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Separation by solvent extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

Holt, Jr., Charles H. (Kennewick, WA)

1976-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Optimal distance separating halfspace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plastria & Carrizosa / Optimal distance separating halfspace. 2. 1 Gauge Distance to a Hyperplane. Let ? be a gauge on Rd with unit ball B, i.e. B is a compact ...

169

Gas-separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material.

Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Molten salt electrolyte separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

successfully demonstrated the separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent of the c arbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a pulve rized coal plant. In t he ARRA-funded project, Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR) and its partners tested the Polaris(tm) membrane system, which uses a CO 2 -selective polymeric membrane material and module to capture CO 2 from a plant's flue gas. Since the Polaris(tm) membranes

172

Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops May 24, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis The self-propelled baler collects and...

173

D1 Fuel Crops Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D1 Fuel Crops Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name D1 Fuel Crops Ltd Place London, United Kingdom Zip SE1 2RE Product London-based JV between BP and D1 oils focusing on the...

174

Contemporary and historical classification of crop types in Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research compares three different classification algorithms for mapping crops in Pinal County, Arizona, using both present and historical image data. The study area lacked past crop maps, and farmers were dealing with the risk of evolution of resistance ...

KyleA. Hartfield, StuartE. Marsh, ChristaD. Kirk, Yves Carrière

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Century of Monitoring Weather and Crops: The Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Publication of a national weekly weather summary called the Weekly Weather Chronicle began in 1872. This summary was the precursor of today's Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (WWCB), a publication that reports global weather and climate ...

Thomas R. Heddinghaus; Douglas M. Le Comte

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Pharmaceutical crops have a mixed outlook in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crops have a mixed outlook in California by Michelle Marvieras environmental harm. The outlook for the production of

Marvier, Michelle

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Map of the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Zone of the United States. The zone contains the eastern side of California and follows the US border to cover the western half of Texas. The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a series of best practices and case studies to help builders improve whole-house energy performance in buildings found in hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. Best Practice Guides New Construction Case Studies Improvements to Existing Homes Case Studies Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates - Volume 9 New Construction Case Studies Arizona Project: Gordon Estates - Phoenix Builder: Mandalay Homes Profile: Fourteen homes in this subdivision achieved Challenge Home

178

Development of sweet sorghum as an energy crop. Volume III. Integration concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past 3 years, Battelle's Columbus Division and several co-investigators have conducted interregional investigations related to biomass and sugar production for conversion to alcohol and other fuels. These investigations have emphasized primarily the production of sweet sorghum and sugarcane due to their ability to produce high biomass and readily fermentable sugars' yields which allow a highly favorable energy balance when converted to ethanol. The primary goal of the 1979 research program was to determine the agronomic and economic feasibility of developing sweet sorghum, sweet sorghum hybrids, and sugarcane as energy-producing crops in selected geographic regions of the United States. The objectives of the research include the following: (1) to conduct a prefeasibility analysis of the potential for integrating sugarcane and sugar beet production/processing with sweet sorghum; and (2) to formulate an analytical approach to estimate the economic impact of growing sweet sorghum as an energy crop upon the US agricultural system. This volume is comprised of two separate investigations pertaining to potential integration of sweet sorghum into US agriculture. The first investigation entitled, Economic Potential for Integrating Alcohol Fuels Production from Sweet Sorghum with Other Carbohydrate Crops conducted independently, looks at integration of sweet sorghum from a microeconomic viewpoint, i.e., what would be the effects of combining sweet sorghum with other sugar crops to produce alcohol in terms of plant investment and operating costs.

Scantland, D.A.; Riddle, W.E.; McClure, T.A.; Woodford, P.G.; Honton, E.J.; Lipinsky, E.S.

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Flash drying protects standby plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes how special fast-drying technique provides effective corrosion protection for units that will be in standby for a short time. The Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) has developed a technique for rapidly drying out its boilers as an effective corrosion prevention measure, even for units which will be out of service for a short time. The JEA has several steam generating units that are not in continual service. These units, whether on standby or in extended cold storage, must be maintained if they are to operate reliably when they are needed. JEA uses dehumidification as the primary method to reduce corrosion in these standby units. Engineers at JEA believe it is better to reduce the amount of water retained in standby boilers than to add inhibiting chemicals to retained water for corrosion protection.

Mallard, R.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test of a solar crop dryer Danish Technological Institute Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Aidt Miljø A/S SEC-R-6 #12;Test of a solar crop dryer Søren �stergaard Jensen Danish Technological/S January 2001 #12;Preface The report describes the tests carried out on a solar crop dryer. The work

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Particle size distributions of ground corn and DDGS from dry grind processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT. Ethanol production has increased in the past decade as a result of growth in the dry grind industry. In the dry grind process, the first step is grinding of corn. The particle size of the resulting ground corn can affect the fermentation process and the particle size of dried distillers ’ grains with solubles (DDGS), a coproduct of dry grind processing. Few data are available that characterize particle size distributions of ground corn or DDGS. The objective was to determine particle size distributions of ground corn and DDGS. Samples of ground corn and DDGS were obtained from nine dry grind plants; particle size distribution, geometric mean diameter (dgw) and geometric standard deviation (Sgw) were determined. The dgw of ground corn and of DDGS were not different among processing plants. The overall mean dgw of ground corn was not different from that of DDGS. Most of the ground corn (80 g/100 g) and DDGS (70 g/100 g) were recovered in the three largest particle size categories. The particle size distributions of ground corn were not correlated (r Corn, DDGS, Distillers dried grains with solubles, Ethanol. Corn is processed into ethanol by one of two major processes: dry grinding or wet milling. Wet milling is more complex than dry grinding because fiber and germ components are separated; this requires considerable equipment and capital. In the dry grind process,

K. D. Rausch; R. L. Belyea; M. R. Ellersieck; V. Singh; D. B. Johnston; M. E. Tumbleson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Combined Corex/DRI technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasible steelmaking alternative, the Corex/direct reduction/electric arc furnace combination, provides an economic route for the production of high quality steel products. This combination is a major step into a new generation of iron and steel mills. These mills are based on the production of liquid steel using noncoking coal and comply with the increasing demands of environmental protection. The favorable production costs are based on: Utilization of Corex and DRI/HBI plants; Production of hot metal equal to blast furnace quality; Use of low cost raw materials such as noncoking coal and lump ore; Use of process gas as reducing agent for DRI/HBI production; and Use of electric arc furnace with high hot metal input as the steelmaking process. The high flexibility of the process permits the adjustment of production in accordance with the strategy of the steel mills. New but proven technologies and applications of the latest state of art steelmaking process, e.g., Corex, in conjunction with DRI production as basic raw material for an electric arc furnace, will insure high quality, high availability, optimized energy generation at high efficiency rates, and high product quality for steelmaking.

Flickenschild, A.J.; Reufer, F. [Deutsche Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau GmbH, Dusseldorf (Germany); Eberle, A.; Siuka, D. [Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau, Linz (Austria)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

Fant, C.A.

184

SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

1958-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

185

WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

1958-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

ARM - Campaign Instrument - dri-air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send Campaign Instrument : Desert Research Institute Airborne Aerosol Instruments (DRI-AIR) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Airborne Observations Campaigns Aerosol IOP ...

187

Gas-separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating condensable organic components from gas streams. The process makes use of a membrane made from a polymer material that is glassy and that has an unusually high free volume within the polymer material. 6 figures.

Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.; Baker, R.W.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

Lowe, C.S.

1959-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

NEAMS safeguards and separations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation provides a program management update on the Safeguards and Separations Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) program in the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS). It provides an overview of FY11 work packages at multiple DOE Labs and includes material on challenge problem definitions for the IPSC effort.

Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory; De Paoli, David W [ORNL

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

190

Molten salt electrolyte separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

Kaun, T.D.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hydrogen isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D.sub.2, DT, T.sub.2, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

Bartlit, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Denton, William H. (Abingdon, GB3); Sherman, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Mathematical modelling of brown seaweed drying curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple solution on one-term exponential models is used in the analysis of raw data obtained from the drying experiment. The values of the parameters a, n and the constant k for the models are determined using a plot of curve drying models. Three different ... Keywords: brown seaweed, drying curves, mathematical models

Ahmad Fudholi; Mohd Hafidz Ruslan; Lim Chin Haw; Sohif Mat; Mohd Yusof Othman; Azami Zaharim; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Dry Cooling: Perspectives on Future Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total number of dry-cooled power plants in the United States has increased significantly in recent years. This is because nonutility generators are using dry-cooling systems to meet environmental protection and water conservation requirements. A survey shows that utility planners expect that dry cooling could become an important cooling-system option for new utility plants.

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

Mesoporous Block Copolymer Battery Separators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is ~1-2 $ kg -1 , the cost of battery separators is ~120-240greatly reduce the cost of battery separators. Our approach1-2 $ kg -1 , the cost of a typical battery separator is in

Wong, David Tunmin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gaze-Based Interaction for Semi-Automatic Photo Cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an interactive method for cropping photographs given minimal information about the location of important content, provided by eye tracking. Cropping is formulated in a general optimization framework that facilitates adding new composition rules, as well as adapting the system to particular applications. Our system uses fixation data to identify important content and compute the best crop for any given aspect ratio or size, enabling applications such as automatic snapshot recomposition, adaptive documents, and thumbnailing. We validate our approach with studies in which users compare our crops to ones produced by hand and by a completely automatic approach. Experiments show that viewers prefer our gaze-based crops to uncropped images and fully automatic crops. Author Keywords cropping, photography, composition, evaluation, eye tracking, visual perception

Anthony Santella; Maneesh Agrawala; Doug Decarlo; David Salesin; Michael Cohen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics Jump to: navigation, search Name International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics Place India Sector Biofuels Product Biofuels ( Academic / Research foundation ) References International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics is a company located in India . References ↑ "International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Crops_Research_Institute_for_the_Semi_Arid_Tropics&oldid=347036

197

Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Steam separator latch assembly  

SciTech Connect

A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Kobsa, Irvin R. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Steam separator latch assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Laser isotope separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

1975-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advanced Separation Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating uranium oxides from PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and other actinide oxides is described. The oxide mixture is suspended in a fused salt melt and a chlorinating agent such as chlorine gas or phosgene is sparged through the suspension. Uranium oxides are selectively chlorinated and dissolve in the melt, which may then be filtered to remove the unchlorinated oxides of the other actinides. (AEC)

Lyon, W.L.

1962-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

SLA battery separators  

SciTech Connect

Since they first appeared in the early 1970's, sealed lead acid (SLA) batteries have been a rapidly growing factor in the battery industry - in rechargeable, deep-cycle, and automotive storage systems. The key to these sealed batteries is the binderless, absorptive glass microfiber separator which permits the electrolyte to recombine after oxidation. The result is no free acid, no outgassing, and longer life. The batteries are described.

Fujita, Y.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cell separator and cell  

SciTech Connect

There is disclosed a novel cell separator made of a grafted membrane comprising a polyethylene film which is graft copolymerized with a monomer having an ion exchange group, characterized in that said membrane has an area which is not grafted at all or an area of low degree grafting. By making use of this membrane, a small size and thin cell having excellent performance as well as satisfactory mechanical strength can be produced at low cost with great advantages.

Ishigaki, I.; Machi, S.; Murata, K.; Okada, T.; Senoo, K.; Sugo, T.; Tanso, S.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Separation of sulfur isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

DeWitt, Robert (Centerville, OH); Jepson, Bernhart E. (Dayton, OH); Schwind, Roger A. (Centerville, OH)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

A national research & development strategy for biomass crop feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning was initiated in 1996 with the objective of reevaluating current biomass feedstock research and development strategies to: (1) assure that by 2005, one or more commercial lignocellulosic to ethanol projects will be able to acquire a dependable supply of biomass crop feedstocks; (2) assure that recently initiated demonstrations of crops to electricity will be successful and; (3) assure that the research base needed to support future biomass industry expansion is being developed. Multiple trends and analyses indicate that biomass energy research and development strategies must take into account the fact that competition for land will define the upper limits of available biomass energy crop supplies and will largely dictate the price of those supplies. Only crop production and utilization strategies which contribute profit to the farmer or landowner and to energy producers will be used commercially for biomass energy production. Strategies for developing biomass {open_quotes}energy{close_quotes} crop supplies must take into consideration all of the methods by which biomass crops will enter biomass energy markets. The lignocellulosic materials derived from crops can be available as primary residues or crop by-products; secondary residues or processing by-products; co-products (at both the crop production and processing stages); or, as dedicated energy crops. Basic research and development (R&D) leading to yield improvement continues to be recommended as a major long-term focus for dedicated energy crops. Many additional near term topics need attention, some of which are also applicable to by-products and co-products. Switchgrass R&D should be expanded and developed with greater collaboration of USDA and state extension groups. Woody crop research should continue with significant cost-share from industries developing the crops for other commercial products. Co-product options need more investigation.

Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electrical conductivity of dispersions: from dry foams to dilute suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new data for the electrical conductivity of foams in which the liquid fraction ranges from two to eighty percent. We compare with a comprehensive collection of prior data, and we model all results with simple empirical formul\\ae. We achieve a unified description that applies equally to dry foams and emulsions, where the droplets are highly compressed, as well as to dilute suspensions of spherical particles, where the particle separation is large. In the former limit, Lemlich's result is recovered; in the latter limit, Maxwell's result is recovered.

K. Feitosa; S. Marze; A. Saint-Jalmes; D. J. Durian

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

208

PROJECT SHEET SUBCOMMITTEE: Food Residues Subcommittee PROJECT TITLE: Expansion, Development and Harmonization of Crop Groups With Specified Representative Crops for Field Crop Residues Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOAL/OBJECTIVE: To further develop and implement Crop groups utilized by NAFTA and based on representative commodities to foster worldwide harmonization of Crop groups and commodity terminology which will help remove trade irritants due to differences in commodity tolerance levels or MRLs for minor and specialty crops. PROJECT DESCRIPTION/PROCEDURE The Chairperson (Hong Chen) of the International Crop Grouping Consulting Committee (ICGCC) forwards the Symposium proposal for a particular crop group to the appropriate workgroup of the ICGCC via emails and requests the workgroup members to provide input on crop information and maximum residue limit (MRL) information (includes U.S., NAFTA, Codex and EU) on the commodities. Growers and commodity experts also provide valuable input on commodities. International members provide specific information on the commodities grown in their countries and regions which provides perspectives on harmonization approaches. Based on the input, the ICGCC Chairperson will prepare commodity monographs, divide subgroups, select representative crops and draft new crop group petitions. The draft petitions will be forwarded to the workgroup for review and comments before being finalized, and the

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

210

Biotechnology Approaches togy pp Woody Crop Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Co-firing) Pulp, Paper & Wood Products Biofuels(Heat & Power) (Direct & Co firing)Wood Products 3Demand for Woody Biomass is Growing Demand Drivers Advanced Biofuels Pellets (Heat & Power) Electricity (Direct ProximityHigh Productivity Enables Close Proximity · A processor consuming 1 million dry tons of wood from

Wynne, Randolph H.

211

SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products by treating a nitrate solution of fission products, uranium, and hexavalent plutonium with a relatively water-insoluble fluoride to adsorb fission products on the fluoride, treating the residual solution with a reducing agent for plutonium to reduce its valence to four and less, treating the reduced plutonium solution with a relatively insoluble fluoride to adsorb the plutonium on the fluoride, removing the solution, and subsequently treating the fluoride with its adsorbed plutonium with a concentrated aqueous solution of at least one of a group consisting of aluminum nitrate, ferric nitrate, and manganous nitrate to remove the plutonium from the fluoride.

Maddock, A.G.; Smith, F.

1959-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

Polymeric battery separators  

SciTech Connect

Configurations of cross-linked or vulcanized amphophilic or quaternized block copolymer of haloalkyl epoxides and hydroxyl terminated alkadiene polymers are useful as battery separators in both primary and secondary batteries, particularly nickel-zinc batteries. The quaternized block copolymers are prepared by polymerizing a haloalkyl epoxide in the presence of a hydroxyl terminated 1,3-alkadiene to form a block copolymer that is then reacted with an amine to form the quaternized or amphophilic block copolymer that is then cured or cross-linked with sulfur, polyamines, metal oxides, organic peroxides and the like.

Minchak, R. J.; Schenk, W. N.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

NIOBIUM-TANTALUM SEPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The usual method for the separation of tantalum and niobium consists of a selective solvent extraction from an aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution of the metals. A difficulty encountered in this process is the fact that the corrosion problems associated with hydrofluoric acid are serious. It has been found that the corrosion caused by the hydrofluoric acid may be substantially reduced by adding to the acidic solution an amine, such as phenyl diethanolamine or aniline, and adjusting pH value to between 4 and 6.

Wilhelm, H.A.; Foos, R.A.

1959-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Agriculture Partner: Farm Service Agency Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=ener&topic=bcap Cost: Free The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. Overview The Biomass Crop Assistance provides financial assistance to offset, for a period of time, the fuel costs for a biomass facility. The Biomass Crop

216

Explosively separable casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a pocket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

Jacobson, Albin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Rychnovsky, Raymond E. (Livermore, CA); Visbeck, Cornelius N. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Membrane separation systems---A research and development needs assessment  

SciTech Connect

Industrial separation processes consume a significant portion of the energy used in the United States. A 1986 survey by the Office of Industrial Programs estimated that about 4.2 quads of energy are expended annually on distillation, drying and evaporation operations. This survey also concluded that over 0.8 quads of energy could be saved in the chemical, petroleum and food industries alone if these industries adopted membrane separation systems more widely. Membrane separation systems offer significant advantages over existing separation processes. In addition to consuming less energy than conventional processes, membrane systems are compact and modular, enabling easy retrofit to existing industrial processes. The present study was commissioned by the Department of Energy, Office of Program Analysis, to identify and prioritize membrane research needs in light of DOE's mission. Each report will be individually cataloged.

Baker, R.W. (Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Cussler, E.L. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science); Eykamp, W. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Koros, W.J. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA)); Riley, R.L. (Separation Systems Technology, San Diego, CA (USA)); Strathmann, H. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Grenzflaech

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Membrane separation systems---A research and development needs assessment  

SciTech Connect

Industrial separation processes consume a significant portion of the energy used in the United States. A 1986 survey by the Office of Industrial Programs estimated that about 4.2 quads of energy are expended annually on distillation, drying and evaporation operations. This survey also concluded that over 0.8 quads of energy could be saved in the chemical, petroleum and food industries alone if these industries adopted membrane separation systems more widely. Membrane separation systems offer significant advantages over existing separation processes. In addition to consuming less energy than conventional processes, membrane systems are compact and modular, enabling easy retrofit to existing industrial processes. The present study was commissioned by the Department of Energy, Office of Program Analysis, to identify and prioritize membrane research needs in light of DOE's mission. Each report will be individually cataloged.

Baker, R.W. (Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Cussler, E.L. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science); Eykamp, W. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Koros, W.J. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA)); Riley, R.L. (Separation Systems Technology, San Diego, CA (USA)); Strathmann, H. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Grenzflaech

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Wet/dry cooling tower and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Crops Engineered for Increased Sugar Extraction through ...  

Energy Crops Engineered for Increased Sugar Extraction through Inhibition of snl6 Expression Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Essays on ethanol-driven corn demand and crop choice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two essays are focused on crop choice and the growth of corn production in the Corn Belt and surrounding areas. The first essay develops a… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields  

SciTech Connect

Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Liquid Desiccant Drying of Thermoreversibly Gelcast Bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Liquid Desiccant Drying of Thermoreversibly Gelcast Bodies. Author(s), Noah O Shanti, Katherine T Faber. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Noah ...

225

,"Utah Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

226

ARM - Campaign Instrument - dri-gnd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send Campaign Instrument : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments (DRI-GND) Instrument Categories Aerosols Campaigns Aerosol IOP Download Data Southern...

227

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump...

228

Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes ... successfully tested as a replacement for barrier bricks in several reduction cell technology types ...

229

Cold vacuum drying system conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the activities involved in the removal of the SNF from the leaking basins and to place it in stable dry storage.

Bradshaw, F.W.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG...

231

,"Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

232

,"Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

233

,"Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production ",52,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

234

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

235

,"Ohio Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

236

,"California Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

237

FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process  

SciTech Connect

This report includes major findings and outlook from the transformational electrode drying project performance period from January 6, 2012 to August 1, 2012. Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheating and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80°C vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 – 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.

Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M. (A123 Systems, Inc.)

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Propane earth materials drying techniques and technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A feasibility study for the use of propane as a subbase drying technique. Michael Blahut (1) Dr. Vernon Schaefer (2) Dr. Chris Williams (3) The… (more)

Blahut, Michael Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

,"Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301981" ,"Release Date:","81...

240

,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2011,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","81...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Developing Switchgrass as a Bioenergy Crop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization of energy crops produced on American farms as a source of renewable fuels is a concept with great relevance to current ecological and economic issues at both national and global scales. Development of a significant national capacity to utilize perennial forage crops, such as switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) as biofuels could benefit our agricultural economy by providing an important new source of income for farmers. In addition energy production from perennial cropping systems, which are compatible with conventional fining practices, would help reduce degradation of agricultural soils, lower national dependence on foreign oil supplies, and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants to the atmosphere (McLaughlin 1998). Interestingly, on-farm energy production is a very old concept, extending back to 19th century America when both transpofiation and work on the farm were powered by approximately 27 million draft animals and fueled by 34 million hectares of grasslands (Vogel 1996). Today a new form of energy production is envisioned for some of this same acreage. The method of energy production is exactly the same - solar energy captured in photosynthesis, but the subsequent modes of energy conversion are vastly different, leading to the production of electricity, transportation fuels, and chemicals from the renewable feedstocks. While energy prices in the United States are among the cheapest in the world, the issues of high dependency on imported oil, the uncertainties of maintaining stable supplies of imported oil from finite reserves, and the environmental costs associated with mining, processing, and combusting fossil fuels have been important drivers in the search for cleaner burning fuels that can be produced and renewed from the landscape. At present biomass and bioenergy combine provide only about 4% of the total primary energy used in the U.S. (Overend 1997). By contrast, imported oil accounts for approximately 44% of the foreign trade deficit in the U.S. and about 45% of the total annual U.S. oil consumption of 34 quads (1 quad = 1015 Btu, Lynd et al. 1991). The 22 quads of oil consumed by transportation represents approximately 25% of all energy use in the US and excedes total oil imports to the US by about 50%. This oil has environmental and social costs, which go well beyond the purchase price of around $15 per barrel. Renewable energy from biomass has the potential to reduce dependency on fossil fhels, though not to totally replace them. Realizing this potential will require the simultaneous development of high yielding biomass production systems and bioconversion technologies that efficiently convert biomass energy into the forms of energy and chemicals usable by industry. The endpoint criterion for success is economic gain for both agricultural and industrial sectors at reduced environmental cost and reduced political risk. This paper reviews progress made in a program of research aimed at evaluating and developing a perennial forage crop, switchgrass as a regional bioenergy crop. We will highlight here aspects of research progress that most closely relate to the issues that will determine when and how extensively switchgrass is used in commercial bioenergy production.

Bouton, J.; Bransby, D.; Conger, B.; McLaughlin, S.; Ocumpaugh, W.; Parrish, D.; Taliaferro, C.; Vogel, K.; Wullschleger, S.

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Plutonium hexafluoride is a satisfactory fluorinating agent and may be reacted with various materials capable of forming fluorides, such as copper, iron, zinc, etc., with consequent formation of the metal fluoride and reduction of the plutonium to the form of a lower fluoride. In accordance with the present invention, it has been found that the reactivity of plutonium hexafluoride with other fluoridizable materials is so great that the process may be used as a method of separating plutonium from mixures containing plutonium hexafluoride and other vaporized fluorides even though the plutonium is present in but minute quantities. This process may be carried out by treating a mixture of fluoride vapors comprising plutonium hexafluoride and fluoride of uranium to selectively reduce the plutonium hexafluoride and convert it to a less volatile fluoride, and then recovering said less volatile fluoride from the vapor by condensation.

Brown, H.S.; Hill, O.F.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Improved Strontium and Actinide Separations  

Effect of aging on mMST performance 15 wt% mMST suspension in water Dried mMST powder mMST dissolved Scanning electron micrograph of mMST in sulfuric ...

244

Copper Palladium Hydrogen Separation Membranes  

This patent-pending technology, “Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance,” consists of copper-palladium alloy compositions for hydrogen separation membranes that use less palladium and have a ...

245

Separability of Tripartite Quantum Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the separability of arbitrary dimensional tripartite sys- tems. By introducing a new operator related to transformations on the subsystems a necessary condition for the separability of tripartite systems is presented.

Ming Li; Shao-Ming Fei; Zhi-Xi Wang

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

High-Resolution Separations Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) provides relatively high efficiency separations, the analysis of some complex, natural-matrix ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

Photoelectrochemical Separation and Imaging Device  

Disclosure Number 200301283 ... The invention relates to the separation and detection of biomolecules and other charged species using ...

249

Short-term dynamics of soil carbon, microbial biomass, and soil enzyme activities as compared to longer-term effects of tillage in irrigated row crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates by tillage and crop rotation: a global data analysis.of tillage in irrigated row crops Daniel Geisseler & Williamthe cropping season in all crop sequences D. Geisseler (*) :

Geisseler, Daniel; Horwath, William R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Image separation using particle filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we will analyze the problem of source separation in the case of superpositions of different source images, which need to be extracted from a set of noisy observations. This problem occurs, for example, in the field of astrophysics, where ... Keywords: Bayesian source separation, Image separation, Non-stationary noise, Particle filtering, Sequential Monte Carlo

Mauro Costagli; Ercan Engin Kuruo?lu

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Method for separating boron isotopes  

SciTech Connect

A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheating and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80°C vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 – 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.

Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M. (A123 Systems, Inc.)

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cold vacuum drying facility 90% design review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains review comment records for the CVDF 90% design review. Spent fuels retrieved from the K Basins will be dried at the CVDF. It has also been recommended that the Multi-Conister Overpacks be welded, inspected, and repaired at the CVD Facility before transport to dry storage.

O`Neill, C.T.

1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

255

HYDROGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A likely membrane for future testing of high-temperature hydrogen separation from a gasification product stream was targeted as an inorganic analog of a dense-metal membrane, where the hydrogen would dissolve into and diffuse through the membrane structure. An amorphous membrane such as zinc sulfide appeared to be promising. Previously, ZnS film coating tests had been performed using an electron-beam vacuum coating instrument, with zinc films successfully applied to glass substrates. The coatings appeared relatively stable in air and in a simple simulated gasification atmosphere at elevated temperature. Because the electron-beam coating instrument suffered irreparable breakdown, several alternative methods were tested in an effort to produce a nitrogen-impermeable, hydrogen-permeable membrane on porous sintered steel substrates. None of the preparation methods proved successful in sealing the porous substrate against nitrogen gas. To provide a nitrogen-impermeable ZnS material to test for hydrogen permeability, two ZnS infrared sample windows were purchased. These relatively thick ''membranes'' did not show measurable permeation of hydrogen, either due to lack of absorption or a negligible permeation rate due to their thickness. To determine if hydrogen was indeed adsorbed, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses tests were performed on samples of ZnS powder. A significant uptake of hydrogen gas occurred, corresponding to a maximum of 1 mole H{sub 2} per 1 mole ZnS at a temperature of 175 C. The hydrogen remained in the material at ambient temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere, but approximately 50% would be removed in argon. Reheating in a hydrogen atmosphere resulted in no additional hydrogen uptake. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the hydrogen uptake was probably due to the formation of a zinc-sulfur-hydrogen species resulting in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The zinc sulfide was found to be unstable above approximately 200 C, probably with the reduction to metallic zinc with the evolution of hydrogen sulfide. The work has shown that ZnS is not a viable candidate for a high-temperature hydrogen separation membrane.

Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Incorporation of crop phenology in Simple Biosphere Model (SiBcrop) to improve land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from croplands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for integrated field crop management. Cornell Universityactivity within the crop canopy. Aust. J. agric. Res. , 23,Assessing uncertainties in crop model simulations using

Lokupitiya, Erandathie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS ALMOND APPLE/PEAR APRICOTNut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops—2011 Table of Contents — 1Nut, Strawberry, and Vine Crops in California Single active

Adaskaveg, J E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Integrated plant nutrient management on diversified cropping system in aqua-terrestrial ecosystem for yield potentiality, quality and rural sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agronomic Management of Wetland Crops, published by Kalyanion these aquatic beneficial crops for obtaining higherof aquatic food and non-food crops in neglected way ( Puste,

PUSTE, ANANDAMOY DR.; DE, PRALAY ER.; MAITY, TAPAN KUMAR DR.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Combined Water-Fertilizer Management to Minimize Non-Point Water Pollution While Achieving High Crop Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLLUTION WHILE ACHIEVING HIGH CROP PRODUCTION JOHN ~ETEYand broccoli relationships and crop yield and nitrogen as amust anticipate Applica- crop nutrient and must be placed in

Letey, John; Jarrell, Wesley M

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Dynamics of Irrigated Perennial Crop Production With Applications to the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

severe damages to U.S. crop yields under climate change,”demand for perennial crops is identified by systematicallyspace approach to perennial crop supply analysis,” American

Franklin, Bradley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The cost of producing switchgrass as a dedicated energy crop  

SciTech Connect

Switchgrass offers many air soil, and water quality benefits as discussed in Herbaceous Energy Crops and the Potential for Soil conservation. But for large-scale biofuel production to become a reality several economic criteria must be met. This article summarizes the biological and economic potential for making switchgrass a commercial energy crop.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Biomass Crop Production: Benefits for Soil Quality and Carbon Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research at three locations in the southeastern US is quantifying changes in soil quality and soil carbon storage that occur during production of biomass crops compared with row crops. After three growing seasons, soil quality improved and soil carbon storage increased on plots planted to cottonwood, sycamore, sweetgum with a cover crop, switchgrass, and no-till corn. For tree crops, sequestered belowground carbon was found mainly in stumps and large roots. At the TN site, the coarse woody organic matter storage belowground was 1.3 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}yr{sup {minus}1}, of which 79% was stumps and large roots and 21% fine roots. Switchgrass at the AL site also stored considerable carbon belowground as coarse roots. Most of the carbon storage occurred mainly in the upper 30 cw although coarse roots were found to depths of greater than 60 cm. Biomass crops contributed to improvements in soil physical quality as well as increasing belowground carbon sequestration. The distribution and extent of carbon sequestration depends on the growth characteristics and age of the individual biomass crop species. Time and increasing crop maturity will determine the potential of these biomass crops to significantly contribute to the overall national goal of increasing carbon sequestration and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Bandaranayake, W.; Bock, B.R.; Houston, A.; Joslin, J.D.; Pettry, D.E.; Schoenholtz, S.; Thornton, F.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Tyler, D.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

263

Surrogate Data to Estimate Crop-Hail Loss  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail insurance loss data for 1948–94 are useful as measures of the historical variability of damaging hail in those 26 states where most crop damages occur. However, longer records are needed for various scientific and business applications, ...

David Changnon; Stanley A. Changnon

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

13September 2011 Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13September 2011 2010 Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative- tonnage bioenergy crop on a commercial scale and convert it into an advanced biofuel (gasoline) in a pilot the biofuels production goals of the United States while helping to alleviate constraints on food and feed

265

Review: Sensing technologies for precision specialty crop production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advances in electronic and information technologies, various sensing systems have been developed for specialty crop production around the world. Accurate information concerning the spatial variability within fields is very important for precision ... Keywords: Precision agriculture, Review, Sensing, Specialty crop

W. S. Lee; V. Alchanatis; C. Yang; M. Hirafuji; D. Moshou; C. Li

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Inspection of Used Fuel Dry Storage Casks  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates the storage of used nuclear fuel, which is now and will be increasingly placed in dry storage systems. Since a final disposition pathway is not defined, the fuel is expected to be maintained in dry storage well beyond the time frame originally intended. Due to knowledge gaps regarding the viability of current dry storage systems for long term use, efforts are underway to acquire the technical knowledge and tools required to understand the issues and verify the integrity of the dry storage system components. This report summarizes the initial efforts performed by researchers at Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to identify and evaluate approaches to in-situ inspection dry storage casks. This task is complicated by the design of the current storage systems that severely restrict access to the casks.

Dennis C. Kunerth; Tim McJunkin; Mark McKay; Sasan Bakhtiari

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

RESONATOR PARTICLE SEPARATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wave guide resonator structure is described for use in separating particles of equal momentum but differing in mass and having energies exceeding one billion electron volts. The particles are those of sub-atomic size and are generally produced as a result of the bombardment of a target by a beam such as protons produced in a high-energy accelerator. In this wave guide construction, the particles undergo preferential deflection as a result of the presence of an electric field. The boundary conditions established in the resonator are such as to eliminate an interfering magnetic component, and to otherwise phase the electric field to obtain a traveling wave such as one which moves at the same speed as the unwanted particle. The latter undergoes continuous deflection over the whole length of the device and is, therefore, eliminated while the wanted particle is deflected in opposite directions over the length of the resonator and is thus able to enter an exit aperture. (AEC)

Blewett, J.P.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

RESONATOR PARTICLE SEPARATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wave-guide resonator structure is designed for use in separating particles of equal momentum but differing in mass, having energies exceeding one billion eiectron volts. The particles referred to are those of sub-atomic size and are generally produced as a result of the bombardment of a target by a beam such as protons produced in a high energy accelerator. In the resonator a travelling electric wave is produced which travels at the same rate of speed as the unwanted particle which is thus deflected continuously over the length of the resonator. The wanted particle is slightly out of phase with the travelling wave so that over the whole length of the resonator it has a net deflection of substantially zero. The travelling wave is established in a wave guide of rectangular cross section in which stubs are provided to store magnetic wave energy leaving the electric wave energy in the main structure to obtain the desired travelling wave and deflection. The stubs are of such shape and spacing to establish a critical mathemitical relationship. (AEC)

Blewett, J.P.; Kiesling, J.D.

1963-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops December 9, 2009 - 11:12am Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? Utilizing sites in Nevada that are currently used as buffers around roads for biofuel production instead could meet up to 22 percent of the state's energy requirements. That's 11 times the energy the state currently produces from biomass. Nebraska is known for its rolling cornfields in America's heartland, and agriculture is so thick in the state that people there can smell the fresh produce in the air. Many more in the U.S. might end up tasting the hearty vegetables as well. But one concern about new technologies that use crops for fuel is that those crops, and the land on which they're grown,

270

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops December 9, 2009 - 11:12am Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? Utilizing sites in Nevada that are currently used as buffers around roads for biofuel production instead could meet up to 22 percent of the state's energy requirements. That's 11 times the energy the state currently produces from biomass. Nebraska is known for its rolling cornfields in America's heartland, and agriculture is so thick in the state that people there can smell the fresh produce in the air. Many more in the U.S. might end up tasting the hearty vegetables as well. But one concern about new technologies that use crops for fuel is that those crops, and the land on which they're grown,

271

Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system Home > content > Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system Crops reap benefits of Pantex irrigation system

272

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Efficient crop type mapping based on remote sensing in the Central Valley, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based approach to map crop types in the San Joaquin Valley,focus on the solutions of identifying these crop types orcategories when crop mapping is extended to a larger extent

Zhong, Liheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Toxic hazards of the industrial atmospheric pollutant sulphur dioxide on tree crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

most important perennial tree crop of Kerala, which plays aeconomy, is the major tree crop in and around factories ofsulphur dioxide on tree crops such as coconut. The study

Rani, B Dr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Drought-tolerant Biofuel Crops could be a Critical Hedge for Biorefineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canopy Temperature as a Crop Water-Stress Indicator. WaterM.S. , et al. , Estimating Crop Water-Deficit Using theNations (FAO), N.R.a.E. , Crop evapotrasporation - Guidlines

Morrow, III, William R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Ozone reduces crop yields and alters competition with weeds such as yellow nutsedge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DT (eds. ). Assessment of Crop Loss from Air Pollutants:Ambient ozone and adverse crop re- sponse: An evaluation ofthe effects of ozone on crops and trees. In: Lefohn AS (

Grantz, David A.; Shrestha, Anil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dynamics of lettuce drop incidence and Sclerotinia minor inoculum under varied crop rotations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Koike, S. T. 1998. Effects of crop rotation and irrigationImplications for yield and crop rotation. Asp. Appl. Biol.minor Inoculum Under Varied Crop Rotations J. J. Hao and K.

Hao, J J; Subbarao, K V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Critical Zinc Deficiency Levels in Indian Soils and Cereal Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, N.K. 1986 Field Crops Res. 13: 55-61. 9. Singh,Singh, Kuldeep 1984 Field Crops Res, 9: 143-149. 7. Singh,than any other group of crops, suffer from Zn deficiency,

Kuldeep, Singh - -

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sudex cover crops can kill and stunt subsequent tomato, ?lettuce and broccoli transplants through allelopathy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Article t Sudex cover crops can kill and stunt subsequentJ. Stapleton Grass cover crops can be harvested for biomassmay affect subsequent crops. We stud- ied the effects of

Summers, Charles G.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Prather, Timothy S.; Stapleton, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Impact of tillage and crop rotation on aggregate-associated carbon in two oxisols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oades. 1980. The effect of crop rotation on aggregation in aand J.H. Long. 1990. Crop rotation and tillage effects onImpact of Tillage and Crop Rotation on Aggregate-Associated

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Crop growth as influenced by Zinc and organic matter in Cadmium-rich polluted soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the soil as well as the crop plants, which affect theamount of Pb, Ni and Cd in crops in sewage irrigated areastubers and lowest in cereal crops (Setia et al. 1998). A

Talatam, Satyanarayana; talatam, satyanarayana; Parida, Binaya Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The effect of location and facility demand on the marginal cost of delivered wood chips from energy crops: A case study of the state of Tennessee  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost-supply curves for delivered wood chips from short rotation woody crops were calculated for 21 regularly-spaced locations spanning the state of Tennessee. These curves were used to systematically evaluate the combined effects of location and facility demand on wood chip feedstock costs in Tennessee. The cost-supply curves were developed using BRAVO, a GIS-based decision support system which calculates marginal cost of delivering wood chips to a specific location given road network maps and maps of farmgate prices and supplies of woody chips from short rotation energy crops. Marginal costs of delivered chips varied by both facility location in the state and facility demand. Marginal costs were lowest in central Tennessee unless the facility demand was greater than 2.7 million dry Mg per year (3 million dry tons per year) in which case west Tennessee was the lowest cost region. Marginal costs rose rapidly with increasing facility demand in the mountainous eastern portion of the state. Transportation costs accounted for 18 to 29% of the delivered cost and ranged between $8 and $18/dry Mg ($7 and $16/dry ton). Reducing the expected farmer participation rate from 100% to 50% or 25% dramatically raised the marginal costs of feedstock supply in the east and central regions of the state. The analysis demonstrates the need to use geographically-specific information when projecting the potential costs and supplies of biomass feedstock.

Graham, R.L.; Liu, W.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biofuels Feedstock Development Program; Noon, C.; Daly, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Management Science Program; Moore, A. [Dept. of Trade and Industry, Harwell (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Support Unit

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Impacts of Future Climate Change on California Perennial Crop Yields: Model Projections with Climate and Crop Uncertainties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most research on the agricultural impacts of climate change has focused on the major annual crops, yet perennial cropping systems are less adaptable and thus potentially more susceptible to damage. Improved assessments of yield responses to future climate are needed to prioritize adaptation strategies in the many regions where perennial crops are economically and culturally important. These impact assessments, in turn, must rely on climate and crop models that contain often poorly defined uncertainties. We evaluated the impact of climate change on six major perennial crops in California: wine grapes, almonds, table grapes, oranges, walnuts, and avocados. Outputs from multiple climate models were used to evaluate climate uncertainty, while multiple statistical crop models, derived by resampling historical databases, were used to address crop response uncertainties. We find that, despite these uncertainties, climate change in California is very likely to put downward pressure on yields of almonds, walnuts, avocados, and table grapes by 2050. Without CO{sub 2} fertilization or adaptation measures, projected losses range from 0 to >40% depending on the crop and the trajectory of climate change. Climate change uncertainty generally had a larger impact on projections than crop model uncertainty, although the latter was substantial for several crops. Opportunities for expansion into cooler regions are identified, but this adaptation would require substantial investments and may be limited by non-climatic constraints. Given the long time scales for growth and production of orchards and vineyards ({approx}30 years), climate change should be an important factor in selecting perennial varieties and deciding whether and where perennials should be planted.

Lobell, D; Field, C; Cahill, K; Bonfils, C

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Optimal compost rates for organic crop production based on a decay series.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? One of the more challenging aspects of organic farming is the development of an appropriate fertility plan, which may include crop rotation, cover crops,… (more)

Endelman, Jeffrey B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Optimal Compost Rates for Organic Crop Production Based on a Decay Series.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One of the more challenging aspects of organic farming is the development of an appropriate fertility plan, which may include crop rotation, cover crops, and/or… (more)

Endelman, Jeffrey B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Biomass crops can be used for biological disinfestation and remediation of soils and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as biomass crops for biofuel production also possess prop-candidate species for biofuel production are taxonomicallyof switching from food production crops to biofuel feedstock

Stapleton, James J; Banuelos, Gary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Bioenergy crop models: Descriptions, data requirements and future challenges  

SciTech Connect

Field studies that address the production of lignocellulosic biomass as a source of renewable energy provide critical data for the development of bioenergy crop models. A literature survey revealed that 14 models have been used for simulating bioenergy crops including herbaceous and woody bioenergy crops, and for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) crops. These models simulate field-scale production of biomass for switchgrass (ALMANAC, EPIC, and Agro-BGC), miscanthus (MISCANFOR, MISCANMOD, and WIMOVAC), sugarcane (APSIM, AUSCANE, and CANEGRO), and poplar and willow (SECRETS and 3PG). Two models are adaptations of dynamic global vegetation models and simulate biomass yields of miscanthus and sugarcane at regional scales (Agro-IBIS and LPJmL). Although it lacks the complexity of other bioenergy crop models, the environmental productivity index (EPI) is the only model used to estimate biomass production of CAM (Agave and Opuntia) plants. Except for the EPI model, all models include representations of leaf area dynamics, phenology, radiation interception and utilization, biomass production, and partitioning of biomass to roots and shoots. A few models simulate soil water, nutrient, and carbon cycle dynamics, making them especially useful for assessing the environmental consequences (e.g., erosion and nutrient losses) associated with the large-scale deployment of bioenergy crops. The rapid increase in use of models for energy crop simulation is encouraging; however, detailed information on the influence of climate, soils, and crop management practices on biomass production is scarce. Thus considerable work remains regarding the parameterization and validation of process-based models for bioenergy crops; generation and distribution of high-quality field data for model development and validation; and implementation of an integrated framework for efficient, high-resolution simulations of biomass production for use in planning sustainable bioenergy systems.

Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Zhang, Xuesong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miguez, Fernando [Iowa State University; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Gas separation membrane module assembly  

SciTech Connect

A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Separate Training Influences Relative Validity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concurrent inhibitory training of B were to alter respondingComparative Psychology Separate Training Influences RelativeDuring relative validity training, X was reinforced when

Mehta, Rick; Dumont, Jamie-Lynne; Combiadakis, Sharon; Williams, Douglas A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES, BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pome and stone fruit crops including almond; pistachio,NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS ALMOND APPLE/PEAR APRICOTCrops ..

Adaskaveg, James E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research will use infrared heating technology for peeling tomatoes. Infrared dry peeling, a device District: 8 Senate District: 5 Application: Nationwide Amount: $324,250 Term: November 1, 2010

293

Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Empire, Nevada Coordinates 40.5757352°, -119.34213° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

294

High strength air-dried aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

295

Production of Dry Air by Isentropic Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have explored the factors governing upper-tropospheric relative humidity with a simple model based on isentropic mixing and condensation. Our analysis has focused on the Northern Hemisphere winter season and on the 315-K (dry) ...

H. Yang; R. T. Pierrehumbert

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Intraseasonal Variability in a Dry Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long integration of a primitive equation dry atmospheric model with time-independent forcing under boreal winter conditions is analyzed. A variety of techniques such as time filtering, space–time spectral analysis, and lag regressions are used ...

Hai Lin; Gilbert Brunet; Jacques Derome

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

298

Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

Irwin, J.J.

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dry capture of SO/SUB/2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of dry sorbents into the flue gas stream is a much simpler process for SO/SUB/2 removal than wet scrubbing. The process may be economically attractive, however only for plants near to deposits of such minerals as nahcolite or trona. The mechanism of sulphur removal by these minerals is described and the prospects for their use in the western US are examined. The economics of dry injection for a hypothetical plant in Wisconsin are shown.

Moore, T.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Short Rotation Woody Crops Program: Project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of summaries describing research efforts in the US Department of Energy's Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP). The SRWCP is sponsored by DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division and is field-managed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SRWCP is an integrated basic research program with 18 field research projects throughout the United States. The overall objective of the program is to improve the productivity and increase the cost efficiency of growing and harvesting woody trees and shrubs. In a competitive technical review, 25 projects were chosen to form a new research program. Although some of the original projects have ended and new ones have begun, many of the long-term research projects still form the core of the SRWCP. This document contains individual summaries of each of the 18 research projects in the SRWCP from October 1985 to October 1986. Each summary provides the following information: name and address of the contracting institution, principal investigator, project title, current subcontract or grant number, period of performance, and annual funding through fiscal year 1986. In addition, each summary contains a brief description of the project rationale, objective, approach, status, and future efforts. A list of publications that have resulted from DOE-sponsored research follows many of the summaries.

Not Available

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice Dry ice is regulated as a hazardous material if shipped by air or water. Contact Shipping for any shipments that include dry ice (x5094, x4388, or shipping@lbl.gov)....

302

Engineering Enzymes in Energy Crops: Conditionally Activated Enzymes Expressed in Cellulosic Energy Crops  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Enzymes are required to break plant biomass down into the fermentable sugars that are used to create biofuel. Currently, costly enzymes must be added to the biofuel production process. Engineering crops to already contain these enzymes will reduce costs and produce biomass that is more easily digested. In fact, enzyme costs alone account for $0.50-$0.75/gallon of the cost of a biomass-derived biofuel like ethanol. Agrivida is genetically engineering plants to contain high concentrations of enzymes that break down cell walls. These enzymes can be “switched on” after harvest so they won’t damage the plant while it’s growing.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and. 4) development of dry deposition formulations applicable to urban areas. Also to improve dry deposition modeling capabilities, atmospheric dispersion models in which the dry deposition formulations are imbedded need better source-term plume initialization and improved in-plume treatment of particle growth processes. Dry deposition formulations used in current models are largely inapplicable to the complex urban environment. An improved capability is urgently needed to provide surface-specific information to assess local exposure hazard levels in both urban and non-urban areas on roads, buildings, crops, rivers, etc. A model improvement plan is developed with a near-term and far-term component. Despite some conceptual limitations, the current formulations for particle deposition based on a resistance approach have proven to provide reasonable dry deposition simulations. For many models with inadequate dry deposition formulations, adding or improving a resistance approach will be the desirable near-term update. Resistance models however are inapplicable aerodynamically very rough surfaces such as urban areas. In the longer term an improved parameterization of dry deposition needs to be developed that will be applicable to all surfaces, and in particular urban surfaces.

Droppo, James G.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Separator material for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is characterized as utilizing an aramid fiber as a separator material. The aramid fibers are especially suited for lithium/thionyl chloride battery systems. The battery separator made of aramid fibers possesses superior mechanical strength, chemical resistance, and is flame retardant.

Cieslak, W.R.; Storz, L.J.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Separator material for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell characterized as utilizing an aramid fiber as a separator material. The aramid fibers are especially suited for lithium/thionyl chloride battery systems. The battery separator made of aramid fibers possesses superior mechanical strength, chemical resistance, and is flame retardant. 1 tab.

Cieslak, W.R.; Storz, L.J.

1989-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

306

Three phase downhole separator process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

Cognata, Louis John (Baytown, TX)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Set separation Neural Network paradigms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for forecasting financial time series 29 f´evrier 2008 Designing a neural network for forecasting financial time for forecasting financial time series #12;Neural Net The inputs Set separation Neural Network paradigms From network for forecasting financial time series #12;Neural Net The inputs Set separation Neural Network

Chen, Yiling

308

Separator material for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell characterized as utilizing an aramid fiber as a separator material. The aramid fibers are especially suited for lithium/thionyl chloride battery systems. The battery separator made of aramid fibers possesses superior mechanical strength, chemical resistance, and is flame retardant.

Cieslak, Wendy R. (1166 Laurel Loop NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Storz, Leonard J. (2215 Ambassador NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen separation using silica membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silica membranes were synthesized on tubular supports of alumina by dipping in silica colloidal solutions. The quality and the performance of the silica membranes were tested by experiments on single gas permeation and gas separation of mixed N2, ... Keywords: Knudsen diffusion, colloidal solution, gas permeation, hydrogen separation, silica membranes

Salvador Alfaroa; Miguel A. Valenzuelaa; Pedro Bosch

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM SUSPENSIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for separating colloidally dissed uranium oxides from the heavy water medium in upwhich they are contained. The method consists in treating such dispersions with hydrogen peroxide, thereby converting the uranium to non-colloidal UO/sub 4/, and separating the UO/sub 4/ sfter its rapid settling.

Wigner, E.P.; McAdams, W.A.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

Low Cost Geothermal Separators BLISS Boundary Layer Inline Separator Scrubber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new compact, low cost, and high performance separator is being developed to help reduce the installed and O and M cost of geothermal power generation. This device has been given the acronym ''BLISS'' that stands for ''Boundary Layer Inline Separator Scrubber''. The device is the first of a series of separators, and in the case of injectates, scrubbers to address the cost-reduction needs of the industry. The BLISS is a multi-positional centrifugal separator primarily designed to be simply installed between pipe supports, in a horizontal position. This lower profile reduces the height safety concern for workers, and significantly reduces the total installation cost. The vessel can demand as little as one-quarter (25%) the amount of steel traditionally required to fabricate many large vertical separators. The compact nature and high separating efficiency of this device are directly attributable to a high centrifugal force coupled with boundary layer control. The pseudo isokinetic flow design imparts a self-cleaning and scale resistant feature. This polishing separator is designed to remove moderate amounts of liquid and entrained solids.

Jung, Douglas; Wai, King

2000-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

312

EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic 1: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHECs). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000

313

Drought has significant effect on corn crop condition, projected ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The corn crop in the affected region is a main feedstock for ethanol, ... out of a total supply of 14.2 billion ... Farmers took advantage of the relatively warm ...

314

Phenological Crop–Climate Models for Illinois, 1951–80  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To examine whether crop climate modeling using data based on phonological stages is appropriate for identifying different climatic effects on corn yields, two phonological models and a model using monthly data are devised for portions of Illinois ...

Pradnya S. Dharmadhikari; David M. Sharpe; Wayne M. Wendland

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Descriptions Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (Site Descriptions) West, T.O., and W.M. Post. 2002. Soil Organic Carbon...

316

Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of known plant viruses and are responsible for more than half the viral damage to crop plants throughout the world. New images of the viruses' structures, which were poorly...

317

Texas Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar...

318

Texas Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

319

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 10 Soap Drying Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 10 Soap Drying Systems Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 10 Soap Drying Systems from ...

320

South Dakota Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

322

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Dry Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...

323

New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

324

Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)...

325

Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

326

West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)...

327

Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

328

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

329

Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

330

Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

331

Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

332

Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

333

Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

334

North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)...

335

Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)...

336

Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

337

Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

338

New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

339

Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

340

Characterization of Dry Aggregates in Carbon Anodes by Image ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anodes are mainly composed of dry aggregates such as calcined petroleum coke and recycled materials with pitch as the binder. Granulometry of the dry ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Selection of herbaceous energy crops for the western corn belt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate economic feasibility of biomass depends on its cost of production and on the cost of competing fuels. The purpose of this research project is to evaluate the production costs of several combinations of species and management systems for producing herbaceous biomass for energy use in Iowa. Herbaceous biomass production systems have costs similar to other crop production systems, such as corn, soybean, and forages. Thus, the factors influencing the costs of producing dedicated biomass energy crops include technological factors such as the cultivation system, species, treatments, soil type, and site and economic factors such as input prices and use of fixed resources. In order to investigate how these production alternatives are influenced by soil resources, and climate conditions, two locations in Iowa, Ames and Chariton, with different soil types and slightly different weather patterns were selected for both the agronomic and economic analyses. Nine crops in thirteen cropping systems were grown at the two sites for five years, from 1988 to 1992. Some of the systems had multiple cropping or interplanting, using combinations of cool-season species and warm-season species, in order to meet multiple objectives of maximum biomass, minimal soil loss, reduced nitrogen fertilization or diminished pesticide inputs. Six of the systems use continuous monocropping of herbaceous crops with an emphasis on production. The seven other systems consist of similar crops, but with crop rotation and soil conservation considerations. While the erosion and other off-site effects of these systems is an important consideration in their overall evaluation, this report will concentrate on direct production costs only.

Anderson, I.C.; Buxton, D.R.; Hallam, J.A. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Copula Based Stochastic Weather Generator as an Application for Crop Growth Models and Crop Insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic Weather Generators (SWG) try to reproduce the stochastic patterns of climatological variables characterized by high dimensionality, non-normal probability density functions and non-linear dependence relationships. However, conventional SWGs usually typify weather variables with unjustified probability distributions assuming linear dependence between variables. This research proposes an alternative SWG that introduces the advantages of the Copula modeling into the reproduction of stochastic weather patterns. The Copula based SWG introduces more flexibility allowing researcher to model non-linear dependence structures independently of the marginals involved, also it is able to model tail dependence, which results in a more accurate reproduction of extreme weather events. Statistical tests on weather series simulated by the Copula based SWG show its capacity to replicate the statistical properties of the observed weather variables, along with a good performance in the reproduction of the extreme weather events. In terms of its use in crop growth models for the ratemaking process of new insurance schemes with no available historical yield data, the Copula based SWG allows one to more accurately evaluate the risk. The use of the Copula based SWG for the simulation of yields results in higher crop insurance premiums from more frequent extreme weather events, while the use of the conventional SWG for the yield estimation could lead to an underestimation of risks.

Juarez Torres, Miriam 77-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development of an optical sensor for crop leaf chlorophyll content detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrogen content in crop leaf is an important indication for evaluating crop health and predicting crop yield. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is widely used as an indicator in estimating leaf nitrogen content in practice. How to effectively ... Keywords: Crop leaf nitrogen content, Hand-held instrument, In-field NDVI measurement, Lower cost design

Di Cui; Minzan Li; Qin Zhang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

346

Efficient separations & processing crosscutting program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect chemical and physical separations technologies and chemical processes which treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE complex. The ESP funds several multiyear tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R & D) leading to the demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Source separation of household waste: A case study in China  

SciTech Connect

A pilot program concerning source separation of household waste was launched in Hangzhou, capital city of Zhejiang province, China. Detailed investigations on the composition and properties of household waste in the experimental communities revealed that high water content and high percentage of food waste are the main limiting factors in the recovery of recyclables, especially paper from household waste, and the main contributors to the high cost and low efficiency of waste disposal. On the basis of the investigation, a novel source separation method, according to which household waste was classified as food waste, dry waste and harmful waste, was proposed and performed in four selected communities. In addition, a corresponding household waste management system that involves all stakeholders, a recovery system and a mechanical dehydration system for food waste were constituted to promote source separation activity. Performances and the questionnaire survey results showed that the active support and investment of a real estate company and a community residential committee play important roles in enhancing public participation and awareness of the importance of waste source separation. In comparison with the conventional mixed collection and transportation system of household waste, the established source separation and management system is cost-effective. It could be extended to the entire city and used by other cities in China as a source of reference.

Zhuang Ying; Wu Songwei; Wang Yunlong [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Wu Weixiang [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)], E-mail: weixiang@zju.edu.cn; Chen Yingxu [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Evaluation of a simulation model in predicting the drying parameters for deep-bed paddy drying  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation model for deep-bed batch drying of paddy was developed to predict the profiles of grain moisture content, grain temperature, air temperature and air humidity during the drying process. In order to evaluate the validity of this model, a laboratory-scale ... Keywords: Deep-bed, Energy optimization, Paddy, Simulation model

Dariush Zare; Guangnan Chen

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Soil and water quality implications of production of herbaceous and woody energy crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field-scale studies in three physiographic regions of the Tennessee Valley in the Southeastern US are being used to address the environmental effects of producing biomass energy crops on former agricultural lands. Comparison of erosion, surface water quality and quantity, and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops began with crop establishment in 1994. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes, and productivity of the different crops are also being monitored at the three sites.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lindberg, J.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States); Green, T.H. [Alabama A and M Univ., Normal, AL (United States). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Method and apparatus for drying web  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drying a web of paper utilizing impulse drying techniques. In the method of the invention for drying a paper web, the paper web is transported through a pair of rolls wherein at least one of the rolls has been heated to an elevated temperature. The heated roll is provided with a surface having a low thermal diffusivity of less than about 1.times.10.sup.-6 m.sup.2 /s. The surface material of the roll is preferably prepared from a material selected from the group consisting of ceramics, polymers, glass, inorganic plastics, composite materials and cermets. The heated roll may be constructed entirely from the material having a low thermal diffusivity or the roll may be formed from metal, such as steel or aluminum, or other suitable material which is provided with a surface layer of a material having a low thermal diffusivity.

Orloff, David I. (Atlanta, GA); Kloth, Gerald R. (Kennesaw, GA); Rudemiller, Gary R. (Paducah, KY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fluorine separation and generation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for the electrolytic separation of fluorine from a mixture of gases is disclosed. Also described is the process and apparatus for the generation of fluorine from fluorine/fluoride containing solids, liquids or gases.

The Regents of the University of California (Oakland, CA)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

Device for separating a mixture  

SciTech Connect

A device is described for separating a mixture of, for example, oil and water consists of a number of elements treating the mixture in stages, said elements being arranged in overlying position in order to manufacture a compact device.

Koot, T.A.; Verpalen, W.A.

1981-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hydrogen isotope separation from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating tritium from tritium-containing water or deuterium enrichment from water is described. The process involves selective, laser-induced two-photon excitation and photodissociation of those water molecules containing deuterium or tritium followed by immediate reaction of the photodissociation products with a scavenger gas which does not substantially absorb the laser light. The reaction products are then separated from the undissociated water. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Bioenergy Crop Breeding and Production Research in the Southeast, Final Report for 1996 to 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a native grass species to much of the US. It has shown great potential for use in production of fuel ethanol from cellulosic biomass (Lynd et al., 1991). Work in Alabama demonstrated very high dry matter yields can be achieved with switchgrass (Maposse et al. 1995) in the southeastern US. Therefore, this region is thought to be an excellent choice for development of a switchgrass cropping system where farmers can produce the grass for either biomass or forage. Another report has shown success with selection and breeding to develop high yielding germplasm from adapted cultivars and ecotypes of switchgrass (Moser and Vogel 1995). In the mid 1990s, however, there was little plant breeding effort for switchgrass with a potential for developing a cultivar for the southeast region. The main goal of the project was to develop adaptive, high-yielding switchgrass cultivars for use in cropping systems for bioenergy production in the southeastern US. A secondary objective was to assess the potential of alternate herbaceous species such as bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.), bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge.), and napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.) that may compete with switchgrass for herbaceous bioenergy production in the southeast. During the conduct of the project, another goal of developing molecular markers useful for genetic mapping was added. The ''lowland'' cultivars, Alamo and Kanlow, were found to be the highest yielding switchgrass cultivars. Although most summers during the project period were hot and dry, their annual dry matter yield continue to outperform the best ''upland'' cultivars such as Cave-in-Rock, Shawnee, NE Late, and Trailblazer. The use of a breeding procedure based on the ''honeycomb design'' and multi-location progeny testing, coupled with the solid heritability and genetic gain estimates for dry matter yield in lowland type switchgrass germplasm, indicated excellent potential to isolate parental genotypes for producing higher yielding synthetic cultivars. The four experimental synthetics produced thus far, and now in performance tests, could provide this cultivar. Initial performance results of these experimentals have been very promising demonstrating a 30% yield enhancement over Alamo and Kanlow. Future testing, including testing in other states, will be critical before a determination can be made to release one or more of these into the commercial seed trade. In the genetic mapping project, 42 genotypes of switchgrass were surveyed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes from different grass species. The different genotypes included 24 from Alamo, 15 from Kanlow, and 3 from ''Summer.'' A majority of the probes (87%) hybridized to the switchgrass DNA and 81% were polymorphic. Most of the polymorphism observed was between the cultivars. A mapping population consisting of 100 progeny from a cross between the most dissimilar Kanlow and Summer genotypes was produced during 2001. The parents and progeny population are now maintained at the University of Georgia and will be used to construct a map based on the polymorphic RFLP probes. When compared to ''Tifton 85'' bermudagrass, ''Tifton 9'' bahiagrass, and ''Merkron'' napier-grass, Alamo switchgrass was found to show poorer yields than Merkron and Tifton 85, but better yields than Tifton 9 in the coastal plain region. The exceptional performance of Tifton 85 bermudagrass is extremely noteworthy because this hybrid bermudagrass is also a variety of choice for many commercial hay producers in the lower south and would give any producers a very good option to produce either biomass for a biofuels initiative or sell as hay on the open market. Merkron has consistently showed the highest dry matter yields. However, there continues to be some winter damage each year on this species at the Athens location indicating its real potential lies mainly in the Gulf Coast region of the southeastern United States. The excellent characteristic of Tifton 85 and Merkron should therefore be enough to initi

Bouton, J.H.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Entanglement transformations using separable operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study conditions for the deterministic transformation $\\ket{\\psi}\\longrightarrow\\ket{\\phi}$ of a bipartite entangled state by a separable operation. If the separable operation is a local operation with classical communication (LOCC), Nielsen's majorization theorem provides necessary and sufficient conditions. For the general case we derive a necessary condition in terms of products of Schmidt coefficients, which is equivalent to the Nielsen condition when either of the two factor spaces is of dimension 2, but is otherwise weaker. One implication is that no separable operation can reverse a deterministic map produced by another separable operation, if one excludes the case where the Schmidt coefficients of $\\ket{\\psi}$ and are the same as those of $\\ket{\\phi}$. The question of sufficient conditions in the general separable case remains open. When the Schmidt coefficients of $\\ket{\\psi}$ are the same as those of $\\ket{\\phi}$, we show that the Kraus operators of the separable transformation restricted to the supports of $\\ket{\\psi}$ on the factor spaces are proportional to unitaries. When that proportionality holds and the factor spaces have equal dimension, we find conditions for the deterministic transformation of a collection of several full Schmidt rank pure states $\\ket{\\psi_j}$ to pure states $\\ket{\\phi_j}$.

Vlad Gheorghiu; Robert B. Griffiths

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production  

SciTech Connect

Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Watching Liquids Separate at White Heat | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Spin on Inducing Chirality in Pre-biological Molecules A New Spin on Inducing Chirality in Pre-biological Molecules How Ancient Rock Got Off to a Hot Start A Quantum of Vibration in an Unexpected Place A Virus That Can Infect Lung Cancer Cells Imaging Plant Viruses Could Yield New Ways to Safeguard Crops Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Watching Liquids Separate at White Heat OCTOBER 30, 2008 Bookmark and Share Floating liquid droplet (inset) imaged at white heat on APS x-ray beamline 11-ID-C (main photo). Using temperatures approaching those found on the surface of the sun and intense x-ray beams from two synchrotron x-ray facilities, including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have

358

Annotated Bibliography for Drying Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internationally, the nuclear industry is represented by both commercial utilities and research institutions. Over the past two decades many of these entities have had to relocate inventories of spent nuclear fuel from underwater storage to dry storage. These efforts were primarily prompted by two factors: insufficient storage capacity (potentially precipitated by an open-ended nuclear fuel cycle) or deteriorating quality of existing underwater facilities. The intent of developing this bibliography is to assess what issues associated with fuel drying have been identified, to consider where concerns have been satisfactorily addressed, and to recommend where additional research would offer the most value to the commercial industry and the U. S. Department of Energy.

Rebecca E. Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer apparatus includes a first chamber having a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, and an outlet. A first heat transfer gas source provides a first gas flow to the first chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A second gas flow through a second chamber connected to the side of the first chamber, generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling of the first and second gases in the acoustically augmented first chamber. The first chamber may also include a material inlet for receiving material to be dried, in which case the gas outlet serves as a dried material and gas outlet.

Bramlette, T. Tazwell (Livermore, CA); Keller, Jay O. (Oakland, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a , Eric Blond1, b , Alain Gasser1 Forbach, France a damintode.kolani@univ-orleans.fr, b eric.blond@univ-orleans.fr Keywords: coal, drying: drying process and pyrolysis of coal. A heat and mass transfer model was developed to simulate the drying

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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361

Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the same amount of electricity or more. Power generation with nuclear and renewable energy, such as wind, solar, geo- thermal, tidal, and hydroelectric, must be expanded as...

362

Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2} Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains. 11 figs.

Balachandran, U.

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

364

Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization State of the Art Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies, including circulating dry scrubbers (CDS), spray dryer absorbers (SDA), and the Alstom Novel Integrated Desulfurization (NID) technology. These can all be considered “semi-dry” technologies, as the flue gas is cooled and humidified as part of each of these processes. This report also discusses a completely dry FGD technology, dry sorbent injection (DSI), which is ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method for dry etching of transition metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Esherick, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Parmeter, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Rieger, Dennis J. (Tijeras, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Method for dry etching of transition metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

Utilizing Spaceborne Radars to Retrieve Dry Snowfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dataset consisting of one year of CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) near-surface radar reflectivity Z associated with dry snowfall is examined in this study. The CPR observations are converted to snowfall rates S using derived Ze–S ...

Mark S. Kulie; Ralf Bennartz

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Dry capture of SO/sub 2/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineral reagents found in the West may offer a simple, low-cost route to removing sulfur from the flue gas of coal-fired boilers. Two naturally occurring sodium-based minerals, nahcolite and trona, are currently the compounds of interest as dry sorbents. Electric Power Reseach Institute efforts are aimed at reducing economic uncertainties and broadening potential applications. 2 references, 4 figures.

Moore, T.; Carr, R.; Hooper, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Galaxy formation from dry and hydro simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of dry and wet merging on the Scaling Laws (SLs) of elliptical galaxies (Es) are discussed. It is found that the galaxy SLs, possibly established at high redshift by the fast collapse of gas-rich and clumpy stellar distributions in preexisting dark matter halos following the cosmological SLs, are compatible with a (small) number of galaxy mergers at lower redshift.

Ciotti, L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Molten carbonate fuel cell separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a stacked array of molten carbonate fuel cells, a fuel cell separator is positioned between adjacent fuel cells to provide isolation as well as a conductive path therebetween. The center portion of the fuel cell separator includes a generally rectangular, flat, electrical conductor. Around the periphery of the flat portion of the separator are positioned a plurality of elongated resilient flanges which form a gas-tight seal around the edges of the fuel cell. With one elongated flange resiliently engaging a respective edge of the center portion of the separator, the sealing flanges, which are preferably comprised of a noncorrosive material such as an alloy of yttrium, iron, aluminum or chromium, form a tight-fitting wet seal for confining the corrosive elements of the fuel cell therein. This arrangement permits a good conductive material which may be highly subject to corrosion and dissolution to be used in combination with a corrosion-resistant material in the fuel cell separator of a molten carbonate fuel cell for improved fuel cell conductivity and a gas-tight wet seal.

Nickols, Richard C. (East Hartford, CT)

1986-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Molten carbonate fuel cell separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a stacked array of molten carbonate fuel cells, a fuel cell separator is positioned between adjacent fuel cells to provide isolation as well as a conductive path therebetween. The center portion of the fuel cell separator includes a generally rectangular, flat, electrical conductor. Around the periphery of the flat portion of the separator are positioned a plurality of elongated resilient flanges which form a gas-tight seal around the edges of the fuel cell. With one elongated flange resiliently engaging a respective edge of the center portion of the separator, the sealing flanges, which are preferably comprised of a noncorrosive material such as an alloy of yttrium, iron, aluminum or chromium, form a tight-fitting wet seal for confining the corrosive elements of the fuel cell therein. This arrangement permits a good conductive material which may be highly subject to corrosion and dissolution to be used in combination with a corrosion-resistant material in the fuel cell separator of a molten carbonate fuel cell for improved fuel cell conductivity and a gas-tight wet seal.

Nickols, R.C.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

1985-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Apparatus for molecular weight separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for separating high molecular weight molecules from low molecular weight molecules. More specifically, the invention relates to the use of microdialysis for removal of the salt (low molecular weight molecules) from a nucleotide sample (high molecular weight molecules) for ESI-MS analysis. The dialysis or separation performance of the present invention is improved by (1) increasing dialysis temperature thereby increasing desalting efficiency and improving spectrum quality; (2) adding piperidine and imidazole to the dialysis buffer solution and reducing charge states and further increasing detection sensitivity for DNA; (3) using low concentrations (0-2.5 mM NH4OAc) of dialysis buffer and shifting the DNA negative ions to higher charge states, producing a nearly 10-fold increase in detection sensitivity and a slightly decreased desalting efficiency, (4) conducting a two-stage separation or (5) any combination of (1), (2), (3) and (4).

Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Liu, Chuanliang (Haverhill, MA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evaluating environmental consequences of producing herbaceous crops for bioenergy  

SciTech Connect

The environmental costs and benefits of producing bioenergy crops can be measured both in kterms of the relative effects on soil, water, and wildlife habitat quality of replacing alternate cropping systems with the designated bioenergy system, and in terms of the quality and amount of energy that is produced per unit of energy expended. While many forms of herbaceous and woody energy crops will likely contribute to future biofuels systems, The Dept. of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), has chosen to focus its primary herbaceous crops research emphasis on a perennial grass species, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), as a bioenergy candidate. This choice was based on its high yields, high nutrient use efficiency, and wide geographic distribution, and also on its poistive environmental attributes. The latter include its positive effects on soil quality and stabiity, its cover value for wildlife, and the lower inputs of enerty, water, and agrochemicals required per unit of energy produced. A comparison of the energy budgets for corn, which is the primary current source of bioethanol, and switchgrass reveals that the efficiency of energy production for a perennial grass system can exceed that for an energy intensive annual row crop by as much as 15 times. In additions reductions in CO{sub 2} emission, tied to the energetic efficiency of producing transportation fuels, are very efficient with grasses. Calculated carbon sequestration rates may exceed those of annual crops by as much as 20--30 times, due in part to carbon storage in the soil. These differences have major implications for both the rate and efficiency with which fossil energy sources can be replaced with cleaner burning biofuels.

McLaughlin, S.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

DNA Separation Using Photoelectrophoretic Traps  

SciTech Connect

In our recent publications we presented a design that allows formation of highly localized and optically controlled electrophoretic traps. 1,2 We demonstrated that electrophoretic traps can be utilized for biomolecule photoconcentration, optically directed transport, and separation by size. 1,2 In the current publication we suggest a hybrid design for biomolecule separation which implements electrophoretic traps in tandem with well-established electrophoretic techniques. We perform Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate that the resolution of well-established electrophoretic techniques can be greatly enhanced by introducing photoelectrophoretic traps.

Braiman, Avital [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL; Rudakov, Fedor M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Anti-stratification battery separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a separator for an electric storage battery comprising a thin microporous sheet for suppressing dendrite growth between adjacent plates of the battery. The sheet has top, bottom and lateral edges defining the principal face of the separator and ribs formed on the surface of the face. The improvement described here comprises: the ribs each (1) having a concave shape, (2) being superposed one over another and (3) extending laterally across the face substantially from one the lateral edge to the other the lateral edge for reducing the accumulation of highly concentrated electrolyte at the bottom of the battery during recharge.

Stahura, D.W.; Smith, V.V. Jr.

1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect

Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Environmental effects of growing short-rotation woody crops on former agricultural lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field-scale studies in the Southeast have been addressing the environmental effects of converting agricultural lands to biomass crop production since 1994. Erosion, surface water quality and quantity and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops are being compared. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes and crop productivity are also being monitored at the three sites. Maximum sediment losses occurred in the spring and fall. Losses were greater from sweetgum planted without a cover crop than with a cover crop. Nutrient losses of N and P in runoff and subsurface water occurred primarily after spring fertilizer application.

Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thornton, F.C.; Joslin, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

ORECCL - Summary of a national database on energy crop landbase, yields, and costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biofuels Feedstock Development Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a county-level database on energy crops-the Oak Ridge Energy Crop County-Level database (RECCL). This database encompasses all U.S. counties and provides easy access to energy crop information specific to a state or county. The database contains predictions of energy crop yields and farmgate prices along with county-level data on the acreage of land suitable for energy crop production. This paper describes the database and presents state-level summary statistics on land suitable for energy crop production and average predicted yields and farmgate prices.

Graham, R.L.; Allison, L.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Becker, D.A. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

METHOD OF SEPARATING HYDROGEN ISOTOPES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process of separating a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and tritium by contacting finely dlvided palladium with the mixture in order to adsorb the gases, then gradually heating the palladium and collecting the evolved fractlons, is described. The fraction first given off is richer in trltium than later fractions.

Salmon, O.N.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Separations innovative concepts: Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project summary includes the results of 10 innovations that were funded under the US Department's Innovative Concept Programs. The concepts address innovations that can substantially reduce the energy used in industrial separations. Each paper describes the proposed concept, and discusses the concept's potential energy savings, market applications, technical feasibility, prior work and state of the art, and future development needs.

Lee, V.E. (ed.)

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

33rd Actinide Separations Conference  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

386

Conic separation of finite sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer. 95.54. 87.14. 95.86. Heart. 85.19. 80.33. 83.00. Pima. 76.30. 60.13 ... iii) An interesting subject of future research is the robustness of the separation by ...

387

Separation and purification of xenon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Xenon is separated from a mixture of xenon and krypton by extractive distillation using carbon tetrafluoride as the partitioning agent. Krypton is flushed out of the distillation column with CF.sub.4 in the gaseous overhead stream while purified xenon is recovered from the liquid bottoms. The distillation is conducted at about atmospheric pressure or at subatmospheric pressure.

Schlea, deceased, Carl Solomon (LATE OF Aiken, SC)

1978-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

388

Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

Paul KT Liu

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Dry Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Dry Lake Wind Farm Facility Dry Lake Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Iberdrola Renewables Location Navajo County AZ Coordinates 34.635651°, -110.357351° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.635651,"lon":-110.357351,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

Evaluation of herbacceous biomass crops in the northern Great Plains. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Herbaceous lignocellulose crops are a potential renewable feedstock for biochemical conversion systems second in size to wood products. Several herbaceous crops are utilized as forage crops in the northern Great Plains, but forage quality considerations usually dictates a early harvest. Biomass cropping does not have this constraint; therefore, little information was available on herbaceous crops utilized as energy crops prior to this project. Our primary objectives were to evaluate the biomass yield and select chemical components of several herbaceous crops for energy crops in the northern Great Plains, compare the economic feasibility of energy crops with common competing crops, and evaluate biomass cropping on summer fallow lands. Three good, two marginal, and one irrigated sites were used during 1988 to 1992 for the first component. At least six perennial and four annual biomass species were included at all sites. Three to four nitrogen (N) levels and a crop-recrop comparison (annuals only) were management intensities included. Biomass cropping on idled lands was performed on dryland at Carrington and evaluated the effects of removing leguminous biomass on fallowed lands. This report summarizes results from the 5-year project.

Meyer, D.W.; Norby, W.E.; Erickson, D.O.; Johnson, R.G. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Multiobjective hierarchical control architecture for greenhouse crop growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of determining the trajectories to control greenhouse crop growth has traditionally been solved by using constrained optimization or applying artificial intelligence techniques. The economic profit has been used as the main criterion in most ... Keywords: Agriculture, Hierarchical systems, Optimization methods, Process control, Yield optimization

A. Ramírez-Arias; F. Rodríguez; J. L. Guzmán; M. Berenguel

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

QuarkNet/Walta/CROP Cosmic Ray Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QuarkNet/Walta/CROP Cosmic Ray Detectors User's Manual Jeff Rylander and Tom Jordan, Fermilab R. J. Project Development Team Fermilab: Sten Hansen, Tom Jordan, Terry Kiper Univeristy of Nebraska: Dan Claes energies. However, it is possi- ble to do high-energy physics in your school without a particle accelerator

California at Santa Cruz, University of

396

Short rotation wood crops program: Annual progress report for 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes accomplishments in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP) for the year ending September 30, 1986. The program is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division and consists of research projects at 29 institutions and corporations. The SRWCP is an integrated program of research and development devoted to a single objective: improving the productivity, cost efficiency, and fuel quality of wood energy crops as feedstocks for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels. SRWCP directives have shifted from species-screening and productivity evaluations to large-scale viability trials of model species selected for their productivity potential and environmental compatibility. Populus was chosen the lead genera of five model species, and initial steps were taken toward organizing a Populus Research Consortium. Production yields from SRWCP research plots and coppice studies are discussed along with new efforts to model growth results and characteristics on a tree and stand basis. Structural and chemical properties of short-rotation intensive culture wood have been evaluated to determine the desirability of species traits and the potential for genetic improvements. Innovative wood energy crop handling techniques are presented as significant cost reduction measures. The conclusion is that new specialized wood energy crops can be feasible with the advances that appear technically possible over the next 10 years. 34 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Ranney, J.W.; Wright, L.L.; Layton, P.A.; McNabb, W.A.; Wenzel, C.R.; Curtin, D.T.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative Accomplishments 2009 Lead lignocellulosic "drop-in" biofuels. "Drop-in" means they are compatible with the existing petroleum refining and distribution infrastructure. With this project Texas can become a leader in biofuels production

398

Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

399

Ethiopian Highlands Crop-Climate Prediction: 1979–2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares different methods of predicting crop-related climate in the Ethiopian highlands for the period 1979–2009. A target index (ETH4) is developed as an average of four variables in the June–September season—rainfall, rainfall minus ...

Mark R. Jury

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed to improve crop yields. As this publication advises, growers should evaluate such products carefully and conduct field trials to determine their merit.

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Interactive Crop Management in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal Influences on Land–Atmosphere Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1) is evaluated with two coupled atmosphere–land simulations. The CTRL (control) simulation represents crops as unmanaged grasses, while CROP represents a crop managed simulation that includes ...

Samuel Levis; Gordon B. Bonan; Erik Kluzek; Peter E. Thornton; Andrew Jones; William J. Sacks; Christopher J. Kucharik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Comparison of Crop Rotation for Verticillium Wilt Management and Effect on Pythium Species in Conventional and Organic Strawberry Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Koike, S. T. 1998. Effects of crop rotation and irrigationwww.apsnet.org Comparison of Crop Rotation for VerticilliumK. V. 2009. Comparison of crop rotation for Verticillium

Subbarao, Krishna V

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

How ancient agriculturalists managed yield fluctuations through crop selection and reliance on wild plants: An example from central India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land under the principal crops grown in the Centraland the loss of Amazonian crop genetic resources. I. TheEngland. Howard, A. 1924. Crop production in India. Humphrey

Smith, Monica L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Crop–Climate Modeling Using Spatial Patterns of Yield and Climate. Part 1: Background and an Example from Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique in statistical crop-climate analysis, the direct linking of spatial patterns of crop yield and spatial patterns of climate, is explored. Yield and climate data from networks of crop reporting districts and meteorological stations ...

T. M. L. Wigley; Tu Qipu

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Regulating the Regulators: The Increased Role for the Federal Judiciary in Monitoring the Debate over Genetically Modified Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Links Europe's Ban on Bio-Crops With Hunger, N.Y. TIMES, MayRichmond, Genetically Modified Crops in the Philippines: Canw]hat Monsanto [a GM crop producer] wished for from

Denton, Blake

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Scientists, growers assess trade-offs in use of tillage, cover crops and compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depth depth depth depth compost was added two times perConv. crops were present. Compost was ap- Main effect Fof tillage, cover crops and compost Louise E. Jackson Irenee

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Impact of Climate Change on Crop Yield: A Case Study of Rainfed Corn in Central Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper assesses the effect of climate change on crop yield from a soil water balance perspective. The uncertainties of regional-scale climate models, local-scale climate variability, emissions scenarios, and crop growth models are combined to ...

Ximing Cai; Dingbao Wang; Romain Laurent

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

410

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

411

California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

412

Dry Cask Storage Probabilistic Risk Assessment Scoping Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes and evaluates the current state of risk assessment methodologies applicable to dry cask storage probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and suggests appropriate approaches for performing the various aspects of a dry cask storage PRA.

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

414

Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

415

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Virtually Dry Snowball Earth Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hadley cell of a virtually dry snowball Earth atmosphere under equinox insolation is studied in a comprehensive atmospheric general circulation model. In contrast to the Hadley cell of modern Earth, momentum transport by dry convection, which ...

Aiko Voigt; Isaac M. Held; Jochem Marotzke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for...

417

Property:Dry Mass(kg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mass(kg) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Dry Mass(kg) Property Type String Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:DryMass(kg)&oldid623736"...

418

Property:Dry Mass (kg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mass (kg) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Dry Mass (kg) Property Type String Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:DryMass(kg)&oldid642179"...

419

Hanford Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Multi-Canister Overpack...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that was designed to dry the irradiated fuel rods which were previously stored underwater in the K-Basins. Upon completion of the drying process in the CVDF, the MCOs,...

420

Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Bioenergy crop models: Descriptions, data requirements and future challenges  

SciTech Connect

Field studies that address the production of lignocellulosic biomass as a potential source of renewable energy are making available critical information for the development, validation, and use of bioenergy crop models. A literature survey revealed that 14 models have been developed and validated for herbaceous and woody bioenergy crops, and for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) crops adapted to arid lands. These models simulate field-scale production of biomass for switchgrass (ALMANAC, EPIC, and Agro-BGC), miscanthus (MISCANFOR, MISCANMOD, and WIMOVAC), sugarcane (APSIM, AUSCANE, and CANEGRO), and poplar and willow (SECRETS and 3PG). Two models are adaptations of dynamic global vegetation models and simulate biomass yields of miscanthus and sugarcane as plant function types at regional scales (Agro-IBIS and LPJmL). A model of biomass production in CAM plants has been developed (EPI), but lacks the sophistication of the other models. Except for CAM plants, all the models include representations of leaf area dynamics, radiation interception and utilization, biomass production, and partitioning of biomass to roots and shoots. A few of the models are capable of simulating soil water, nutrient, and carbon cycle processes, making them especially useful for assessing environmental consequences (e.g., erosion and nutrient losses) associated with the field-scale deployment of bioenergy crops. Similar to other process-based models, simulations are challenged by computing and data management issues and an integrated framework for model testing and inter-comparison is needed. Considerable work remains concerning the development of models for unconventional bioenergy crops like CAM plants, generation and distribution of high-quality field data for model development and validation, and development of an integrated framework for efficient execution of large-scale simulations for use in planning regional to global sustainable bioenergy production systems.

Surendran Nair, Sujith; Kang, Shujiang; Zhang, Xuesong; Miguez, Fernando; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Post, W. M.; Dietze, Michael; Lynd, Lee R.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Blind Source Separation Techniques for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blind Source Separation techniques, based both on Independent Component Analysis and on second order statistics, are presented and compared for extracting partially hidden texts and textures in document images. Barely perceivable features may occur, for instance, in ancient documents previously erased and then re-written (palimpsests), or for transparency or seeping of ink from the reverse side, or from watermarks in the paper. Detecting these features can be of great importance to scholars and historians. In our approach, the document is modeled as the superposition of a number of source patterns, and a simplified linear mixture model is introduced for describing the relationship between these sources and multispectral views of the document itself. The problem of detecting the patterns that are barely perceivable in the visible color image is thus formulated as the one of separating the various patterns in the mixtures. Some examples from an extensive experimentation with real ancient documents are shown and commented.

Detecting Hidden Texts; Anna Tonazzini; Emanuele Salerno; Matteo Mochi; Luigi Bedini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Molecular separation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for separating a gaseous mixture of chemically identical but physically different molecules based on their polarities. The gaseous mixture of molecules is introduced in discrete quantities into the proximal end of a porous glass molecular. The molecular sieve is exposed to microwaves to excite the molecules to a higher energy state from a lower energy state, those having a higher dipole moment being excited more than those with a lower energy state. The temperature of the sieve kept cold by a flow of liquid nitrogen through a cooling jacket so that the heat generated by the molecules colliding with the material is transferred away from the material. The molecules thus alternate between a higher energy state and a lower one, with the portion of molecules having the higher dipole moment favored over the others. The former portion can then be extracted separately from the distal end of the molecular sieve.

Villa-Aleman, Eliel (3108 Roses Run, Aiken, SC 29803)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Availability of cadmium to rats from crops grown on cadmium-enriched soil  

SciTech Connect

The research was initiated to enhance understanding of the availability to animals of Cd present in edible plants. Such information is of considerable importance since agricultural crops can accumulate high concentrations of the metal when grown in certain soils or with sewage sludge as a fertilizer. Edible plants were labeled with /sup 109/Cd by growing them on /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/ treated soil. The availability of /sup 109/Cd to male and female rats was then determined by feeding semisynthetic diets containing either freeze-dried radioactive spinach, lettuce, soybean, carrots, tomatoes, or wheat flour, or comparable nonradioactive plant powders spiked with /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/. Retention of /sup 109/Cd by liver and kidney was determined after a 14-day feeding period. With the exception of spinach, Cd accumulation by rats was not found to be significantly influenced by the form of Cd in the diet whether supplied as plant-bound /sup 109/Cd or added to nonradioactive diets as /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/. The mean retention of Cd in liver and kidney was 0.17% of the dose consumed for males and 0.26% for females consuming diets containing wheat, soybean, carrots, lettuce, or tomatoes.

Buhler, D.R.; Tinsley, I.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Convex polytopes and quantum separability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We advance a perspective of the entanglement issue that appeals to the Schlienz-Mahler measure [Phys. Rev. A 52, 4396 (1995)]. Related to it, we propose a criterium based on the consideration of convex subsets of quantum states. This criterium generalizes a property of product states to convex subsets (of the set of quantum states) that is able to uncover an interesting geometrical property of the separability property.

Holik, F.; Plastino, A. [Departamento de Matematica - Ciclo Basico Comun, Universidad de Buenos Aires - Pabellon III, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires, Argentina and CONICET (Argentina); National University La Plata and CONICET IFLP-CCT, C.C. 727 - 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method to blend separator powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making a blended powder mixture, whereby two or more powders are mixed in a container with a liquid selected from nitrogen or short-chain alcohols, where at least one of the powders has an angle of repose greater than approximately 50 degrees. The method is useful in preparing blended powders of Li halides and MgO for use in the preparation of thermal battery separators.

Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM); Andazola, Arthur H. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

427

Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Dempsey, Michael D. (Revere, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Separation of Tritium from Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proprietary tritium loading bed developed by Molecular Separations, Inc (MSI) has been shown to selectively load tritiated water as waters of hydration at near ambient temperatures. Tests conducted with a 126 {micro}C{sub 1} tritium/liter water standard mixture showed reductions to 25 {micro}C{sub 1}/L utilizing two, 2-meter long columns in series. Demonstration tests with Hanford Site wastewater samples indicate an approximate tritium concentration reduction from 0.3 {micro}C{sub 1}/L to 0.07 {micro}C{sub 1}/L for a series of two, 2-meter long stationary column beds Further reduction to less than 0.02 {micro}C{sub 1}/L, the current drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL), is projected with additional bed media in series. Tritium can be removed from the loaded beds with a modest temperature increase and the beds can be reused Results of initial tests are presented and a moving bed process for treating large quantities of wastewaters is proposed. The moving bed separation process appears promising to treat existing large quantities of wastewater at various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The enriched tritium stream can be grouted for waste disposition. The separations system has also been shown to reduce tritium concentrations in nuclear reactor cooling water to levels that allow reuse. Energy requirements to reconstitute the loading beds and waste disposal costs for this process appear modest.

JEPPSON, D.W.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

429

AMMONIA DISTILLATION FOR DEUTERIUM SEPARATION  

SciTech Connect

The relative volatility or separation factor for deuterium enrichment in ammonia distillation was measured at several pressures and deuterium concentrations. The knowledge of this ingormation is very helpful in predicting costs of heawy water production by the ammonia distillation process. It hss been stated by others, that the ammonia distillation process of heawy water production would be competitive with other developed methods only if the actusl separation factor was at least 1.062 at low deuterium concentration. Ungortunately, the measurements do not indicate that the separation factor at low deuterium composition differs greatly from the vapor pressure pre diction ( alpha = 1.042). Deutero-ammonia was synthesized by isotopic exchange between natural ammonia and heavy water. Equilibrium determinations were made using an Othmer still, modified for low temperature operation, and a concentric tube fractionating column. The arnmonia samples were analyzed for deuterium content by converting them to water by flow torough hot copper oxide, followed by a differential density determination using the falling drop method. ( auth)

Petersen, G.T.; Benedict, M.

1960-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

OUTLOOK: Specialty crops and methyl bromide alternatives: Taking stock after 7 years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

finding alternatives to Outlook Specialty crops and methylNumber 3 Steve Fennimore Outlook Non-fumigant approaches to

Browne, Greg T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Dry Granulation of Molten Blast Furnace Slag and Heat Recovery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meeting the Materials Challenges to Enable Clean Coal Technologies ... Study on Drying Characteristics of Australian Brown Coal Using Superheated Steam.

432

Heat Transfer Performance of a Dry and Wet / Dry Advanced Cooling Tower Condenser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an EPRI-funded experimental evaluation of advanced air-cooled ammonia condensers for a phase. Change dry/wet cooling system for power plants. Two condenser surfaces with different air-side augmentation were tested in an ammonia phase change pilot plant (0.6 MWth) located at UCC/Linde. The first unit consisted of integral shaved-fin-extruded aluminum tubing designed for dry operation. Heat transfer and air-side pressure loss characteristics were measured under varying air face velocities (1 to 5 m/s) and initial temperature differences, ITD (11 to 33K). Measured overall heat transfer coefficients, U, ranged between 40 and 49 J /m2 S.K (based on air-side surface). The second configuration constituted an aluminum plate-fin/tube assembly, which was tested in both dry and wet (water deluge) modes at 1 to 4 m/s air face velocities and ITD's of 5 to 33K. Deluge rates varied from 1 to 6 m3/s per meter of core width. In the dry mode, U ranged from 42 to 63 J/m2 .S.K. Water deluge enhanced the heat rejection up to 4.5 times over dry operation.

Fricke, H. D.; Webster, D. J.; McIlroy, K.; Bartz, J. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

DRI Model of the U.S. Economy -- Model Documentation:  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides documentation on Data Resources, Inc., DRI Model of the U.S. Economy and the DRI Personal Computer Input/Output Model. It also describes the theoretical basis, structure and functions of both DRI models; and contains brief descriptions of the models and their equations.

Information Center

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A LIDAR-based crop height measurement system for Miscanthus giganteus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop a stem height measurement system for Miscanthus giganteus (MxG), to be used as a component in a future Look Ahead Yield Monitor (LAYM). For this purpose, a SICK(R) LMS 291 LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) ... Keywords: Crop height, Crop sensor, Energy crop, Laser scanner, Plant phenotype, Yield monitor

Lei Zhang; Tony E. Grift

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

A Study on the Bioenergy Crop Production Function of Land Use in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of the bioenergy crop production function of land use, combined with the current situation of Chinese land use, this paper analyzes and discusses the cultivation of energy plants and the bioenergy crop production function of land ... Keywords: Land use, Bioenergy crop production function, farmers income

Zhang Kun; Duan Jiannan; Yang Jun; Li Ping

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Original paper: Development of an integrated Cropland and Soil Data Management system for cropping system applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most cropping system models and decision support tools are structured for site-specific (i.e. field- or point-based) simulation and analysis. As the need grows for analyses on crop production and management at local, county, state, national, and even ... Keywords: Cropland Data Layer, Cropping system, Database management system, Geographic Information System (GIS), Map service, SSURGO, Soil data

Yubin Yang; Lloyd Ted Wilson; Jing Wang; Xiaobao Li

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A GIS-based approach to evaluate biomass potential from energy crops at regional scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the paper is to propose a method to maximize energy production from arboreous and herbaceous dedicated crops given the characteristics of the local environment: geo-morphology, climate, natural heritage, current land use. The best energy crops ... Keywords: Agricultural land, Carbon mitigation, Energy crops, GIS, Land use, Spatial analysis

Giulia Fiorese; Giorgio Guariso

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Genomics assisted design of training populations of perennial forage and biofuel crops for predicting breeding value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biofuel crops for predicting breeding value Supervisors: Leif Skøt (IBERS), Gancho improvement of crops for food, feedstock and biofuel is an urgent priority to meet with respect to training populations in perennial forage and biofuel crops, specifically

Millar, Andrew J.

439

Relating United States Crop Land Use to Natural Resources and Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop production depends not only on the yield but also on the area harvested. The yield response to climate change has been widely examined, but the sensitivity of crop land use to hypothetical climate change has not been examined directly. Crop ...

K. G. Hubbard; F. J. Flores-mendoza

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Regional crop monitoring and discrimination based on simulated ENVISAT ASAR wide swath mode images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paper investigates the potential contribution of ENVISAT wide swath (WS) images for discrimination and monitoring of crops at a regional scale. The study was based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired throughout an entire growing ... Keywords: Coarse spatial resolution, Crop discrimination, Crop monitoring, ENVISAT, Synthetic aperture radar, Wide swath-ASAR

X. Blaes; F. Holecz; H. J. C. van Leeuwen; P. Defourny

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

442

Apparatus and method for separating constituents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A centrifugal separator apparatus and method for improving the efficiency of the separation of constituents in a fluid stream. A cyclone separator includes an assembly for separately discharging both constituents through the same end of the separator housing. A rotary separator includes a rotary housing having a baffle disposed therein for minimizing the differential rotational velocities of the constituents in the housing, thereby decreasing turbulence, and increasing efficiency. The intensity of the centrifugal force and the time which the constituents reside within the housing can be independently controlled to improve efficiency of separation.

Maronde, Carl P. (McMurray, PA); Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that higher temperature calcination of trona leds to reduced carbonation activity in subsequent cycles, but that calcination in dry carbon dioxide did not result in decreased activity relative to calcination in helium. Following higher temperature calcination, sodium bicarbonate (SBC) No.3 has greater activity than either coarse or fine grades of trona. Fixed bed testing of calcined SBC No.3 at 70 C confirmed that high rates of carbon dioxide absorption are possible and that the resulting product is a mixture of Wegscheider's salt and sodium carbonate. In fluidized bed testing of supported potassium carbonate, very rapid carbonation rates were observed. Activity of the support material complicated the data analysis. A milled, spherical grade of SBC appeared to be similar in attrition and abrasion characteristics to an unmilled, less regularly shaped SBC. The calcination behavior, at 107 C, for the milled and unmilled materials was also similar.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P.Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Structural anisotropy of directionally dried colloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aqueous colloidal dispersions of silica particles become anisotropic when they are dried through evaporation. This anisotropy is generated by a uniaxial strain of the liquid dispersions as they are compressed by the flow of water toward a solidification front. Part of the strain produced by the compression is relaxed, and part of it is stored and transferred to the solid. This stored elastic strain has consequences for the properties of the solid, where it may facilitate the nucleation of cracks and shear bands and influence the direction of their propagation.

François Boulogne; Ludovic Pauchard; Frédérique Giorgiutti-Dauphiné; Robert Botet; Ralf Schweins; Michael Sztucki; Joaquim Li; Bernard Cabane; Lucas Goehring

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Gelcasting compositions having improved drying characteristics and machinability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gelcasting composition has improved drying behavior, machinability and shelf life in the dried and unfired state. The composition includes an inorganic powder, solvent, monomer system soluble in the solvent, an initiator system for polymerizing the monomer system, and a plasticizer soluble in the solvent. Dispersants and other processing aides to control slurry properties can be added. The plasticizer imparts an ability to dry thick section parts, to store samples in the dried state without cracking under conditions of varying relative humidity, and to machine dry gelcast parts without cracking or chipping. A method of making gelcast parts is also disclosed.

Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Walls, Claudia A. H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TREATMENT OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL TO ENHANCE SEPARATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Reactive Gas Recycling (RGR) technology development has been initiated at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), with a stretch-goal to develop a fully dry recycling technology for Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF). This approach is attractive due to the potential of targeted gas-phase treatment steps to reduce footprint and secondary waste volumes associated with separations relying primarily on traditional technologies, so long as the fluorinators employed in the reaction are recycled for use in the reactors or are optimized for conversion of fluorinator reactant. The developed fluorination via SF{sub 6}, similar to the case for other fluorinators such as NF{sub 3}, can be used to address multiple fuel forms and downstream cycles including continued processing for LWR via fluorination or incorporation into a aqueous process (e.g. modified FLUOREX) or for subsequent pyro treatment to be used in advanced gas reactor designs such metal- or gas-cooled reactors. This report details the most recent experimental results on the reaction of SF{sub 6} with various fission product surrogate materials in the form of oxides and metals, including uranium oxides using a high-temperature DTA apparatus capable of temperatures in excess of 1000{deg}C . The experimental results indicate that the majority of the fission products form stable solid fluorides and sulfides, while a subset of the fission products form volatile fluorides such as molybdenum fluoride and niobium fluoride, as predicted thermodynamically. Additional kinetic analysis has been performed on additional fission products. A key result is the verification that SF{sub 6} requires high temperatures for direct fluorination and subsequent volatilization of uranium oxides to UF{sub 6}, and thus is well positioned as a head-end treatment for other separations technologies, such as the volatilization of uranium oxide by NF{sub 3} as reported by colleagues at PNNL, advanced pyrochemical separations or traditional full recycle approaches. Based on current results of the research at SRNL on SF{sub 6} fluoride volatility for UNF separations, SF{sub 6} treatment renders all anticipated volatile fluorides studied to be volatile, and all non-volatile fluorides studied to be non-volatile, with the notable exception of uranium oxides. This offers an excellent opportunity to use this as a head-end separations treatment process because: 1. SF{sub 6} can be used to remove volatile fluorides from a UNF matrix while leaving behind uranium oxides. Therefore an agent such as NF{sub 3} should be able to very cleanly separate a pure UF{sub 6} stream, leaving compounds in the bottoms such as PuF{sub 4}, SrF{sub 2} and CsF after the UNF matrix has been pre-treated with SF{sub 6}. 2. Due to the fact that the uranium oxide is not separated in the volatilization step upon direct contact with SF{sub 6} at moderately high temperatures (? 1000{deg}C), this fluoride approach may be wellsuited for head-end processing for Gen IV reactor designs where the LWR is treated as a fuel stock, and it is not desired to separate the uranium from plutonium, but it is desired to separate many of the volatile fission products. 3. It is likely that removal of the volatile fission products from the uranium oxide should simplify both traditional and next generation pyroprocessing techniques. 4. SF{sub 6} treatment to remove volatile fission products, with or without treatment with additional fluorinators, could be used to simplify the separations of traditional aqueous processes in similar fashion to the FLUOREX process. Further research should be conducted to determine the separations efficiency of a combined SF{sub 6}/NF{sub 3} separations approach which could be used as a stand-alone separations technology or a head-end process.

Gray, J.; Torres, R.; Korinko, P.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Becnel, J.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Adams, T.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

448

EFFICACY AND TIMING OF FUNGICIDES,BACTERICIDES, AND BIOLOGICALS for DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT, NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS 2010 (rev. April 1, 2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pome and stone fruit crops including almond; pistachio,NUT, STRAWBERRY, AND VINE CROPS ALMOND APPLE/PEAR APRICOTCrops ..

Adaskaveg, J E; Gubler, W D; Michailides, Themis J.; Holtz, Brent A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15.2 Crop yield14 Impact of ozone on crop yield 15 Data 15.1 Ozonecrop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Industrial Membrane Filtration and Short-bed Fractal Separation Systems for Separating Monomers from Heterogeneous Plant Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large-scale displacement of petroleum will come from low-cost cellulosic feedstocks such as straw and corn stover crop residues. This project has taken a step toward making this projection a reality by reducing capital and energy costs, the two largest cost factors associated with converting cellulosic biomass to chemicals and fuels. The technology exists for using acid or enzyme hydrolysis processes to convert biomass feedstock (i.e., waste cellulose such as straw, corn stover, and wood) into their base monomeric sugar building blocks, which can, in turn, be processed into chemicals and fuels using a number of innovative fermentation technologies. However, while these processes are technically possible, practical and economic barriers make these processes only marginally feasible or not feasible at all. These barriers are due in part to the complexity and large fixed and recurring capital costs of unit operations including filtration, chromatographic separation, and ion exchange. This project was designed to help remove these barriers by developing and implementing new purification and separation technologies that will reduce the capital costs of the purification and chromatographic separation units by 50% to 70%. The technologies fundamental to these improvements are: (a) highly efficient clarification and purification systems that use screening and membrane filtration to eliminate suspended solids and colloidal material from feed streams and (b) fractal technology based chromatographic separation and ion exchange systems that can substitute for conventional systems but at much smaller size and cost. A non-hazardous ''raw sugar beet juice'' stream (75 to 100 gal/min) was used for prototype testing of these technologies. This raw beet juice stream from the Amalgamated Sugar LLC plant in Twin Falls, Idaho contained abrasive materials and membrane foulants. Its characteristics were representative of an industrial-scale heterogeneous plant extract/hydrolysis stream, and therefore was an ideal model system for developing new separation equipment. Subsequent testing used both synthetic acid hydrolysate and corn stover derived weak acid hydrolysate (NREL produced). A two-phased approach was used for the research and development described in this project. The first level of study involved testing the new concepts at the bench level. The bench-scale evaluations provided fundamental understanding of the processes, building and testing small prototype systems, and determining the efficiency of the novel processes. The second level of study, macro-level, required building larger systems that directly simulated industrial operations and provided validation of performance to minimize financial risk during commercialization. The project goals and scope included: (1) Development of low-capital alternatives to conventional crop-based purification/separation processes; and (2) Development of each process to the point that transition to commercial operation is low risk. The project reporting period was January 2001 to December 2004. This included a one year extension of the project (without additional funding).

Kearney, M; Kochergin, V; Hess, R; Foust, T; Herbst, R; Mann, N

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

SEPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM FROM CONTAMINANTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of protactinium by volatilization method is described. According to the invention, neutron irradiated finely divided thorium is reacted with aluminum trichloride or a mixture of aluminum trichloride and chlorine gas at a temperature of preferably between about 200 and 400 deg C. Following the chlorinating step the protactinium chloride along with aluminum chloride is selectively distilled from the mixture at a temperature of approximately 100 deg C. The protactinium chloride may be recovered from the mixture by treatment with sodium hydroxide, which converts the aluminum chloride to a soluble salt and forms insoluble protactinium hydroxide.

Malm, J.G.; Fried, S.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Separation of actinides from lanthanides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic extracting solution and an extraction method useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form is described. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4- dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

Smith, B.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for separating uranium from thorium wherein the ratio of thorium to uranium is between 100 to 10,000. According to the invention the thoriumuranium mixture is dissolved in nitric acid, and the solution is prepared so as to obtain the desired concentration within a critical range of from 4 to 8 N with regard to the total nitrate due to thorium nitrate, with or without nitric acid or any nitrate salting out agent. The solution is then contacted with an ether, such as diethyl ether, whereby uranium is extracted into ihe organic phase while thorium remains in the aqueous phase.

Hellman, N.N.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

SEPARATION OF THORIUM FROM URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A description is given for the separation of thorium from uranium by forming an aqueous acidic solution containing ionic species of thorium, uranyl uranium, and hydroxylamine, flowing the solution through a column containing the phenol-formaldehyde type cation exchange resin to selectively adsorb substantially all the thorium values and a portion of the uranium values, flowing a dilute solution of hydrochloric acid through the column to desorb the uranium values, and then flowing a dilute aqueous acidic solution containing an ion, such as bisulfate, which has a complexing effect upon thortum through the column to desorb substantially all of the thorium.

Bane, R.W.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Investigation of management strategies for the production of sweet sorghum as a bioenergy crop and preservation of crop residue by the ensiling process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this project was to investigate management practices for sweet sorghum as a bioenergy crop in Iowa and its storability as an ensiled… (more)

Cogdill, Todd Joseph

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Aligning Insect IPM Programs with a Cropping Systems Perspective: Cover Crops and Cultural Pest Control in Wisconsin Organic Corn and Soybean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a conversation among researcher, agroecology student, and farmers about the association between cover crops and seedcorn maggot in organic grain crops. Survey data showed that Wisconsin organic farmers would use cover crop management, insect degree day forecasting, and planting date cultural controls, given appropriate knowledge context and extension information provision. We developed electronic and print resources and engaged with farmers and educators nationally through the eOrganic Community of Practice. Project outcomes exemplify student and farmer ability to effect change in land grant university extension recommendations through integrated pest management content and delivery aligned with a cropping systems perspective.

Copyright Taylor; Francis Group; Eileen M. Cullen; Katelin M. Holm

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

459

SOME MECHANISMS OF DRY BEARING CHATTER  

SciTech Connect

Much study has been devoted to the motion of shafts in lubricated journal bearings. In contrast, the work done on the motion of shafts in unlubricated or dry bearings is negligible. The reason is obvious: in most applications, lubrication of the bearings is relatively simple. This is not the case in nuclear power plant appliciltion where bearings operate in low viscosity primary coolants of liquid metal or water without the benefit of coolant contaminating lubricants. For this reason, an analytical study was made to determine what motions would be excited in a shaft mounted in a dry bearing. The study splits naturally into two parts: (a) the shaft maintains continuous contact with the bearing, either rolling or sliding or a combination of the two; (b) the shaft dances (or chatters) about the bearing in a series of impacts. Typical motions in each of these cases (rolling oscillations, sliding oscillations, stick- slip oscillations, chatter) are calculated and plotted. Except for the stick- slip oscillation, none of the motions studied is self-sustaining; rolling and sliding oscillations will damp out due to frictional and other losses, and chatter degenerates into a rolling whirl of the shaft around the bearing. (auth)

Jahsman, W.E.; Miller, D.R.

1956-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Economics of dry FGD by sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly stringent pollution control requirements for new power plants have nearly doubled the cost of producing electricity. The capital, operating and maintenance costs of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are major, and considerable interest is currently being given to less expensive dry systems. One attractive alternative to wet scrubbing for FGD is to inject a dry, powdered reagent into the duct work between a coal-fired boiler and a FF (baghouse). The reagent (and fly ash) are collected on the fabric surface where the SO/sub 2//reagent contact occurs. The technical aspects of SO/sub 2/ removal using nahcolite and trona as sorbents have been investigated at laboratory-scale, demonstrated at full-scale, and are reported on briefly. These results indicate that injection of sodium based reagents is technically an attractive alternative to the many steps and processes involved in wet scrubbing. This paper summarizes a project to examine the economics of nahcolite/trona and furnace limestone injection FGD and compare them to those of the more advanced spray dryer FGD systems. Uncertainties in material handling, pulverization, and waste disposal were investigated and designs were produced as a basis for cost estimating.

Naulty, D.J.; Hooper, R.; Keeth, R.J.; McDowell, D.A.; Muzio, L.J.; Scheck, R.W.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Method of enhancing the wettability of boron nitride for use as an electrochemical cell separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A felt or other fabric of boron nitride suitable for use as an interelectrode separator within an electrochemical cell is wetted with a solution containing a thermally decomposable organic salt of an alkaline earth metal. An aqueous solution of magnesium acetate is the preferred solution for this purpose. After wetting the boron nitride, the solution is dried by heating at a sufficiently low temperature to prevent rapid boiling and the creation of voids within the separator. The dried material is then calcined at an elevated temperature in excess of 400/sup 0/C to provide a coating of an oxide of magnesium on the surface of the boron nitride fibers. A fabric or felt of boron nitride treated in this manner is easily wetted by molten electrolytic salts, such as the alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides, that are used in high temperature, secondary electrochemical cells.

McCoy, L.R.

1981-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

463

Ultracentrifuge for separating fluid mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. A centrifuge for the separation of fluid mixtures having light and heavy fractions comprising a cylindrical rotor, disc type end-plugs closing the ends of the rotor, means for mounting said rotor for rotation about its cylindrical axis, a housing member enclosing the rotor, a vacuum chamber in said housing about the central portion of the rotor, a collection chamber at each end of the housing, the innermost side of which is substantially formed by the outer face of the end-plug, means for preventing flow of the fluid from the collection chambers to said vacuum chamber, at least one of said end-plugs having a plurality of holes therethrough communicating between the collection chamber adjacent thereto and the inside of the rotor to induce countercurrent flow of the fluid in the centrifuge, means for feeding fluid to be processed into the centrifuge, means communicating with the collection chambers to extract the light and heavy separated fractions of the fluid, and means for rotating the rotor.

Lowry, Ralph A. (Charlottesville, VA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Separations and safeguards model integration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and development of advanced reprocessing plant designs can greatly benefit from the development of a reprocessing plant model capable of transient solvent extraction chemistry. This type of model can be used to optimize the operations of a plant as well as the designs for safeguards, security, and safety. Previous work has integrated a transient solvent extraction simulation module, based on the Solvent Extraction Process Having Interaction Solutes (SEPHIS) code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The goal of this work was to strengthen the integration by linking more variables between the two codes. The results from this integrated model show expected operational performance through plant transients. Additionally, ORIGEN source term files were integrated into the SSPM to provide concentrations, radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and thermal power data for various spent fuels. This data was used to generate measurement blocks that can determine the radioactivity, neutron emission rate, or thermal power of any stream or vessel in the plant model. This work examined how the code could be expanded to integrate other separation steps and benchmark the results to other data. Recommendations for future work will be presented.

Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Zinaman, Owen

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Isotope separation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferably substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. Because the molecules in the beam occupy various degenerate energy levels, if the laser beam comprises chirped pulses comprising selected wavelengths, the laser beam will very efficiently excite substantially all unexcited molecules and will cause stimulated emission of substantially all excited molecules of a selected one of the isotopes in the beam which such pulses encounter. Excitation caused by first direction chirped pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning chirped pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement of essentially all the molecules containing the one isotope is accomplished by a large number of chirped pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

Feldman, Barry J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Isotope separation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferable substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. The laser beam comprises .pi.-pulses of a selected wavelength which excite unexcited molecules, or cause stimulated emission of excited molecules of one of the isotopes. Excitation caused by first direction .pi.-pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning .pi.-pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement is accomplished by a large number of .pi.-pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

467

Innovative oxygen separation membrane prototype  

SciTech Connect

Improvements are still needed to gas separation processes to gain industry acceptance of coal gasification systems. The Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) technology, being developed by the US Department of Energy and its partners, offers an opportunity to lower overall plant cost and improve efficiency compared to cryogenic distillation and pressure swing adsorption methods. The technology is based on a novel class of perovskite ceramic oxides which can selectively separate oxygen ions from a stream of air at high temperature and pressure. Those ions are transported across the ITM leaving non-permeate air which can be integrated with a fuel-fired gas system, enabling co-production of power and steam along with the concentrated, high-purity oxygen. The project is at the second phase, to scale up the ITM Oxygen ceramic devices to demonstrate the technology at the 1-5 tpd capability in the Subscale Engineering Prototype. A third phase to demonstrate commercial viability extends to the end of the decade. 2 figs.

NONE

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Phase II) (Phase II) Jump to: navigation, search Name Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) Facility Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon-EDPR Developer Horizon-EDPR Location Grundy County IL Coordinates 41.202313°, -88.530078° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.202313,"lon":-88.530078,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

469

Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One of the major challenges associated with the use of SBCR for this purpose is the problem of catalyst/wax separation. If the catalyst particles break up into smaller ones during the F-T synthesis, these small particles (>5-10 ?m in diameter) will cause problems with the catalyst/wax separation. Several research groups have worked on development of attrition resistant spray-dried iron catalysts, and methodology to measure and predict their attrition behavior. However, these attrition tests were not conducted under conditions representative of those encountered in a SBCR. In this work, the attrition behavior of six spray-dried catalysts and two precipitated catalysts was evaluated under slurry reaction conditions in a stirred tank slurry reactor (STSR). Spray-dried catalysts used in this study were prepared at Texas A&M University (TAMU) and at Hampton University (HU), employing different preparation procedures and silica sources (potassium silicate, tetraethyl orthosilicate or colloidal silica). The attrition properties of F-T catalysts were determined by measuring particle size distribution (PSD) of catalysts before and after F-T synthesis in the STSR. This provides a direct measure of changes in particle size distribution in the STSR, and accounts for both physical and chemical attrition effects. Also, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the mechanism of attrition - erosion vs. fracture, and to obtain morphological characteristics of catalysts. Spray dried 100Fe/3Cu/5K/16SiO2 catalyst (WCS3516-1), prepared from wet precursors using colloidal silica as the silica source, was the best in terms of its attrition strength. After 337 hours of F-T synthesis in the STSR, the reduction in the average particle size and generation of particles less than 10 ?m in diameter were found to be very small. This indicates that both particle fracture and erosion were insignificant during testing in the STSR. All other catalysts, except one of the spray dried catalysts synthesized at Hampton University, also had a good attrition resistance and would be suitable for use in slurry reactors for F-T synthesis.

Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Biomass fuel from woody crops for electric power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the biologic, environmental, economic, and operational issues associated with growing wood crops in managed plantations. Information on plantation productivity, environmental issues and impacts, and costs is drawn from DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development as well as commercial operations in the US and elsewhere. The particular experiences of three countries--Brazil, the Philippines, and Hawaii (US)--are discussed in considerable detail.

Perlack, R.D.; Wright, L.L.; Huston, M.A.; Schramm, W.E.

1995-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

471

Drying Results of K-Basin Fuel Element 6513U (Run 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the eighth of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 6513U. This element (referred to as Element 6513U) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 6513U was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0 and discussed in Section 6.0.

BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

472

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 1164M (run 6)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the sixth of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 1164 M. This element (referred to as Element 1164M) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 1164M was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0, and discussed in Section 6.0.

Oliver, B.M.; Klinger, G.S.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 5744U (Run 4)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basins have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the fourth of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 5744U. This element (referred to as Element 5744U) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 5744U was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0, and discussed in Section 6.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Drying Results of K-Basin Fuel Element 2660M (Run 7)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the seventh of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 2660M. This element (referred to as Element 2660M) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 2660M was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0, and discussed in Section 6.0.

B.M. Oliver; G.S. Klinger; J. Abrefah; S.C. Marschman; P.J. MacFarlan; G.A. Ritter

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

Drying Results of K-Basin Fuel Element 6603M (Rune 5)  

SciTech Connect

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium spent nuclear fuels in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the fifth of those tests conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element (6603M) which had been stored underwater in the Hanford 100 Area K-West basin from 1983 until 1996. This fuel element was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments which were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0. The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections on the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0. Discussion of the results is given in Section 6.0.

B.M. Oliver; G.A. Ritter; G.S. Klinger; J. Abrefah; L.R. Greenwood; P.J. MacFarlan; S.C. Marschman

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

476

Regional uptake and release of crop carbon in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO(2) sinks where it is harvested and regional CO(2) sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. With respect to US Farm Resource Regions, net sources of CO(2) associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.3 to 6.1% yr(-1) during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Branstetter, Marcia L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Schuh, Andrew [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Ogle, Stephan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

478

Astrophysical image separation by blind time--frequency source separation methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, two prevalent blind time-frequency (TF) source separation methods in the literature are adapted to astrophysical image mixtures and four algorithms are developed to separate them into their astrophysical components. The components considered ... Keywords: Astrophysical image separation, Blind time--frequency source separation methods, Cosmic microwave background radiation, Joint diagonalization, Source separation

Mehmet Tankut Özgen; Ercan Engin Kuruo?lu; Diego Herranz

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Process for strontium-82 separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process is for the selective separation of Sr-82 and Sr-85 from a proton-irradiated Mo target. It includes dissolving the Mo in H2O2 to form a solution which is then passed through a cationic resin, whereby Mo, Nb, Tc, Se, V, As, Ge, Zr, Rb ions remain in the solution, while Rb, Zn, Be, Co, Fe, Mn, Cr, Sr, Y, Zr ions are adsorbed. The resin is contacted with an acid solution to remove the adsorbed ions, forming a second solution. The second solution is evaporated and the residue dissolved in a dilute acid to form a third solution. After adjusting the acid molarity, the third solution is passed through a second cationic resin; this resin is contacted first with a dilute sulfuric acid solution and then with a dilute acid solution to remove the adsorbed Sr ions. Zr, Rb, and Y radioisotopes can also be recovered with additional steps.

Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Taylor, W.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

SEPARATION PROCESS FOR THORIUM SALTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the separation of uranium, thorium, and rare earths extracted from monazite by digesting with sulfuric acid. By carefully increasing the pH of the solution, stepwise, over the range 0.8 to 5.5, a series of selective precipitations will be achieved, with the thorium values coming out at lower pH, the rare earths at intermediate pH and the uranium last. Some mixed precipitates will be obtained, and these may be treated by dissolving in HNO/sub 3/ and contacting with dibutyl phosphate, whereby thorium or uranium are taken up by the organic phase while the rare earths preferentially remain in the aqueous solution.

Bridger, G.L.; Whatley, M.E.; Shaw, K.G.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dry crops separate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Separation of magnetic field lines  

SciTech Connect

The field lines of magnetic fields that depend on three spatial coordinates are shown to have a fundamentally different behavior from those that depend on two coordinates. Unlike two-coordinate cases, a flux tube in a magnetic field that depends on all three spatial coordinates that has a circular cross section at one location along the tube characteristically has a highly distorted cross section at other locations. In an ideal evolution of a magnetic field, the current densities typically increase. Crudely stated, if the current densities increase by a factor {sigma}, the ratio of the long to the short distance across a cross section of a flux tube characteristically increases by e{sup 2{sigma}}, and the ratio of the longer distance to the initial radius increases as e{sup {sigma}}. Electron inertia prevents a plasma from isolating two magnetic field structures on a distance scale shorter than c/{omega}{sub pe}, which is about 10 cm in the solar corona, and reconnection must be triggered if {sigma} becomes sufficiently large. The radius of the sun, R{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm is about e{sup 23} times larger, so when {sigma} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 23, two lines separated by c/{omega}{sub pe} at one location can be separated by the full scale of any magnetic structures in the corona at another. The conditions for achieving a large exponentiation, {sigma}, are derived, and the importance of exponentiation is discussed.

Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Gas separation with glass membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual molecular sieving'' behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000[degrees]F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H[sub 2]/CO,N[sub 2]/CO[sub 2], 0[sub 2]/N[sub 2], and NH[sub 3]/N[sub 2] mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], CO, NH[sub 3]). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long-Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev. 0 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign O.K. Chopra, D. Diercks, R. Fabian, D. Ma, V. Shah, S-W Tam, and Y.Y. Liu Argonne National Laboratory June 30, 2012 FCRD-USED-2012-000119 ANL-12/29 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

484

Hot dry rock Phase II reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early attempts to hydraulically fracture and connect two wells drilled at the Hot Dry Rock site at Fenton Hill in New Mexico failed. Microearthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing indicated that the fracture zones grew in unexpected directions. Consequently one of the wells was sidetracked at a depth of 2.9 km; was redrilled into the zones of most intense microseismic activity; and a flow connection was achieved. Hydraulic communication was improved by supplemental fracturing using recently developed high temperature and high pressure open hole packers. Preliminary testing indicates a reservoir with stimulated joint volume which already surpasses that attained in the earlier phase I reservoir after several years of development. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, H.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

486

Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates to someone by E-mail Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE

487

Image Source Separation Using Color Channel Dependencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the problem of source separation in images in the Bayesian framework using the color channel dependencies. As a case in point we consider the source separation of color images which have dependence between its components. A Markov Random ...

Koray Kayabol; Ercan E. Kuruoglu; Bulent Sankur

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

A characterization of separable conjugate spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Necessary and sufficient conditions for a separable Banach space to be a dual space are proved. Some applications are discussed

Rossi, Stefano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Molecular Transport/Microporous Hydrogen Separation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Microporous Hydrogen Separation Systems Participants Acquaviva, Jim: Armstrong, Tim: Asaro, Marianne: Berchtold, Kathryn: Bischoff, Brian: Cornelius, Chris: Huang,...

490

Device for hydrogen separation and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for hydrogen separation has a porous support and hydrogen separation material on the support. The support is prepared by heat treatment of metal microparticles, preferably of iron-based or nickel-based alloys that also include aluminum and/or yttrium. The hydrogen separation material is then deposited on the support. Preferred hydrogen separation materials include metals such as palladium, alloys, platinum, refractory metals, and alloys.

Paglieri, Stephen N. (White Rock, NM); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

491

California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 334 350 365 1980's 299 306 362 381 265 256 255 238 215 222 1990's 217 216 203 189 194 153 156 164 106 192 2000's 234 177 190 167 189 268 206 205 146 163 2010's 173 165 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of 12/31 (Summary)

492

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Dry Ice vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Previous Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!) Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water! Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Dry ice is cold. Liquid nitrogen is cold, too. What happens when the two are mixed together? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix dry ice and liquid nitrogen? Steve: Well, we just happen to have a chunk of dry ice left over from when we filmed 'How to Make a Cloud Chamber,' and here at Jefferson Lab, liquid nitrogen flows like water, so we're going to find out!

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