National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for drug retention times

  1. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  2. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  3. The effect of solids retention time on tertiary ozonation and carbon adsorption of petrochemical wastewaters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buys, Ronald Earl

    1980-01-01

    time of 30 days. 34 10 Correlation between measured and calculated nonadsorbable COD values for bio-oxidized samples. 37 Correlation between measured and calculated nonadsorbable COD values for bio-oxidized plus ozonated samples. 12 Effect... of solids retention time on nonadsorbable COD, with and without ozonation. 39 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Biochemical and chemical oxygen demand data. COD removal and ozone consumption data 21 26 iVon-adsorbable COD data for bio-oxidized effluent. . 3O...

  4. The retention time of inorganic mercury in the brain — A systematic review of the evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rooney, James P.K.

    2014-02-01

    Reports from human case studies indicate a half-life for inorganic mercury in the brain in the order of years—contradicting older radioisotope studies that estimated half-lives in the order of weeks to months in duration. This study systematically reviews available evidence on the retention time of inorganic mercury in humans and primates to better understand this conflicting evidence. A broad search strategy was used to capture 16,539 abstracts on the Pubmed database. Abstracts were screened to include only study types containing relevant information. 131 studies of interest were identified. Only 1 primate study made a numeric estimate for the half-life of inorganic mercury (227–540 days). Eighteen human mercury poisoning cases were followed up long term including autopsy. Brain inorganic mercury concentrations at death were consistent with a half-life of several years or longer. 5 radionucleotide studies were found, one of which estimated head half-life (21 days). This estimate has sometimes been misinterpreted to be equivalent to brain half-life—which ignores several confounding factors including limited radioactive half-life and radioactive decay from surrounding tissues including circulating blood. No autopsy cohort study estimated a half-life for inorganic mercury, although some noted bioaccumulation of brain mercury with age. Modelling studies provided some extreme estimates (69 days vs 22 years). Estimates from modelling studies appear sensitive to model assumptions, however predications based on a long half-life (27.4 years) are consistent with autopsy findings. In summary, shorter estimates of half-life are not supported by evidence from animal studies, human case studies, or modelling studies based on appropriate assumptions. Evidence from such studies point to a half-life of inorganic mercury in human brains of several years to several decades. This finding carries important implications for pharmcokinetic modelling of mercury and potentially for the regulatory toxicology of mercury.

  5. Sediment Retention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediment Retention Sediment Retention Tour LANL maintains hundreds of wells, stream sampling stations and stormwater control structures to protect waters. Open full screen to view...

  6. Unsupervised parameter optimization for automated retention time alignment of severely shifted gas chromatographic data using the piecework alignment algorithm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2007-02-02

    First, simulated chromatographic separations with declining retention time precision were used to study the performance of the piecewise retention time alignment algorithm and to demonstrate an unsupervised parameter optimization method. The average correlation coefficient between the first chromatogram and every other chromatogram in the data set was used to optimize the alignment parameters. This correlation method does not require a training set, so it is unsupervised and automated. This frees the user from needing to provide class information and makes the alignment algorithm more generally applicable to classifying completely unknown data sets. For a data set of simulated chromatograms where the average chromatographic peak was shifted past two neighboring peaks between runs, the average correlation coefficient of the raw data was 0.46 ± 0.25. After automated, optimized piecewise alignment, the average correlation coefficient was 0.93 ± 0.02. Additionally, a relative shift metric and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to independently quantify and categorize the alignment performance, respectively. The relative shift metric was defined as four times the standard deviation of a given peak’s retention time in all of the chromatograms, divided by the peak-width-at-base. The raw simulated data sets that were studied contained peaks with average relative shifts ranging between 0.3 and 3.0. Second, a “real” data set of gasoline separations was gathered using three different GC methods to induce severe retention time shifting. In these gasoline separations, retention time precision improved ~8 fold following alignment. Finally, piecewise alignment and the unsupervised correlation optimization method were applied to severely shifted GC separations of reformate distillation fractions. The effect of piecewise alignment on peak heights and peak areas is also reported. Piecewise alignment either did not change the peak height, or caused it to slightly decrease. The average relative difference in peak height after piecewise alignment was –0.20%. Piecewise alignment caused the peak areas to either stay the same, slightly increase, or slightly decrease. The average absolute relative difference in area after piecewise alignment was 0.15%.

  7. Residence Time Effects on P Sorption/Desorption on Ferrihydrite Understanding mechanisms of P retention/release on soil mineral surfaces is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Residence Time Effects on P Sorption/Desorption on Ferrihydrite Y. Arai Understanding mechanisms of P retention/release on soil mineral surfaces is fundamental in assessing the P biogeochemistry that are high ammonium oxalate extractable P, due to long-term manure amendments. Since there is a high

  8. 210 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 3, NO. 1, MARCH 2004 Toward Long-Term Retention-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    210 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 3, NO. 1, MARCH 2004 Toward Long-Term Retention, nanotechnology, quantum dots. I. INTRODUCTION BOTH nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) dot [1] and oxide- silicon-controlled memory node positioning, relying on modern nanotechnologies [6], [7]. Therefore, a memory architecture

  9. Matrix tablets are drug delivery devices that release a water-soluble drug over an extended period of time. Such matrix tablets are formulated from mixtures of drug, polymer, and excipient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinow, Peter

    Summary Matrix tablets are drug delivery devices that release a water-soluble drug over an extended period of time. Such matrix tablets are formulated from mixtures of drug, polymer, and excipient powders variation in the drug release profile of the tablet. While fabrication of experimental tablets

  10. 174. THE EFFECTS OF RESIDENCE TIME ON THE RETENTION OF ARSENATE BY GOETHITE. S.E. O'Reilly and D.L. Sparks, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    174. THE EFFECTS OF RESIDENCE TIME ON THE RETENTION OF ARSENATE BY GOETHITE. S.E. O'Reilly and D on goethite. Batch sorption and desorption studies were conducted at pH 6 for periods up to 2 months. Arsenate sorption increased slowly with time. As residence time between arsenate and goethite increased

  11. Time-Resolved SAXS/WAXS Study of the Phase Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of Drug/PEG Solid Dispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Qing; Harris, Michael T.; Taylor, Lynne S. (Purdue)

    2013-03-07

    Simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) was employed to elucidate the physical state and location of various small molecule drugs blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG), as well as the time dependent microstructural evolution of the systems. Samples were prepared by comelting physical mixtures of the drug and PEG, followed by solidification at 25 C. The model drugs selected encompassed a wide variety of physicochemical properties in terms of crystallization tendency and potential for interaction with PEG. It was observed that compounds which crystallized rapidly and had weak interactions with PEG tended to be excluded from the interlamellar region of the PEG matrix. In contrast, drugs which had favorable interactions with PEG were incorporated into the interlamellar regions of the polymer up until the point at which the drug crystallized whereby phase separation occurred. These factors are likely to impact the effectiveness of drug/PEG systems as drug delivery systems.

  12. Robotic-Lab.COM Nanotechnology boosts anticancer drug cocktail many times over http://www.robotic-lab.com/en/2011/04/22/nanotechnology-boosts-anticancer-drug-cocktail-many-times-over/[5/2/2011 12:11:22 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Robotic-Lab.COM » Nanotechnology boosts anticancer drug cocktail many times over http://www.robotic-lab.com/en/2011/04/22/nanotechnology-boosts-anticancer-drug-cocktail-many-times-over/[5/2/2011 12:11:22 PM] Nanotechnology boosts anticancer drug cocktail many times over Writte by Jim Lewis the 22/04/2011 Using

  13. Tritium retention in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dylla, H.F.; Wilson, K.L. (eds.)

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the materials physics related to D-T operation in TFTR. Research activities are described pertaining to basic studies of hydrogenic retention in graphite, hydrogen recycling phenomena, first-wall and limiter conditioning, surface analysis of TFTR first-wall components, and estimates of the tritium inventory.

  14. Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=21055.php[4/21/2011 11:18:27 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over http a report of consumers' views on the use of nanotechnology Posted: Apr 21st, 2011 Using niosomes: Apr 18th, 2011 Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over

  15. Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres settling in sharply stratified fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Richard M.

    Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres settling in sharply OF FLUIDS 25, 081701 (2013) Retention and entrainment effects: Experiments and theory for porous spheres of the sphere but does not capture the retention time at the density transition quantitatively. Entrainment

  16. Why Do They Stay? Building a Conceptual Model to Understand Worker Retention and Turnover in Public Child Welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Amy Denise

    2010-01-01

    Hall. Henry, S. (1990). Non-salary retention incentives forexperiences • Caseload • Salary • Supervision • PeerCohort Extrinsic Job Factors Salary Hours % time -clients %

  17. Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, GW; Levi, R

    2012-01-01

    of beta blockers: from antianginal drugs to ligand-directedmechanisms of gating and drug block of sodium channels.Roden DM. Antiarrhythmic drugs: past, present and future. J

  18. Design Storm for Total Retention.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    endorse the viewpoint of a publication or guarantee its technical correctness. Title: Design Storm for "Total Retention" under Individual Permit, Poster, Individual Permit for...

  19. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  20. Policy on Retention and Disposition of University Records Policy on Retention and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Retention and Disposition of University Records 06/01/2012 Policy on Retention and Disposition of University Records I. Purpose and Scope This policy and its implementing procedures will assist, as well as to optimize the use of storage space and minimize the cost of record retention. This policy

  1. Pulse transit time and the pulse wave contour as measured by photoplethysmography: the effect of drugs and exercise 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Rupert Alistair

    2009-07-07

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a simple means of measuring the pulse wave in humans, exploitable for the purposes of timing the arrival of the pulse at a particular point in the arterial tree, and for pulse contour analysis. ...

  2. ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

    2011-09-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

  3. Drug Trafficking Organizations and Counter-Drug Strategies in the U.S.-Mexican Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astorga, Luis; Shirk, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic Assessment of U.S. Drug Policy. Washington, D.C. ,K. (2008). Mexico Faces New Drug Challenge: Mini-Submarines.Mayors on Front Line of the Drug War. Los Angeles Times Los

  4. Sample Retention Incentive Service Agreement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) program. Coverage amounts will be based on the full-time salary of the position. Your premiums will continue to be deducted from your pay. 5. Thrift...

  5. Evolutionary Computing for Detection of Retentive Structures in Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    and the demography of these fishes. Retentive structures are meso-scale vortices, whose size ranges from 10 km to 200 task At this stage of the study, there is no formal model for these meso-scales retentive structures

  6. New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention BDMS Security Access - Instructions 1@nmsu.edu if you have any questions. #12;Reset New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention BDMS

  7. Undergraduate Retention Initiatives College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Undergraduate Retention Initiatives College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources Office and Natural Resources. Current Structure/Approach The college generally provides retention services. Practically speaking, the evidence of effective programs is clear, namely that the route to successful

  8. Information Sheet for Retention Review During Fourth Probationary Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Sheet for Retention Review During Fourth Probationary Year Faculty Name materials must be included for those faculty undergoing their Fourth Year Retention Review in the order shown below: (1) Information Sheet for Retention Review During Fourth Probationary Year (2) Academic

  9. Information Sheet for Retention Review During Third Probationary Year -Comprehensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Sheet for Retention Review During Third Probationary Year - Comprehensive Faculty Name The following materials must be included for those faculty undergoing a comprehensive Third Year Retention Review in the order shown below: 1) Information Sheet for Retention Review During Third Probationary Year

  10. Influence of plasticizer molecular weight on plasticizer retention in PVC geomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROOFS Influence of plasticizer molecular weight on plasticizer retention in PVC geomembranes T. D, accepted 31 October 2004 ABSTRACT: Plasticizers are used to make PVC flexible so it can be used as a geomembrane. Plasticizers can migrate from PVC geomembranes over time because of contact with air, liquid, and

  11. AVATAR: A VARIABLE-RETENTION TIME AWARE REFRESH FOR DRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Onur

    and energy Refresh cost proportional to capacity è Exponentially increasing 8% 46% *Liu et al., "RAIDR;11 EXPERIMENTAL SETUP A B C Test platform: DDR3 testing platform Xilinx ML605 FPGA development board

  12. Retention time and dispersion associated with submerged aquatic canopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    The shear layer at the top of a submerged canopy generates coherent vortices that control exchange between the canopy and the overflowing water. Unlike free shear layers, the vortices in a canopy shear layer do not grow ...

  13. 300 Area Building Retention Evaluation Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. McBride

    2007-07-03

    Evaluate the long-term retention of several facilities associated with the PNNL Capability Replacement Laboratory and other Hanfor mission needs. WCH prepared a mitigation plan for three scenarios with different release dates for specific buildings. The evaluations present a proposed plan for providing utility services to retained facilities in support of a long-term (+20 year) lifespan in addition to temporary services to buildings with specified delayed release dates.

  14. Static ferroelectric memory transistor having improved data retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T. (13609 Verbena Pl., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Warren, William L. (7716 Wm. Moyers Ave., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Tuttle, Bruce A. (12808 Lillian Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1996-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric FET structure in which the ferroelectric layer is doped to reduce retention loss. A ferroelectric FET according to the present invention includes a semiconductor layer having first and second contacts thereon, the first and second contacts being separated from one another. The ferroelectric FET also includes a bottom electrode and a ferroelectric layer which is sandwiched between the semiconductor layer and the bottom electrode. The ferroelectric layer is constructed from a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4 in sufficient concentration to impede shifts in the resistance measured between the first and second contacts with time. The ferroelectric FET structure preferably comprises Pb in the A-site. The first and second elements are preferably Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred B-site dopants are Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten at concentrations between 1% and 8%.

  15. Workforce Retention Work Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department of EnergyDataWind TheEnergy WorkersRetention Work

  16. EISPC White Paper on "State Approaches to Retention of Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (EISPC) has released a white paper on "State Approaches to Retention of Nuclear Power Plants" that examines operational, economic, and policy pressure points affecting...

  17. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  18. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burch, Steven D. (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber therebetween. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food.

  19. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, T.F.; Benson, D.K.; Burch, S.D.

    1997-07-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber there between. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food. 26 figs.

  20. A Healthy Business: The evolution of the U.S. market for prescription drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younkin, Peter Allen

    2010-01-01

    1903. "Cheating in the Drug Trade." in New York Times.New York. 1904. "Dishonest Drugs." in New York Times. New1960. "Senators Scored on Drug Inquiry." in New York Times.

  1. Retention of Riverine Sediment and Nutrient Loads by Coastal Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retention of Riverine Sediment and Nutrient Loads by Coastal Plain Floodplains Gregory B. Noe for their cumulative retention of the annual river loads of nutrients or sediments. Here we report measurements of sediment accretion and associated carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus accu- mulation as sedimentation over

  2. The Retention of Social Workers in the Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    professional expectations, concerns and ambitions of social workers and how these impact on their developingThe Retention of Social Workers in the Health Services: An Evidence-Based Assessment Professor COLLEGE DUBLIN #12;Foreword The Retention of Social Workers in the Health Services and Evidence Based

  3. Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic; Davy, C.A.; Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean

    2012-07-15

    This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

  4. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  5. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  6. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  7. New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Reset New Mexico State University Records Management and Retention Project Initiation RMR-Project-Initiation.pdf, 07/2013 ROUTING Instructions: This form is for official New Mexico State University Document

  8. Drug Testing Notification Form RV 2 May 22, 2013 DRUG TESTING NOTIFICATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drug Testing Notification Form RV 2 May 22, 2013 DRUG TESTING NOTIFICATION FORM Section 1: Employer testing collector. You are required to undergo urine drug testing as a condition of hiring. You must have of Collection: ___________________________ Date and time of Test* * For testing out side of Louisiana testing

  9. WALLDYN Simulations of Global Impurity Migration and Fuel Retention in JET and Extrapolations to ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WALLDYN Simulations of Global Impurity Migration and Fuel Retention in JET and Extrapolations to ITER

  10. Pilot-Scale Benzene Retention and Release Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marek, J.C.

    2003-11-10

    During the initial months of In-Tank Precipitation radioactive operation in 1995 the process experienced high rates of tetraphenylborate decomposition with assumed corresponding high rates of benzene generation. In March 1996 after a two month quiescent period, a water addition to Tank 48H resulted in an unexpected benzene release to the tank vapor phase. This was the first time a low energy input resulted in a significant release rate. This led to questions about how benzene, generated in-situ by TPB decomposition, was retained in the surrounding potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. It was postulated the retention mechanism may have changed during the quiescent period prior to March so the benzene present became readily releasable to the vapor phase with low energy input to the slurry or that enough benzene accumulated that some of it was in a different, more releasable form. Readily releasable is a qualitative term defined as a rapid release of benzene at a rate approaching evaporation of a free benzene layer. It is intended to distinguish between benzene in a form with high liquid phase resistance to mass transfer diffusion controlled from benzene in a form with minimal liquid phase resistance to mass transfer free benzene layer evaporation. If a readily releasable form of benzene was present, the vapor space profile during release tests was anticipated to have an initial benzene vapor space concentration peak followed by a lower vapor concentration, longer duration release.

  11. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Final Hazard Category Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUTH, L.L.

    2001-06-06

    The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility was designed to store 242-A Evaporator process condensate and other liquid waste streams for treatment at the 200 East Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility has been previously classified as a Category 3 Nonreactor Nuclear Facility. As defined in Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports (DOE 1992, DOE 1997), Category 3 Nuclear Facilities have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences. However, based on current facility design, operations, and radioactive constituent concentrations, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility does not have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences and is categorized as a Radiological Facility. This report documents the final hazard categorization process performed in accordance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. This report describes the current configuration and operations of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility. Also included is a preliminary hazard categorization, which is based on current and proposed radioactive and hazardous material inventories, a preliminary hazards and accident analysis, and a final hazard category determination. The results of the hazards and accident analysis, based on the current configuration and operations of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and the current and proposed radioactive and hazardous material inventories, demonstrate that the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility does not have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences. Based on the final hazard category analysis, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility is a Radiological Facility. The final hazard category determination is based on a comparative evaluation of the consequence basis for the Category 3 threshold quantities to the calculated consequences for credible releases The basis for the Category 3 threshold quantities is 10 rem-equivalent man at 30 meters (98 feet) (DOE 1992, DOE 1997). The calculated 12 hour consequences to an individual located at 30 meters (98 feet) for two credible scenarios, spray release and a pool release, are 3.50 rem and 1.32 rem, respectively, which based upon the original hazard categorization criteria (DOE 1992) classified the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility as a Radiological Facility. Comparison of the calculated 24 hour consequences to an individual located at 30 meters (98 feet) for two credible scenarios, spray release and a pool release, 7.00 rem and 2.64 rem respectively, confirmed the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility classification as a Radiological Facility under the current hazard categorization criteria (DOE 1997). Both result in dose consequence values less than the allowable, 10 rem, meeting the requirements for categorizing the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility as a Radiological Facility.

  12. Retention of elemental mercury in fly ashes in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Lopez-Anton; M. Diaz-Somoano; M.R. Martinez-Tarazona

    2007-01-15

    Mercury is an extremely volatile element, which is emitted from coal combustion to the environment mostly in the vapor phase. To avoid the environmental problems that the toxic species of this element may cause, control technologies for the removal of mercury are necessary. Recent research has shown that certain fly ash materials have an affinity for mercury. Moreover, it has been observed that fly ashes may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its capture. However, the exact nature of Hg-fly ash interactions is still unknown, and mercury oxidation through fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, the influence of a gas atmosphere on the retention of elemental mercury on fly ashes of different characteristics was evaluated. The retention capacity was estimated comparatively in inert and two gas atmospheres containing species present in coal gasification and coal combustion. Fly ashes produced in two pulverized coal combustion (PCC) plants, produced from coals of different rank (CTA and CTSR), and a fly ash (CTP) produced in a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) plant were used as raw materials. The mercury retention capacity of these fly ashes was compared to the retention obtained in different activated carbons. Although the capture of mercury is very similar in the gasification atmosphere and N{sub 2}, it is much more efficient in a coal combustion retention, being greater in fly ashes from PCC than those from FBC plants. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, Richard H. (West Seneca, NY)

    1998-01-01

    Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein. The apparatus releasably retains the conduit out of the way of nearby personnel and equipment. The apparatus includes a portable support frame defining a slot therein having an open mouth portion in communication with the slot for receiving the conduit through the open mouth portion and into the slot. A retention bar is pivotally connected to the support frame adjacent the mouth portion for releasably retaining the conduit in the slot. The retention bar freely pivots to a first position, so that the mouth portion is unblocked in order that the conduit is received through the mouth portion and into the slot. In addition, the retention bar freely pivots to a second position, so that the mouth portion is blocked in order that the conduit is retained in the slot. The conduit is released from the slot by pivoting the retention bar to the first position to unblock the mouth portion and thereafter manipulating the conduit from the slot and through the mouth portion. The apparatus may further include a mounting member attached to the support frame for mounting the apparatus on a vertical support surface. Another embodiment of the apparatus includes a shoe assembly of predetermined weight removably connected to the support frame for resting the apparatus on a floor in such a manner that the apparatus is substantially stationary on the floor.

  14. Modeling oxaliplatin drug delivery to circadian rhythms in drug metabolism and host tolerance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clairambault, Jean

    period) time-scheduled regimens for cytotoxic drug delivery by intravenous infusion, a pharmacokinetic constant infusion of the same daily dose, when the biological time of peak infusion is correctly chosen. Furthermore, it is well adapted to using mathematical optimization methods of drug infusion flow, choosing

  15. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA General Records Retention and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    #12;UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA General Records Retention and Disposition Schedule April 2007 #12;MANAGING PUBLIC RECORDS IN THE STATE-SUPPORTED UNIVERSITIES OF NORTH CAROLINA Introduction in the University of North Carolina System (UNC) to use when managing the records in their offices. It lists records

  16. PLASTICIZER RETENTION IN PVC GEOMEMBRANES T. D. Stark1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PLASTICIZER RETENTION IN PVC GEOMEMBRANES T. D. Stark1 , H. Choi2 , and P. W. Diebel3 1, Ontario, Canada, N1R 5T6; PH (519)623-1630; email: PDiebel@cgtower.com ABSTRACT: Plasticizers are used to make PVC flexible so it can be used as a geomembrane for containment purposes. Plasticizers can migrate

  17. Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio Impacts the duration of transmitter attachment and minimizing the impacts of radios on the behavior and demography of the study animal. We tested 4 methods of radio attachment for a breeding population of upland sandpipers

  18. Predicting Student Retention and Academic Success at New Mexico Tech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Predicting Student Retention and Academic Success at New Mexico Tech by Julie Luna Submitted Research and Statistics Option New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Socorro, New Mexico August at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. Joe Franklin of the Information Services Department

  19. Evolutionary Computing for Detection of Retentive Structures in Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    ,robillia,poty,fonlupt}@lil.univ-littoral.fr, Abstract-- The demography of anchovy fishes in the Gulf of Biscay seems to be related to the presence of so- called "retentive" hydrodynamical structures, that keep fish eggs and larvae in a favorable environment be used to decide fishing quotas or bans for the sake of preserving the natural resource. We propose two

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Transient gut retention and persistence of Salmonella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeff

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Transient gut retention and persistence of Salmonella through metamorphosis the consumption of contaminated food. The causative organism, Salmonella, can enter the production process at any commodities, a thor- ough understanding of the on-farm ecology and epidemi- ology of Salmonella from which

  1. Exanthematous allergic drug reactions due to four chemically unrelated drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramji; Gupta, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    16. Lachgar T, Touil Y. The drug hypersensitivity syndromeW, Bircher A, Romano A et al. Drug provocation testing inthe diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity reactions: general

  2. Pond age and riparian zone proximity influence anuran occupancy of urban retention ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    Pond age and riparian zone proximity influence anuran occupancy of urban retention ponds Devynn A and negatively affects many wildlife populations. However, certain urban features, such as retention ponds, may proximity and pond age on retention pond occupancy by anurans. We identified and estimated the age of 25

  3. Nanotechnology Now -Press Release: "Sandia and UNM lead effort to destroy cancers: Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over" http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=42258[4/21/2011 11:23:41 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Nanotechnology Now - Press Release: "Sandia and UNM lead effort to destroy cancers: Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over" http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=42258[4/21/2011 11:23:41 AM] About Us Nanotechnology News Columns Products Directories Career Center

  4. Adolescent drug abuse - Awareness & prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; Shah, Shyam; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    and the risk of illicit drug use: the Adverse Childhoodalcohol, tobacco and other drug use. Int Rev Psychiatry.therapy for adolescent drug abuse. J Clin Child Psychol.

  5. In-vessel tritium retention and removal in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federici, G.; Anderl, R.A.; Andrew, P.

    1998-06-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is envisioned to be the next major step in the world`s fusion program from the present generation of tokamaks and is designed to study fusion plasmas with a reactor relevant range of plasma parameters. During normal operation, it is expected that a fraction of the unburned tritium, that is used to routinely fuel the discharge, will be retained together with deuterium on the surfaces and in the bulk of the plasma facing materials (PFMs) surrounding the core and divertor plasma. The understanding of he basic retention mechanisms (physical and chemical) involved and their dependence upon plasma parameters and other relevant operation conditions is necessary for the accurate prediction of the amount of tritium retained at any given time in the ITER torus. Accurate estimates are essential to assess the radiological hazards associated with routine operation and with potential accident scenarios which may lead to mobilization of tritium that is not tenaciously held. Estimates are needed to establish the detritiation requirements for coolant water, to determine the plasma fueling and tritium supply requirements, and to establish the needed frequency and the procedures for tritium recovery and clean-up. The organization of this paper is as follows. Section 2 provides an overview of the design and operating conditions of the main components which define the plasma boundary of ITER. Section 3 reviews the erosion database and the results of recent relevant experiments conducted both in laboratory facilities and in tokamaks. These data provide the experimental basis and serve as an important benchmark for both model development (discussed in Section 4) and calculations (discussed in Section 5) that are required to predict tritium inventory build-up in ITER. Section 6 emphasizes the need to develop and test methods to remove the tritium from the codeposited C-based films and reviews the status and the prospects of the most attractive techniques. Section 7 identifies the unresolved issues and provides some recommendations on potential R and D avenues for their resolution. Finally, a summary is provided in Section 8.

  6. A Particle-Water Based Model for Water Retention Hysteresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yixiang Gan; Federico Maggi; Giuseppe Buscarnera; Itai Einav

    2013-12-04

    A particle-water discrete element based approach to describe water movement in partially saturated granular media is presented and tested. Water potential is governed by both capillary bridges, dominant at low saturations, and the pressure of entrapped air, dominant at high saturations. The approach captures the hysteresis of water retention during wetting and drainage by introducing the local evolution of liquid-solid contact angles at the level of pores and grains. Extensive comparisons against experimental data are presented. While these are made without the involvement of any fitting parameters, the method demonstrates relative high success by achieving a correlation coefficient of at least 82%, and mostly above 90%. For the tested materials with relatively mono-disperse grain size, the hysteresis of water retention during cycles of wetting and drainage has been shown to arise from the dynamics of solid-liquid contact angles as a function of local liquid volume changes.

  7. Orphanet Berichtsreihe Orphan Drugs Datenerhebung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Orphanet Berichtsreihe Orphan Drugs Datenerhebung Verzeichnis der in Europa zugelassenen Orphan Drugs Mit europäischer Orphan-Drug-Designation und europäischer Marktzulassung* Mit europäischer Marktzulassung* ohne vorherige Orphan-Drug-Designation *Zentrales Zulassungsverfahren der Europäischen

  8. Intake retention functions and derived investigation levels for selected radioelements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buitron Sanchez, Susana

    1990-01-01

    , Sr. (Chair of Committee) Milton . McLain (Member) Wesl E. Bolch (Member) Dan ightower (Member) ohn W. oston, Sr (Department Head) August 1990 ABSTRACT Intake Retention Functions and Derived Investigation Levels for Selected Radioelements... for radionuclide exposure control. Here, both routes of entry into the body are considered, i. e. , inhalation and ingestion, and ALI values are tabulated for both. 2. Introduction of the term Derived Air Concentration (DAC) instead of the term (MPC)a to prevent...

  9. "...powered bodies turn to commodities..." -stereolab Drugs and Drug Abuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teissére, Jeremy Alden

    "...powered bodies turn to commodities..." - stereolab BIO 115 Fall, 2008 Drugs and Drug Abuse the current narratives surrounding drug use. In parallel, we will closely examine the putative mechanisms by which drugs act in the central nervous system ­ and also discuss how the action of these drugs has

  10. Drug delivery Sustained Drug Release from Non-eroding Nanoporous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Drug delivery Sustained Drug Release from Non-eroding Nanoporous Templates** Evin Gultepe, Dattatri drug, doxorubicin (Dox), from different non-eroding nanopor- ous coatings. Detailed studies of drug phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), which is commonly employed to simulate in vivo conditions for drug release

  11. September 2012, Work Force Retention Work Group Status Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to theDepartmentWork Force Retention Work Group

  12. An Analysis of Texas Superintendents' Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment and Retention Practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lara-Alecio, Rafael; Galloway, Martha; Irby, Beverly J.; Brown, Genevieve

    2010-10-22

    teaching fairs for bilingual students. Begin early to recruit through these fairs, even at the sixth grade level. One superintendent in our study pointed out, ?Bilingual/ESL teachers are in great demand and merit much more recognition than school...=ISO-8859-1 Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment/Retention 1 Running Head: BILINGUAL/ESL TEACHER RECRUITMENT/RETENTION An Analysis of Texas Superintendents? Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment and Retention Practices Rafael Lara...

  13. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance Lucheng Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance ......................................................................................................................... 2 2. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof .............................................................................. 13 4. Methods of Storm Analysis and Green Roof Performance Analysis

  14. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  15. Finding a Home: A Developmental Model of Rural Physician Recruitment and Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, Christine M

    2008-01-01

    http://www.unmc.edu/Community/mralmeded/rural_background_http://wvvw.unmc.edu/Community/ruralmeded/rural_interested_Physician retention in rural communities: the perspective of

  16. Fixed drug eruption caused by the Japanese herbal drug kakkonto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuichi, Megumi; Hara, Hiroshi; Asano, Yukie; Makino, Teruhiko; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2010-01-01

    Topical provocation of fixed drug eruption. Br J Dermatol.neglected offender for fixed drug eruptions. Eur J Dermatoloral and non-oral herbal drugs may cause FDE. References 1.

  17. Drug Use and Drug Policy in a Prohibition Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCoun, Robert; Martin, Karin D.

    2008-01-01

    Prisoners (prior to offense), Drug-related Emergency RoomVisits, 2007 DAWN All illicit drugs Marijuana Cocaine Crack2/4/2008 - 41 Other Sentence Drug Sentence Federal Prisoners

  18. Noninvasive quantification of drug delivery from an implantable MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Audrey M., 1976-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) sensors in vivo in real time and corroborated by scintillation of urine samples. The goal of monitoring drug delivery from an implant in vivo, in real time and without disturbing the tissue environment, was ...

  19. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harter, Katherine; Levine, Michael; Henderson, Sean O.

    2015-01-01

    et al. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review 15. NishijimaRandomized antiplatelet drugs. In: Goodman & Gilman’s The2008;24:2757-65. Cardiovasc Drugs. 2006;6:265-85. 34. Nordt

  20. Adolescent drug abuse - Awareness & prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; Shah, Shyam; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    alcohol, tobacco and other drug use. Int Rev Psychiatry.therapy for adolescent drug abuse. J Clin Child Psychol.outcomes in an indicated drug prevention program for high-

  1. Wetlands and Aquatic Processes Phosphorus Retention by Wetland Soils used for Treated Wastewater Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    to evaluate likely mechanisms of P removal in the soils. Intact soil cores (0-40 cm) and bulk soil samples (0Wetlands and Aquatic Processes Phosphorus Retention by Wetland Soils used for Treated Wastewater were to (i) determine the P retention capacity of representative wetland soils being used for disposal

  2. U.S. Navy Promotion and Retention by Race and Sex Amos Golan, American University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    U.S. Navy Promotion and Retention by Race and Sex Amos Golan, American University William Greene The Navy's promotion-retention process involves two successive decisions: The Navy decides whether an individual is selected for promotion, and then, conditional on the Navy's decision, the sailor decides

  3. Information Sheet for Retention Review During Third Probationary Year Short Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for a fourth probationary year: [ ] Additional comments are attached. [ ] Additional comments are not attached/Director Recommendation: I recommend retention for a fourth probationary year: [ ] Additional comments are attached. College Dean Recommendation: I recommend retention for a fourth probationary year: [ ] Additional comments

  4. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE -II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    1 SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE - II C. P. Kumar* Sanjay knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated presents the soil moisture retention characteristics at RD 838 of Indira Gandhi Nahar Priyojana, Stage - II

  5. Page 1 of 2 Application and Retention of Salary Savings Resulting From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Page 1 of 2 Application and Retention of Salary Savings Resulting From Sponsored Programs: Buyouts University and to provide consistency in the application and retention of salary support for externally- funded efforts across all Georgia Southern University units. II. Policy Statement Salaries charged

  6. THE IMPACT OF INCREASED EMPLOYEE RETENTION UPON PERFORMANCE IN A CUSTOMER CONTACT CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitt, Ward

    -run average performance. Keywords: contact centers, call centers, retention, employee turnover, churn, agent by low employee job satisfaction, as evidenced by high turnover, referred to as churn [11]. There is good reason to believe that churn can be reduced (retention can be increased) by increasing employee job

  7. Drug Information Chart Notes Drug ad (intrinsic bias)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    Drug Information Chart Notes Drug ad (intrinsic bias) Trade name Different for each company Dosage Same or different? A drug in a different dosage can be used for a different therapy. Precautions Check for pregnancy A complete book on drugs in pregnancy and lactation in bibliography. (unbiased

  8. Deuterium Retention in Beryllium Exposed to a 60kV Deuterium Beam ­ Consequences for Next Step Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deuterium Retention in Beryllium Exposed to a 60kV Deuterium Beam ­ Consequences for Next Step Devices

  9. submitted to Deep Sea Research II Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    submitted to Deep Sea Research II Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine finmarchicus, copepod, dormancy, diapause, Gulf of Maine, interannual variability, zooplankton #12;Abstract and retention of dormant C. finmarchicus in the deep Gulf of Maine, in the northwestern Atlantic. Retention

  10. DRUG DISCOVERY AT PURDUE 2013-14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    DRUG DISCOVERY AT PURDUE 2013-14 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 2 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 3 #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY DRUG DISCOVERY 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................p. 8 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF DRUG DISCOVERY RESEARCHERS

  11. AVATAR: A Variable-Retention-Time (VRT) Aware Refresh for DRAM Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Onur

    it from performing read and write re- quests. 2) refresh operations consume significant energy [6,28, 35, and we need scalable mechanisms to overcome them. DDR3 Future FutureDDR3 perdevice(mW) Power

  12. Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aklamati, E K; Mulenga, M; Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A; Peerson, J M; Kafwembe, E; Brown, K H; Haskell, M J

    2009-10-12

    A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children <5 y of age. To explore possible reasons for the lack of response to HD-VAS among Zambian children, we quantified the absorption, retention, and urinary elimination of either a single HDVAS (60 mg) or a smaller dose of stable isotope (SI)-labeled VA (5 mg), which was used to estimate VA pool size, in 3-4 y old Zambian boys (n = 4 for each VA dose). A 25 nCi tracer dose of [{sup 14}C{sub 2}]-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of {sup 14}C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting {sup 14}C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 {+-} 7.1%, 76.3 {+-} 6.7%, and 1.9 {+-} 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 {+-} 9.5%, 71.1 {+-} 9.4%, and 1.8 {+-} 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

  13. Bushing retention system for thermal medium cooling delivery tubes in a gas turbine rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY)

    2002-01-01

    Bushings are provided in counterbores for wheels and spacers for supporting thermal medium cooling tubes extending axially adjacent the rim of the gas turbine rotor. The retention system includes a retaining ring disposed in a groove adjacent an end face of the bushing and which retaining ring projects radially inwardly to prevent axial movement of the bushing in one direction. The retention ring has a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs along its inner diameter whereby the ring is supported by the lands of the tube maintaining its bushing retention function, notwithstanding operation in high centrifugal fields and rotation of the ring in the groove into other circular orientations.

  14. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Suo, Zhigang E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  15. Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  16. In-Vessel Retention - Recent Efforts and Future Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe

    2004-10-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. However, it is not clear that the external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) proposed for existing and some advanced reactors would provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1400 MWe) without additional enhancements. This paper summarizes recent efforts to enhance IVR and identifies additional needs to demonstrate that there is sufficient margin for successful IVR in high power reactors.

  17. LIQUID EFFLUENT RETENTION FACILITY (LERF) BASIN 42 STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2004-10-29

    This report documents laboratory results obtained under test plan RPP-21533 for samples submitted by the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) from the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Basin 42 (Reference 1). The LERF Basin 42 contains process condensate (PC) from the 242-A Evaporator and landfill leachate. The ETF processes one PC campaign approximately every 12 to 18 months. A typical PC campaign volume can range from 1.5 to 2.5 million gallons. During the September 2003 ETF Basin 42 processing campaign, a recurring problem with 'gelatinous buildup' on the outlet filters from 60A-TK-I (surge tank) was observed (Figure 1). This buildup appeared on the filters after the contents of the surge tank were adjusted to a pH of between 5 and 6 using sulfuric acid. Biological activity in the PC feed was suspected to be the cause of the gelatinous material. Due to this buildup, the filters (10 {micro}m CUNO) required daily change out to maintain process throughput.

  18. UD Facts & Figures 2013-14 RETENTION RATES FOR ENTERING FIRST-TIME, FULL-TIME FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall PROGRAM BY CAMPUS 2007 cohort 2008 cohort 2009 cohort 2010 cohort 2011 cohort 2012 cohort N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall N % to 2nd Fall DOVER Nonresidents

  19. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt 2014; published online 14 October 2014) Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced

  20. Rapid Conversion of Hindered Arylsulfonates to Alkyl Chlorides with Retention of Configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepore, Salvatore D.

    Rapid Conversion of Hindered Arylsulfonates to Alkyl Chlorides with Retention of Configuration of highly efficient leaving groups containing chelating units capable of attracting incoming nucleophiles assisting leaving groups (NALGs) that contain a polyether unit (including macrocyclic) attached to the aryl

  1. SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA IN SELECTED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA systems require knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K). This study involved field and laboratory determination of soil

  2. Mercury retention by fly ashes from coal combustion: Influence of the unburned carbon content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Anton, M.A.; Diaz-Somoano, M.; Martinez-Tarazona, M.R.

    2007-01-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of unburned carbon particles present in fly ashes produced by coal combustion on mercury retention. To achieve this objective, the work was divided into two parts. The aim of the first part of the study was to estimate the amount of mercury captured by the fly ashes during combustion in power stations and the relationship of this retention to the unburned carbon content. The second part was a laboratory-scale study aimed at evaluating the retention of mercury concentrations greater than those produced in power stations by fly ashes of different characteristics and by unburned carbon particles. From the results obtained it can be inferred that the unburned carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture in fly ashes. The textural characteristics of these unburned particles and of other components of fly ashes also influence retention.

  3. Variations in the Retention and Excretion of {sup 137}Cs with Age and Sex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boni, A.L.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses the effects of age and sex on the retention and excretion of {sup 137}Cs in the body in a cross section of the general population over a four-year period.

  4. The retention and distribution of Salmonella typhimurium in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Gary Lee

    1981-01-01

    THE RETENTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN THE CHANNEL CATFISH (ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS) A Thesis by GARY LEE COON Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A8d~ University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December Ig81 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology THE RETENTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN THE CHANNEL CATFISH (ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS) A Thesis by GARY LEE COON Approved as to style and content by...

  5. Oral Drug Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamashita, Shinji

    2006-10-26

    Stability 0 20 40 60 80 100 25 10 5 1 0.5 size? r 0 (?m) Fr action absor b ed in hum an (% ) Peff =5.0 Peff =3.0 Peff =1.0 Peff =0.5 Peff =0.1 Solubility? Cs = 1.0 (?g/ml) Effect of micronization on intestinal absorption of poorly soluble drugs Peff... ?? permeability to human intestine? (cm/sec x 10 -4 ) 8 Effect of Solubility on intestinal absorption of poorly soluble drugs Cs (?g/ml) 0 5 10 15 50 Fr action absor b ed in hum an (% ) 0 20 40 60 80 100 Peff =5.0 Peff =3.0 Peff =1.0 Peff =0.5 Peff =0.1 r 0 = 1...

  6. Systems Theory for Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aswani, Anil Jayanti

    2010-01-01

    model to identify multiple drug targets which can be candidates for the traditional process of drug discovery.

  7. PHCL4003: Anti-infective drugs: Drugs that kill invaders -2015 Spring Course Co-Directors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, Jonathan

    1 PHCL4003: Anti-infective drugs: Drugs that kill invaders - 2015 Spring Course Co to antimicrobial chemotherapy Jan. 26: 2. Principles of antibacterial drugs I: Drug targets and cytotoxicity Jan. 28: 3. Principles of antibacterial drugs II: Drug resistance Feb. 2: 4. Antibacterial drugs

  8. Investigating Student Satisfaction and Retention in Online High School Courses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Susan Haley

    2014-11-07

    ) students taking a course for the first time who subsequently earned course credit, (b) students taking a course for the first time who subsequently did not earn course credit, (c) students repeating a course who subsequently earned course credit, and (d...

  9. Retention system and method for the blades of a rotary machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Poul D. (Cincinnati, OH); Glynn, Christopher C. (Hamilton, OH); Walker, Roger C. (Piedmont, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A retention system and method for the blades of a rotary machine for preventing forward or aft axial movement of the rotor blades includes a circumferential hub slot formed about a circumference of the machine hub. The rotor blades have machined therein a blade retention slot which is aligned with the circumferential hub slot when the blades are received in correspondingly shaped openings in the hub. At least one ring segment is secured in the blade retention slots and the circumferential hub slot to retain the blades from axial movement. A key assembly is used to secure the ring segments in the aligned slots via a hook portion receiving the ring segments and a threaded portion that is driven radially outwardly by a nut. A cap may be provided to provide a redundant back-up load path for the centrifugal loads on the key. Alternatively, the key assembly may be formed in the blade dovetail.

  10. Drug metabolizing enzymes activities versus genetic variances for drug of clinical pharmacogenomic relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Alan HB

    2011-01-01

    this article as: Wu: Drug metabolizing enzyme activitiesgenetic variances for drug of clinical pharmacogenomicPROTEOMICS Open Access Drug metabolizing enzyme activities

  11. Retention by vegetation of radionuclides deposited in rainfall: A literature summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    1987-06-01

    Data include the results of experiments with artificial tracers and information from direct measurements of naturally occurring and fallout-produced radionuclides washed out or rained out by storms. Individual measurements of retention varied from negative to over 100%. The conclusion is that a value of 0.4 to 0.5 would be appropriate for average retention, and a value of 1.0 would not be unreasonable if one wished to be conservative, particularly where high vegetation densities might be expected. 35 refs., 16 tabs.

  12. Influence of rainfall on the retention of sludge trace metals by the leaves of forage crops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Stephen Grady

    1977-01-01

    INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE METALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis STEPHEN GRADY JONES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Soil Science INFLUENCE OF RAINFALL ON THE RETENTION OF SLUDGE TRACE MFTALS BY THE LEAVES OF FORAGE CROPS A Thesis by STEPHEN GRADY JONES Approved a to style and content by: 1 (Chairman of Committee...

  13. Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, Michael S.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3•nH2O) to goethite (?-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathway’s contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ~7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 ?M, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM) coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14 to 89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ? 50 ?M when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64 to 89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron oxides as a retention process of U across a wide range of biogeochemical environments and the sensitivity of uranium retention processes to operative (bio)geochemical conditions.

  14. 8.6 Closeout The requirement for timely closeout is a grantee responsibility. Failure to submit timely and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    8.6 Closeout The requirement for timely closeout is a grantee responsibility. Failure to submit for amounts due the grantee or NIH. Closeout of a grant does not automatically cancel any requirements for property accountability, record retention, or financial accountability. Following closeout, the grantee

  15. Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Todd

    Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen Department of Biology, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA Introduction Orb webs depend upon threads, the sticky spirals of orb webs perform two important functions during prey cap- ture. First

  16. Employee Retention of the X and Y Generation Employees at ABC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatto, Sean

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this Engineering Management Field Project is to gain a better understanding of how ABC is performing in the area of Employee Retention of generation X and Y employees. ABC is a high tech aerospace company that was established...

  17. The impact of combined heat and noise on short-term retention 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parent, John Scott

    1993-01-01

    This thesis reports on the impact of combined heat and noise on the performance of a short-term memory retention task with two levels of difficulty. Thirty-two males, ages 18 - 35, were exposed to four different treatment conditions during four one...

  18. MESH RETENTION OF LARVAE OF SARDINOPS CAERULEA AND ENGRAULIS MORDAX BY PLANKTON NETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . LENARZ 1 ABSTRACT Mesh retention of the standard plankton sampling gear used by the California by the standard gear with a gear that retains larvae of all sizes. The results indicate that 67% of sardine larvae and 60% of anchovy larvae are retained by the meshes of the standard gear. The standard gear was replaced

  19. Finance Program Retention for FALL 2014 Instructions for Transcript Review Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Finance Program ­ Retention for FALL 2014 Instructions for Transcript Review Form College of Business at Northern Illinois University The Department of Finance Transcript Review Form should in the finance core). All NIU students are eligible to declare a major in Finance; however, students must meet

  20. Aspect influences on soil water retention and storage I. J. Geroy,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Hans-Peter

    D. G. Chandler,4 S. G. Benner3 and J. P. McNamara3 * 1 United States Forest Service, Durango, CO differentiated by slope aspect. In this study, we compare quantitative measures of soil water retention capacity hydraulic conductivity and moisture cont

  1. Local coordination of Zn in hydroxy-interlayered minerals and implications for Zn retention in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in soils Olivier Jacquat, Andreas Voegelin *, Ruben Kretzschmar Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant-interlayered minerals (HIM) for Zn retention in contaminated soils. Published and newly collected extended X. In a second part, we determined the spe- ciation of Zn in eight contaminated soils (251­1039 mg/kg Zn

  2. RETENTION OF Cd, Cu, Pb AND Zn BY WOOD ASH, LIME AND FUME DUST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    RETENTION OF Cd, Cu, Pb AND Zn BY WOOD ASH, LIME AND FUME DUST TAIT CHIRENJE1 , LENA Q. MA2 and ecosystem health. This study investigated the effectiveness of wood ash in immobilizing the heavy metals Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn from aqueous solutions. The effects of initial metal concentrations, solution pH, ash

  3. Background: Subsurface Water Retention Technology (SWRT) Durable and easy to install: Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Background: Subsurface Water Retention Technology (SWRT) Benefits Durable and easy to install: Water retaining membranes can last at least 40 years and can be installed quickly and costeffectively permeable marginal soils converting them to much higher production levels of food crops. Better water

  4. Threshold effects of variable retention harvesting on understory plant communities in the boreal mixedwood forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    Threshold effects of variable retention harvesting on understory plant communities in the boreal mixedwood forest Ashley Craig, S. Ellen Macdonald * Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta are characterized by an on-going cycle of natural disturbances and successional development at varying scales

  5. Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedarhemlock forests,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Retention of canopy lichens after partial-cut harvesting in wet-belt interior cedar­hemlock forests-growth cedar­hemlock forests of the interior wet-belt of British Columbia are rich in abundance and diversity a zone of high precipitation, the so-called interior wet- belt, which favours the development of lush wet

  6. Analysis of Assembly Bill 310: Prescription Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01

    pdf. Accessed February 2011. Medco. 2010 Drug Trend Report.www.drugtrend.com/art/drug_trend/pdf/DT_Report_2010.pdf.chronic myeloid leukaemia. Drugs. 2007;67(2): p. 299- April

  7. Prescription Drug List effective January 1, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    1 Your 2015 Prescription Drug List effective January 1, 2015 Student Resources Traditional ThreeZIPcode. ·Lookuppossiblelower-costmedicationalternatives. ·Comparemedicationpricingandoptions. #12;2 Your Prescription Drug List This Prescription Drug List (PDL) outlines the most commonly prescribed medications for certain

  8. Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer(L-lactic acid) is promising in drug delivery applications because it allows for drug release in a controlled manner. In a polymer-based drug delivery system, drug release is controlled by polymer degradation

  9. Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    1 Effect of Drug Loading and Laser Surface Melting on Drug Release Profile from Biodegradable The biodegradable polymer such as poly(L-lactic acid) is promising in drug delivery applications because it allows for drug release in a controlled manner. In a polymer-based drug delivery system, drug release

  10. Drug-Drug Interaction Detection: A New Approach Based on Maximal Frequent Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Paolo

    Drug-Drug Interaction Detection: A New Approach Based on Maximal Frequent Sequences Detecci´on de´armacos, extracci´on de relaciones, secuencias frecuentes maximales Abstract: In this paper, a new approach for Drug-Drug that contain Drug-Drug Interactions. Maximal Frequent Sequences define word sequences that are frequent

  11. Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2012-02-24

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy's River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments began with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments. The most significant results from the current experiments are that progressively lower gas retention occurs in tests with progressively deeper sediment layers and that the method of gas generation also affects the maximum retention. Based on the results of this study, it is plausible that relatively low gas retention could occur in sufficiently deep tank waste in DSTs. The current studies and previous work, however, have not explored how gas retention and release will behave when two or more layers with different properties are present.

  12. Proposed Plan Amendment Language for the Improved Retention and Utilization program -Amendment 49 to the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Fishery Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposed Plan Amendment Language for the Improved Retention and Utilization program - Amendment 49 to the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Fishery Management Plan: Insert a new section 14.9 to read as follows: 14.9 Improved Retention/Improved Utilization (IR/IU) Program. 14.9.1 Minimum retention requirements All vessels

  13. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Science Subject Feed Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) 29 > Oleoresin Capsicum...

  14. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

    1999-02-23

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to percolati on in single-shell tank (SST) waste forms. The much higher void being currently observed in SY-101 represents essentially a new crust configuration, and the mechanisms for sudden gas release need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the situation of gas bubbles in crust based on the previous work on gas bubble retention, migration, and release in simulants and actual waste. We have also conducted some visual observations of bubble migration through simulated crusts to help understand the interaction of the various mechanisms.

  15. Discovering the Targets of Drugs Via Computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discovering the Targets of Drugs Via Computational Systems Biology* Published, JBC Papers in Press is empowering the study of drug action. Studies on biological effects of chemical com- pounds have increased of drugs, with the collective potential to change the nature of drug discovery and pharmacological therapy

  16. Drug-Target Interaction Predicates Combining Similarities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    Drug-Target Interaction Predicates DataSet Combining Similarities Collective Inference Collective Inference and Multi-Relational Learning for Drug­Target Interaction Prediction Shobeir Fakhraei1, Bert Huang1 and Lise Getoor1,2 Poly-pharmacology Drug Repurposing Drug-Target Interaction Network Studies

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2013-03-21

    In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

  18. Retention sleeve for a thermal medium carrying tube in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Norman Douglas (Ballston Lake, NY); Czachor, Robert Paul (Cincinnati, OH)

    2003-01-01

    Multiple tubes are connected to steam supply and spent cooling steam return manifolds for supplying cooling steam to buckets and returning spent cooling steam from the buckets to the manifolds, respectively. The tubes are prevented from axial movement in one direction by flanges engaging end faces of the spacer between the first and second-stage wheels. Retention sleeves are disposed about cantilevered ends of the tubes. One end of the retention sleeve engages an enlarged flange on the tube, while an opposite end is spaced axially from an end face of the adjoining wheel, forming a gap, enabling thermal expansion of the tubes and limiting axial displacement of the tube in the opposite direction.

  19. Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-08-02

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  20. Detailed Analysis of a Late-Phase Core-Melt Progression for the Evaluation of In-vessel Corium Retention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; R. J. Park; S. B. Kim; K. Y. Suh; F. B.Cheung

    2006-12-01

    Detailed analyses of a late-phase melt progression in the advanced power reactor (APR)1400 were completed to identify the melt and the thermal-hydraulic states of the in-vessel materials in the reactor vessel lower plenum at the time of reactor vessel failure to evaluate the candidate strategies for an in-vessel corium retention (IVR). Initiating events considered included high-pressure transients of a total loss of feed water (LOFW) and a station blackout (SBO) and low-pressure transients of a 0.0009-m2 small, 0.0093-m2 medium, and 0.0465-m2 large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) without safety injection. Best-estimate simulations for these low-probability events with conservative accident progression assumptions that lead to reactor vessel failure were performed by using the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 computer code. The SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 results have shown that the pressurizer surge line failed before the reactor vessel failure, which results in a rapid decrease of the in-vessel pressure and a delay of the reactor vessel failure time of ~40 min in the high-pressure sequences of the total LOFW and the SBO transients. In all the sequences, ~80 to 90% of the core material was melted and relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel at the time of reactor vessel failure. The maximum value of the volumetric heat source in the corium pool was estimated as 1.9 to 3.7 MW/m3. The corium temperature was ~2800 to 3400 K at the time of reactor vessel failure. The highest volumetric heat source sequence is predicted for the 0.0465-m2 large-break LOCA without safety injection in the APR1400, because this sequence leads to an early reactor vessel failure.

  1. Soft-Template-Synthesized Mesoporous Carbon for Oral Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Dipendu [ORNL] [ORNL; Warren, Kaitlyn E [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Template-synthesized mesoporous carbons were successfully used in in vitro investigations of controlled delivery of three model drugs, captopril, furosemide, and ranitidine hydrochloride. Captopril and furosemide exhibited desorption kinetics over 30 40 h, and ranitidine HCl had a complete release time of 5 10 h. As evident from the slow release kinetics, we contend that our mesoporous carbon is an improved drug-delivery medium compared to state-of-the-art porous silica-based substrates. The mesoporous carbons, synthesized from phloroglucinol and lignin, a synthetic and a sustainable precursor, respectively, exhibit BET surface area of 200 400 m2 g-1 and pore volume of 0.2 0.6 cm3 g-1. The phloroglucinol-based carbon has narrower pore widths and higher pore volume than the lignin-derived counterpart and maintains a longer release time. Numerical modeling of the release kinetics data reveals that the diffusivities of all the drugs from lignin-based carbon media are of equivalent magnitude (10-22 to 10-24 m2 s-1). However, a tailored reduction of pore width in the sorbent reduces the diffusivity of smaller drug molecules (captopril) by an order of magnitude. Thus, engineered pore morphology in our synthesized carbon sorbent, along with its potential to tailor the chemistry of its interaction with sorbet, can be exploited for optimal delivery system of a preferred drug within its therapeutic level and below the level of toxicity.

  2. Drug-Target Interaction Prediction for Drug Repurposing with Probabilistic Similarity Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    Drug-Target Interaction Prediction for Drug Repurposing with Probabilistic Similarity Logic Shobeir, USA getoor@cs.umd.edu ABSTRACT The high development cost and low success rate of drug dis- covery from appro- ved drugs. Computational methods can be effective in focu- sing efforts for such drug repurposing

  3. An approach to drug delivery using novel carbohydrates to carry drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    An approach to drug delivery using novel carbohydrates to carry drugs has recently been described of the cancer drug doxorubicin targeted to hepatocytes in a mouse liver tumour model. Known as the LEAPT step involves administering the rhamnose-capped pro-drug; the drug is activated in the target cell once

  4. Drug-Initiated, Controlled Ring-Opening Polymerization for the Synthesis of Polymer-Drug Conjugates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Drug-Initiated, Controlled Ring-Opening Polymerization for the Synthesis of Polymer-Drug Conjugates to paclitaxel and the subsequent ring-opening polymerization of lactide. The drug-initiated, controlled(-caprolactone)) was also achieved through drug/(BDI-II)ZnN(TMS)2-mediated controlled polymerization. These drug

  5. Drug-Initiated Ring-Opening Polymerization of OCarboxyanhydrides for the Preparation of Anticancer Drug-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Drug-Initiated Ring-Opening Polymerization of OCarboxyanhydrides for the Preparation of Anticancer Drug- Poly(Ocarboxyanhydride) Nanoconjugates Qian Yin, Rong Tong,, Yunxiang Xu, Kwanghyun Baek of polymer-drug conjugates for nanoparticulate drug delivery: hydroxyl-containing drug (e.g., camptothecin

  6. Alcohol and Other Drugs -1 -Approved: 05/09/2014 Alcohol and Other Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Alcohol and Other Drugs - 1 - Approved: 05/09/2014 Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy Type: Board with the federal Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988, the federal Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, and the Commonwealth of Virginia's Policy on Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD), it is the policy of Virginia Commonwealth

  7. Investigation of the use of nanofluids to enhance the In-Vessel Retention capabilities of Advanced Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannink, Ryan Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids at very low concentrations experimentally exhibit a substantial increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) compared to water. The use of a nanofluid in the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) severe accident management strategy, ...

  8. Teacher Participation in Professional Activities and Job Satisfaction: Prevalence and Associative Relationship to Retention for High School Science Teachers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozeman, Todd Dane

    2012-02-14

    satisfaction. Using relative risk statistics, I determined the direction and significance of multiple associative relationships involving teachers’ participation in professional activities, satisfaction with working conditions, and retention state. Finally, I...

  9. Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Gregory L

    2011-01-01

    In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

  10. Impact of organic matrix compounds on the retention of steroid hormone estrone by a ‘loose’ nanofiltration membrane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Nghiem, L. D.; Meier, Anja; Neale, Peta A.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of solute-solute interactions on retention and membrane adsorption of the micropollutant estrone was determined in the presence of surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), natural organic matter (NOM) and ...

  11. An Exploration of How Involvement in a Freshman Retention Program Relates to Intention to Complete an Undergraduate Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clounch, Teresa Lynn

    2010-07-15

    The study examined the relationship of the level and type of involvement of freshman students in the Hawk Link Retention Program, a first-year program at the University of Kansas, to intent to return and graduate. The study ...

  12. Enhanced drug delivery capabilities from stents coated with absorbable polymer and crystalline drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlyle, Wenda C.

    Current drug eluting stent (DES) technology is not optimized with regard to the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery. A novel, absorbable-coating sirolimus-eluting stent (AC-SES) was evaluated for its capacity to deliver drug ...

  13. Brain science, addiction and drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiesner, Karoline

    Designing your future Page 7 Theme: Nanoscience and Quantum Information Exchanging keys in the Canaries Page:searchUniversity of Bristol · Research Review · Issue 10 · October 2005 research themes issue #12;Research themes 2005 Establishedresearchthemes Theme: Neuroscience Brain science, addiction and drugs Other established research themes

  14. A bright idea? : the promise and peril of a memory drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowd, William (William Michael)

    2007-01-01

    In the MIT lab of neuropharmacologist Richard Wurtman, rodents that received a new Alzheimer's drug have shown a marked improvement in learning and memory. They are able to master elaborate mazes in half the time of their ...

  15. Interim Report on Consumer Acceptance, Retention, and response to Time-based rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. Department of Energy |June 2015 Interim Report on Impacts

  16. Sediment Retention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistanceand Governmentm D mSecurityWeirs

  17. Packaging for a drug delivery microelectromechanical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2005-01-01

    Local drug delivery is a fast expanding field, and has been a center of attention for researchers in medicine in the last decade. Its advantages over systemic drug delivery are clear in cancer therapy, with localized tumors. ...

  18. Financing drug discovery for orphan diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagnan, David Erik

    Recently proposed ‘megafund’ financing methods for funding translational medicine and drug development require billions of dollars in capital per megafund to de-risk the drug discovery process enough to issue long-term ...

  19. SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-08

    This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

  20. The pipeline and future of drug development in schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, J A; Roth, B L

    2007-01-01

    The Pipeline and Future of Drug Development in SchizophreniaThe Drug Discovery Pipeline in Schizophrenia Keywords:discuss the current pipeline of drugs for schizophrenia,

  1. Drug transport in brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardridge, William M

    2011-01-01

    diffusion. Drug transport into cerebrospinal fluid vs. brainDrug transport from blood to interstitial fluid (ISF) isDrug transport in brain via the cerebrospinal fluid William

  2. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-08-15

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. 38 39 Information provided in this Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 40 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility permit application documentation is 41 current as of June 1, 1997.

  3. Method for training honeybees to respond to olfactory stimuli and enhancement of memory retention therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCade, Kirsten J.; Wingo, Robert M.; Haarmann, Timothy K.; Sutherland, Andrew; Gubler, Walter D.

    2015-12-15

    A specialized conditioning protocol for honeybees that is designed for use within a complex agricultural ecosystem. This method ensures that the conditioned bees will be less likely to exhibit a conditioned response to uninfected plants, a false positive response that would render such a biological sensor unreliable for agricultural decision support. Also described is a superboosting training regime that allows training without the aid of expensive equipment and protocols for training in out in the field. Also described is a memory enhancing cocktail that aids in long term memory retention of a vapor signature. This allows the bees to be used in the field for longer durations and with fewer bees trained overall.

  4. Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    ARTICLES Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs Michael J. Keiser1,2 *, Vincent Setola3 drugs are intended to be selective, at least some bind to several physiological targets, explaining side effects and efficacy. Because many drug­target combinations exist, it would be useful to explore possible

  5. CMVO Drug Testing Program Reasonable Suspicion Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    CMVO Drug Testing Program Reasonable Suspicion Testing CMVO Revised Suspicion Form (Revised 6/08) Guidelines for Reasonable Suspicion Drug and Alcohol Testing: A supervisor, trained in accordance with 49 CFR involved in an incident that requires drug/alcohol testing as set forth in 382.307. Remember: Reasonable

  6. Focus Article Open challenges in magnetic drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Focus Article Open challenges in magnetic drug targeting Benjamin Shapiro,1,2 Sandip Kulkarni,1 Aleksander Nacev,3 Silvia Muro,1,4 Pavel Y. Stepanov3 and Irving N. Weinberg3 The principle of magnetic drug is that highlight- ing these challenges will help researchers translate magnetic drug targeting from a novel concept

  7. Drugs and Behavior (Psychology 320 Sec. 001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopfinger, Joseph B.

    1 Drugs and Behavior (Psychology 320 Sec. 001) Syllabus Example Text: Maisto, Galizio and Conners. Drug Use and Abuse. Harcourt Brace College Publishers. 2008, Fifth Edition. Prerequisites: This course of drugs of abuse. An overview of basic pharmacology and behavioral pharmacology will be provided followed

  8. Thoughts on Studying and Learning the Content of 4170 The textbook gives a complete coverage of this subject. Many, many drugs are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    of this subject. Many, many drugs are shown and discussed. Due to time limitations, in this class, we will discuss drug structures from memory. You do need to know specific facts and concepts associated with the "case studies" covered in class (for example sulfa drugs and H2-blockers). You do not need to recall all of your

  9. Proctors' Memorandum on Drugs Misuse Guidelines from Proctors' Office on Dealing with Drugs Misuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Proctors' Memorandum on Drugs Misuse Guidelines from Proctors' Office on Dealing with Drugs Misuse The use of specified drugs is illegal within the UK, and is inimical to the University's primary objectives of the pursuit of academic study and research. The presence of drugs within the University

  10. Dimeric Drug Polymeric Nanoparticles with Exceptionally High Drug Loading and Quantitative Loading Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Dimeric Drug Polymeric Nanoparticles with Exceptionally High Drug Loading and Quantitative LoadingChampaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education-molecule drugs in hydrophobic polymers or amphiphilic copolymers has been extensively used for preparing

  11. Experimenting with Drugs (and Topic Models): Multi-Dimensional Exploration of Recreational Drug Discussions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dredze, Mark

    Experimenting with Drugs (and Topic Models): Multi-Dimensional Exploration of Recreational Drug of new recreational drugs and trends re- quires mining current information from non-traditional text components. The resulting model learns factors that correspond to drug type, delivery method (smoking

  12. Automatic Drug Side Effect Discovery from Online Patient-Submitted Reviews: Focus on Statin Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic Drug Side Effect Discovery from Online Patient-Submitted Reviews: Focus on Statin Drugs become empowered to share personal experiences regarding prescription drugs via Web page discussion from patient-provided drug reviews on health-related web sites. We focus on the statin class

  13. HAZARDOUS DRUG SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HANDLING ANTINEOPLASTIC OTHER HAZARDOUS DRUGS IN CLINICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    HAZARDOUS DRUG SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HANDLING ANTINEOPLASTIC AND OTHER HAZARDOUS DRUGS IN CLINICAL ENVIRONMENTS (5/3/2013) Introduction Drugs have a successful history of use in treating diseases and are responsible for many medical advances over the past century. However, virtually every drug has side effects

  14. Policy on Drug-Free Workplace Policy on Drug-Free Workplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Drug-Free Workplace 10/26/2014 Policy on Drug-Free Workplace I. Purpose and Scope responsible decision- making regarding the use of alcohol and other drugs. Northeastern strives to maintain drug use can create. Additionally, the University is committed to enforcing policies and laws relating

  15. Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-26

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

  16. RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2013-06-17

    Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

  17. Drugs in Cinema: Separating the Myths from Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iannicelli, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Drugs in Cinema: Separating the Myths from Reality PaulSUMMARY 7 (2000). DRUGS IN CINEMA policy has a significantviolence in film. DRUGS IN CINEMA III. HISTORY OF DRUG USE

  18. Vaginal mesh grafts and the Food and Drug Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostergard, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    and the Food and Drug Administration Donald R. Ostergardthe food and drug administration's (FDA) 510(k) process of

  19. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  20. Testing Drugs Versus Testing For Drug Use: Private Risk Management in the Shadow of the Criminal Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCoun, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Preface: The Varieties of Drug Control at the Dawn of thetbl.1.1. Id. See Peter Reuter, Drug Use Measures: What AreBetween Student Illicit Drug Use and School Drug-Testing

  1. SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    =forever) Cost spent to build variation point i at time i = index over variation points #12;SYMBOLS FOR TIME to account for net present value of money r = assumed interest rate i = index over variation points Cost Expected cost summed over all relevant time intervals Cost spent to build variation point i at time r

  2. Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a user of that drug (e.g. it produces a positive result with probability .98 in the case that the tested individual uses the drug) and 90% accurate in the case of a non

  3. Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Drug testing example for conditional probability Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug .98 in the case that the tested individual uses the drug) and 90% accurate in the case of a non it is known that 10% of the entire population uses this drug. You test someone and the test is positive. What

  4. Insights from Investigations of In-Vessel Retention for High Powered Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe

    2005-10-01

    In a three-year U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI), state-of-the-art analytical tools and key U.S. and Korean experimental facilities were used to explore two options, enhanced ERVC performance and the use of internal core catchers, that have the potential to increase the margin for in-vessel retention (IVR) in high power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). This increased margin has the potential to improve plant economics (owing to reduced regulatory requirements) and increase public acceptance (owing to reduced plant risk). Although this program focused upon the Korean Advanced Power Reactor -- 1400 MWe (APR 1400) design, recommentations were developed so that they can easily be applied to a wide range of existing and advanced reactor designs. This paper summarizes new data gained for evaluating the margin associated with various options investigated in this program. Insights from analyses completed with this data are also highlighted.

  5. Modelling Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-09-03

    We briefly review two concepts of time - the usual time associated with "being" and more recent ideas, answering to the description of "becoming". The approximation involved in the former is examined. Finally we argue that it is (unpredictable) fluctuations that underlie time.

  6. Local mass non-equilibrium dynamics in multi-layered porous media: application to the drug-eluting stent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontrelli, Giuseppe

    the drug is initially loaded in polymer-encapsu- lated solid-phase, and then released both to the coating problem. Drug concentration levels and mass profiles in each layer at various times are computed, either with experimental methods [3] and with numerical simulations [4­6]. Nonetheless, many questions

  7. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  8. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  9. Analysis of Assembly Bill 310: Prescription Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01

    drugs related to infertility treatment (for those plans thatloss treatments; infertility treatments; smoking cessationfor the treatment of sexual dysfunction and infertility). In

  10. Exhibit 1C Patent Rights Retention by the Seller ITER UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exhibit 1C ­ Patent Rights ­ Retention by the Seller ­ ITER UT-B Contracts Div March 2007 Page 1 to the public on reasonable terms. (5) "Small business firm" means a small business concern as defined at section 2 of Pub. L. 85-536 (15 U.S.C. 632) and implementing regulations of the Administrator of the Small

  11. Use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water retention properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water retention properties. Most database. Results showed that use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity as a predictor led

  12. Prediction of soil water retention properties after stratification by combining texture, bulk density and the type of horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of water content at particular water potentials (Rawls et al., 1982 & 2004) or the estimation). Most class-PTFs provide class average water contents at particular water potentials or one average1 Prediction of soil water retention properties after stratification by combining texture, bulk

  13. Enhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    al. [10], assuming the overall efficiency of the fuel cell system is 20%, the specific energyEnhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells 31 July 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) Neat-methanol operation Water

  14. Influence of pH on Phosphorus Retention in Oxidized Lake Sediments O. G. Olila* and K. R. Reddy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Influence of pH on Phosphorus Retention in Oxidized Lake Sediments O. G. Olila* and K. R. Reddy-soluble P concentration (WSP) and P sorption by suspended sediments in shallow eutrophic lakes. Labora- tory sediment suspensions from two subtropical lakes (Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee, Florida). The P sorption

  15. Quantum Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ashmead

    2010-05-05

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  16. Mechanical loading impacts intramuscular drug transport : impact on local drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter I-Kung

    2008-01-01

    Controlled-release drug-delivery systems enable efficient and defined administration of therapeutic agents to target tissues. However, ultimate drug distribution and pharmacologic effect are determined by target tissue ...

  17. Computational Method for Drug Target Search and Application in Drug Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuzong

    Ligand-protein inverse docking has recently been introduced as a computer method for identification of potential protein targets of a drug. A protein structure database is searched to find proteins to which a drug can bind ...

  18. Large-scale prediction of adverse drug reactions using chemical, biological, and phenotypic properties of drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mei; Wu, Yonghui; Chen, Yukun; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming; Chen, Xue-wen; Matheny, Michael Edwin; Xu, Hua

    2012-06-19

    Abstract Objective Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is one of the major causes of failure in drug development. Severe ADRs that go undetected until the post-marketing phase of a drug often lead to patient morbidity. Accurate prediction of potential ADRs...

  19. POLICY STATEMENT ON DRUG-FREE CAMPUS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    11 POLICY STATEMENT ON DRUG-FREE CAMPUS* It is the policy of ETSU that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, possession, use of alcohol and illicit drugs on the ETSU campus, in the workplace (on or off campus), on property owned or controlled by ETSU, or as part of any activity of ETSU is strictly

  20. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.haage@helios-kliniken.de [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  1. Pricing in the Market for Anticancer Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, David H.

    In 2011, Bristol-Myers Squibb set the price of its newly approved melanoma drug ipilimumab— brand name Yervoy—at $120,000 for a course of therapy. The drug was associated with an incremental increase in life expectancy of ...

  2. Illegal Drugs Policy Swansea University and Students' Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Illegal Drugs Policy Swansea University and Students' Union #12;Illegal Drugs Policy for Swansea University and Students' Union Table of Contents Page Drugs Policy Statement 2 Drugs Policy 3 1. Introduction 2. Who is covered by the policy? 3. Aims of the policy 5. What do we mean by illegal drugs? 4

  3. Kodama time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abreu, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    In a general time-dependent (3+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime, the so-called Kodama vector is a naturally defined geometric quantity that is timelike outside the evolving horizon and so defines a preferred class of fiducial observers. However the Kodama vector does not by itself define any preferred notion of time. We demonstrate that a preferred time coordinate - which we shall call Kodama time - can be introduced by taking the additional step of applying the Clebsch decomposition theorem to the Kodama vector. We thus construct a geometrically preferred coordinate system for any time-dependent spherically symmetric spacetime, and explore its properties. In particular we use this formalism to construct a general class of conservation laws, generalizing Kodama's energy flux. We study the geometrically preferred fiducial observers, and demonstrate that it is possible to define and calculate a generalized notion of surface gravity that is valid throughout the entire evolving spacetime. Furthermor...

  4. Modeling Multiple Drugs on Lung Cancer and Normal Cells using Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Drug Combination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .n 27 vii List of Tables Drug Concentration . . . . . . .Factorial Designs in Antiviral Drug Stud- ies. ” Quality and

  5. Quantum time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannetti, Vittorio

    We give a consistent quantum description of time, based on Page and Wootters’s conditional probabilities mechanism, which overcomes the criticisms that were raised against similar previous proposals. In particular we show ...

  6. An implantable device for localized drug delivery and sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Karen D

    2009-01-01

    There are many potential clinical applications for localized drug delivery and sensing systems, such as cancer, vaccinations, pain management, and hormone therapy. Localized drug delivery systems reduce the amount of drug ...

  7. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print Tuesday, 23 June 2015 13:00 The cancer drug...

  8. Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs: Examining Limitations and Future Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Christopher A.; Weiner, Scott G.; Feldman, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Li G, Brady JE, Lang B, et al. Prescription drug monitoringand drug overdose mortality. Inj Epidemiol. 2014;1:1-9.EM, Desai HA. Prescription drug monitoring programs and

  9. Drugs in Cinema: Separating the Myths from Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iannicelli, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Introduction: The Evolution of Drug Abuse in Americain HAND- BOOK OF DRUG CONTROL IN THE UNITED STATES (James A.See JOSEPH SPILLANE, MODERN DRUG, MODERN MENANCE 214 (1994).

  10. Optimizing Combination Therapies with Existing and Future CML Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katouli, Allen A.; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2010-01-01

    kinase inhibitors. Nat Rev Drug Discov 3: 1001–10. 12.screen: high efficacy of drug combinations. Blood 108: 2332–Abl kinase domain mutations, drug resistance, and the road

  11. Chow Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -1 THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to Texas A...

  12. The Role of Transporters in the Pharmacokinetics of Orally Administered Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shugarts, Sarah; Benet, Leslie Z.

    2009-01-01

    A, Benet LZ. Effects of drug transporters on volume of4. Mizuno N, Sugiyama Y. Drug transporters: their role andand development of new drugs. Drug Metab. Pharmacokinet.

  13. Resistance proof, folding-inhibitor drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Broglia; G. Tiana; R. Berera

    2002-10-09

    Conventional drugs work, as a rule, by inhibiting the enzymatic activity of specific proteins, capping their active site. In this paper we present a model of non- conventional drug design based on the inhibiting effects small peptides obtained from segments of the protein itself have on the folding ability of the system. Such peptides attach to the newly expressed (unfolded) protein and inhibit its folding, inhibition which cannot be avoided but through mutations which in any case denaturate the enzyme. These peptides, or their mimetic molecules, can be used as effective alternative drugs to those already available, displaying the advantage of not suffering from the upraise of resistence.

  14. Preliminary Study of Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-10-12

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy’s River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize initial progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The work is ongoing; this report provides a summary of the initial findings. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments will begin with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments.

  15. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

  16. In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

  17. In-Vessel Retention of Molten Corium: Lessons Learned and Outstanding Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Rempe; K.Y. Suh; F. B. Cheung; S. B. Kim

    2008-03-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Advanced 600 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designed by Westinghouse (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs). However, it is not clear that the ERVC proposed for the AP600 could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe) without additional enhancements. This paper reviews efforts made and results reported regarding the enhancement of IVR in LWRs. Where appropriate, the paper identifies what additional data or analyses are needed to demonstrate that there is sufficient margin for successful IVR in high power thermal reactors.

  18. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  19. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

  20. From the Frontlines to the Bottom Line: Medical Marijuana, the War on Drugs, and the Drug Policy Reform Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heddleston, Thomas Reed

    2012-01-01

    International Journal of Drug Policy 10: 319-28. Zinberg,Norman E. 1984. Drug, Set, and Setting: The Basis forand Mirrors: The War on Drugs and the Politics of Failure.

  1. Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Life Technologies Corporation and LANL have...

  2. Nanotechnology Medical Applications Breakthroughs in nanotechnology promise to revolutionize drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Nanotechnology Medical Applications Breakthroughs in nanotechnology promise to revolutionize drug's Nanotechnology Center are creating novel tools and developing new methods for crucial research areas of drug

  3. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein...

  4. Aerosol retention during SGTR meltdown sequences: Experimental insights of the effect of size and shape of the breach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herranz, L. E.; Tardaguila, R. D.; Lopez, C. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Avd. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarizes the major insights gained from aerosol retention capability of a tube bundle that simulates the break stage of the secondary side of a failed steam generator under dry SGTR conditions. This scenario is highly relevant in nuclear safety since it affects the potential retention of radioactive particles in case of meltdown sequences with a SGTR. An 8-test experimental campaign has been carried out, extending the current database on the decontamination capability of the steam generator. The effects of the breach features (shape and size) and the particle nature (SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}) on the collection efficiency have been explored. The results confirmed the strong effect of the physical nature even when tube breaks in a fish-mouth mode. Loose aggregates (i.e. TiO{sub 2}) would be trapped to a limited extent (less than 25%); while single- or few-aggregates (i.e. SiO{sub 2}) would undergo a quite effective removal (i.e. over 75%). For fish-mouth breaches and SiO{sub 2} particles, the breach size has been found to moderately affect retention efficiency. Furthermore, the breach shape does not seem to have any effect on the net collection efficiency within the break stage, no matter the particle type. However, individual tube measurements indicate notably different deposition patterns, although an effect of the facility geometry cannot be disregarded as a key player in this observation. (authors)

  5. In-Vessel Retention Technology Development and Use for Advanced PWR Designs in the USA and Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.G. Theofanous; S.J. Oh; J.H. Scobel

    2004-05-18

    In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of molten core debris by means of external reactor vessel flooding is a cornerstone of severe accident management for Westinghouse's AP600 (advanced passive light water reactor) design. The case for its effectiveness (made in previous work by the PI) has been thoroughly documented, reviewed as part of the licensing certification, and accepted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A successful IVR would terminate a severe accident, passively, with the core in a stable, coolable configuration (within the lower head), thus avoiding the largely uncertain accident evolution with the molten debris on the containment floor. This passive plant design has been upgraded by Westinghouse to the AP1000, a 1000 MWe plant very similar to the AP600. The severe accident management approach is very similar too, including In-Vessel Retention as the cornerstone feature, and initial evaluations indicated that this would be feasible at the higher power as well. A similar strategy is adopted in Korea for the APR1400 plant. The overall goal of this project is to provide experimental data and develop the necessary basic understanding so as to allow the robust extension of the AP600 In-Vessel Retention strategy for severe accident management to higher power reactors, and in particular, to the AP1000 advanced passive design.

  6. Summary of remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3), 300-FF-2 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulstrom, L.C.

    1994-06-30

    Remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3) in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site were conducted as part of the 300-FF-1 operable unit Phase 1 remedial investigation (RI) in accordance with the approved RI work plan. During the RI, the southwestern boundary of the 300-FF-1 operable unit was modified by all signatories to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, which shifted the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches to the 300-FF-3 operable unit. As a consequence, the RI results from these waste management units were not included in the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation Report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. As a results of recent Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the 300-FF-2 operable unit now consists of the remaining 300 Area operable units within the 300 Area National Priorities List (NPL), which includes the former 300-FF-3 operable unit. Therefore, this document summarizes the RI results from the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches in the 300-FF-2 operable unit. Analysis and evaluation of these results well be included in the 300-FF-2 RI report.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRITICAL HEAT FLUX WITH ALUMINA-WATER NANOFLUIDS IN DOWNWARD-FACING CHANNELS FOR IN-VESSEL RETENTION APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, R.J.

    The Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of water with dispersed alumina nanoparticles was measured for the geometry and flow conditions relevant to the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) situation which can occur during core melting sequences ...

  8. The Effects of Concept Mapping and Questioning on Students’ Organization and Retention of Science Knowledge While Using Interactive Read-Alouds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Jaime Leigh

    2012-10-19

    students in learning science concepts. Little or no research has combined these methods to examine its effect on learning. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare concept mapping and questioning on students' organization and retention...

  9. An Empirical Analysis of Factors That Influence the First Year to Second Year Retention of Students at One Large, Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Steven Lamar

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify how input and environmental factors impact first-to-second year retention of undergraduate students at a large Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). An additional purpose of the study was to determine...

  10. An identification of policies and practices that hinder and facilitate the admission and retention of Hispanics in institutions of higher education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantu, Linda Valdez

    2006-04-12

    and that facilitate or hinder institutions of higher education in the recruitment, admission, retention, and graduation of students, particularly Hispanic students. The researcher utilized the Delphi method to conduct the study. This research method produces a...

  11. 5.16: LIBRARY RETENTION, TENURE AND PROMOTIONS CRITERIA Approved by Library Faculty, Department Co-Chairs, and University Librarian 9/21/06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5.16: LIBRARY RETENTION, TENURE AND PROMOTIONS CRITERIA Approved by Library Faculty, Department Co in Library Assignment and amplifications are noted below for Professional Achievement and Growth & Research Libraries (ACRL), the national organization associated with academic librarians. For tenure

  12. Computational model of local intravascular drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Brinda

    2007-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) virtually eradicate the clinical phenomena of vessel restenosis; yet, they also increase the short and long term risks for stent thrombosis. To improve their safety and efficacy, it is critical ...

  13. Transdermal drug delivery by localized intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, James C.

    Both field-confined skin electroporation and microscissioning offer minimally invasive methods for delivering drugs across skin and nail with minimal sensation. Both methods create high permeability pathways in a pain-free ...

  14. Rethinking America’s Illegal Drug Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donohue III, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs (ESSPAOD). 2003. The ESPAD Report 2003: Alcohol andModintryckoffset. http://www.espad.org/documents/Espad/ESPAD_reports/The_2003_ESPAD_report.pdf. Fainaru, Steve, and

  15. Rethinking America’s Illegal Drug Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donohue III, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Throwing Away the Key or the Taxpayer’s Money? Santa Monica,sell these drugs has cost taxpayers billions of dollars eachdiffusely and the individual taxpayer cannot easily measure

  16. NEW APPROACHES IN UNDERSTANDING DRUG METABOLISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Steven N.

    2011-02-22

    Limitations in technology, such as DNA sequencing and appropriate model systems, have made it difficult to understand the genetic and non-genetic factors that influence the liver's role in metabolizing drugs. New approaches ...

  17. Exhibit 1C Patent Rights-Retention by the Seller (Short Form) UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Exhibit 1C ­ Patent Rights-Retention by the Seller (Short Form) UT-B Contracts Div Mar 2001 Page 1 of 3 ex1C-mar01format2005 Exhibit 1C Ref: DEAR 952.227-11 PATENT RIGHTS - RETENTION BY THE SELLER be patentable or otherwise protectable under title 35 of the United States Code, or any novel variety of plant

  18. An Enhanced In-Vessel Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe

    2005-11-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the invessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

  19. Development of an Enhanced Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Condie, K.G. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Knudson, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Suh, K.Y. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Cheung, F.B. [The Pennsylvania State University (United States); Kim, S.B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the in-vessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

  20. Potential for AP600 in-vessel retention through ex-vessel flooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Allison, C.M.; Thinnes, G.L.; Atwood, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) is a new severe accident management strategy that involves flooding the reactor cavity to submerge the reactor vessel in an attempt to cool core debris that has relocated to the vessel lower head. Advanced and existing light water reactors (LWRs) are considering ERVC as an accident management strategy for in-vessel retention (IVR) of relocated debris. In the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for the AP600 design, Westinghouse credits ERVC for preventing vessel failure during postulated severe accidents with successful reactor coolant system (RCS) depressurization and reactor cavity flooding. To support the Westinghouse position on IVR, DOE contracted the University of California--Santa Barbara (UCSB) to produce the peer-reviewed report. To assist in the NRC`s evaluation of IVR of core melt by ex-vessel flooding of the AP6OO, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was tasked to perform: An in-depth critical review of the UCSB study and the model that UCSB used to assess ERVC effectiveness; An in-depth review of the UCSB study peer review comments and of UCSB`s resolution method to identify areas where technical concerns weren`t addressed; and An independent analysis effort to investigate the impact of residual concerns on the margins to failure and conclusions presented in the UCSB study. This report summarizes results from these tasks. As discussed in Sections 1.1 and 1.2, INEEL`s review of the UCSB study and peer reviewer comments suggested that additional analysis was needed to assess: (1) the integral impact of peer reviewer-suggested changes to input assumptions and uncertainties and (2) the challenge present by other credible debris configurations. Section 1.3 summarized the corresponding analysis approach developed by INEEL. The remainder of this report provides more detailed descriptions of analysis methodology, input assumptions, and results.

  1. February 2011 1906: Pure Food & Drugs Act regulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    February 2011 #12; 1906: Pure Food & Drugs Act ­ regulated adultered/misbranded food & drugs 1938: Food, Drugs, & Cosmetics Acts ­ required premarket review for safety 1962: FDCA Amendments ­ the birth for investigations of new drugs, including a requirement for informed consent #12; 21 CFR 312 Subpart A ­ general

  2. Mar. Drugs 2015, 13, 3154-3181; doi:10.3390/md13053154 marine drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    Mar. Drugs 2015, 13, 3154-3181; doi:10.3390/md13053154 marine drugs ISSN 1660-3397 www.mdpi.com/journal/marinedrugs Review Molecular Architecture and Biomedical Leads of Terpenes from Red Sea Marine Invertebrates Mohamed Costantino Received: 9 April 2015 / Accepted: 7 May 2015 / Published: 20 May 2015 Abstract: Marine

  3. Mar. Drugs 2013, 11, 4370-4389; doi:10.3390/md11114370 marine drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirin Lopez, Jose Maria

    Mar. Drugs 2013, 11, 4370-4389; doi:10.3390/md11114370 marine drugs ISSN 1660-3397 www.mdpi.com/journal/marinedrugs Review Bivalve Omics: State of the Art and Potential Applications for the Biomonitoring of Harmful Marine of the marine ecosystem, constitute very valuable commercial resources in aquaculture, and have been widely used

  4. Drug Free Workplace This notice is intended to meet the requirements of the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Drug Free Workplace This notice is intended to meet the requirements of the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988, United States Code Title 41, Chapter 81, and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments revision date of September 1, 2016. Notice In accordance with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act

  5. Predicting Drug-Target Interaction for New Drugs Using Enhanced Similarity Measures and Super-Target Clustering1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Francis Y.L.

    Predicting Drug-Target Interaction for New Drugs Using Enhanced Similarity Measures and Super.hku.hk, FYLC: chin@cs.hku.hk * To whom correspondence should be addressed. Abstract--Predicting drug-target interaction using computa- tional approaches is an important step in drug discovery and repositioning

  6. Section 21: Drug Discovery/Delivery Pharmacokinetic Considerations of Local Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, Alec N.

    1 Section 21: Drug Discovery/Delivery Pharmacokinetic Considerations of Local Drug Delivery.Plontke@uni-tuebingen.de Although there is increasing interest in the local delivery of drugs to the inner ear by applying them to the round window (RW) membrane, most drug application protocols have been empirically- based. As a result

  7. Drug Research Assignment This assignment asks you choose a drug and learn how it works. This is NOT a writing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    CHEM 4170 Drug Research Assignment This assignment asks you choose a drug and learn how it works. This is NOT a writing assignment, this is a literature research project. The data for your drug will be presented below. Do not choose a drug that has been discussed in detail in Silverman's Book or in class. You may

  8. A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery VLSI Design and CAD Laboratory (VDCL), University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA. 2 Electrical many side effects, such as reduction in battery life time, increase in operating tempera- ture

  9. Achieving Continuous Manufacturing: Technologies and Approaches for Synthesis, Workup, and Isolation of Drug Substance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the different considerations for developing continuous processes compared with batch. In addition, through scale-up and into full scale production. The impact of continuous manufacture on drug substance analytical technologies (PAT) for real-time dynamic control of continuous processes. Develop modeling

  10. Experimental Study on the Improved In-Vessel Corium Retention Concepts for the Severe Accident Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, K.H.; Park, R.J.; Koo, K.M.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150, Dukjin-Dong, Yusong-Gu, Taejon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Feasibility experiments were performed for the assessment of improved In-Vessel Corium Retention (IVR) concepts using an internal engineered gap device and also a dual strategy of In/Ex-vessel cooling using the LAVA experimental facility. The internal engineered gap device made of carbon steel was installed inside the LAVA lower head vessel and it made a uniform gap with the vessel by 10 mm. In/Ex-vessel cooling in the dual strategy experiment was performed installing an external guide vessel outside the LAVA lower head vessel at a uniform gap of 25 mm. The LAVA lower head vessel was a hemispherical test vessel simulated with a 1/8 linear scale mock-up of the reactor vessel lower plenum with an inner diameter of 500 mm and thickness of 25 mm. In both of the tests, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt was delivered into about 50 K subcooled water inside the lower head vessel under the elevated pressure. Temperatures of the internal engineered gap device and the lower head vessel were measured by K-type thermocouples embedded radially in the 3 mm depth of the lower head vessel outer surface and in the 4 mm depth of the internal engineered gap device, respectively. In the dual strategy experiment, the Ex-vessel cooling featured pool boiling in the gap between the lower head vessel and the external guide vessel. It could be found from the experimental results that the internal engineered gap device was intact and so the vessel experienced little thermal and mechanical attacks in the internal engineered gap device experiment. And also the vessel was effectively cooled via mutual boiling heat removal in- and ex-vessel in the dual strategy experiment. Compared with the previous LAVA experimental results performed for the investigation of the inherent in-vessel gap cooling, it could be confirmed that the Ex-vessel cooling measure was dominant over the In-vessel cooling measure in this study. It is concluded that the improved cooling measures using a internal engineered gap device and a dual strategy promote the cooling characteristics of the lower head vessel and so enhance the integrity of the vessel in the end. (authors)

  11. In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scobel, James H.; Conway, L.E. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, P.O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0355 (United States); Theofanous, T.G. [Center for Risk Studies and Safety, University of California Santa Barbara (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris via external reactor vessel cooling is the hallmark of the severe accident management strategies in the AP600 passive PWR. The vessel is submerged in water to cool its external surface via nucleate boiling heat transfer. An engineered flow path through the reactor vessel insulation provides cooling water to the vessel surface and vents steam to promote IVR. For the 600 MWe passive plant, the predicted heat load from molten debris to the lower head wall has a large margin to the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel, which is the upper limit of the cooling capability. Up-rating the power of the passive plant from 600 to 1000 MWe (AP1000) significantly increases the heat loading from the molten debris to the reactor vessel lower head in the postulated bounding severe accident sequence. To maintain a large margin to the coolability limit for the AP1000, design features and severe accident management (SAM) strategies to increase the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel wall need to be implemented. A test program at the ULPU facility at University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) has been initiated to investigate design features and SAM strategies that can enhance the critical heat flux. Results from ULPU Configuration IV demonstrate that with small changes to the ex-vessel design and SAM strategies, the peak critical heat flux in the AP1000 can be increased at least 30% over the peak critical heat flux predicted for the AP600 configuration. The design and SAM strategy changes investigated in ULPU Configuration IV can be implemented in the AP1000 design and will allow the passive plant to maintain the margin to critical heat flux for IVR, even at the higher power level. Continued testing for IVR phenomena is being performed at UCSB to optimize the AP1000 design and to ensure that vessel failure in a severe accident is physically unreasonable. (authors)

  12. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL’s WTP gas retention and release modeling.

  13. Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time? Alan Johnston* and Shin'ya Nishida Recent experiments show that synchronous events can appear to an observer to occur at different times. Neural processing time delays are offered as an explanation of these temporal illusions, but equating perceived time

  14. Alcohol and Other Drugs Education and Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · The School's commitment to conducting a biennial review of its program. Employees, like students, are coveredAlcohol and Other Drugs Education and Prevention Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Student.0 BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The Colorado School of Mines is committed to: · Providing students educational

  15. RELATED ARTICLES Pricey Hepatitis C Drug Draws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Listen Tweet 28 RELATED ARTICLES Pricey Hepatitis C Drug Draws Criticism World Hepatitis Day Highlights Global Scourge, Hopes for Treatment News / Health Elimination of Chronic Hepatitis Feasible FILE A nurse vaccinates a child against hepatitis to prevent disease in Constitucion, Chile. Lisa Schlein July

  16. Time Management Managing Time and Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Management Managing Time and Tasks What is time management? Time can't be managed ­ but you can manage the amount of time you use each day for fun, work, rest, and time spent with others. Why is time management important? You have responsibilities to yourself, to your family and friends, to your

  17. Improving the efficiency of the later stages of the drug development process : survey results from the industry, academia, and the FDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottschalk, Adrian Hedley Benjamin, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Drug development in the United States is a lengthy and expensive endeavor. It is estimated that average development times range from eleven to fifteen years and exceed costs of one billion dollars. The development pathway ...

  18. TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramowitz, Howard; Brandys, Marek; Cecil, Richard; D'Angelo, Nicholas; Matlack, Keith S.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Callow, Richard A.; Joseph, Innocent

    2012-12-11

    Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

  19. Luminal flow amplifies stent-based drug deposition in arterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Evan G.

    Background: Treatment of arterial bifurcation lesions using drug-eluting stents (DES) is now common clinical practice and yet the mechanisms governing drug distribution in these complex morphologies are incompletely ...

  20. Regression analysis of oncology drug licensing deal values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkins, Paul Allen

    2006-01-01

    This work is an attempt to explain wide variations in drug licensing deal value by using regression modeling to describe and predict the relationship between oncology drug deal characteristics and their licensing deal ...

  1. Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS Print Tuesday, 19 May 2015 12:25 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM),...

  2. Optimization of preclinical profiling operations in drug discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiney, John P. (John Patrick)

    2007-01-01

    In early-stage drug discovery, thousands of compounds must be tested using in vitro assays to determine their exposure and safety characteristics. This data is used to guide the selection of potential drug candidates and ...

  3. Measuring the effects of drugs on single cancer cell growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Yaochung

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effectiveness of a drug therapy on halting disease progression is an essential aspect of cancer biology. Conventional assays that study cell behavior after a drug intervention report the average response ...

  4. Specific and general binding in arterial drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Andrew D. (Andrew David), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents have emerged as the most effective method for treating restenosis following percutaneous coronary interventions. This thesis investigates how drugs with similar physiochemical properties but different ...

  5. Amphiphilic linear-dendritic block copolymers for drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Phuong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    Polymeric drug delivery systems have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. Such systems can solubilize and sequester hydrophobic drugs from degradation, thereby increasing circulation half-life and efficacy. ...

  6. Alignment strategies for drug product process development and manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garvin, Christopher John

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of information between the drug product development and manufacturing organizations is fundamental to drug product commercialization. This information is used to characterize the product-process interaction ...

  7. Overcoming Drug Resistance by Co-Targeting Marzieh Ayati1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Limsoon

    , Statistics and Computer Science, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran Abstract Removal or suppression of key to the drug. Communica- tion to the resistance machinery---e.g., efflux pumps and drug-modifying enzymes

  8. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print Wednesday, 27 February 2008 00:00 The veil has...

  9. Microneedle delivery for improved efficacy of antiretroviral and antibiotic drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stauber, Zachary Jason

    2012-01-01

    Two classes of drugs, antiretrovirals and antibiotics, could benefit greatly from delivery through microneedles. Microneedles (MN) offer an increase in efficacy for these drugs by providing delivery to the lymphatic system ...

  10. Progress toward a Colon Targeting Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xiao

    2012-07-16

    Hydrophobic drug paclitaxel nanoparticles (PAX NPs) and pH sensitive hydrogels were prepared in this study to build a colon targeting nanoparticle based drug delivery system for oral administration. Negative charged PAX NPs at the size of 110...

  11. Research Articles Combining Drug and Gene Similarity Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharan, Roded

    of drug-drug and gene-gene similarity measures, combined with a logistic regression component to detection problems due to multiple gene and compound names. Additional attempts were based on reverse

  12. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns.

  13. Aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for cancer prevention: an international consensus statement.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    nonsteroidal anti-in? ammatory drugs and risk of colorectalof nonsteroidal antiin? ammatory drugs: a pooled analysis ofsteroidal anti-in? ammatory drugs on colorectal adenomas:

  14. Anti-cancer drugs elicit re-expression of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in melanoma cells.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellinger, Ryan W; Matundan, Harry H; Ahmed, Amelia S; Duong, Priscilla H; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

    2012-01-01

    effect of valproic acid on drug and steroid glucuronidationglucuronosyltrans- ferases. Curr Drug Metab 1: 143–161. 10.aerodigestive tract tissues. Drug Metab Dispos 30: 397–403.

  15. Drug-Free Federal Workplace Testing Implementation Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-07-29

    The order provides guidance and policy for the administration, application and implementation of the DOE Drug-free Federal Workplace Plan and other regulations that facilitate the maintenance of a drug-free Federal workplace through the establishment of programs to test for the use of illegal drugs. Chg 1, dated 8-21-92

  16. Model-Based Dependability Analysis of Programmable Drug Infusion Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Model-Based Dependability Analysis of Programmable Drug Infusion Pumps Sriram Sankaranarayanan.lastname@colorado.edu Abstract. Infusion pumps are commonly used in home/hospital care to inject drugs into a patient a case-study involving an infusion pump used to manage pain through the infusion of analgesic drugs

  17. UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN POLICY ON DRUGS AND ALCOHOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neri, Peter

    UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN POLICY ON DRUGS AND ALCOHOL 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 The University of Aberdeen, and the introduction of a drugs and alcohol policy is intended to form an integral part of that approach. 1 and consistently. The University recognises that alcohol/drug dependency is an illness and will be treated

  18. An Algorithmic Framework for Predicting Side-Effects of Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharan, Roded

    An Algorithmic Framework for Predicting Side-Effects of Drugs Nir Atias and Roded Sharan Blavatnik,roded}@post.tau.ac.il Abstract. One of the critical stages in drug development is the iden- tification of potential side effects for promising drug leads. Large scale clinical experiments aimed at discovering such side effects are very

  19. Drug-free Workplace Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drug-free Workplace Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Human Resources Policy Contact, students, and other individuals in our workplace and campus community. Alcohol abuse and drug use can pose.1 There are many risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol, including physical

  20. Optically generated ultrasound for enhanced drug delivery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Campbell, Heather L. (Baltimore, MD); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01

    High frequency acoustic waves, analogous to ultrasound, can enhance the delivery of therapeutic compounds into cells. The compounds delivered may be chemotherapeutic drugs, antibiotics, photodynamic drugs or gene therapies. The therapeutic compounds are administered systemically, or preferably locally to the targeted site. Local delivery can be accomplished through a needle, cannula, or through a variety of vascular catheters, depending on the location of routes of access. To enhance the systemic or local delivery of the therapeutic compounds, high frequency acoustic waves are generated locally near the target site, and preferably near the site of compound administration. The acoustic waves are produced via laser radiation interaction with an absorbing media and can be produced via thermoelastic expansion, thermodynamic vaporization, material ablation, or plasma formation. Acoustic waves have the effect of temporarily permeabilizing the membranes of local cells, increasing the diffusion of the therapeutic compound into the cells, allowing for decreased total body dosages, decreased side effects, and enabling new therapies.

  1. Media's Positive and Negative Frames in Reporting Celebrity Deaths From Illegal Drug Overdoses Versus Prescription Drug Overdoses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Michelle

    2011-12-31

    This study compared the celebrity illegal drug overdose deaths of River Phoenix, Chris Farley, and Brad Renfro to the prescription drug overdose deaths of Anna Nicole Smith, Heath Ledger, and Brittany Murphy. This research ...

  2. Targeted drug delivery by novel polymer-drug conjugates containing linkers cleavable by disease-associated enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chau, Ying

    2005-01-01

    We have conceptualized a new class of polymer-linker-drug conjugates to achieve targeted drug delivery for the systemic treatment of cancer and other inflammatory diseases. The physiochemical properties of the polymer allow ...

  3. Mathematical modeling and simulation of intravascular drug delivery from drug-eluting stents with biodegradable PLGA coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiaoxiang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) are commonly used in coronary angioplasty procedures. A DES elutes drug compounds from a thin polymeric coating into the surrounding coronary artery tissue to reduce in-stent restenosis (a significant ...

  4. Late-Phase Melt Conditions Affecting the Potential for In-Vessel Retention in High Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; K. Y. Suh; F. B.Cheung; S. B. Kim

    2004-05-01

    If cooling is inadequate during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident. In such a case, concerns about containment failure and associated risks can be eliminated if it is possible to ensure that the lower head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel. Accordingly, in-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt as a key severe accident management strategy has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and planned for some advanced light water reactors. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements can provide sufficient heat removal to assure IVR for high power reactors (i.e., reactors with power levels up to 1500 MWe). Consequently, a joint United States/Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) has been launched to develop recommendations to improve the margin of success for in-vessel retention in high power reactors. This program is initially focussed on the Korean Advanced Power Reactor—1400 MWe (APR1400) design. However, recommendations will be developed that can be applied to a wide range of existing and advanced reactor designs. The recommendations will focus on modifications to enhance ERVC and modifications to enhance in-vessel debris coolability. In this paper, late-phase melt conditions affecting the potential for IVR of core melt in the APR1400 were established as a basis for developing the I-NERI recommendations. The selection of ‘bounding’ reactor accidents, simulation of those accidents using the SCDAP/RELAP5-3D© code, and resulting late-phase melt conditions are presented. Results from this effort indicate that bounding late-phase melt conditions could include large melt masses (>120,000 kg) relocating at high temperatures (3400 K). Estimated lower head heat fluxes associated with this melt could exceed the maximum critical heat flux, indicating additional measures such as the use of a core catcher and/or modifications to enhance external reactor vessel cooling may be necessary to ensure in-vessel retention of core melt.

  5. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  6. AutoDrug: fully automated macromolecular crystallography workflows for fragment-based drug discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Yingssu; McPhillips, Scott E.; González, Ana; McPhillips, Timothy M.; Zinn, Daniel; Cohen, Aina E.; Feese, Michael D.; Bushnell, David; Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Stout, C. David; Ludaescher, Bertram; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Soltis, S. Michael

    2013-05-01

    New software has been developed for automating the experimental and data-processing stages of fragment-based drug discovery at a macromolecular crystallography beamline. A new workflow-automation framework orchestrates beamline-control and data-analysis software while organizing results from multiple samples. AutoDrug is software based upon the scientific workflow paradigm that integrates the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource macromolecular crystallography beamlines and third-party processing software to automate the crystallography steps of the fragment-based drug-discovery process. AutoDrug screens a cassette of fragment-soaked crystals, selects crystals for data collection based on screening results and user-specified criteria and determines optimal data-collection strategies. It then collects and processes diffraction data, performs molecular replacement using provided models and detects electron density that is likely to arise from bound fragments. All processes are fully automated, i.e. are performed without user interaction or supervision. Samples can be screened in groups corresponding to particular proteins, crystal forms and/or soaking conditions. A single AutoDrug run is only limited by the capacity of the sample-storage dewar at the beamline: currently 288 samples. AutoDrug was developed in conjunction with RestFlow, a new scientific workflow-automation framework. RestFlow simplifies the design of AutoDrug by managing the flow of data and the organization of results and by orchestrating the execution of computational pipeline steps. It also simplifies the execution and interaction of third-party programs and the beamline-control system. Modeling AutoDrug as a scientific workflow enables multiple variants that meet the requirements of different user groups to be developed and supported. A workflow tailored to mimic the crystallography stages comprising the drug-discovery pipeline of CoCrystal Discovery Inc. has been deployed and successfully demonstrated. This workflow was run once on the same 96 samples that the group had examined manually and the workflow cycled successfully through all of the samples, collected data from the same samples that were selected manually and located the same peaks of unmodeled density in the resulting difference Fourier maps.

  7. In-vessel melt retention as a severe accident management strategy for the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO International Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Theofanous, T.G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The concept of lower head coolability and in-vessel retention of corium has been approved as a basic element of the severe accident management strategy for IVO`s Loviisa Plant (VVER-440) in Finland. The selected approach takes advantage of the unique features of the plant such as low power density, reactor pressure vessel without penetrations at the bottom and ice-condenser containment which ensures flooded cavity in all risk significant sequences. The thermal analyses, which are supported by experimental program, demonstrate that in Loviisa the molten corium on the lower head of the reactor vessel is coolable externally with wide margins. This paper summarizes the approach and the plant modifications being implemented. During the approval process some technical concerns were raised, particularly with regard to thermal loadings caused by contact of cool cavity water and hot corium with the reactor vessel. Resolution of these concerns is also discussed.

  8. Drug testing Example for Conditional Probability and Bayes Theorem Suppose that a drug test for an illegal drug is such that it is 98% accurate in the case of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Drug testing Example for Conditional Probability and Bayes Theorem Suppose that a drug test a positive result with probability .98 in the case that the tested individual uses the drug) and 90% accurate not use the drug). Suppose it is known that 10% of the entire population uses this drug. You test someone

  9. Time and Labor Manual -Time Keepers -LSUSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor Manual

  10. Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go Everyone starts the week with the same number of hours. So, why does your time go so fast? Let's find out! Number of hours of sleep each night ____ x 7 preparation/clean-up time) ____ x 7 = ____ Travel time to and from campus ___ x __ = ____ Number of hours per

  11. Above- and below-ground Litter Manipulation: Effect on Retention and Release of DOC, DON and DIN in the Sikfokut Forest, Hungary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evetts, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Jacqueline A.

    2009-09-30

    on the retention and release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), nitrate and ammonium in the soil profile at 0-5 and 5-15 cm depths. The soils were obtained from a Long Term Ecological Research site in the Sikfokut Forest in Hungary...

  12. Genipin-Cross-Linked Microencapsulated Human Adipose Stem Cells Augment Transplant Retention Resulting in Attenuation of Chronically Infarcted Rat Heart Fibrosis and Cardiac Dysfunction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Arghya; Chen, Guangyong; Khan, Afshan; Rao, Vijayaraghava T. S.; Shum-Tim, Dominique; Prakash, Satya

    2012-12-01

    of biocompatible, fluorogenic genipin-cross-linked alginate chitosan (GCAC) microcapsules in delivery of human adipose stem cells (hASCs) with an aim to increase the implant retention in the infarcted myocardium for maximum clinical benefits. In vitro results show...

  13. Experimental strategies for investigating passive and ultrasound-enhanced transdermal drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers many advantages over traditional drug delivery methods. However, the natural resistance of the skin to drug permeation represents a major challenge that transdermal drug delivery needs to ...

  14. Effects of solids retention time on the performance of bioreactors bioaugmented with a 17b-estradiol-utilizing bacterium, Sphingomonas strain KC8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Kung-Hui "Bella"

    ; Baronti et al., 2000). Incomplete removal of estrogens by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contributes-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) that were inocu- lated with nitrifying activated sludge and bioaugmented observed for the SBRs. Nei- ther estrogens nor estrogenic activity was detected in the treated water

  15. Volatilizable Biogenic Organic Compounds (VBOCs) with two dimensional Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS): sampling methods, VBOC complexity, and chromatographic retention data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    4 isoprene toluene- d 8 OxMT FB BFB ST MT t 1 (s) ? primarycedrene camphor linalool BFB t 1 (s) ? primary retentiontoluene-d8, bromofluorobenzene (BFB), and 1,2-DCB-d4 (1,2-

  16. Toward Real-time Modeling of Human Heart Ventricles at Cellular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Toward Real-time Modeling of Human Heart Ventricles at Cellular Resolution: Multi-hour Simulation of Drug-induced Arrhythmias Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  17. A SNPshot of PubMed to associate genetic variants with drugs, diseases, and adverse reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baral, Chitta

    A SNPshot of PubMed to associate genetic variants with drugs, diseases, and adverse reactions Jörg, drug efficacy, and drug responses between individuals and sub-populations. Wrong dosages of drugs can lead to severe adverse drug reac- tions in individuals whose drug metabolism drastically differs from

  18. A search for interaction among combinations of drugs of abuse and the use of isobolographic analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran

    Commentary A search for interaction among combinations of drugs of abuse and the use: abused drugs, drug combinations, isobole, multi-drug abuse, synergy SUMMARY What is known and Objective: Individuals who abuse drugs usually use more than one substance. Toxic consequences of single and multi-drug

  19. A Mathematical Tumor Model with Immune Resistance and Drug Therapy: An Optimal Control Approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    De Pillis, L. G.; Radunskaya, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present a competition model of cancer tumor growth that includes both the immune system response and drug therapy. This is a four-population model that includes tumor cells, host cells, immune cells, and drug interaction. We analyze the stability of the drug-free equilibria with respect to the immune response in order to look for target basins of attraction. One of our goals was to simulate qualitatively the asynchronous tumor-drug interaction known as “Jeffs phenomenon.” The model we develop is successful in generating this asynchronous response behavior. Our other goal was to identify treatment protocols that could improve standard pulsed chemotherapymore »regimens. Using optimal control theory with constraints and numerical simulations, we obtain new therapy protocols that we then compare with traditional pulsed periodic treatment. The optimal control generated therapies produce larger oscillations in the tumor population over time. However, by the end of the treatment period, total tumor size is smaller than that achieved through traditional pulsed therapy, and the normal cell population suffers nearly no oscillations.« less

  20. Title: Drug and Alcohol Policies --Drug-Free Workplace Code: 1-300-020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    -free workplace, and, in the case of grantees who are individuals, by requiring each individual to certify to receiving a contract or grant from a federal agency. All grantees who fail to meet the drug-free workplace of the Act. Grantees are not required to make a certification in order to continue receiving funds under

  1. Interaction of celecoxib with different anti-cancer drugs is antagonistic in breast but not in other cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Awady, Raafat A., E-mail: relawady@sharjah.ac.ae [Pharmacology unit, Department of Cancer Biology, National, Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Fom El-Khalig, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Sharjah, University City road, 27272 Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Saleh, Ekram M. [Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology unit, Department of Cancer Biology, National, Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Fom El-Khalig, Cairo (Egypt); Ezz, Marwa [College of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Elsayed, Abeer M. [Tissue Culture unit, Pathology Department, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2011-09-15

    Celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, is being investigated for enhancement of chemotherapy efficacy in cancer clinical trials. This study investigates the ability of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to sensitize cells from different origins to several chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of the drug's mechanism of action and sequence of administration are also investigated. The sensitivity, cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA damage of five different cancer cell lines (HeLa, HCT116, HepG2, MCF7 and U251) to 5-FU, cisplatin, doxorubicin and etoposide {+-} celecoxib following different incubation schedules were analyzed. We found antagonism between celecoxib and the four drugs in the breast cancer cells MCF7 following all incubation schedules and between celecoxib and doxorubicin in all cell lines except for two combinations in HCT116 cells. Celecoxib with the other three drugs in the remaining four cell lines resulted in variable interactions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that celecoxib exerts different molecular effects in different cells. In some lines, it abrogates the drug-induced G2/M arrest enhancing pre-mature entry into mitosis with damaged DNA thus increasing apoptosis and resulting in synergism. In other cells, it enhances drug-induced G2/M arrest allowing time to repair drug-induced DNA damage before entry into mitosis and decreasing cell death resulting in antagonism. In some synergistic combinations, celecoxib-induced abrogation of G2/M arrest was not associated with apoptosis but permanent arrest in G1 phase. These results, if confirmed in-vivo, indicate that celecoxib is not a suitable chemosensitizer for breast cancer or with doxorubicin for other cancers. Moreover, combination of celecoxib with other drugs should be tailored to the tumor type, drug and administration schedule. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Celecoxib may enhance effects of anticancer drugs. > Its combination with four drugs was tested in five cancer cell lines. > It antagonized the effects of the four drugs in the breast cancer cell line MCF7. > Doxorubicin's cytotoxic effects were antagonized by celecoxib in four cell lines. > Cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA damage explain the different interactive effects.

  2. Charge Retention by Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au11L53+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is demonstrated that the Au11L53+ cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-

  3. Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Takeda Advances Diabetes Drug Development at the ALS Print Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), characterized by abnormally high blood glucose levels, affects hundreds of millions of...

  4. Intratumor heterogeneity alters most effective drugs in designed combinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Boyang

    The substantial spatial and temporal heterogeneity observed in patient tumors poses considerable challenges for the design of effective drug combinations with predictable outcomes. Currently, the implications of tissue ...

  5. Nobel Laureate speaks on antibiotics and drug resistance | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nobel Laureate speaks on antibiotics and drug resistance Ramakrishnan cited several pioneers of antibiotic research in his talk. Ramakrishnan cited several pioneers of antibiotic...

  6. Cellulose, Chitosan, and Keratin Composite Materials. Controlled Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Cellulose, Chitosan, and Keratin Composite Materials. Controlled Drug Release Chieu D. Tran 53201, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: A method was developed in which cellulose (CEL

  7. Skeletal muscle biomechanics drives intramuscular transport of locally delivered drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter I-Kung

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Effective local drug delivery to contractile tissues such as skeletal muscle requires a thorough understanding of the impact of mechanical loads on intramuscular pharmacokinetics. Current preparations for ...

  8. Food and Drug Administration White Oak Campus Environmental Stewardshi...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stewardship and Cost Savings FEMP ESPC Success Story on water conservation and green energy at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) White Oak Campus. PDF icon...

  9. In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Sydney S.; Kim, Jae S.; Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov; Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2013-06-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ? 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL.

  10. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Faizal; Mohammed M. Khalil; Saurya Das

    2014-12-29

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  11. Regulatory aspects of oncology drug safety evaluation: Past practice, current issues, and the challenge of new drugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeldt, Hans; Kropp, Timothy; Benson, Kimberly; Ricci, M. Stacey; McGuinn, W. David; Verbois, S. Leigh

    2010-03-01

    The drug development of new anti-cancer agents is streamlined in response to the urgency of bringing effective drugs to market for patients with limited life expectancy. FDA's regulation of oncology drugs has evolved from the practices set forth in Arnold Lehman's seminal work published in the 1950s through the current drafting of a new International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) safety guidance for anti-cancer drug nonclinical evaluations. The ICH combines the efforts of the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan, and the United States and the pharmaceutical industry from these three regions to streamline the scientific and technical aspects of drug development. The recent development of new oncology drug classes with novel mechanisms of action has improved survival rates for some cancers but also brings new challenges for safety evaluation. Here we present the legacy of Lehman and colleagues in the context of past and present oncology drug development practices and focus on some of the current issues at the center of an evolving harmonization process that will generate a new safety guidance for oncology drugs, ICH S9. The purpose of this new guidance will be to facilitate oncology drug development on a global scale by standardizing regional safety requirements.

  12. Corium Retention for High Power Reactors by An In-Vessel Core Catcher in Combination with External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; K. Y. Suh; F. -B. Cheung; S. -B. Kim

    2004-05-01

    If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel lower head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR), resulted in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, IVR of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors. However, it is not clear that currently-proposed methods to achieve ERVC will provide sufficient heat removal for higher power reactors. A US–Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project has been initiated in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) will determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe. This paper summarizes results from the first year of this 3-year project.

  13. RETENTION OF A PRIMORDIAL COLD CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT IN AN INSTABILITY-DRIVEN MODEL OF SOLAR SYSTEM FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E.; Fraser, Wesley C., E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The cold classical population of the Kuiper Belt exhibits a wide variety of unique physical characteristics, which collectively suggest that its dynamical coherence has been maintained throughout the solar system's lifetime. Simultaneously, the retention of the cold population's relatively unexcited orbital state has remained a mystery, especially in the context of a solar system formation model, that is driven by a transient period of instability, where Neptune is temporarily eccentric. Here, we show that the cold belt can survive the instability, and its dynamical structure can be reproduced. We develop a simple analytical model for secular excitation of cold Kuiper Belt objects and show that comparatively fast apsidal precession and nodal recession of Neptune, during the eccentric phase, are essential for preservation of an unexcited state in the cold classical region. Subsequently, we confirm our results with self-consistent N-body simulations. We further show that contamination of the hot classical and scattered populations by objects of similar nature to that of cold classicals has been instrumental in shaping the vast physical diversity inherent to the Kuiper Belt.

  14. Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauderer, B.

    1996-09-01

    The primary project objective is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor. This non-equilibrium process is a key step in the capture and retention of sulfur released during coal combustion by the interaction with calcium based sorbent particles. By encapsulating the sulfur bearing calcium particles in slag, the need for landfilling of this waste is eliminated. This objective will be implemented through a series of up to 20 one day tests carried out in a 20 MMBtu/hr air cooled, slagging combustor-boiler installation located in Philadelphia, PA. The project will consist of two tasks. Task 1 consists of the experiments conducted in the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor, and task 2 will consist of analysis of this data. All the operating procedures for this effort have been developed in the 7 years of operation of this combustor.

  15. An In-situ materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) diagnostic to study particle density control and hydrogenic fuel retention in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allain, Jean-Paul

    2014-09-05

    A new materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) was designed, constructed and tested to develop understanding of particle control and hydrogenic fuel retention in lithium-based plasma-facing surfaces in NSTX. The novel feature of MAPP is an in-situ tool to probe the divertor NSTX floor during LLD and lithium-coating shots with subsequent transport to a post-exposure in-vacuo surface analysis chamber to measure D retention. In addition, the implications of a lithiated graphite-dominated plasma-surface environment in NSTX on LLD performance, operation and ultimately hydrogenic pumping and particle control capability are investigated in this proposal. MAPP will be an invaluable tool for erosion/redeposition simulation code validation.

  16. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Huang, Shiew-Mei, E-mail: shiewmei.huang@fda.hhs.go [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Building 51, Room 3188, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  17. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford single-shell waste tanks 241-A-101, 241-S-106, and 241-U-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rinehart, D.E.; Forbes, S.V.

    1998-09-01

    The 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site contain millions of gallons of radioactive waste resulting from the purification of nuclear materials and related processes. Through various mechanisms, flammable gas mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide are generated and retained in significant quantities within the waste in many ({approximately}25) of these tanks. The potential for large releases of retained gas from these wastes creates a flammability hazard. It is a critical component of the effort to understand the flammability hazard and a primary goal of this laboratory investigation to establish an understanding of the mechanisms of gas retention and release in these wastes. The results of bubble retention experimental studies using waste samples from several waste tanks and a variety of waste types support resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. Gas bubble retention information gained in the pursuit of safe storage will, in turn, benefit future waste operations including salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval.

  18. Revealing the paradox of drug reward in human evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Nestler 2005). Most commonly used psychoactive drugs are plant secondary metabolites (e.g. alkaloids secondary metabolites, including alkaloids such as nicotine, morphine and cocaine, are potent neurotoxins. However, the most commonly used drugs are plant neurotoxins that evolved to punish, not reward

  19. Drug-Free Federal Workplace Testing Implementation Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-06

    The subject directive provides requirements and responsibilities for the implementation of a workplace program to test for the use of illegal drugs to facilitate the maintenance of a drug-free Federal workplace. In the course of the revision, the document number will change from DOE O 3792.3 to DOE O 343.1.

  20. Experimental Models of Anxiety for Drug Discovery and Brain Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Chapter 18 Experimental Models of Anxiety for Drug Discovery and Brain Research Peter C. Hart and anxiogenic drugs. Detailed protocols will be provided for these paradigms, and possible confounds+Business Media, LLC 2010 299 #12;300 Hart et al. It is important to understand, however, that any animal exper

  1. Alternative Breaks Alcohol and Drug Policy 2014-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Alternative Breaks Alcohol and Drug Policy 2014-2015 In order to promote personal development order and stability on Alternative Break trips, the following standards concerning drug and alcohol use have been set and will be enforced on all Alternative Break trips: 1. Use, possession or distribution

  2. Blue MedicareRx (PDP)SM 2012 Comprehensive Drug List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Blue MedicareRx (PDP)SM 2012 Comprehensive Drug List PLEASE READ: THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS DrugList Blue MedicareRx (PDP)SM 2012 Formulary (List of Covered Drugs) DrugList PLEASE READ. Blue MedicareRx (PDP) is a stand-alone prescription drug plan with a Medicare contract offered by HCSC

  3. Drug Resistance Updates 15 (2012) 9097 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Drug Resistance Updates 15 (2012) 90­97 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Drug Resistance Updates journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/drup The dynamics of drug resistance Park, MD, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Drug-dependent/independent resistance Drug scheduling

  4. Drug-Free Workplace Program UT-B Contracts Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drug-Free Workplace Program UT-B Contracts Sep 2012 Page 1 of 1 drug-free-workplace-ext-sep12 DRUG, the Seller and its subcontractors working on the project site must maintain a drug-free workplace program. (B) If the Seller is an out-of-state entity, the Company may upon request allow a drug-free workplace

  5. Space time and the passage of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George F. R. Ellis; Rituparno Goswami

    2012-08-26

    This paper examines the various arguments that have been put forward suggesting either that time does not exist, or that it exists but its flow is not real. I argue that (i) time both exists and flows; (ii) an Evolving Block Universe (`EBU') model of spacetime adequately captures this feature, emphasizing the key differences between the past, present, and future; (iii) the associated surfaces of constant time are uniquely geometrically and physically determined in any realistic spacetime model based in General Relativity Theory; (iv) such a model is needed in order to capture the essential aspects of what is happening in circumstances where initial data does not uniquely determine the evolution of spacetime structure because quantum uncertainty plays a key role in that development. Assuming that the functioning of the mind is based in the physical brain, evidence from the way that the mind apprehends the flow of time prefers this evolving time model over those where there is no flow of time.

  6. Manage Your Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lynn

    2000-06-27

    People view time in different ways, but we all could do a better job of managing our time. This publication explains three different time management tools: the 24-hour time log and chart; a self-assessment of thinking styles and time management...

  7. Call for Papers for 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management Strategies, and Novel Drug Targets"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Call for Papers for 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management submissions for the 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium, titled "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management, at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/diabetescare. When submitting your manuscript, please mention the 3rd

  8. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and drug-induced toxicity in a panel of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Claudia V.; Oliveira, Paulo J. [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [CNC—Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra (Portugal); Will, Yvonne [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States); Nadanaciva, Sashi, E-mail: sashi.nadanaciva@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)] [Compound Safety Prediction, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been proposed to be involved in idiosyncratic drug reactions. However, current in vitro and in vivo models lack the genetic diversity seen in the human population. Our hypothesis is that different cell strains with distinct mtDNA SNPs may have different mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles and may therefore vary in their response to drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, we used an in vitro system composed of four strains of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with mtDNA polymorphisms. We sequenced mtDNA from embryonic fibroblasts isolated from four mouse strains, C57BL/6J, MOLF/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ, with the latter two being sequenced for the first time. The bioenergetic profile of the four strains of MEFs was investigated at both passages 3 and 10. Our results showed that there were clear differences among the four strains of MEFs at both passages, with CZECHII/EiJ having a lower mitochondrial robustness when compared to C57BL/6J, followed by MOLF/EiJ and PERA/EiJ. Seven drugs known to impair mitochondrial function were tested for their effect on the ATP content of the four strains of MEFs in both glucose- and galactose-containing media. Our results showed that there were strain-dependent differences in the response to some of the drugs. We propose that this model is a useful starting point to study compounds that may cause mitochondrial off-target toxicity in early stages of drug development, thus decreasing the number of experimental animals used. -- Highlights: ? mtDNA SNPs may be linked to individual predisposition to drug-induced toxicity. ? CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ mtDNA was sequenced for the first time in this study. ? Strain-dependent mitochondrial capacity differences were measured. ? Strain-dependent differences in response to mitochondrial toxicants were observed.

  9. Name______________________________________Drug-like Properties all answers must fit in space provided Imagine that a drug discovery program generated the two lead compounds shown below. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Name______________________________________Drug-like Properties all answers must fit in space provided 1 Imagine that a drug discovery program generated the two lead compounds shown below designed to facilitate drug discovery. We'll be using a free, web-based application that calculates drug

  10. One of the main issues with drug delivery is that drugs tend to disperse throughout the entire body, instead of targeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlushko, Vitali

    One of the main issues with drug delivery is that drugs tend to disperse throughout the entire body, instead of targeting the specific site (or area) that it is intended to reach. Therefore, drugs candidates for more focused drug delivery systems is magnetic manipulation of nanoparticles

  11. Margin for In-Vessel Retention in the APR1400 - VESTA and SCDAP/RELAP5-3D Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; D. Knudson

    2004-12-01

    If cooling is inadequate during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the lower head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with such plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe pressurized water reactor (PWR) (AP600), which relied upon external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR), resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing light water reactors (LWRs). IVR of core melt is therefore a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed ERVC without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a three-year, United States (U.S.) -Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was initiated in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) explored options, such as enhanced ERVC performance and an enhanced in-vessel core catcher (IVCC), that have the potential to ensure that IVR is feasible for higher power reactors.

  12. Synchronization of follicular wave emergence, luteal regression, and ovulation for fixed-time artificial insemination in beef cows and heifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stutts, Kyle Jeffrey

    2006-10-30

    Two experiments tested the efficacy of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or estradiol cypionate (ECP) administration in combination with controlled internal drug release (CIDR) inserts on pregnancy rate to fixed-time artificial insemination...

  13. Mass drug administration for the control and elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria: an ecological study from Jiangsu province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Hsiang et al. : Mass drug administration for the control andL, Greenwood BM: Mass administrations of antimalarial drugs.Skarbinski J: Mass drug administration for malaria. Cochrane

  14. Regulatory approval of cancer risk-reducing (chemopreventive) drugs: moving what we have learned into the clinic.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Risk-Reducing (Chemopreventive) Drugs: Moving What We Haverisk reduction) drugs and discusses possible improvements toof Cancer Risk- Reducing Drugs approach along with primary

  15. Prenatal Exposure to Nitrates, Nitrites, and Nitrosatable Drugs and Preterm Births 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuong, Ann Minh

    2013-10-28

    , we examined the relation between preterm births and: 1) prenatal nitrosatable drug usage; 2) dietary intake of nitrates/nitrites; 3) joint exposures to nitrosatable drugs and nitrate/nitrite intake; and 4) nitrosatable drugs and vitamin C intake among...

  16. Commercial potential for thermal & magnetic sensitive polymer in drug delivery applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward, Jonathan M. (Jonathan Mark)

    2008-01-01

    Thermal and magnetically sensitive polymers are a new class of materials with unique properties suitable for applications in drug delivery. Specifically, these polymers can be combined with a drug reservoir to make a drug ...

  17. HIV-related sexual behaviors, drugs, and violence among high risk populations in Baja California, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volkmann, Tyson Alexander

    2012-01-01

    USDOJ, Alcohol, tobacco and other drug use by youth in ruralmale and female injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico.International Journal of Drug Policy, 2003. 14(1): p. 45-62.

  18. Sexuality Under the Influence: The Queer Pleasures of Illicit Drugs in Transatlantic Gay and Lesbian Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randolph, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Susan. Inventing the Addict: Drugs, Race, and Sexuality inPrint. ---. “Queering the Drug Diary: Go Ask Alice and ItsDavid T. Forces of Habit: Drugs and the Making of the Modern

  19. Cascade search for HSV-1 combinatorial drugs with high antiviral efficacy and low toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    blood pressure lowering drugs: analysis of 354 randomisedKSHV) with combinatory drugs. Integr Biol (Camb). 2009;1(1):matrix metalloproteinases as drug targets and anti-targets

  20. On Time. 6b: Quantum Mechanical Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. K. Raju

    2008-08-09

    The existence of small amounts of advanced radiation, or a tilt in the arrow of time, makes the basic equations of physics mixed-type functional differential equations. The novel features of such equations point to a microphysical structure of time. This corresponds to a change of logic at the microphysical level. We show that the resulting logic is a quantum logic. This provides a natural and rigorous explanation of quantum interference. This structured-time interpretation of quantum mechanics is briefly compared with various other interpretations of q.m.

  1. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Lopez, Aron R; Turei, Denes; Modos, Dezso; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmaros, Tamas; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understan...

  2. What are the public health effects of direct-to-consumer drug advertising?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasi, Elizabeth A; Stafford, Randall S; Kravitz, Richard L; Mansfield, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    to-consumer prescription drug Advertising. Health Commun 16:2004) Direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs:2003) Direct-to-consumer advertising: Physicians’ views on

  3. Magnetically Triggered Nanocomposite Membranes: A Versatile Platform for Triggered Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoare, Todd

    Drug delivery devices based on nanocomposite membranes containing thermoresponsive nanogels and superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to provide reversible, on?off drug release upon application (and removal) ...

  4. Drug Court Effectiveness: A Review of California Evaluation Reports, 1995-1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guydish, Joseph R PhD; Wolfe, Ellen; Tajima, Barbara; Woods, William J

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation qfthe Oakland Drug Court Afur ?ue Ycan. Onklsnd.39; Journal ¢JP:ydIurclive Drugs 378 - -. ~z. ~. ;- Sa;;n"IDrug Courl::

  5. Hyperpolarized Nanodiamond with Long Spin Relaxation Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewa Rej; Torsten Gaebel; Thomas Boele; David E. J. Waddington; David J. Reilly

    2015-02-22

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance (MR), such as 13C-labeled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarizaton technique is the inherently short spin relaxation times, typically nanodiamond (ND) can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of toxic free- radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 hour. Combined with the already established applications of NDs in the life-sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized MR.

  6. Effectiveness of educational leadership in a budget crisis : implications for faculty retention and demographics in one university system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newmann, Jennifer Jane

    2012-01-01

    pipeline for new, college-educated workers. By lengthening the time to degree, students who are at-risk

  7. Bioresponsive Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Triggered Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Neetu

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential carriers for therapeutic payloads. However, achieving triggered drug release from MSNPs in vivo has been challenging. Here, we ...

  8. Near-infrared-actuated devices for remotely controlled drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timko, Brian P.

    A reservoir that could be remotely triggered to release a drug would enable the patient or physician to achieve on-demand, reproducible, repeated, and tunable dosing. Such a device would allow precise adjustment of dosage ...

  9. Engineered microtissue platforms for modeling human pathophysiology and drug metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Cheri Yingjie

    2013-01-01

    Over 50% of all drug candidates entering clinical trials are abandoned due to insufficient efficacy or unexpected safety issues despite extensive pre-clinical testing. Liver metabolites that cause toxicity or other side ...

  10. Drugs CSA Schedules Medical Uses Physical Usual Method Possible Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Drugs CSA Schedules Medical Uses Physical Psycho- logical Toleranc e Duration (Hours) Usual Method Hashish and Hashish Oil Substance I Hash, Hash oil None Unknown Moderate Yes 2-4 Smoked, oral Anabolic

  11. Biosynthetic engineering for the assembly of better drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav, Vikramaditya Ganapati

    2013-01-01

    The declining prospects of innovator pharmaceutical companies have been attributed to their inability to discover leads that bind to novel protein domains. All of the 21,000-odd drug products that have ever been approved ...

  12. Use of physical enhancers for gastrointestinal and transdermal drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoelihammer, Carl M. (Carl Magnus)

    2015-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis represents a significant advance in the field of transdermal- and gastrointestinal (GI)-based drug delivery. With regards to the former, previous work has led to a thorough mechanistic ...

  13. Cellular responses against DNA damaged by platinum anticancer drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Yongwon, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    The anticancer activity of platinum-based drugs such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin is mediated by their ability to attack DNA such that generated adducts trigger numerous cellular responses. A better understanding ...

  14. Biocompatibility of an implantable ophthalmic drug delivery device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Sarah J. (Sarah Jennifer)

    2007-01-01

    Diseases of the posterior eye present clinicians with a treatment challenge mainly due to the region's inaccessible location. Several drugs, including those available for the treatment of exudative age-related macular ...

  15. Streamlining data management in drug product commercialization and manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Spencer C. (Spencer Clark)

    2014-01-01

    Effective execution and alignment of data management across development and manufacturing teams is essential for Amgen's Drug Product Technology group to realize its main goals of shortening the development timeline and ...

  16. Needle-free drug delivery using shock wave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlov, Atanas (Atanas Ivanov)

    2006-01-01

    A recent advancement in the area of needle-free injection systems has been the development of devices capable of epidermal delivery of powder medications. These devices use high-pressure compressed gas to accelerate drug ...

  17. A fully implantable intracochlear drug delivery device : development and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan, Erin Eileen Leary, 1976-

    2009-01-01

    In a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Draper Laboratory is developing an implantable microfluidic drug delivery system for long-term treatment of inner ear disorders and prevention of ...

  18. A research-inspired laboratory sequence investigating acquired drug resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug ...

  19. Photoswitchable Nanoparticles for Triggered Tissue Penetration and Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Rong

    We report a novel nanoparticulate drug delivery system that undergoes reversible volume change from 150 to 40 nm upon phototriggering with UV light. The volume change of these monodisperse nanoparticles comprising spiropyran, ...

  20. Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and...

  1. Titanium MEMS Technology Development for Drug Delivery and Microfluidic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandan, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Etching of Bulk Titanium for MEMS Applications. ” Journal ofMeng. 2012. “An Implantable MEMS Micropump System for Drugand Ellis Meng. 2009. “A Passive MEMS Drug Delivery Pump for

  2. Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use in Illinois: Prevalence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Assessment Program. Rod R. Blagojevich, Governor #12;#12;Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use in Illinois by the federal Office of Management and Budget. Theodora Binion-Taylor, Associate Director 100 West Randolph

  3. Feeling molecular forces: tactile feedback to enhance drug design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jocylin Amber

    2013-02-22

    Molecular modeling is a vital component for structure-based drug design. Currently implemented technology combines data and graphics to give the user visual capabilities to assist in discovering possible binding arrangements. ...

  4. Stimuli Responsive Polymers for Enhanced Drug Release Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Michael K. C.

    This talk will focus on the development of polymeric nano-structured systems for drug and gene delivery applications. Two major classes of polymer systems will be considered; namely poly(ethylene-oxide-b-propylene-oxide- ...

  5. Predicting Crystallisation of Amorphous Drugs With Terahertz Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibik, Juraj; Lobmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Zeitler, J. Axel

    2015-06-19

    solubility and dissolution rate.1,4 This can be exploited for applications such as in the pharmaceutical field to increase bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs when administered orally in the form of tablets or capsules. However, from a thermodynamic point... of amorphous systems, such as amorphous drugs, in order to prevent their crystallisation over the shelf life of a final product. Materials and Methods Materials. Paracetamol, indomethacin and flufenamic acid were obtained from Sigma- Aldrich (St. Louis, MA, USA...

  6. Final Paper Drug Screening and Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    for a particular disease using only a computer. In this type of high-throughput screening (HTS), large libraries to the public after World War II. That same decade also witnessed the #12;growth of synthetic organic chemistry candidates was economically feasible. Synthetic organic chemistry was a very important advance at the time

  7. Clinical, Laboratorial, and Urodynamic Findings of Prostatic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Urinary Retention Related to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. A Prospective Single-Center Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antunes, Alberto A.; Carnevale, Francisco C. Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim M. da; Yoshinaga, Eduardo M.; Cerri, Luciana M. O.; Baroni, Ronaldo H.; Marcelino, Antonio S. Z.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Srougi, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to describe the clinical, laboratorial, and urodynamic findings of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in patients with urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).MethodsA prospective study of 11 patients with urinary retention due to BPH was conducted. Patients underwent physical examination, prostate specific antigen (PSA) measurement, transrectal ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. International prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), and urodynamic testing were used to assess the outcome before and after 1 year.ResultsClinical success was 91 % (10/11 patients) with a mean follow-up of 22.3 months (range, 12-41 months). At the first year follow-up, the mean IPSS score was 2.8 points (p = 0.04), mean QoL was 0.4 points (p = 0.001), mean PSA decreased from 10.1 to 4.3 ng/mL (p = 0.003), maximum urinary flow (Qmax) improved from 4.2 to 10.8 mL/sec (p = 0.009), and detrusor pressure (Pdet) decreased from 85.7 to 51.5 cm H{sub 2}O (p = 0.007). Before PAE, Bladder Outlet Obstruction Index (BOOI) showed values >40 in 100 % of patients. After PAE, 30 % of patients were >40 (obstructed), 40 % were between 20 and 40 (undetermined), and 30 % were <20 (unobstructed). Patients with a BOOI <20 had higher PSA values at 1-day after PAE.ConclusionsClinical and urodynamic parameters improved significantly after PAE in patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH. Total PSA at day 1 after PAE was higher in patients with unobstructed values in pressure flow studies.

  8. Yet another time about time - Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen L. Simeonov

    2015-08-29

    This paper presents yet another personal reflection on one the most important concepts in both science and the humanities: time. This elusive notion has been not only bothering philosophers since Plato and Aristotle. It goes throughout human history embracing all analytical and creative (anthropocentric) disciplines. Time has been a central theme in physical and life sciences, philosophy, psychology, music, art and many more. This theme is known with a vast body of knowledge across different theories and categories. What has been explored concerns its nature (rational, irrational, arational), appearances/qualia, degrees, dimensions and scales of conceptualization (internal, external, fractal, discrete, continuous, mechanical, quantum, local, global, etc.). Of particular interest have been parameters of time such as duration ranges, resolutions, modes (present, now, past, future), varieties of tenses (e.g. present perfect, present progressive, etc.) and some intuitive, but also fancy phenomenological characteristics such as arrow, stream, texture, width, depth, density, even scent. Perhaps the most distinct characteristic of this fundamental concept is the absolute time constituting the flow of consciousness according to Husserl, the reflection of pure (human) nature without having the distinction between exo and endo. This essay is a personal reflection upon the meaning of time in modern physics and phenomenological philosophy.

  9. Universal Time Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenter Nimtz

    2009-01-26

    How much time does a tunneling wave packet spent in traversing a barrier? Quantum mechanical calculations result in zero time inside a barrier . In the nineties analogous tunneling experiments with microwaves were carried out. The results agreed with quantum mechanical calculations. Electron tunneling time is hard to measure being extremely short and parasitic effects due to the electric charge of electrons may be dominant. However, quite recently the atomic ionization tunneling time has been measured. Experimental data of photonic, phononic, and electronic tunneling time is available now and will be presented. It appears that the tunneling time is a universal property independent of the field in question.

  10. TYPE OF DRUG DRUG NAMES STREET NAMES METHOD OF USE SYMPTOMS OF USE HAZARDS OF USE HASHISH OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    , disorientation, possible paranoia depending on strength of THC content Impaired memory, perception; interference, phenobarbital, pentobarbital, etc. Benzodiazepines: Valium, Xanax, Librium, Ativan, Dalmane, Serax, Restoril, convulsions, anxiety with withdrawal NARCOTICS & ANALOGS (related drugs produced in labs) Heroin, Morphine

  11. From the Frontlines to the Bottom Line: Medical Marijuana, the War on Drugs, and the Drug Policy Reform Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heddleston, Thomas Reed

    2012-01-01

    Politics: Emotion and Act Up’s Fight Against AIDS. Chicago,Henry K. 2006. “Bitter Fight Over Sweet Pot Treats: Drugto give the appearance that the fight against drugs wasn’t

  12. From the Frontlines to the Bottom Line: Medical Marijuana, the War on Drugs, and the Drug Policy Reform Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heddleston, Thomas Reed

    2012-01-01

    1993. “Cannabis: Legal Reform, Medicinal Use and HarmBruce 2004. "Drug Policy Reform and Its Detractors: TheRobins. 2003. Cannabis Law Reform in Canada: Is the “Saga of

  13. Physicochemical investigations of a drug delivery oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhalla, A. S.; Siegel, R. A.

    2006-10-27

    .8 5.3 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 Volume of 0.009 N HCl added (mL) p H 0.178 0.704 1.146 1.77 2.158 2.77 3.69 4.04 4.68 5.69 6.77 0 Days Buffer capacity increases with time Fit 4.3 4.5 4.7 4.9 5.1 5.3 5.5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Time (Hours) p H...-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) Hydrophobic at 370 C 90 mol % or 95 mol % Ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (EGDMA) Crosslinker Methacrylic acid (MAA) pKa =4.66 Hydrophilic in basic form 10 mol % or 5 mol% COO - COO - COO --COO - ? Gluconic acid/gluconate buffer build up...

  14. Time Asymmetric Quantum Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bohm

    1999-02-26

    Mathematical and phenomenological arguments in favor of asymmetric time evolution of micro-physical states are presented.

  15. Noncommutative Two Time Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-05-10

    We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

  16. Time-periodic universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  17. Absolute Time Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Matolcsi; P. Van

    2006-10-23

    A four dimensional treatment of nonrelativistic space-time gives a natural frame to deal with objective time derivatives. In this framework some well known objective time derivatives of continuum mechanics appear as Lie-derivatives. Their coordinatized forms depends on the tensorial properties of the relevant physical quantities. We calculate the particular forms of objective time derivatives for scalars, vectors, covectors and different second order tensors from the point of view of a rotating observer. The relation of substantial, material and objective time derivatives is treated.

  18. Ultra-Fast Absorption of Amorphous Pure Drug Aerosols Via Deep Lung Inhalation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    Ultra-Fast Absorption of Amorphous Pure Drug Aerosols Via Deep Lung Inhalation JOSHUA D. RABINOWITZ. A promising means of accelerating drug action is through rapid systemic drug administration via deep lung inhalation. The speed of pulmonary drug absorption depends on the site of aerosol deposition within the lung

  19. Extension of the Isobolographic Approach to Interactions Studies between More than Two Drugs: Illustration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Extension of the Isobolographic Approach to Interactions Studies between More than Two Drugs received the drugs separately or in various combinations. Drug infusion was stopped at the onset of maximal seizures, and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected for determination of drug concentration by high

  20. DRUG-TARGET INTERACTION PREDICTION BY INTEGRATING CHEMICAL, GENOMIC, FUNCTIONAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Jianyang "Michael"

    DRUG-TARGET INTERACTION PREDICTION BY INTEGRATING CHEMICAL, GENOMIC, FUNCTIONAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL.edu.cn Corresponding author In silico prediction of unknown drug-target interactions (DTIs) has become a popular tool for drug repositioning and drug development. A key challenge in DTI prediction lies in integrating multiple

  1. Drug-evoked synaptic plasticity and addictive behavior, a causal relationship?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    Drug-evoked synaptic plasticity and addictive behavior, a causal relationship? Christian Luescher principal interest is on drug reward and how exposure to addictive substances can change behavior in rodent models of addiction. "Drug-evoked synaptic plasticity" has emerged as a mechanism underlying drug

  2. Dynamical Spot Queries to Improve Specificity in P450s based Multi-Drugs Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Dynamical Spot Queries to Improve Specificity in P450s based Multi-Drugs Monitoring Sandro Carrara accurate and frequent monitoring of drugs metabolic response in living organisms during drug treatments monitoring of the patient's drug metabolism is essential as the metabolic pathways efficacy is highly

  3. DRUG DELIVERY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUES: AN APPLICATION TO THE ELUTING STENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontrelli, Giuseppe

    DRUG DELIVERY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUES: AN APPLICATION TO THE ELUTING STENT G. Pontrelli1 , F. de Monte2 , M. Prosi3 1. ABSTRACT The drug diffusion process through an arterial eluting stent is studied and a quantitative description for drug transport to evaluate feasibility of new drug delivery strategies

  4. Strategies to Target Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells using Natural Killer Cells and Chemotherapeutic Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanzon, Caitlin Jean

    2015-01-01

    pharmaceutical drug and nutritional supplement used primarily as a mucolytic agent and in the management

  5. Time scales in LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pireaux

    2007-03-23

    The LISA mission is a space interferometer aiming at the detection of gravitational waves in the [$10^{-4}$,$10^{-1}$] Hz frequency band. In order to reach the gravitational wave detection level, a Time Delay Interferometry (TDI) method must be applied to get rid of (most of) the laser frequency noise and optical bench noise. This TDI analysis is carried out in terms of the coordinate time corresponding to the Barycentric Coordinate Reference System (BCRS), TCB, whereas the data at each of the three LISA stations is recorded in terms of each station proper time. We provide here the required proper time versus BCRS time transformation. We show that the difference in rate of station proper time versus TCB is of the order of $5 10^{-8}$. The difference between station proper times and TCB exhibits an oscillatory trend with a maximum amplitude of about $10^{-3}$ s.

  6. Time in Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curt A. Moyer

    2013-05-23

    The failure of conventional quantum theory to recognize time as an observable and to admit time operators is addressed. Instead of focusing on the existence of a time operator for a given Hamiltonian, we emphasize the role of the Hamiltonian as the generator of translations in time to construct time states. Taken together, these states constitute what we call a timeline, or quantum history, that is adequate for the representation of any physical state of the system. Such timelines appear to exist even for the semi-bounded and discrete Hamiltonian systems ruled out by Pauli's theorem. However, the step from a timeline to a valid time operator requires additional assumptions that are not always met. Still, this approach illuminates the crucial issue surrounding the construction of time operators, and establishes quantum histories as legitimate alternatives to the familiar coordinate and momentum bases of standard quantum theory.

  7. Synergistic drug-cytokine induction of hepatocellular death as an in vitro approach for the study of inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinghai J.

    Idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity represents a major problem in drug development due to inadequacy of current preclinical screening assays, but recently established rodent models utilizing bacterial LPS co-administration ...

  8. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in ?{sup 13}C between batches from ?29.7 to ?31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between ?31.3 to ?34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  9. Matter: Space without Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  10. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyo Eyo Ita III; Chopin Soo; Hoi-Lai Yu

    2015-02-06

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  11. Electromagnetic field triggered drug and chemical delivery via liposomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liburdy, Robert P. (1820 Mountain View Rd., Tiburon, CA 94920)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system and to a method of delivering a drug to a preselected target body site of a patient, comprising the steps of encapsulating the chemical agent within liposomes, essentially temperature insensitive, i.e. not having a specific predetermined phase transition temperature within the specific temperature range of drug administration; administering the liposomes to the target body site; and subjecting the target body site to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in an area of the preselected target body in order to release said chemical agent from the liposomes at a temperature of between about +10 and 65.degree. C. The invention further relates to the use of said liposomes to bind to the surface of or to enter target tissue or an organ in a living system, and, when subjected to a nonionizing field, to release a drug from the liposomes into the target site.

  12. Electromagnetic field triggered drug and chemical delivery via liposomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liburdy, R.P.

    1993-03-02

    The present invention relates to a system and to a method of delivering a drug to a preselected target body site of a patient, comprising the steps of encapsulating the chemical agent within liposomes, essentially temperature insensitive, i.e. not having a specific predetermined phase transition temperature within the specific temperature range of drug administration; administering the liposomes to the target body site; and subjecting the target body site to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in an area of the preselected target body in order to release the chemical agent from the liposomes at a temperature of between about +10 and 65 C. The invention further relates to the use of the liposomes to bind to the surface of or to enter target tissue or an organ in a living system, and, when subjected to a nonionizing field, to release a drug from the liposomes into the target site.

  13. Dynamic instability of microtubules: effect of catastrophe-suppressing drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankaj Kumar Mishra; Ambarish Kunwar; Sutapa Mukherji; Debashish Chowdhury

    2007-02-21

    Microtubules are stiff filamentary proteins that constitute an important component of the cytoskeleton of cells. These are known to exhibit a dynamic instability. A steadily growing microtubule can suddenly start depolymerizing very rapidly; this phenomenon is known as ``catastrophe''. However, often a shrinking microtubule is ``rescued'' and starts polymerizing again. Here we develope a model for the polymerization-depolymerization dynamics of microtubules in the presence of {\\it catastrophe-suppressing drugs}. Solving the dynamical equations in the steady-state, we derive exact analytical expressions for the length distributions of the microtubules tipped with drug-bound tubulin subunits as well as those of the microtubules, in the growing and shrinking phases, tipped with drug-free pure tubulin subunits. We also examine the stability of the steady-state solutions.

  14. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Angeli-Greaves, M.

    2007-10-26

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments.

  15. Time functions as utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Minguzzi

    2009-09-04

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K^+ relation (Seifert's relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg's and Levin's theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K^+ (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin's theorem and smoothing techniques.

  16. Controlling drug delivery across the placenta: A commentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audus, Kenneth L.

    1999-01-01

    Audus, K.L. (1999) Controlling drug delivery across the placenta: A commentary. Eur. J. Pharm. Sci. 8, 161-165. PMID: 10379038. Publisher’s official version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0928-0987(99)00031-7. Open Access version: http... document contains the author’s accepted manuscript. For the publisher’s version, see the link in the header of this document.] Paper citation: Audus, K.L. (1999) Controlling drug delivery across the placenta: A commentary. Eur. J. Pharm. Sci. 8...

  17. Time Domain Reflectometry Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    Time Domain Reflectometry Theory Application Note 1304-2 For Use with Agilent 86100 Infiniium DCA #12;2 The most general approach to evaluating the time domain response of any electromagnetic system a concise presentation of the fundamentals of TDR and then relates these fundamentals to the parameters

  18. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  19. Optimal Learning for Drug Discovery in Ewing's Sarcoma Diana Negoescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (molecules) to dramatically reduce the number of molecular tests required, but has heavy computational the sequence of molecular compounds to test in drug discovery. Beginning with a base compound, we consider. The problem of choosing the molecules to test to maximize the expected quality of the best compound discovered

  20. Metabolic Regulation and Anticancer Drug Resistance in the Yeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metabolic Regulation and Anticancer Drug Resistance in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mattias-91-576-8059-4 © 2014 Mattias Carlsson, Uppsala Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2014 #12;Metabolic Regulation regulation by the yeast Rph1p protein, a zinc finger transcription factor which also contains a jmjC domain

  1. An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Enver G. Kilinc, Camilla of the implantable monitoring system for long- term duration has many challenges. First, a multi-target biosen- sor coil; (ii) A power manage- ment IC dealing with the energy source of the implantable microsystem

  2. University of Alberta Sexual Assault Centre Alcohol & Drug-Facilitated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    University of Alberta Sexual Assault Centre Alcohol & Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault In a survey conducted at the University of Alberta, it was found that over half of the sexual assaults experienced process involves remembering and working through the memories, #12;University of Alberta Sexual Assault

  3. Drug Delivery DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802260

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    ,[2] which were genetically engineered to universally express luciferase, provides a rapid readout of the body by using a modified b-actin promoter.[4] As the majority of luciferin is cleared from the body nanoparticle could be engineered to target different cells.[3,6] PLA is an Food and Drug Administration (FDA

  4. Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs Jeffrey M. Perloff* Valerie Y. Suslow** Paul and starts selling a spatially-differentiated product, the prices of existing products may rise due to a better match between consumers and products. Entry may have three unusual effects. First, the new price

  5. Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs Jeffrey M. Perloffa Valerie Y. Suslowb,* Paul product, the prices of existing and new products may be higher than the incumbent's original price due to a better match between consumers and products. In other words, the average price in the market can rise

  6. Research Commentary An ``Omics'' View of Drug Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    Informatics, Stanford University Stanford, California Strategy, Management and Health Policy Enabling Postmarketing Phase IV ABSTRACT The pharmaceutical industry cannot be blamed for having a love/hate relationship, pharmaceutical developers and regulators have been careful in creating strategies for using genetics in drug

  7. Kairoscope : coordinating time socially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Reed Eric

    2010-01-01

    If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

  8. The Williston time capsule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, David (David Patrick)

    2015-01-01

    This project is a time capsule of the oil economy, created by entombing everyday objects made from and powered by petroleum into a landscape that spatially recreates the processes of drilling and fracking a contemporary ...

  9. Sublinear Time Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinfeld, Ronitt

    Sublinear time algorithms represent a new paradigm in computing, where an algorithm must give some sort of an answer after inspecting only a very small portion of the input. We discuss the types of answers that one can ...

  10. Time, energy & form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnis, Martha Jane

    1982-01-01

    Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

  11. Time in quantum mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapin, Kimberly R.

    1997-01-01

    TIME IN QUANTUM MECHANICS A Thesis by KIMBERLY R. CHAPIN Submitted to Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Marian O. Scully (Chair... of Committee) Edward S. Fry (Member) aan Laane (Member) Thomas W. Adair, III (Head of Department) August 1997 Major Subject: Physics TIME IN QIJANTUM MECHANICS A Thesis by KIMBERLY R. CHAPIN Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  12. The thermodynamics of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dries Sels; Michiel Wouters

    2015-01-22

    The problem of time is a deep paradox in our physical description of the world. According to Aristotle's relational theory, time is a measure of change and does not exist on its own. In contrast, quantum mechanics, just like Newtonian mechanics, is equipped with a master clock that dictates the evolution of a system. This clock is infinitely precise and tacitly supplied free of charge from outside physics. Not only does this absolute time make it notoriously difficult to make a consistent theory of quantum gravity, it is also the underlying problem in establishing the second law. Indeed, contrary to our experience, the Wheeler-deWitt equation --a canonical quantization of general relativity-- predicts a static universe. Similarly, when simply concerned with the dynamics of a closed quantum system, there is no second law because the Von Neumann entropy is invariant under unitary transformations. Here we are mainly concerned with the latter problem and we show that it can be resolved by attributing a minimal amount of resources to the measurement of time. Although there is an absolute time in quantum mechanics, an observer can only establish a time by measuring a clock. For a local measurement, the minimal entropy production is equal to the number of ticks. This lower bound is attained by a black hole.

  13. New oil modified acrylic polymer for pH sensitive drug release: Experimental results and statistical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Panja; A. K. Chattopadhyay

    2014-12-05

    We report results of an experimental study, complemented by detailed statistical analysis of the experimental data, on the development of a more effective control method of drug delivery using a pH sensitive acrylic polymer. New copolymers based on acrylic acid and fatty acid are constructed from dodecyl castor oil and a tercopolymer based on methyl methacrylate, acrylic acid and acryl amide were prepared using this new approach. Water swelling characteristics of fatty acid, acrylic acid copolymer and tercopolymer respectively in acid and alkali solutions have been studied by a step-change method. The antibiotic drug cephalosporin and paracetamol have also been incorporated into the polymer blend through dissolution with the release of the antibiotic drug being evaluated in bacterial stain media and buffer solution. Our results show that the rate of release of paracetamol getss affected by the pH factor and also by the nature of polymer blend. Our experimental data have later been statistically analyzed to quantify the precise nature of polymer decay rates on the pH density of the relevant polymer solvents. The time evolution of the polymer decay rates indicate a marked transition from a linear to a strictly non-linear regime depending on the whether the chosen sample is a general copolymer (linear) or a tercopolymer (non-linear). Non-linear data extrapolation techniques have been used to make probabilistic predictions about the variation in weight percentages of retained polymers at all future times, thereby quantifying the degree of efficacy of the new method of drug delivery.

  14. Mar. Drugs 2014, 12, 3587-3607; doi:10.3390/md12063587 marine drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    three times by centrifugation (10 min, 16 °C, 800 g) to remove all AB, and the pellet was resuspended.E.; Marks, L.J.; Wood, C.R.; Risser, S.M.; Gray, S. Symbiotic relations between bacteria and the domoic acid

  15. Mar. Drugs 2011, 9, 680-689; doi:10.3390/md9040680 Marine Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizet, Victor

    .mdpi.com/journal/marinedrugs Article Bactericidal Kinetics of Marine-Derived Napyradiomycins against Contemporary Methicillin indicated that both terrestrial and marine-derived members of the napyradiomycin class possess potential kinetics of these chemical scaffolds in time-kill MRSA assays. Both napyradiomycin derivatives demonstrate

  16. The evolution of drug resistance and the curious orthodoxy of aggressive chemotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Troy

    milieu where in-host competition can radically alter the fitness costs and benefits of re- sistance, there is near-universal agreement that combination drug therapy, the coadministration of drugs with unrelated

  17. Impact of flow pulsatility on arterial drug distribution in stent-based therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Caroline C.

    Drug-eluting stents reside in a dynamic fluid environment where the extent to which drugs are distributed within the arterial wall is critically modulated by the blood flowing through the arterial lumen. Yet several factors ...

  18. Diffusion-limited binding explains binary dose response for local arterial and tumour drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzafriri, A. R.

    Background:? Local drug delivery has transformed medicine, yet it remains unclear how drug efficacy depends on physicochemical properties and delivery kinetics. Most therapies seek to prolong release, yet recent studies ...

  19. Medical data mining : improving information accessibility using online patient drug reviews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yueyang Alice

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of information accessibility for patients concerned about, pharmaceutical drug side effects and experiences. We create a new corpus of online patient-provided drug reviews and present our initial ...

  20. The Major Role of Clinicians in the Discovery of Off-Label Drug Therapies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMonaco, Harold J.

    2005-09-23

    Objective: To determine, through a review of the medical literature and author contact, the role of clinicians in the discovery of off label use of Food and Drug Administration approved prescription drugs.

  1. FDA Approves Drug for Type 2 Diabetes Invented with Aid of Protein...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FDA Approves Drug for Type 2 Diabetes Invented with Aid of Protein Structure Data Taken at ALS FDA Approves Drug for Type 2 Diabetes Invented with Aid of Protein Structure Data...

  2. DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION OF THE DRUG-PROCESSING GENOME IN MOUSE LIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yue

    2010-07-29

    Despite the recent progress in understanding the expression patterns and regulatory mechanisms of drug-processing genes, namely phase-I and -II drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in adults, very little is known of ...

  3. Reforming pharmaceutical regulation: a case study of generic drugs in Brazil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonseca, Elize Massard da

    2011-12-09

    Brazil is renowned worldwide for its remarkable reforms in pharmaceutical regulation, which have enhanced access to essential medicines while lowering drug costs. As part of these reforms, the Generic Drug Act was introduced in 1999. This policy...

  4. Reforming pharmaceutical regulation: a case study of generic drugs in Brazil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonseca, Elize Massard

    2012-06-29

    Brazil is renowned worldwide for its remarkable reforms in pharmaceutical regulation, which have enhanced access to essential medicines while lowering drug costs. As part of these reforms, the Generic Drug Act was ...

  5. The evaluation of melamine dendrimers as potential macromolecular vehicles for anticancer drug delivery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neerman, Michael Frederick

    2005-08-29

    Often associated with chemotherapy are the dangerous and sometimes lifethreatening side effects towards non-cancerous tissue that can occur while on such drug regimens. The design and utilization of macromolecular drug delivery vehicles is gaining...

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the effects of low-frequency sonophoresis on transdermal drug transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Hua, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers many advantages over traditional drug administration methods such as injections and oral delivery, including increased patient compliance, and avoiding first-pass effects. However, due to ...

  7. Analysis: Why Drug Porn Isn't Exciting Anymore By TED HESSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Analysis: Why Drug Porn Isn't Exciting Anymore By TED HESSON Dec. 20, 2012-- The Imagery of pornography: like war porn, torture porn or the standard naked-people porn, drug porn offers up a taste

  8. Survival of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi in Vembanadu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    Survival of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi the survival response of multi-drug resistant enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella paratyphi- otypes of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica typhi and paratyphi are highly endemic to India

  9. Changes in the characteristics of approved New Drug Applications for antihypertensives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacNeil, John Simon Howe

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, the control of hypertension provides the backdrop for my effort to investigate how clinical trial design has evolved for antihypertensive drug submissions reviewed and approved by the Food and Drug ...

  10. Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll -HCSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll - HCSD Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll - HCSD Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor 9.1 Time

  11. Timed Alternating-Time Temporal Logic Thomas A. Henzinger1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henzinger, Thomas A.

    equally powerful options for updating the state of the game, advancing time, or blocking time. Second, we in order to specify real-time objectives for games played on timed structures. We define the semantics Timed games are a formal model for the synthesis of real-time systems [22, 20]. While much research

  12. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesisSediments andTheTime-Resolved Time-Resolved

  13. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-05-29

    Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

  14. A NOVEL DNA-BASED MICROFLUORIMETRIC METHOD TO EVALUATE ANTIMALARIAL DRUG ACTIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    -plasmodial drugs, including quinine and artemisinin,7,8 many of which are derived from biodiversity-rich developing

  15. Time Activity Time Activity Time Activity Tuesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    Time Activity Time Activity Time Activity Tuesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE 2-Jun-15 Wednesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE 3-Jun-15 Thursday CLOSED

  16. Time in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Brout; R. Parentani

    1999-02-05

    The notion of time in cosmology is revealed through an examination of transition matrix elements of radiative processes occurring in the cosmos. To begin with, the very concept of time is delineated in classical physics in terms of correlations between the succession of configurations which describe a process and a standard trajectory called the clock. The total is an isolated system of fixed energy. This is relevant for cosmology in that the universe is an isolated system which we take to be homogeneous and isotropic. Furthermore, in virtue of the constraint which arises from reparametrization invariance of time, it has total energy zero. Therefore the momentum of the scale factor is determined from the energy of matter. In the quantum theory this is exploited through use of the WKB approximation for the wave function of the scale factor, justified for a large universe. The formalism then gives rise to matrix elements describing matter processes. These are shown to take on the form of usual time dependent quantum amplitudes wherein the temporal dependence is given by a background which is once more fixed by the total energy of matter.

  17. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  18. Presenter:! Time & Date: !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    a checkbook, you can understand which energy options have the promise of supporting humankind - wind, hydro://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! #12;A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! Presenter: Liz Moyer! Time a bigger, richer population without fossil fuels (which will definitely run out someday)? Energy is a hot

  19. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  20. Time reversal communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  1. The encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs in Pluronic F127 micelles: the effects of drug hydrophobicity, solution temperature and pH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajib Basak; Ranjini Bandyopadhyay

    2014-06-27

    Three drugs, Ibuprofen, Aspirin and Erythromycin, are encapsulated in spherical Pluronic F127 micelles. The shapes and the size distributions of the micelles in dilute, aqueous solutions, with and without drugs, are ascertained using cryo- Scanning Electron Microscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) experiments, respectively. Uptake of drugs above a threshold concentration is seen to reduce the critical micellization temperature of the solution. The mean hydrodynamic radii and polydispersities of the micelles are found to increase with decrease in temperature and in the presence of drug molecules. The hydration of the micellar core at lower temperatures is verified using fluorescence measurements. Increasing solution pH leads to the ionization of the drugs incorporated in the micellar cores. This causes rupture of the micelles and release of the drugs into the solution at the highest solution pH value of 11.36 investigated here and is studied using DLS and fluorescence spectrocopy.

  2. A HYBRID INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR FORMULATION OF BCS CLASS II DRUGS IN HARD GELATIN CAPSULES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Yun

    A HYBRID INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR FORMULATION OF BCS CLASS II DRUGS IN HARD GELATIN CAPSULES Gunjan in hard gelatin cap- sules. Several significant challenges are involved in drug- formulation: the active of drug formulations for hard gelatin capsules can present significant challenges [4]. Some

  3. CABM Symposium Applications of NMR to structure-based drug design in structural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    CABM Symposium Applications of NMR to structure-based drug design in structural genomics Robert, structure-based drug design, structural genomics Abstract Structural genomics is poised to have a tremendous impact on traditional structure-based drug design programs. As a result, there is a growing need

  4. MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design by Coupling to evaluate ligand binding with an obvious utility in structure-based drug discovery and design.7-10 The "SAR to bind a target protein while obtaining structure-related information as part of a struc- ture-based drug

  5. Efficient algorithms for a scheduling problem and its applications to illicit drug market crackdowns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    scheduling problem. By duality we transform a special case of the drug market crackdown scheduling problemEfficient algorithms for a scheduling problem and its applications to illicit drug market for the general case of the drug market crackdown scheduling problem with monomial cost functions. key words: job

  6. Drugs: education, prevention and policy, June 2013; 20(3): 184194 Copyright 2013 Informa UK Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triolo, Livio

    2013 Drugs: education, prevention and policy, June 2013; 20(3): 184­194 Copyright ß 2013 Informa UK Ltd. ISSN: 0968-7637 print/1465-3370 online DOI: 10.3109/09687637.2012.750274 Drug user dynamics: A compartmental model of drug users for scenario analyses Mario Santoro1 , Livio Triolo1 , & Carla Rossi2 1

  7. DETERMINATION OF BOVINE SERUM ALBUMIN CONJUGATED DRUGS BY IMMOBILIZATION AS MICROARRAYS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    DETERMINATION OF BOVINE SERUM ALBUMIN CONJUGATED DRUGS BY IMMOBILIZATION AS MICROARRAYS AND OBLIQUE, California, USA & Human serum is a mixture of various proteins which may interact with drugs. Therefore. The experimental results show that the binding affinities between most of the drugs and their antibodies were

  8. Repurposing Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Request for Proposals (RFP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    Repurposing Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Request for Proposals (RFP) Neurodegenerative diseases represent one of the most difficult classes of diseases for which to develop drugs, yet, offering a huge opportunity to target some of these pathways with repurposed drugs approved

  9. Resistance to currently used drugs is a serious problem in most fields of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Crossresistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Resistance to currently used drugs is a serious problem in most fields of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Crossresistance between two of the major classes of drug used in the treat- ment of African as a result of alterations in an unusual adenosine transporter involved in the uptake of these drugs. African

  10. Encapsulation of Hydrophobic Drugs in a Copolymer: Glass Transition Behavior and Miscibility Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Encapsulation of Hydrophobic Drugs in a Copolymer: Glass Transition Behavior and Miscibility, Greece The knowledge of glass transition temperatures Tg in drug + polymer systems is indispensable for drug encapsulation. Tg values as a function of composition make possible the determination whether

  11. Drug delivery systems based on sugar-macromolecule conjugates Benjamin G Davis* & Mark A Robinson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    Drug delivery systems based on sugar-macromolecule conjugates Benjamin G Davis* & Mark A Robinson in Drug Discovery & Development 2002 5(2): 279-288 PharmaPress Ltd ISSN 1367-6733 The specificity-tuning of active drug delivery through their great ability to undergo site- specific modification

  12. Journal of Chromatography A, 1116 (2006) 193203 Determination of acidic drugs and caffeine in municipal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Chromatography A, 1116 (2006) 193­203 Determination of acidic drugs and caffeine of both sample preparation and instrumental techniques for analysis of such acidic drugs and Oasis HLB SPE cartridges were used to pre-concentrate samples for acidic drugs and caffeine

  13. DRUGS OF ABUSE IN URBANDRUGS OF ABUSE IN URBAN GROUNDWATER. A CASE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    DRUGS OF ABUSE IN URBANDRUGS OF ABUSE IN URBAN GROUNDWATER. A CASE STUDY: BARCELONA. Anna Jurado J, J., Tubau, I.,Pujades, E., Postigo, C., Lopez de Alda, M., Barceló, D. (2012). "Drugs of abuse Are not efficiently removed in WWTP's. Some of them are endocrine disrupters. Pharmaceuticals Hormones Drugs of abuse

  14. Raspberry derived mesoporous carbon-tubules and fixed-bed adsorption of pharmaceutical drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Raspberry derived mesoporous carbon-tubules and fixed-bed adsorption of pharmaceutical drugs Shashi Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290, USA 1. Introduction Pharmaceutical drugs (PD­water partition coefficient Pharmaceutical drugs A B S T R A C T Novel mesoporous carbon-tubules were prepared

  15. University Policy Statement for Students concerning Drugs Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    University Policy Statement for Students concerning Drugs Page 1 of 3 THE UNIVERSITY OF KENT University Policy Statement for Students concerning Drugs (Substance Misuse) 1. Purpose (i) The University responsibility to promote good health by raising awareness of the risks of drug misuse. (iii) The University

  16. This ICBG program links the discovery of drugs and genes for agriculture with biodiversity conservation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    ABSTRACT This ICBG program links the discovery of drugs and genes for agriculture with biodiversity of Panama's scientific infrastructure for drug and gene discovery, the training of Panamanian scientists in the short- and long-term. INTRODUCTION Over 50% of the most common prescription drugs orig- inate from

  17. Predicting drug metabolism: experiment and/or computation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchmair, Johannes; Göller, Andreas H.; Lang, Dieter; Kunze, Jens; Testa, Bernard; Wilson, Ian D.; Glen, Robert C.; Schneider, Gisbert

    2015-04-24

    metabolites. These xenobiotics also include synthetic drugs, in addition to naturally occurring substances (e.g. bacterial, fungal and herbal toxins), often produced as part of a specific defence mechanism. Recent studies have highlighted the often... Metabolic enzymes and effectors involved in their regulation are known for remarkable ligand promiscuity. The plasticity and size of their binding sites (some of them have two or more) is a direct result of their function, which in the case of xenobiotic...

  18. Reducing acquisition times in multidimensional NMR with a time-optimized Fourier encoding algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frydman, Lucio

    . Acquisitions of 2D heteronuclear correlation NMR spectra on quinine and on the anti-inflammatory drug isobutyl

  19. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  20. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  1. The ethics of ‘smart drugs’: Moral judgments about healthy people’s use of cognitive-enhancing drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheske, Christel; Schnall, Simone

    2012-01-01

    daily basis, presumably at least in part to become more cognitively alert, that coffee is the second most commonly traded commodity in the world, surpassed only by crude oil (Trade Commodities, 2011). Thus, mild cognitive enhancement derived from... state that a behavior is wrong in the absence of any supporting evidence. In particular, concerns about the naturalness of CE drugs may follow a moral intuition rather than defensible reasons. A widespread belief is that natural products...

  2. The ethics of ‘smart drugs’: Moral judgments about healthy people’s use of cognitive-enhancing drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheske, Christel; Schnall, Simone

    2012-01-01

    to become more cognitively alert, that coffee is the second most commonly traded commodity in the world, sur- passed only by crude oil (Trade Commodities, 2011). Thus, mild cognitive enhancement derived from plant sources is very much part of daily life... . In particular, concerns about the naturalness of CE drugs may follow a moral intuition rather than defens- ible reasons. A widespread belief is that natural products are healthier than artificial ones (Britten, 1994; Britten, Ukoumunne, & Boulton, 2002; Giveon...

  3. Electronic Supporting Information Non-Invasive, Real-Time Reporting Drug Release In Vitro and In Vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Jianjun

    and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana­Champaign, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. E, USA. d Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, e Department of Internal Medicine hydride (NaH), diisopropyl azodicarboxylate (DIAD), IR-780 iodide, and other reagents and solvents were

  4. Space-time diamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; T. C. Ralph

    2015-07-02

    We show that the particle number distribution of diamond modes, modes that are localised in a finite space-time region, are thermal for the Minkowski vacuum state of a massless scalar field, an analogue to the Unruh effect. The temperature of the diamond is inversely proportional to its size. An inertial observer can detect this thermal radiation by coupling to the diamond modes using an appropriate energy scaled detector. We further investigate the correlations between various diamonds and find that entanglement between adjacent diamonds dominates.

  5. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Please cite this article in press as: Chen, H. et al., Nanonization strategies for poorly water-soluble drugs, Drug Discov Today (2010), doi:10.1016/j.drudis.2010.02.009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    2010-01-01

    , Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China Poor water solubility for poorly water-soluble drugs, Drug Discov Today (2010), doi:10.1016/j.drudis.2010.02.009 Drug Discovery Today Volume 00, Number 00 March 2010 REVIEWS Nanonization strategies for poorly water-soluble drugs

  6. Time Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    malicious attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel signature model ­ Time Valid One-Time Signature (TVTime Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication Qiyan Wang, Himanshu-OTS) ­ to boost the efficiency of regular one-time signature schemes. Based on the TV-OTS model, we design

  7. Towards engineering hormone-binding globulins as drug delivery agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Wee Lee; Zhou, Aiwu; Read, Randy J.

    2014-11-26

    (2014) Towards Engineering Hormone-Binding Globulins as Drug Delivery Agents. PLoS ONE 9(11): e113402. doi:10.1371/journal.pone. 0113402 Editor: Ashley M. Buckle, Monash University, Australia Received: June 10, 2014 Accepted: October 24, 2014 Published... stock solution was prepared by dissolving lyophilised cortisol (Sigma Aldrich) in 80% ethanol to make a 500 mM solution, which was then diluted with water to make solutions of 20, 40 and 80 mM, with water being used as a negative control. Aliquots...

  8. Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Scott G

    2013-01-01

    studies evaluating the advertising of ED wait times. Only 1potentially used for advertising may be inaccurate. AccessedE ditorial Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times Scott

  9. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 162 Fall 2001. Date: Wednesday December 12, 2001. Time: 7:00 pm -9:00 pm. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  10. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 161 Fall 2001. Date: Friday December 14, 2001. Time: 8:00 am -10:00 am. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  11. 1. 2 , 4 2 ( Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    format with double line spacing (font Times New Roman, 12 pt; margins: left and up -- 30 mm, right , . 20. , , . 1. 2 , 4 2 ( Times New Roman, 12 pt

  12. Denoising Deterministic Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven P. Lalley; Andrew B. Nobel

    2006-04-21

    This paper is concerned with the problem of recovering a finite, deterministic time series from observations that are corrupted by additive, independent noise. A distinctive feature of this problem is that the available data exhibit long-range dependence and, as a consequence, existing statistical theory and methods are not readily applicable. This paper gives an analysis of the denoising problem that extends recent work of Lalley, but begins from first principles. Both positive and negative results are established. The positive results show that denoising is possible under somewhat restrictive conditions on the additive noise. The negative results show that, under more general conditions on the noise, no procedure can recover the underlying deterministic series.

  13. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

    1985-05-21

    A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

  14. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  15. Report on the deuterium retention in CVD coated W on SiC in support of the Ultramet Company’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project: SOW DE-FG02-07ER84941

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada

    2012-06-01

    A tungsten (W) coated (0.0005-inch thickness) silicon carbide (SiC) (1.0-inch diameter and 0.19-inch thickness) sample was exposed to a divertor relevant high-flux (~1022 m-2s-1) deuterium plasma at 200 and 400°C in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), and the total deuterium retention was subsequently measured via the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method. The deuterium retentions were 6.4x1019 m-2 and 1.7x1020 m-2, for 200 and 400°C exposure, respectively. The Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) was used to analyze the measured TDS spectrum to investigate the deuterium behavior in the W coated SiC, and the results indicated that most of the deuterium was trapped in the W coated layer even at 400°C. This thin W layer (0.0005-inch ~ 13µm thickness) prevented deuterium ions from bombarding directly into the SiC substrate, minimizing erosion of SiC and damage creation via ion bombardment. The shift in the D desorption peak in the TDS spectra from 200 C to 400°C can be attributed to D migration to the bulk material. This unexpectedly low deuterium retention and short migration might be due to the porous nature of the tungsten coating, which can decrease the solution concentration of deuterium atoms.

  16. Time's Ontic Voltage Craig Callender

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Time's Ontic Voltage Craig Callender Philosophy of time, as practiced throughout the last hundred venue for attacking questions about the nature of time--in sharp contrast to the primary venue slowly in philosophy of time.1 Since twentieth-century analytic philosophy as a whole often drew

  17. Untameable Timed Automata! (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    are a widely studied model for real­time systems. Since 8 years, several tools implement this model­life systems. 1 Introduction Real­Time Systems ­ Since their introduction by Alur and Dill in [AD94], timed au­ tomata are one of the most studied models for real­time systems. Numerous works have been devoted

  18. Untameable Timed Automata! (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    model for real-time systems. Since 8 years, several tools implement this model and are successfully used for a restricted class of timed automata, which has been sufficient for modeling numerous real-life systems. 1 Introduction Real-Time Systems - Since their introduction by Alur and Dill in [AD94], timed au- tomata are one

  19. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine?, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon-#12;fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning a timing-belt based hydroEngine ?powertrain: 1. Can a belt handle the high torques and power loads demanded by the SLH? (Yes.) 2. Can the SLH blades be mounted to belt with a connection that can withstand the loads encountered in operation? (Yes.) 3. Can the belt, with blade attachments, live through the required cyclic loading? (Yes.) The research adds to the general understanding of sustainable small hydropower systems by using innovative system testing to develop and demonstrate performance of a novel powertrain solution, enabling a new type of hydroelectric turbine to be commercially developed. The technical effectiveness of the methods investigated has been shown to be positive through an extensive design and testing process accommodating many constraints and goals, with a major emphasis on high cycle fatigue life. Economic feasibility of the innovations has been demonstrated through many iterations of design for manufacturability and cost reduction. The project is of benefit to the public because it has helped to develop a solution to a major problem -- despite the large available potential for new low-head hydropower, high capital costs and high levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) continue to be major barriers to project development. The hydroEngine? represents a significant innovation, leveraging novel fluid mechanics and mechanical configuration to allow lower-cost turbine manufacture and development of low head hydropower resources.

  20. Reactions during melting of low-activity waste glasses and their effects on the retention of rhenium as a surrogate for technetium-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Tongan; Kim, Dong-Sang; Tucker, Abigail E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-10-01

    Volatile loss of radioactive 99Tc to offgas is a concern with processing the low-activity waste (LAW) at Hanford site. We investigated the partitioning and incorporation of Re (a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc) into the glass melt during crucible melting of two simulated LAW feeds that resulted in a large difference in 99mTc/Re retention in glass from the small-scale melter tests. Each feed was prepared from a simulated liquid LAW and chemical and mineral additives (boric acid, silica sand, etc.). The as-mixed slurry feeds were dried at 105°C and heated to 600–1100°C at 5 K/min. The dried feeds and heat treated samples were leached with deionized water for 10 min at room temperature followed by 24-h leaching at 80°C. Chemical compositions of the resulting solutions and insoluble solids were analyzed. Volume expansion measurement and X-ray diffraction were performed on dried feeds and heat treated samples to characterize the progress of feed-to-glass conversion reactions. It was found that the incorporation of Re into glass melt virtually completed during the major feed-to-glass conversion reactions were going on at ? 700°C. The present results suggest that the different composition of the salt phase is responsible for the large difference in Re incorporation into glass melt during early stages of glass melting at ? 700°C. Additional studies with modified and simplified feeds are underway to understand the details on how the different salt composition affects the Re incorporation.

  1. Dead-time optimized time-correlated photon counting instrument with synchronized, independent timing channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Dead-time optimized time-correlated photon counting instrument with synchronized, independent timing channels Michael Wahla and Hans-Jürgen Rahn PicoQuant GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29, D-12489 Berlin December 2006; accepted 19 February 2007; published online 23 March 2007 Time-correlated single photon

  2. TCM Database@Taiwan: The World's Largest Traditional Chinese Medicine Database for Drug Screening In Silico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Chian

    Rapid advancing computational technologies have greatly speeded up the development of computer-aided drug design (CADD). Recently, pharmaceutical companies have increasingly shifted their attentions toward traditional ...

  3. Ask Your Doctor About... Prescription Drug Advertising, Patient Autonomy, and the Role of the FDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Direct to consumer advertising is medicalising normal humanconsumer prescription drug advertising. MED CARE 35 (1997):y's guidelines on advertising too limited. say critics.

  4. Opportunities and Barriers in Probation Reform: A Case Study of Drug Testing and Sanctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiman, Mark A. R.; Tran, Thomas H.; Fishbein, Paul; Magula, Maria-Teresa; Allen, Warren; Lacy, Gareth

    2003-01-01

    Offenders: Testing, Sanctions, and Treatment,” in Drugof Drug Testing and Sanctions Mark A.R. Kleiman, Thomas H.10 Sanctions for

  5. Development of a Light Actuated Drug Delivery-on-Demand System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Chase Schilling

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical mechanisms of light- triggered release fromNanospheres for Near-Infrared Light-Triggered Drug Release,products by phenothiazine dyes and light, Photochemistry and

  6. Biopolymer-Connected Liposome Networks as Injectable Biomaterials Capable of Sustained Local Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    Biopolymer-Connected Liposome Networks as Injectable Biomaterials Capable of Sustained Local Drug-20 Such hybrid gels could be used in applications that require implantable biomaterials; however, most

  7. Evolution of a Major Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Defect in the Domestic Cat and Other Felidae: Phylogenetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starks, Philip

    , University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America Abstract The domestic cat (Felis catus) shows remarkable sensitivity to the adverse effects of phenolic drugs, including acetaminophen

  8. Reporting Prescription Drugs, Over-the-Counter Medications, and Dietary Supplements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2008-02-01

    Overview of types of prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications that must be reported in DOE's Human Reliability Program.

  9. Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper -HCSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper - HCSD Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS Copyright create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall

  10. Date of Injury Date Time In Time Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : NORMAL Work Schedule (ie: MF, 8am5pm)First Name Last Name # of hours missed from work #12;RISK MGTDate of Injury Date Time In Time Out Total time worked medical appt no work within restrictions Next Medical Appointment(s): Tuesday of each week. Risk Mgt email: workcomp@colostate.edu; fax

  11. Sociodemographic and drug use characteristics, sex behaviors, and motivations for drug use among HIV- seronegative, heterosexual, methamphetamine users in San Diego, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Wei-Woon Susan

    2009-01-01

    users in San Francisco (the UFO Study). J Urban Health 2003;users in San Francisco (the UFO Study). J Urban Health 2003;Francisco from 1998 to 2004: the UFO Study. Drug Alcohol Rev

  12. Drug deposition and distribution in healthy and atherosclerotic arteries and in models of atherosclerosis following bulk or stent-based drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vukmirovic, Neda

    2007-01-01

    Drug eluting stents have revolutionized the practice of medicine and the landscape of medical devices. Yet, more than four years after introduction clinical trial data and clinical use have still not fully clarified what ...

  13. Time translation of quantum properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Vanni; R. Laura

    2008-12-03

    Based on the notion of time translation, we develop a formalism to deal with the logic of quantum properties at different times. In our formalism it is possible to enlarge the usual notion of context to include composed properties involving properties at different times. We compare our results with the theory of consistent histories.

  14. Time machines and quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark J Hadley

    2006-12-02

    There is a deep structural link between acausal spacetimes and quantum theory. As a consequence quantum theory may resolve some "paradoxes" of time travel. Conversely, non-time-orientable spacetimes naturally give rise to electric charges and spin half. If an explanation of quantum theory is possible, then general relativity with time travel could be it.

  15. The LCLS Timing Event System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF MYCOSIN FAMILY PROTEASES, NOVEL DRUG TARGETS OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Hilary

    2007-09-17

    Mycosin-1 a novel drug target. This study aims to clone and characterize Mycosin-1 for further investigation as a drug target. The mycosin-1 and mycosin-2 genes were successfully cloned for later use in expression studies. Mycosin-2 has been included...

  17. Optimal drug release schedule for in-situ radiosensitization of image guided permanent prostate implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    of image guided 125 I prostate brachytherapy. Spacers used in permanent implants may be manufactured from such a constraint, is not known. This work determines the optimal elution schedules for 125 I prostate brachytherapy. The interaction between brachytherapy dose distributions and drug distribution around drug eluting spacers

  18. Data Warehouse Design for Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery Research Melinda G. Axel and Il-Yeol Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Il-Yeol

    annually on drug discovery research. In the process, they generate vast amounts of scientific data. Data and dimension tables, and a dimensional data model for a drug discovery data warehouse is proposed. 1 data for analytical processing[1]. The dimensional data model for data warehouses was introduced

  19. Challenges in Modern Drug Discovery: A Case Study of Boceprevir, an HCV Protease Inhibitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    the complexity and challenges encountered in the drug discovery process. 50 ACCOUNTS OF CHEMICAL RESEARCH 50Challenges in Modern Drug Discovery: A Case Study of Boceprevir, an HCV Protease Inhibitor cell culture system and the absence of a convenient small animal model have hampered the assessment

  20. Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program (CBMB) in Drug Discovery and Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program (CBMB) in Drug Discovery and Biotechnology-2014), and Director Ching-Shih Chen, the Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program in Drug Discovery their expertise. Starting in autumn 2009, the program is divided into two tracks: Chemical Biology (CB) track