National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for drop cable wire

  1. Wire rope superconducting cable for diurnal load leveling SMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a wire rope cable for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is discussed. The superconducting wires in the rope permit the passage of large currents in the relatively small conductors of the windings and hence cause large electromagnetic forces to act on the rope. The diameter of the rope, from a strength point of view, can be considerably reduced by supporting the rope at various points along its length.

  2. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  3. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  4. Superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allais, Arnaud; Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE

    2009-12-15

    A superconductor cable includes a superconductive cable core (1) and a cryostat (2) enclosing the same. The cable core (1) has a superconductive conductor (3), an insulation (4) surrounding the same and a shielding (5) surrounding the insulation (4). A layer (3b) of a dielectric or semiconducting material is applied to a central element (3a) formed from a normally conducting material as a strand or tube and a layer (3c) of at least one wire or strip of superconductive material is placed helically on top. The central element (3a) and the layer (3c) are connected to each other in an electrically conducting manner at the ends of the cable core (1).

  5. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  6. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the worlds first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  7. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Sou-Tien

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  8. Coaxial cable cutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Leslie C.; Hedges, Robert S.

    1990-04-10

    A cutting device is provided which is useful in trimming the jackets from semi-rigid coaxial cables and wire having a cutting bit and support attached to movable jaws. A thumbpiece is provided to actuate the opening of the jaws for receiving the cable to be trimmed, and a spring member is provided to actuate the closing of the jaws when thumbpiece is released. The cutting device utilizes one moving part during the cutting operation by using a rolling cut action. The nature of the jaws allows the cutting device to work in space having clearances less than 0.160 inches.

  9. Superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allais, Arnaud; Schmidt, Frank; Marzahn, Erik

    2010-05-04

    A superconductor cable is described, having a superconductive flexible cable core (1) , which is laid in a cryostat (2, 3, 4), in which the cable core (1) runs in the cryostat (2, 3, 4) in the form of a wave or helix at room temperature.

  10. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauritzen, T.

    1984-05-23

    This invention relates to apparatus for producing constant tension in cable or the like when it is unreeled and reeled from a drum or spool under conditions of intermittent demand. The invention is particularly applicable to the handling of superconductive cable, but the invention is also applicable to the unreeling and reeling of other strands, such as electrical cable, wire, cord, other cables, fish line, wrapping paper and numerous other materials.

  11. Superconducting Cable Having A Flexible Former

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-08-30

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  12. Superconducting Cable Having A Felexible Former

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-15

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  13. Mechanical design of submarine power cables for floating platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisplinghoff, R. L.; Libby, D. O.; Costantino, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The process of mechanical design of submarine power cables employed by the Simplex Wire and Cable Company is described. The process commences with design criteria and proceeds through preliminary design, load and stress analyses and culminates in extreme value reliability and lifetime predictions. The analytical methods employed are emphasized and some representative numerical results are presented.

  14. Superconducting cable-in-conduit low resistance splice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Artman, Thomas A.

    2003-06-24

    A low resistance splice connects two cable-in-conduit superconductors to each other. Dividing collars for arranging sub-cable units from each conduit are provided, along with clamping collars for mating each sub-cable wire assembly to form mated assemblies. The mated assemblies ideally can be accomplished by way of splicing collar. The mated assemblies are cooled by way of a flow of coolant, preferably helium. A method for implementing such a splicing is also described.

  15. Commercialization of Medium Voltage HTS Triax TM Cable Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, David

    2012-12-31

    The original project scope that was established in 2007 aimed to install a 1,700 meter (1.1 mile) medium voltage HTS Triax{TM} cable system into the utility grid in New Orleans, LA. In 2010, however, the utility partner withdrew from the project, so the 1,700 meter cable installation was cancelled and the scope of work was reduced. The work then concentrated on the specific barriers to commercialization of HTS cable technology. The modified scope included long-length HTS cable design and testing, high voltage factory test development, optimized cooling system development, and HTS cable life-cycle analysis. In 2012, Southwire again analyzed the market for HTS cables and deemed the near term market acceptance to be low. The scope of work was further reduced to the completion of tasks already started and to testing of the existing HTS cable system in Columbus, OH. The work completed under the project included: Long-length cable modeling and analysis HTS wire evaluation and testing Cable testing for AC losses Optimized cooling system design Life cycle testing of the HTS cable in Columbus, OH Project management. The 200 meter long HTS Triax{TM} cable in Columbus, OH was incorporated into the project under the initial scope changes as a test bed for life cycle testing as well as the site for an optimized HTS cable cooling system. The Columbus cable utilizes the HTS TriaxTM design, so it provided an economical tool for these of the project tasks.

  16. Superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Darrell F.; Lake, Bill L.; Ballinger, Ronald G.

    1988-01-01

    A superconducting cable comprising an in-situ-formed type II superconductor, e.g. Nb.sub.3 Sn, in association with a stabilizing conductor both in heat transfer relationship with at least one passage adapted to carry liquified gaseous refrigerant. The conductor and said at least one passage are enclosed by a sheath comprising an alloy consisting essentially of about 49% nickel, about 4% chromium, about 3% niobium, about 1.4% titanium, about 1% aluminum, balance essentially iron.

  17. CABLE CONNECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caller, J.M.

    1962-05-01

    An electrical connector is designed for utilization in connection with either round or flat coaxial cables. The connector comprises a bayonet-type coupling arrangement with a splined movable locking sleeve adapted to lock together components of the connector. A compression spring is attached to one of the connector components and functions to forcibly separate mating components when the locking sleeve is in an unlocked condition so as to minimize the possibility of leaving the conductors electrically coupled. (AEC)

  18. CABLE AMPACITY DERATING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Shane

    1995-07-24

    The purpose and objective of this calculation is to determine the maximum ampacity of the cables in the underground duct bank for ensuring compliance with cable limits.

  19. 300 Area signal cable study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whattam, J.W.

    1994-09-15

    This report was prepared to discuss the alternatives available for removing the 300 Area overhead signal cable system. This system, installed in 1969, has been used for various monitoring and communication signaling needs throughout the 300 Area. Over the years this cabling system has deteriorated, has been continually reconfigured, and has been poorly documented to the point of nonreliability. The first step was to look at the systems utilizing the overhead signal cable that are still required for operation. Of the ten systems that once operated via the signal cable, only five are still required; the civil defense evacuation alarms, the public address (PA) system, the criticality alarms, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Facilities Management Control System (FMCS), and the 384 annunciator panel. Of these five, the criticality alarms and the FMCS have been dealt with under other proposals. Therefore, this study focused on the alternatives available for the remaining three systems (evacuation alarms, PA system, and 384 panel) plus the accountability aid phones. Once the systems to be discussed were determined, then three alternatives for providing the signaling pathway were examined for each system: (1) re-wire using underground communication ducts, (2) use the Integrated Voice/Data Telecommunications System (IVDTS) already installed and operated by US West, and (3) use radio control. Each alternative was developed with an estimated cost, advantages, and disadvantages. Finally, a recommendation was provided for the best alternative for each system.

  20. Yukita Electric Wire Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Yukita Electric Wire Co Ltd Place: Joto-Ku, Osaka, Japan Zip: 536-0001 Product: Osaka-based electric cable and power supply cords manufacturer....

  1. Cable load sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beus, Michael J.; McCoy, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Apparatus for sensing the magnitude of a load on a cable as the cable is employed to support the load includes a beam structure clamped to the cable so that a length of the cable lies along the beam structure. A spacer associated with the beam structure forces a slight curvature in a portion of the length of cable under a cable "no-load" condition so that the portion of the length of cable is spaced from the beam structure to define a cable curved portion. A strain gauge circuit including strain gauges is secured to the beam structure by welding. As the cable is employed to support a load the load causes the cable curved portion to exert a force normal to the cable through the spacer and on the beam structure to deform the beam structure as the cable curved portion attempts to straighten under the load. As this deformation takes place, the resistance of the strain gauges is set to a value proportional to the magnitude of the normal strain on the beam structure during such deformation. The magnitude of the normal strain is manipulated in a control device to generate a value equal to the magnitude or weight of the load supported by the cable.

  2. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, L.D.

    1996-12-10

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. 5 figs.

  3. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made.

  4. Method for fabricating multi-strand superconducting cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1985-04-01

    Multi-strand superconducting cables adapted to be used, for example, to wind a magnet are fabricated by directing wire strands inwardly from spools disposed on the perimeter of a rotating disk and wrapping them diagonally around a tapered mandrel with a flattened cross-sectional shape with a core having a wedge-shaped channel. As the cable is pulled axially, flexibly coupled wedge-shaped pieces are continuously passed through the channel in the mandrel and inserted into the cable as an internal support therefor.

  5. Wire chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  6. Electronically controlled cable wrapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    A spindle assembly engages and moves along a length of cable to be wrapped with insulating tape. Reels of insulating tape are mounted on a outer rotatable spindle which revolves around the cable to dispense insulating tape. The rate of movement of the spindle assembly along the length of the cable is controlled by a stepper motor which is programmably synchronized to the rate at which rotatable spindle wraps the cable. The stepper motor drives a roller which engages the cable and moves the spindle assembly along the length of the cable as it is being wrapped. The spindle assembly is mounted at the end of an articulated arm which allows free movement of the spindle assembly and allows the spindle assembly to follow lateral movement of the cable.

  7. Electronically controlled cable wrapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, T.M.

    1982-08-17

    A spindle assembly engages and moves along a length of cable to be wrapped with insulating tape. Reels of insulating tape are mounted on a outer rotatable spindle which revolves around the cable to dispense insulating tape. The rate of movement of the spindle assembly along the length of the cable is controlled by a stepper motor which is programmably synchronized to the rate at which rotatable spindle wraps the cable. The stepper motor drives a roller which engages the cable and moves the spindle assembly along the length of the cable as it is being wrapped. The spindle assembly is mounted at the end of an articulated arm which allows free movement of the spindle assembly and allows the spindle assembly to follow lateral movement of the cable.

  8. Nb3Sn RRP® strand and Rutherford cable development for a 15 T dipole demonstrator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barzi, E.; Andreev, N.; Li, P.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2016-03-16

    Keystoned Rutherford cables made of 28 strands and with a stainless steel core were developed and manufactured using 1 mm Nb3Sn composite wires produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology with 127 and 169 restacks using the Restacked-Rod-Process®. Furthermore, the performance and properties of these cables were studied to evaluate possible candidates for 15 T accelerator magnets.

  9. CABLE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES, INC. DETERMINATION OF THRESHOLD...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cable TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION DESCRIPTION OF TEST CABLES TEMPERATURE CONDITIONING OF TEST CABLES TESTING OF XLPE INSULATED CABLE BEFORE AGING Threshold ...

  10. Thermal management of long-length HTS cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A; Hassenzahl, William V

    2011-01-01

    Projections of electric power production suggest a major shift to renewables, such as wind and solar, which will be in remote locations where massive quantities of power are available. One solution for transmitting this power over long distances to load centers is direct current (dc), high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables. Electric transmission via dc cables promises to be effective because of the low-loss, highcurrent- carrying capability of HTS wire at cryogenic temperatures. However, the thermal management system for the cable must be carefully designed to achieve reliable and energyefficient operation. Here we extend the analysis of a superconducting dc cable concept proposed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which has one stream of liquid nitrogen flowing in a cryogenic enclosure that includes the power cable, and a separate return tube for the nitrogen. Refrigeration stations positioned every 10 to 20 km cool both nitrogen streams. Both go and return lines are contained in a single vacuum/cryogenic envelope. Other coolants, including gaseous helium and gaseous hydrogen, could provide potential advantages, though they bring some technical challenges to the operation of long-length HTS dc cable systems. A discussion of the heat produced in superconducting cables and a system to remove the heat are discussed. Also, an analysis of the use of various cryogenic fluids in long-distance HTS power cables is presented.

  11. Monitoring cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samm, R.; Garcia, F.; Rodenbaugh, T.; Shimshock, J.

    1990-12-01

    The existing underground transmission system in the United States is worth about $5 billion. To optimize the return on that investment and on further investment in the growing system, EPRI has sponsored research to develop periodic and continuous diagnostic procedures and methodologies for evaluating underground cables. By using monitoring results to support maintenance and cable management decisions, utilities will be able to improve maintenance planning, reduce unscheduled outages, increase system reliability, and extend cable life. At the same time, they will be able to operate systems more efficiently and closer to true ratings. The scope of this paper are the following projects: application of dissolved-gas analysis to the periodic monitoring of liquid-filled, paper-wrapped cables (RP7895-1) and also cables insulated with a laminate of cellulose paper, polypropylene film, and cellulose paper, or PPP-insulated cables (RP7910-1); development of a transmission cable diagnostic system based on periodic power factor measurements (RP7910-5); development of an integrated, multifaceted online diagnostic monitoring system known as the Dynamic Rating and Underground Monitoring System (DRUMS) (RP7900); development of a protocol for using perfluorocarbon tracers to locate leaks in high-pressure, liquid-filled cables (RP7905-1); and a long-term cable life evaluation and management project, comprising 10 research areas (RP7914).

  12. Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartlein, R.A.; Hampton, R.N.

    2010-12-30

    This report summarizes an extensive effort made to understand how to effectively use the various diagnostic technologies to establish the condition of medium voltage underground cable circuits. These circuits make up an extensive portion of the electric delivery infrastructure in the United States. Much of this infrastructure is old and experiencing unacceptable failure rates. By deploying efficient diagnostic testing programs, electric utilities can replace or repair circuits that are about to fail, providing an optimal approach to improving electric system reliability. This is an intrinsically complex topic. Underground cable systems are not homogeneous. Cable circuits often contain multiple branches with different cable designs and a range of insulation materials. In addition, each insulation material ages differently as a function of time, temperature and operating environment. To complicate matters further, there are a wide variety of diagnostic technologies available for assessing the condition of cable circuits with a diversity of claims about the effectiveness of each approach. As a result, the benefits of deploying cable diagnostic testing programs have been difficult to establish, leading many utilities to avoid the their use altogether. This project was designed to help address these issues. The information provided is the result of a collaborative effort between Georgia Tech NEETRAC staff, Georgia Tech academic faculty, electric utility industry participants, as well as cable system diagnostic testing service providers and test equipment providers. Report topics include: •How cable systems age and fail, •The various technologies available for detecting potential failure sites, •The advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic technologies, •Different approaches for utilities to employ cable system diagnostics. The primary deliverables of this project are this report, a Cable Diagnostic Handbook (a subset of this report) and an online

  13. Multistrand superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, Albert R.

    1985-01-01

    Improved multistrand Rutherford-type superconductor cable is produced by using strands which are preformed, prior to being wound into the cable, so that each strand has a variable cross section, with successive portions having a substantially round cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a rectangular cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a round cross section and so forth, in repetitive cycles along the length of the strand. The cable is wound and flattened so that the portions of rectangular cross section extend across the two flat sides of the cable at the strand angle. The portions of round cross section are bent at the edges of the flattened cable, so as to extend between the two flat sides. The rectangular portions of the strands slide easily over one another, so as to facilitate flexing and bending of the cable, while also minimizing the possibility of causing damage to the strands by such flexing or bending. Moreover, the improved cable substantially maintains its compactness and cross-sectional shape when the cable is flexed or bent.

  14. Multistrand superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1984-03-08

    Improved multistrand Rutherford-type superconductor cable is produced by using strands which are preformed, prior to being wound into the cable, so that each strand has a variable cross section, with successive portions having a substantially round cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a rectangular cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a round cross section and so forth, in repetitive cycles along the length of the strand. The cable is wound and flattened so that the portions of rectangular cross section extend across the two flat sides of the cable at the strand angle. The portions of round cross section are bent at the edges of the flattened cable, so as to extend between the two flat sides. The rectangular portions of the strands slide easil

  15. Optimization of cable terminations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolajevic, S.V.; Pekaric-Nad, N.M.; Dimitrijevic, R.M.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes a study of various termination constructions for medium voltage cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cables. A special device was used for electrical field measurements around the cable termination which made it possible to monitor how stress relief materials with different permittivity and placement of isolated or grounded embedded electrodes (EE) affected electrical stress grading. The results of measurements for each configuration were examined by mathematical modeling based on the finite element method (FEM). Finally, the selected constructions of cable termination have passed severe test conditions with load cycling.

  16. Infiniband Based Cable Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minich, Makia

    2007-07-01

    As Infiniband continues to be more broadly adopted in High Performance Computing (HPC) and datacenter applications, one major challenge still plagues implementation: cabling. With the transition to DDR (double data rate) from SDR (single datarate), currently available Infiniband implementations such as standard CX4/IB4x style copper cables severely constrain system design (10m maximum length for DDR copper cables, thermal management due to poor airflow, etc.). This paper will examine some of the options available and compare performance with the newly released Intel Connects Cables. In addition, we will take a glance at Intel's dual-core and quad-core systems to see if core counts have noticeable effect on expected IO patterns.

  17. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roose, L.D.

    1993-12-31

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble- free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed are a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  18. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed is a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  19. HTS Cable Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cable Projects HTS Cable Projects Fact sheet describing what is being done to modernize electricity transmission and distribution HTS Cable Projects More Documents & Publications...

  20. HTS Cable Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HTS Cable Projects HTS Cable Projects Fact sheet describing what is being done to modernize electricity transmission and distribution PDF icon HTS Cable Projects More Documents &...

  1. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

    1992-08-11

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

  2. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandon, Eldon D.; Hooper, Frederick M.; Reichenbach, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

  3. Superconducting wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Singh, J.P.; Dos Santos, D.I.; Lumpp, J.K.; Dusek, J.T.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-06-01

    The requirement of high critical current density has prompted extensive research on ceramic processing of high-T/sub c/ superconductors. An overview of wire fabrication techniques and the limitations they impose on component design will be presented. The effects of processing on microstructure and critical current density will also be discussed. Particle alignment has been observed in extruded samples which is attributed to high shear stresses during plastic forming. Composites of superconductor and silver in several configurations have been made with little deleterious effect on the superconducting properties. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Dynamic cable analysis models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, P.A.; Meggitt, D.J.; Nordell, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the development and validation of undersea cable dynamics computer models by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL) under the sponsorship of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. These models allow for the analysis of both small displacement (strumming) and large displacement (static and dynamic) deformations of arbitrarily configured cable structures. All of the large displacement models described in this paper are available to the public. This paper does not emphasize the theoretical development of the models (this information is available in other references) but emphasizes the various features of the models, the comparisons between model output and experimental data, and applications for which the models have been used.

  5. Columbus HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbus HTS Power Cable Columbus HTS Power Cable This project involves field-testing of a long-length high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable under real environmental stresses and real electrical loads. The cable system forms an important electrical link in a utility substation in Columbus, Ohio. Columbus HTS Power Cable (349.01 KB) More Documents & Publications HTS Cable Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects Albany HTS Power Cable

  6. Method and apparatus for making multistrand superconducting cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royet, John M. (Oakland, CA); Armer, Rollin A. (Orinda, CA)

    1990-01-01

    Improved multistrand Rutherford-type superconducting cable (42) is produced in a flattened form with two layers of helically wound strands (33) and in which the strands are alternately twisted about their lengths equally and in opposite directions to provide a flat cable with improved stability. In particular, the cable (42) is made by guiding multifilament wire strands (33) from spools (32) on a rotating turret (11) to a fixed tapered forming mandrel (22) where they are wound diagonally around the mandrel and then rolled into a flattened shape. The spools (32) are located around the periphery of the turret and are rotatable about axes in a plane parallel to the turret (11) to unroll the wire. Sprocket assemblies (48 and 49) are driven by drive chains (68 and 76) to rotate alternate spools (32) equally and in opposite directions relative to the forming mandrel (22) so that the wire strands (33) are twisted prior to being wound on the mandrel (22). The rate of rotation of the spools (32) in one direction is different than the rate of rotation of the spools (32) in the opposite direction to compensate for the rate of rotation of the turret (11) so that all strands (33) have the same degree of twist about their lengths.

  7. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  8. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  9. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K.; Tolbert, Jerry

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  10. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to 72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  11. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  12. Internal coaxial cable seal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Sneddon, Cameron; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-07-25

    The invention is a seal system for a coaxial cable and is placed within the coaxial cable and its constituent components. A series of seal stacks including load ring components and elastomeric rings are placed on load bearing members within the coaxial cable sealing the annular space between the coaxial cable and an electrical contact passing there through. The coaxial cable is disposed within drilling components to transmit electrical signals between drilling components within a drill string. The seal system can be used in a variety of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars.

  13. Cable shield connecting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  14. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  15. High conductance surge cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Matthew M.; Wilfong, Dennis H.; Lomax, Ralph E.

    1998-01-01

    An electrical cable for connecting transient voltage surge suppressers to ectrical power panels. A strip of electrically conductive foil defines a longitudinal axis, with a length of an electrical conductor electrically attached to the metallic foil along the longitudinal axis. The strip of electrically conductive foil and the length of an electrical conductor are covered by an insulating material. For impedance matching purposes, triangular sections can be removed from the ends of the electrically conductive foil at the time of installation.

  16. High conductance surge cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, M.M.; Wilfong, D.H.; Lomax, R.E.

    1998-12-08

    An electrical cable for connecting transient voltage surge suppressors to electrical power panels. A strip of electrically conductive foil defines a longitudinal axis, with a length of an electrical conductor electrically attached to the metallic foil along the longitudinal axis. The strip of electrically conductive foil and the length of an electrical conductor are covered by an insulating material. For impedance matching purposes, triangular sections can be removed from the ends of the electrically conductive foil at the time of installation. 6 figs.

  17. Method to improve superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1984-03-08

    A method is disclosed of making a stranded superconductor cable having improved flexing and bending characteristics. In such method, a plurality of superconductor strands are helically wound around a cylindrical portion of a mandrel which tapers along a transitional portion to a flat end portion. The helically wound strands form a multistrand hollow cable which is partially flattened by pressure rollers as the cable travels along the transitional portion. The partially flattened cable is impacted with repeated hammer blows as the hollow cable travels along the flat end portion. The hammer blows flatten both the internal and the external surfaces of the strands. The cable is fully flattened and compacted by two sets of pressure rollers which engage the flat sides and the edges of the cable after it has traveled away from the flat end portion of the mandrel. The flattened internal surfaces slide easily over one another when the cable is flexed or bent so that there is very little possibility that the cable will be damaged by the necessary flexing and bending required to wind the cable into magnet coils.

  18. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest.

  19. Superconducting flat tape cable magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-08-11

    A method for winding a coil magnet with the stacked tape cables, and a coil so wound. The winding process is controlled and various shape coils can be wound by twisting about the longitudinal axis of the cable and bending following the easy bend direction during winding, so that sharp local bending can be obtained by adjusting the twist pitch. Stack-tape cable is twisted while being wound, instead of being twisted in a straight configuration and then wound. In certain embodiments, the straight length should be half of the cable twist-pitch or a multiple of it.

  20. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Marble Drop Learning objective: for students to analyze a problem, and test and refine solutions. This will demonstrate a key skill needed in engineering and scientific...

  1. Albany HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Albany HTS Power Cable Albany HTS Power Cable This project involves the development and demonstration of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable in the power grid in Albany, ...

  2. QER- Comment of WIRES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached please find the components of WIRES Comment to the QER. Please direct any questions to Jim Hoecker, below.

  3. High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects A National Effort to Introduce New Technology into ...

  4. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanderson, Stephen N.; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C.

    2013-01-22

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  5. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanderson, Stephen N; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C

    2014-06-24

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  6. Cable Effects Study. Tangents, Rabbit Holes, Dead Ends, and Valuable Results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ardelean, Emil V.; Babuška, Vít; Goodding, James C.; Coombs, Douglas M.; Robertson, Lawrence M.; Lane, Steven A.

    2014-08-04

    Lessons learned during a study on the effects that electrical power and signal wiring harness cables introduce on the dynamic response of precision spacecraft is presented, along with the most significant results. Our study was a three year effort to discover a set of practical approaches for updating well-defined dynamic models of harness-free structures where knowledge of the cable type, position, and tie-down method are known. Although cables are found on every satellite, the focus was on precision, low damping, and very flexible structures. Obstacles encountered, classified as tangents, rabbit holes, and dead ends, offer practical lessons for structural dynamicsmore » research. The paper traces the historical, experiential progression of the project, describing how the obstacles affected the project. Methods were developed to estimate cable properties. Problems were encountered because of the flexible, highly damped nature of cables. A beam was used as a test article to validate experimentally derived cable properties and to refine the assumptions regarding boundary conditions. Furthermore, a spacecraft bus-like panel with cables attached was designed, and finite element models were developed and validated through experiment. Various paths were investigated at each stage before a consistent test and analysis methodology was developed« less

  7. Cable Effects Study. Tangents, Rabbit Holes, Dead Ends, and Valuable Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardelean, Emil V.; Babuška, Vít; Goodding, James C.; Coombs, Douglas M.; Robertson, Lawrence M.; Lane, Steven A.

    2014-08-04

    Lessons learned during a study on the effects that electrical power and signal wiring harness cables introduce on the dynamic response of precision spacecraft is presented, along with the most significant results. Our study was a three year effort to discover a set of practical approaches for updating well-defined dynamic models of harness-free structures where knowledge of the cable type, position, and tie-down method are known. Although cables are found on every satellite, the focus was on precision, low damping, and very flexible structures. Obstacles encountered, classified as tangents, rabbit holes, and dead ends, offer practical lessons for structural dynamics research. The paper traces the historical, experiential progression of the project, describing how the obstacles affected the project. Methods were developed to estimate cable properties. Problems were encountered because of the flexible, highly damped nature of cables. A beam was used as a test article to validate experimentally derived cable properties and to refine the assumptions regarding boundary conditions. Furthermore, a spacecraft bus-like panel with cables attached was designed, and finite element models were developed and validated through experiment. Various paths were investigated at each stage before a consistent test and analysis methodology was developed

  8. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsyth, E.B.; Muller, A.C.

    1983-07-15

    The present invention is a cable which, although constructed from inexpensive polyolefin tapes and using typical impregnating oils, furnishes high voltage capability up to 765 kV, and has such excellent dielectric characteristics and heat transfer properties that it is capable of operation at capacities equal to or higher than presently available cables at a given voltage. This is accomplished by using polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene insulating tape which has been specially processed to attain properties which are not generally found in these materials, but are required for their use in impregnated electrical cables. Chief among these properties is compatibility with impregnating oil.

  9. Infiniband cables installed | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infiniband cables installed Download original image « Back to galleryItem 8

  10. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteers - Sign Up About Science Bowl Curriculum and Activities How to Build a Motor The Great Marble Drop How to Build a Turbine How to Build a Tower Classroom...

  11. Process of modifying a cable end

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, L.D.

    1995-08-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed are a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves. 5 figs.

  12. Process of modifying a cable end

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed are a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  13. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Eric B. (Brookhaven, NY); Muller, Albert C. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

  14. Sintered wire annode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2007-12-25

    A plurality of high atomic number wires are sintered together to form a porous rod that is parted into porous disks which will be used as x-ray targets. A thermally conductive material is introduced into the pores of the rod, and when a stream of electrons impinges on the sintered wire target and generates x-rays, the heat generated by the impinging x-rays is removed by the thermally conductive material interspersed in the pores of the wires.

  15. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface is disclosed. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest. 4 figs.

  16. Wire-inhomogeneity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibson, G.H.; Smits, R.G.; Eberhard, P.H.

    1982-08-31

    A device for uncovering imperfections in electrical conducting wire, particularly superconducting wire, by detecting variations in eddy currents. Eddy currents effect the magnetic field in a gap of an inductor, contained in a modified commercial ferrite core, through which the wire being tested is passed. A small increase or decrease in the amount of conductive material, such as copper, in a fixed cross section of wire will unbalance a bridge used to measure the impedance of the inductor, tripping a detector and sounding an alarm.

  17. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  18. 1998 wire development workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development.

  19. Long Island HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Long Island HTS Power Cable This project involves the demonstration of a hightemperature ... HTS Cable Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects ...

  20. Drum drop test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBeath, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    Testing was performed to determine actual damage to drums when dropped from higher than currently stacked elevations. The drum configurations were the same as they are placed in storage; single drums and four drums banded to a pallet. Maximum drop weights were selected based on successful preliminary tests. Material was lost from each of the single drum tests while only a small amount of material was lost from one of the pelletized drums. The test results are presented in this report. This report also provides recommendations for further testing to determine the appropriate drum weight which can be stored on a fourth tier.

  1. Cable Braid Electromagnetic Penetration Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry K.; Langston, William L.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, W. A.

    2015-06-01

    The model for penetration of a wire braid is rigorously formulated. Integral formulas are developed from energy principles and reciprocity for both self and transfer immittances in terms of potentials for the fields. The detailed boundary value problem for the wire braid is also setup in a very efficient manner; the braid wires act as sources for the potentials in the form of a sequence of line multipoles with unknown coefficients that are determined by means of conditions arising from the wire surface boundary conditions. Approximations are introduced to relate the local properties of the braid wires to a simplified infinite periodic planar geometry. This is used in a simplified application of reciprocity to be able to treat nonuniform coaxial geometries including eccentric interior coaxial arrangements and an exterior ground plane.

  2. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Russell, Alan

    2014-06-04

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  3. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Alan

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  4. Hawaii Deep Water Cable Program: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    The Hawaii Deep Water Cable Program has succeeded unequivocally in determining the feasibility of deploying a submarine power cable system between the islands of Hawaii and Oahu. Major accomplishments of the program include designing, fabricating and testing an appropriate power cable, developing an integrated system to control all aspects of the cable laying operation, and testing all deployment systems at sea in the most challenging sections of the route.

  5. Historical Significance Dropping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Historical Significance Dropping the Ball NNSS is known for more than just nuclear past. NvE celebrates employees with picnics. U1a Facility, Icecap become testing grounds for unique physics experiments. See page 8. See page 4. NNSA Head Frank Klotz Visits NLV, NNSS Facilities On May 6, the National Nuclear Security Administration's new administrator Frank Klotz conducted an all-hands meeting with employees of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and the National Nuclear Security

  6. Multiple connection for an undersea cable system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guazzo, L.; Trezeguet, J.P.

    1984-05-08

    A multiple connection is claimed for connecting a plurality of armored cables to the housing of electrical apparatus in an undersea system having a cable interconnection point where a plurality of cables serving different destinations are brought together. Each of these cables comprise a core surrounded by armor and are terminated by a length of bared core extending beyond a severed end of the armor. The housing has a hollow cable-fixing part through which the bared cable cores pass, characterized in that said connection comprises: a steel binding ring through which the armored portion of each of said cables, is threaded, said ring serving to bind said armored portions of cable together; a steel tube threaded over said bared cores of said cables, having one end abutting against severed end portions of the armor of said cables and having its other end fixed mechanically to said hollow cable-fixing part of the electrical apparatus housing; and auxiliary armor wound around the portions of armored cable bound together by said ring and around the adjacent portion of said steel tube.

  7. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastouret, Alan; Gooijer, Frans; Overton, Bob; Jonker, Jan; Curley, Jim; Constantine, Walter; Waterman, Kendall Miller

    2015-11-13

    High Temperature insulated wire and optical fiber cable is a key enabling technology for the Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). Without insulated electrical wires and optical fiber, downhole temperature and pressure sensors, flow meters and gauges cannot communicate with the surface. Unfortunately, there are currently no insulated electrical wire or fiber cable constructions capable of surviving for extended periods of deployment in a geothermal well (240-325°C) or supercritical (374°C) reservoir. This has severely hindered engineered reservoir creation, management and utilization, as hot zones and cool water intrusions cannot be understood over time. The lack of a insulated electrical wire and fiber cable solution is a fundamental limitation to the viability of this energy source. The High Temperature Downhole Tools target specification is development of tools and sensors for logging and monitoring wellbore conditions at depths of up to 10,000 meters and temperatures up to 374oC. It well recognized in the industry that no current electronic or fiber cable can be successfully deployed in a well and function successfully for more a few days at temperatures over 240oC. The goal of this project was to raise this performance level significantly. Prysmian Group’s objective in this project was to develop a complete, multi-purpose cable solution for long-term deployment in geothermal wells/reservoirs that can be used with the widest variety of sensors. In particular, the overall project objective was to produce a manufacturable cable design that can perform without serious degradation: • At temperatures up to 374°C; • At pressures up to 220 bar; • In a hydrogen-rich environment; and • For the life of the well (> 5 years). This cable incorporates: • Specialty optical fibers, with specific glass chemistry and high temperature and pressure protective coatings for data communication and distributed temperature and pressure sensing, and • High

  8. Silicone injection restores failing submarine cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilstra, M.

    1995-12-01

    Faced with the prospect of replacing nearly 10 miles of aging undersea cables, Orcas Power & Light Co (Opalco) elected instead to inject silicone into as many of the cables as possible. Silicone injection has been used extensively on underground residential distribution (URD) and feeder cables, but only two underwater cables had previously been injected: a feeder cable for Florida Power Corp under an intercoastal waterway and a cable for Washington Water Power Co under a lake in western Idaho. The compound restores power cables damaged by water treeing and prevents further water damage. Selection criteria included age, type, and whether the cables had ever been spliced. Older, soldered, hand-wrapped splices were avoided as they block the CableCure fluid from flowing through. This makes the cable uninjectable unless the splices are replaced with the molded type. The first cables chosen for injection were between 15 and 30 years old and clear of soldered splices. They also were free from faults. 4 figs.

  9. High horizontal movements in longwall gate roads controlled by cable support systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinar, D.R.; Tadolini, S.C.; Blackwell, D.V.

    1996-12-01

    Controlling coal mine roofs subjected to high-horizontal stress conditions has always been difficult and uncertain. Traditional supports such as wooden cribs and posts, concrete donut cribs, and standing supports collapse and fail when the roof and floor move horizontally as mining progresses. The former U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) (currently the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)), in cooperation with Western Fuels-Utah, Incorporated, conducted research to provide an alternative for traditional secondary support systems in a 3-entry gate road system subjected to high horizontal movements. The support system used in several other coal mine operations, consisted of internal high-strength galvanized resin-grouted cable supports. The system virtually eliminates the necessity for external crib, timber, or concrete supports. The support system consisted of 2.4 m (8 ft) full-column resin grouted bolts and 4.8 m (16 ft) long cable supports installed in conjunction with wire mesh and {open_quotes}Monster-Mats.{close_quotes} Cable loading and roof deformations were monitored to evaluate the behavior of the immediate and main roofs during first and second panel extractions. Additionally, cable trusses were installed on the longwall headgate to protect the coal conveyance system from roof and pillar falls created by the formation of cutters and gutters. The test results indicated that the designed support system successfully maintained the roof during the extraction of two longwall panels and dramatically reduced the cost of secondary support. This paper describes the theory of high-horizontal roof movements, the advantages of vertical cable supports and cable trusses, and presents the roof and cable measurements made to assess the support performance during longwall retreat mining.

  10. Development of Aluminum Stabilized Superconducting Cables for the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, Vito; Buehler, M.; Lamm, M.; Page, T.; Curreli, S.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.

    2015-10-16

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to measure the rare process of direct muon-to-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. The experiment comprises a system of three superconducting solenoids, which focus secondary muons from the production target and transport them to an aluminum stopping target, while minimizing the associated background. The Detector Solenoid (DS) is the last magnet in the transport line and its main functions are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target as well as a precision magnetic field in a volume large enough to house the tracker downstream of the stopping target. The Detector Solenoid coils are designed to be wound using NbTi Rutherford cables conformed in high purity aluminum for stabilization and then cold-worked for strength. Two types of Al-stabilized conductor are required to build the DS coils, one for the gradient section and one for the spectrometer section of the solenoid. The dimensions are optimized to generate the required field profile when the same current is transported in both conductors. The conductors contain NbTi Rutherford cables with 12 (DS1) and 8 (DS2) strands respectively and are manufactured by two different vendors. This paper describes the results of the manufacturing of production lengths of the Al-stabilized cables needed to build the Mu2e Detector Solenoid as well as the testing campaigns and main results. The main cable properties and results of electrical and mechanical tests are summarized and discussed for each stage of the cable development process. Results are compared to design values to show how the production cables satisfy all the design criteria starting from the NbTi wires to the Al-stabilized cables.

  11. Results of an effective cable inspection program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenko, J.P.; Charlton, C.B.; Vollkommer, H.T. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    To provide better service to customers and to maximize the service life of distribution underground cables, a cable inspection program began in April of 1992. This inspection program covers medium voltage cable and supplements the minimum AEIC testing requirements done by manufacturers. The AEP program has resulted in preventing substandard and non-specified cables from being placed in service. This program requires manufacturers to send a two foot sample of cable from each shipping reel prior to shipment to the Electrical Laboratory for inspection. The samples are then randomly selected for inspection. Results of each inspection are reported to AEP Operating Companies within five days and are logged into a yearly accumulative data base per manufacturer. During 1993, approximately 108,000 feet of cable were returned to manufacturers which represents about 4.54% of the medium voltage cable received on the AEP System. As a result of this inspection program it appears that several cable manufacturers have improved their product or production system resulting in a cleaner cable, meeting Company and industry standards. Results of these inspections are passed on to their customers through lower costs and a more reliable distribution system. The results of this in-house inspection program are evaluated by Distribution Engineering and sent to Purchasing for their use when preparing blanket purchase orders for cable.

  12. Cable twisting due to atmospheric icing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComber, P.; Druez, J.; Savadjiev, K.

    1995-12-31

    Samples of ice accretions collected on cables of overhead transmission lines have shown evidence of twisting of the cable during atmospheric icing. Previous work has attributed cable twisting to the torque created by the weight of an eccentric ice shape and by wind forces. However, testing of stranded cables and conductors has shown that such cables also twist when there is a change in tension in the cable span. This phenomenon is related to the interaction of the different strand layers under tension. When a cable is subjected to atmospheric icing, cable tension increases and this type of twisting should also be considered. In order to determine how the two types of twisting would compare on transmission lines, a numerical simulation was made using characteristics of a typical 35-mm stranded conductor. The twist angle was computed as a function of cable span, sag to span ratio and increasing ice loads. The simulation shows that for transmission lines, twisting due to varying tension will be significant. Since cable tension is influenced by wind speed and ambient temperature as well as ice load, this phenomenon, unless prevented, results in ice accretion more circular in shape and hence eventually in larger ice loads.

  13. Wire brush fastening device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meigs, R.A.

    1993-08-31

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  14. Wire brush fastening device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meigs, R.A.

    1995-09-19

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

  15. Wire brush fastening device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meigs, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  16. Watch Our CO2 Drop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Watch Our CO2 Drop Watch Our CO2 Drop

  17. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Yuhu; Calzolaio, Ciro; Senatore, Carmine

    2014-08-01

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanical loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.

  18. Development and application of composite overhead ground wire with optical fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Kato, T.; Okazato, A.; Sakurada, H.

    1983-05-01

    A overhead ground wire composed with optical fibers has been developed, as well as the accessories and the joints. The overhead ground wire is provided with an aluminum pipe at the core thereof in which the optical fibers are inserted. The composite overhead ground wire with optical fibers was installed for the Kaga-Reinan 500 kV overhead transmission line in autumn, 1981 for the purposes of observing lightning and using as telecommunication line, as well. After the successful performance of the optical fiber, especially in view of transmission loss after installation, has been proved, the composite overhead ground wire is now being checked for the purposes as stated above. The ground wire was also installed for the Tsuruga Test Line at about the same time and investigations were started to confirm the reliability of the optical fiber to be over a long period of time under severe meteorological conditions such as strong winds and icing. The construction of the composite ground wire with optical fibers is such that the optical fibers contained therein are not restrained by the ground wire itself. This enables insertion and pulling out of optical fiber cables. Tests were conducted at certain sections of the Kaga-Reinan Line to confirm that there was no change in the performance of the optical fibers due to such operations of insertion and pulling out. This report briefly discusses the development of the composite ground wire with optical fibers, its installation and the test results.

  19. Improved wire chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  20. Capacitor discharge process for welding braided cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Rick D.

    1995-01-01

    A capacitor discharge process for welding a braided cable formed from a plurality of individual cable strands to a solid metallic electrically conductive member comprises the steps of: (a) preparing the electrically conductive member for welding by bevelling one of its end portions while leaving an ignition projection extending outwardly from the apex of the bevel; (b) clamping the electrically conductive member in a cathode fixture; (c) connecting the electrically conductive member clamped in the cathode fixture to a capacitor bank capable of being charged to a preselected voltage value; (d) preparing the braided cable for welding by wrapping one of its end portions with a metallic sheet to form a retaining ring operable to maintain the individual strands of the braided cable in fixed position within the retaining ring; (e) clamping the braided cable and the retaining ring as a unit in an anode fixture so that the wrapped end portion of the braided cable faces the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member; and (f) moving the cathode fixture towards the anode fixture until the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member contacts the end portion of the braided cable thereby allowing the capacitor bank to discharge through the electrically conductive member and through the braided cable and causing the electrically conductive member to be welded to the braided cable via capacitor discharge action.

  1. Loose-tube optical-fiber cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, Mark Edmund; Angers, Tyler Louis; Jonker, Jan Wigger

    2015-01-06

    The present invention relates to loose-tube optical-fiber cables that are capable of operating in high-temperature environments.

  2. CABLE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES, INC. DETERMINATION OF THRESHOLD...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CABLE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES, INC. DETERMINATION OF THRESHOLD AND MAXIMUM OPERATING ELECTRIC STRESSES FOR SELECTED HIGH VOLTAGE INSULATIONS Investigation of Aged Polymeric ...

  3. Laboratory testing for enhanced undersea cable survivability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stange, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of useful testing procedures with summaries of test results gleaned from years of cable testing experience illustrate how laboratory testing has identified failure modes, uncovered design deficiencies, characterized performance and supported system design for improved at-sea survivability. Repeated test results give insight into the performance capabilities and limitations of contemporary cables with metal and aramid strength members and demonstrate that successful at-sea performance invariably depends upon the effective mating of cable, attachment hardware and handling equipment. Analysis of the potentially high cost of cable failure at sea clearly demonstrates that it pays to test in the laboratory.

  4. 1997 wire development workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This conference is divided into the following sections: (1) First Generation Wires I; (2) First Generation Wires II; (3) Coated conductors I; and (4) Coated conductors II. Applications of the superconducting wires include fault current limiters, superconducting motors, transformers, and power transmission lines.

  5. File:07HIAGeothermalAndCableSystemDevelopmentPermitting.pdf ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HIAGeothermalAndCableSystemDevelopmentPermitting.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:07HIAGeothermalAndCableSystemDevelopmentPermitting.pdf...

  6. "Flexible aerogel as a superior thermal insulation for high temperature superconductor cable applications"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Shannon O. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Tomich, A. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are an advanced technology that can both strengthen and improve the national electrical distribution infrastructure. HTS cables require sufficient cooling to overcome inherent low temperature heat loading. Heat loads are minimized by the use of cryogenic envelopes or cryostats. Cryostats require improvement in efficiency, reliability, and cost reduction to meet the demanding needs of HTS conductors (1G and 2G wires). Aspen Aerogels has developed a compression resistant aerogel thermal insulation package to replace compression sensitive multi-layer insulation (MLI), the incumbent thermal insulation, in flexible cryostats for HTS cables. Oak Ridge National Laboratory tested a prototype aerogel package in a lab-scale pipe apparatus to measure the rate of heat invasion. The lab-scale pipe test results of the aerogel solution will be presented and directly compared to MLI. A compatibility assessment of the aerogel material with HTS system components will also be presented. The aerogel thermal insulation solution presented will meet the demanding needs of HTS cables.

  7. Nb3Sn cable development for the 11 T dipole demonstation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzi, E.; Lombardo, V.; Nobrega, F.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Karppinen, M.; /CERN

    2011-06-01

    Fermilab (FNAL) and CERN have started the development of 11 T 11-m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipoles to replace a number of LHC NbTi dipoles and free space for cold collimators in the LHC DS areas. An important step in the design of these magnets is the development of the high aspect ratio Nb{sub 3}Sn cable to achieve the nominal field of 11 T at the nominal LHC operating current of 11.85 kA at 1.9 K with 20% margin. Keystoned cables with 40 and 41 strands with and without a stainless steel core were made out of hard Cu wires and Nb{sub 3}Sn RRP strand of 0.7 mm nominal diameter. The cable optimization process was aimed at achieving both mechanical stability and minimal damage to the delicate internal architecture of the Restacked-Rod-Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands with 127 restack design to be used in the magnet short models. Each cable was characterized electrically for transport properties degradation at high field and for low field stability, and metallographically for internal damage.

  8. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  9. An Internal Coaxil Cable Seal System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael; Fox, Joe

    2004-12-23

    The invention is a seal system for a coaxial cable more specifically an internal seal system placed within the coaxial cable and its constituent components. A series of seal stacks including flexible rigid rings and elastomeric rings are placed on load bearing members within the coaxial cable. The current invention is adapted to seal the annular space between the coaxial cable and an electrical contact passing there through. The coaxial cable is disposed within drilling components to transmit electrical signals between drilling components within a drill string. During oil and gas exploration, a drill string can see a range of pressures and temperatures thus resulting in multiple combinations of temperature and pressure and increasing the difficulty of creating a robust seal for all combinations. The seal system can be used in a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string, drill collars, heavy weight drill pipe, and jars.

  10. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  11. Tool for cutting insulation from electrical cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harless, Charles E.; Taylor, Ward G.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an efficient hand tool for precisely slitting the sheath of insulation on an electrical cable--e.g., a cable two inches in diameter--in a manner facilitating subsequent peeling or stripping of the insulation. The tool includes a rigid frame which is slidably fitted on an end section of the cable. The frame carries a rigidly affixed handle and an opposed, elongated blade-and-handle assembly. The blade-and-handle assembly is pivotally supported by a bracket which is slidably mounted on the frame for movement toward and away from the cable, thus providing an adjustment for the depth of cut. The blade-and-handle assembly is mountable to the bracket in two pivotable positions. With the assembly mounted in the first position, the tool is turned about the cable to slit the insulation circumferentially. With the assembly mounted in the second position, the tool is drawn along the cable to slit the insulation axially. When cut both circumferentially and axially, the insulation can easily be peeled from the cable.

  12. Mira and her cables | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and her cables Download original image « Back to galleryItem 5

  13. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  14. Accelerated cable life testing of EPR-insulated medium voltage distribution cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, M.D. ); Bernstein, B.S. ); Smith, J.T. III ); Thue, W.A. , Stuart, FL ); Groeger, J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents results aimed at developing a reliable accelerated aging tank test for EPR-insulated cables. Aging was performed at 2 to 4 times rated voltage on load cycling to temperatures of 45 C, 60 C, 75 C, and 90 C at the conductor with water in the conductor strands and outside the cable. Results show that cable failure is more rapid at the highest electrical stress and lowest conductor load cycle temperature. Cables aged at higher temperatures and various levels of electrical stress rarely failed and retained in excess of 40% of their original breakdown strength after 1,500+ days of aging. Aging performed at 90 C load cycle temperature and 4 times rated voltage with air on the outside and water at the conductor of the cable showed more rapid loss of life than with water outside. Results indicate the optimum aging conditions for EPR-insulated cables in the accelerated cable life test (ACLT) differ significantly from those previously observed for XLPE-insulated cables, and that the appropriate test methodology for EPR-insulated cables requires additional study.

  15. Condition Monitoring of Cables Task 3 Report: Condition Monitoring Techniques for Electric Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villaran, M.; Lofaro, R.; na

    2009-11-30

    For more than 20 years the NRC has sponsored research studying electric cable aging degradation, condition monitoring, and environmental qualification testing practices for electric cables used in nuclear power plants. This report summarizes several of the most effective and commonly used condition monitoring techniques available to detect damage and measure the extent of degradation in electric cable insulation. The technical basis for each technique is summarized, along with its application, trendability of test data, ease of performing the technique, advantages and limitations, and the usefulness of the test results to characterize and assess the condition of electric cables.

  16. Modeling of cable terminations with embedded electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolajevic, S.V.; Pekaric-Nadj, N.M.; Dimitrijevic, R.M.; Djurovic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes a study of various cable termination constructions for medium voltage cross-linked polyethylene (MV XLPE) cables. A special device was used for electrical field measurements around the cable termination, which made it possible to monitor how stress relief materials with different relative permittivity, thickness of stress relief layer and placement of isolated or grounding embedded electrodes (EE) affect electrical stress grading. The results of measurement for each construction were examined by mathematical modeling based on finite element method (FEM). Also, the influence of dielectric losses in the termination was considered, when relative permittivity of the stress relief material is high. Finally, the selected constructions of cable termination were tested in service conditions with load cycling.

  17. Pure Drop Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drop Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pure Drop Ltd Place: Israel Product: Developing a modular concentrated PV tracking system for electricity production, with a...

  18. Noise performance of magneto-inductive cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltshire, M. C. K. Syms, R. R. A.

    2014-07-21

    Magneto-inductive (MI) waveguides are metamaterial structures based on periodic arrangements of inductively coupled resonant magnetic elements. They are of interest for power transfer, communications and sensing, and can be realised in a flexible cable format. Signal-to-noise ratio is extremely important in applications involving signals. Here, we present the first experimental measurements of the noise performance of metamaterial cables. We focus on an application involving radiofrequency signal transmission in internal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where the subdivision of the metamaterial cable provides intrinsic patient safety. We consider MI cables suitable for use at 300 MHz during {sup 1}H MRI at 7 T, and find noise figures of 2.32.8?dB/m, together with losses of 3.03.9?dB/m, in good agreement with model calculations. These values are high compared to conventional cables, but become acceptable when (as here) the environment precludes the use of continuous conductors. To understand this behaviour, we present arguments for the fundamental performance limitations of these cables.

  19. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "positive" terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating "negative" terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  20. Solid state safety jumper cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-02-23

    Solid state jumper cables for connecting two batteries in parallel, having two bridge rectifiers for developing a reference voltage, a four-input decoder for determining which terminals are to be connected based on a comparison of the voltage at each of the four terminals to the reference voltage, and a pair of relays for effecting the correct connection depending on the determination of the decoder. No connection will be made unless only one terminal of each battery has a higher voltage than the reference voltage, indicating positive'' terminals, and one has a lower voltage than the reference voltage, indicating negative'' terminals, and that, therefore, the two high voltage terminals may be connected and the two lower voltage terminals may be connected. Current flows once the appropriate relay device is closed. The relay device is preferably a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) combined with a series array of photodiodes that develop MOSFET gate-closing potential when the decoder output causes an LED to light.

  1. Sintered wire cathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  2. Drop History? No! | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drop History? No! Drop History? No! February 29, 2012 When I was in high school in England, especially in the smaller country schools, teachers were scarce and schedules, therefore, constrained. Further, the English style is for students to choose directions, and therefore subjects, at a relatively early age. So, at age 13, I had to choose between Physics and Chemistry on the one hand, and Latin and History on the other. Of course, I chose Physics and Chemistry, but thereby lost two subjects in

  3. Diamond Wire Technology LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wire Technology LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Diamond Wire Technology LLC Place: Colorado Springs, Colorado Zip: 80916 Sector: Solar Product: US-based manufacturer of...

  4. Applying Diagnostics to Enhance Cable System Reliability (Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative, Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartlein, Rick; Hampton, Nigel; Perkel, Josh; Hernandez, JC; Elledge, Stacy; del Valle, Yamille; Grimaldo, Jose; Deku, Kodzo

    2015-07-25

    The Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative (CDFI) played a significant and powerful role in clarifying the concerns and understanding the benefits of performing diagnostic tests on underground power cable systems. This project focused on the medium and high voltage cable systems used in utility transmission and distribution (T&D) systems. While many of the analysis techniques and interpretations are applicable to diagnostics and cable systems outside of T&D, areas such as generating stations (nuclear, coal, wind, etc.) and other industrial environments were not the focus. Many large utilities in North America now deploy diagnostics or have changed their diagnostic testing approach as a result of this project. Previous to the CDFI, different diagnostic technology providers individually promoted their approach as the “the best” or “the only” means of detecting cable system defects.

  5. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  6. Evaporation of multicomponent drop arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annamalai, K.; Ryan, W.; Chandra, S. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The present paper deals with the evaporation of multicomponent fuel droplets in an array using the recently developed point source method (PSM). First, the quasisteady (QS) evaporation of an isolated, multicomponent droplet is briefly analyzed. The resultant governing equations, along with Raoult's law and the Cox-Antoine relation, constitute the set of equations needed to arrive at the solutions for: (1) the droplet surface temperature, (2) the evaporation rate of each species, and (3) the vapor mass fraction of each species at the droplet surface. The PSM, which treats the droplet as a point mass source and heat sink, is then adopted to obtain an analytic expression for the evaporation rate of a multicomponent droplet in an array of liquid droplets. Defining the correction factor ([eta]) as a ratio of the evaporation of a drop in an array to the evaporation rate of a similar isolated multicomponent drop, an expression for the correction factor is obtained. The results of the point source method (PSM) are then compared with those obtained elsewhere for a three-drop array that uses the method of images (MOI). Excellent agreement is obtained. The treatment is then extended to a binary drop array to study the effect of interdrop spacing on vaporization. 20 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. First principles cable braid electromagnetic penetration model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Langston, William L.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William A.

    2016-01-01

    The model for penetration of a wire braid is rigorously formulated. Integral formulas are developed from energy principles for both self and transfer immittances in terms of potentials for the fields. The detailed boundary value problem for the wire braid is also set up in a very efficient manner; the braid wires act as sources for the potentials in the form of a sequence of line multi-poles with unknown coefficients that are determined by means of conditions arising from the wire surface boundary conditions. Approximations are introduced to relate the local properties of the braid wires to a simplified infinitemore » periodic planar geometry. Furthermore, this is used to treat nonuniform coaxial geometries including eccentric interior coaxial arrangements and an exterior ground plane.« less

  8. First principles cable braid electromagnetic penetration model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Langston, William L.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William A.

    2016-01-01

    The model for penetration of a wire braid is rigorously formulated. Integral formulas are developed from energy principles for both self and transfer immittances in terms of potentials for the fields. The detailed boundary value problem for the wire braid is also set up in a very efficient manner; the braid wires act as sources for the potentials in the form of a sequence of line multi-poles with unknown coefficients that are determined by means of conditions arising from the wire surface boundary conditions. Approximations are introduced to relate the local properties of the braid wires to a simplified infinite periodic planar geometry. Furthermore, this is used to treat nonuniform coaxial geometries including eccentric interior coaxial arrangements and an exterior ground plane.

  9. Load determination for long cable bolt support using computer aided bolt load estimation (CABLE) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bawden, W.F.; Moosavi, M.; Hyett, A.J.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper a numerical formulation is presented for determination of the axial load along a cable bolt for a prescribed distribution of rock mass displacement. Results using the program CABLE indicate that during excavation, the load distribution that develops along an untensioned fully grouted cable bolt depends on three main factors: (i) the properties of the cable itself, (ii) the shear force that develops due to bond at the cable-grout interface (i.e. bond stiffness), and (iii) the distribution of rock mass displacement along the cable bolt length. in general, the effect of low modulus rock and mining induced stress decreases in reducing bond strength as determined from short embedment length tests, is reflected in the development of axial loads significantly less than the ultimate tensile capacity even for long cable bolts. However, the load distribution is also dependent on the deformation distribution in the reinforced rock mass. Higher cable bolt loads will be developed for a rock mass that behaves as a discontinuum, with deformation concentrated on a few fractures, than for one which behaves as a continuum, either due to a total lack of fractures or a very high fracture density. This result suggests that the stiffness of a fully grouted cable bolt is not simply a characteristic of the bolt and grout used, but also of the deformation behavior of the ground. In other words, the same combination of bolt and grout will be stiffer if the rock behaves as a discontinuum than if it behaves as a continuum. This paper also explains the laboratory test program used to determine the constitutive behavior of the Garford bulb and Nutcase cables bolts. Details of the test setup as well as the obtained results are summarized and discussed.

  10. Effects of core type, placement, and width on the estimated interstrand coupling properties of QXF-type Nb3Sn Rutherford cables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collings, E. W.; Sumption, M. D.; Majoros, M.; Wang, X.; Dietderich, D. R.

    2015-01-12

    The coupling magnetization of a Rutherford cable is inversely proportional to an effective interstrand contact resistance Reff , a function of the crossing-strand resistance Rc, and the adjacent strand resistance Ra. In cored cables, Reff continuously varies with W, the core width expressed as percent interstrand cover. For a series of un-heat-treated stabrite-coated NbTi LHC-inner cables with stainless-steel (SS, insulating) cores, Reff (W) decreased smoothly as W decreased from 100%, whereas for a set of research-wound SS-cored Nb3Sn cables, Reff plummeted abruptly and remained low over most of the range. The difference is due to the controlling influence of Rcmore » - 2.5 μΩ for the stabrite/NbTi and 0.26 μΩ for Nb3Sn. The experimental behavior was replicated in the Reff (W)’s calculated by the program CUDI, which (using the basic parameters of the QXF cable) went on to show in terms of decreasing W that: 1) in QXF-type Nb3Sn cables (Rc = 0.26 μΩ), Reff dropped even more suddenly when the SS core, instead of being centered, was offset to one edge of the cable; 2) Reff decreased more gradually in cables with higher Rc’s; and 3) a suitable Reff for a Nb3Sn cable can be achieved by inserting a suitably resistive core rather than an insulating (SS) one.« less

  11. Method of manufacturing superconductor wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Motowidlo, Leszek

    2014-09-16

    A method for forming Nb.sub.3Sn superconducting wire is provided. The method employs a powder-in-tube process using a high-tin intermetallic compound, such as MnSn.sub.2, for producing the Nb.sub.3Sn. The use of a high-tin intermetallic compound enables the process to perform hot extrusion without melting the high-tin intermetallic compound. Alternatively, the method may entail drawing the wire without hot extrusion.

  12. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-04-09

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  13. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-03-03

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  14. Nuclear power plant cable materials : review of qualification and currently available aging data for margin assessments in cable performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2013-05-01

    A selective literature review was conducted to assess whether currently available accelerated aging and original qualification data could be used to establish operational margins for the continued use of cable insulation and jacketing materials in nuclear power plant environments. The materials are subject to chemical and physical degradation under extended radiationthermal- oxidative conditions. Of particular interest were the circumstances under which existing aging data could be used to predict whether aged materials should pass loss of coolant accident (LOCA) performance requirements. Original LOCA qualification testing usually involved accelerated aging simulations of the 40-year expected ambient aging conditions followed by a LOCA simulation. The accelerated aging simulations were conducted under rapid accelerated aging conditions that did not account for many of the known limitations in accelerated polymer aging and therefore did not correctly simulate actual aging conditions. These highly accelerated aging conditions resulted in insulation materials with mostlyinert' aging processes as well as jacket materials where oxidative damage dropped quickly away from the air-exposed outside jacket surface. Therefore, for most LOCA performance predictions, testing appears to have relied upon heterogeneous aging behavior with oxidation often limited to the exterior of the cable cross-section - a situation which is not comparable with the nearly homogenous oxidative aging that will occur over decades under low dose rate and low temperature plant conditions. The historical aging conditions are therefore insufficient to determine with reasonable confidence the remaining operational margins for these materials. This does not necessarily imply that the existing 40-year-old materials would fail if LOCA conditions occurred, but rather that unambiguous statements about the current aging state and anticipated LOCA performance cannot be provided based on original

  15. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  16. 1 mil gold bond wire study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, Johnathon; McLean, Michael B.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2013-05-01

    In microcircuit fabrication, the diameter and length of a bond wire have been shown to both affect the current versus fusing time ratio of a bond wire as well as the gap length of the fused wire. This study investigated the impact of current level on the time-to-open and gap length of 1 mil by 60 mil gold bond wires. During the experiments, constant current was provided for a control set of bond wires for 250ms, 410ms and until the wire fused; non-destructively pull-tested wires for 250ms; and notched wires. The key findings were that as the current increases, the gap length increases and 73% of the bond wires will fuse at 1.8A, and 100% of the wires fuse at 1.9A within 60ms. Due to the limited scope of experiments and limited data analyzed, further investigation is encouraged to confirm these observations.

  17. Numerical simulation of undersea cable dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablow, C.M.; Schechter, S.

    1983-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional code has been written to compute the motion of a towed cable. The code is based on a robust and stable finite difference approximation to the differential equations derived from basic dynamics. A 3500-ft cable pulled at 18.5 knots (hr/sup -1/) through a circular turn of 700 yd radius has been computed in about half of the real time of the maneuver. The computed displacements are close to the measured ones; the changes in depth are within 2%.

  18. Draka Industrial Cable GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Draka Industrial Cable GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Draka Industrial Cable GmbH Place: Wuppertal, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany Zip: 42369 Product: Germany-based...

  19. Determination of permissible underground power cable installation -- A calculation method on cable ampacity based on heat generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, C.K.

    1995-09-01

    In a power plant, it is often necessary to install a medium voltage underground cable system to transport the high capacity of auxiliary transformer power output to switchgear lineups. Installation of high current carrying power cable is often limited by the resistive heat generated by the passage of high current. Because heat dissipation in cable routed underground is affected by the soil temperature, soil resistivity, and cable depth, a systematic analysis is necessary to determine the permissible cable ampacity in each cable among the group of cables in any combination of underground cable and duct arrangements. The calculation will determine the medium allowable ampacity in such a system. Depending on the underground cable and duct arrangements, the current carrying capacity of similar cable systems may be different. The impedance of each phase of a cable will be different in a multi-conductor per phase cable system if the cable and duct arrangements are not symmetrical. The calculation will also determine any unbalanced phase impedances and calculate the unbalanced phase currents.

  20. Research and Development of Nb3Sn Wires and Cables for High-Field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10 to 12 T accelerator-quality dipoles and quadrupoles, as well as their scale-up. ... DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: ...

  1. Research and Development of Nb3Sn Wires and Cables for High-Field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: IEEE Trans.Nucl.Sci. Research Org: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), ...

  2. Development and Fabrication of Nb3Sn Rutherford Cable for the 11 T DS Dipole Demonstration Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzi, E.; Lombardo, V.; Nobrega, F.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Karppinen, M.; /CERN

    2011-11-30

    Fermilab and CERN started the development of 11 T 11-m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipoles to replace few regular LHC NbTi dipoles and free space for cold collimators in LHC DS areas. An important step in the design of these magnets is the development of the high aspect ratio Nb{sub 3}Sn cable to achieve the nominal field of 11 T at the nominal LHC operating current of 11.85 kA with 20% margin. The keystoned cables 14.7 mm wide with and without a stainless steel core were made out of hard Cu wires and Nb{sub 3}Sn RRP strand 0.7 mm nominal diameter. The cable optimization process was aimed at achieving both mechanical stability and minimal damage to the delicate internal architecture of the Restacked-Rod-Process (RRP) Nb{sub 3}Sn strands with 127 restack design to be used in the magnet short models. Each cable was characterized electrically for transport properties degradation at high field and for low field stability, and metallographically for internal damage.

  3. Electrical Cable Testing by Pulse-Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Electricity Transmission Electricity ... Communications Construction and maintenance Electric Utility ... cabling systems in aging aircraft, ships, nuclear ...

  4. Cable attachment for a radioactive brachytherapy source capsule

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-07-18

    In cancer brachytherapy treatment, a small californium-252 neutron source capsule is attached to a guide cable using a modified crimping technique. The guide cable has a solid cylindrical end, and the attachment employs circumferential grooves micromachined in the solid cable end. The attachment was designed and tested, and hardware fabricated for use inside a radioactive hot cell. A welding step typically required in other cable attachments is avoided.

  5. Microminiature coaxial cable and methods of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1983-12-29

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 ..mu..m thick and from 150 to 200 ..mu..m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dieleectric. Alternately the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microballoons to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion.

  6. Microminiature coaxial cable and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1989-03-28

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 [mu]m thick and from 150 to 200 [mu]m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately, the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microspheres to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion. 2 figs.

  7. Microminiature coaxial cable and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1989-01-01

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 .mu.m thick and from 150 to 200 .mu.m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately, the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microspheres to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion.

  8. Microminiature coaxial cable and methods manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1986-04-08

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 [mu]m thick and from 150 to 200 [mu]m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microballoons to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion. 2 figs.

  9. Microminiature coaxial cable and methods manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1986-01-01

    A coaxial cable is provided having a ribbon inner conductor surrounded by a dielectric and a circumferential conductor. The coaxial cable may be microminiature comprising a very thin ribbon strip conductor from between 5 to 15 .mu.m thick and from 150 to 200 .mu.m wide, having a surrounding foamed dielectric or parylene applied thereon by a vapor plasma process and an outer conductor of an adhering high conductivity metal vacuum deposited on the dielectric. Alternately the foam dielectric embodiment may have a contiguous parylene coating applied adjacent the inner conductor or the outer conductor or both. Also, the cable may be fabricated by forming a thin ribbon of strip conductive material into an inner conductor, applying thereabout a dielectric by spraying on a solution of polystyrene and polyethylene and then vacuum depositing and adhering high conductivity metal about the dielectric. The cable strength may be increased by adding glass microfilament fibers or glass microballoons to the solution of polystyrene and polyethylene. Further, the outer conductive layer may be applied by electroless deposition in an aqueous solution rather than by vacuum deposition. A thin coating of parylene is preferably applied to the outer conductor to prevent its oxidation and inhibit mechanical abrasion.

  10. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  11. Californium Recovery from Palladium Wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Jon D.

    2014-08-01

    The recovery of 252Cf from palladium-252Cf cermet wires was investigated to determine the feasibility of implementing it into the cermet wire production operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratorys Radiochemical Engineering Development Center. The dissolution of Pd wire in 8 M HNO3 and trace amounts of HCl was studied at both ambient and elevated temperatures. These studies showed that it took days to dissolve the wire at ambient temperature and only 2 hours at 60C. Adjusting the ratio of the volume of solvent to the mass of the wire segment showed little change in the kinetics of dissolution, which ranged from 0.176 mL/mg down to 0.019 mL/mg. A successful chromatographic separation of 153Gd, a surrogate for 252Cf, from Pd was demonstrated using AG 50x8 cation exchange resin with a bed volume of 0.5 mL and an internal diameter of 0.8 cm.

  12. Cable deformation simulation and a hierarchical framework for Nb3Sn Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbelaez, D.; Prestemon, S. O.; Ferracin, P.; Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Sabbi, G.

    2009-09-13

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional strain state induced in the superconducting filaments due to loads on Rutherford cables is essential to analyze the performance of Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets. Due to the large range of length scales involved, we develop a hierarchical computational scheme that includes models at both the cable and strand levels. At the Rutherford cable level, where the strands are treated as a homogeneous medium, a three-dimensional computational model is developed to determine the deformed shape of the cable that can subsequently be used to determine the strain state under specified loading conditions, which may be of thermal, magnetic, and mechanical origins. The results can then be transferred to the model at the strand/macro-filament level for rod restack process (RRP) strands, where the geometric details of the strand are included. This hierarchical scheme can be used to estimate the three-dimensional strain state in the conductor as well as to determine the effective properties of the strands and cables from the properties of individual components. Examples of the modeling results obtained for the orthotropic mechanical properties of the Rutherford cables are presented.

  13. Diesel prices see slight drop

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Diesel prices see slight drop The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell slightly to $3.91 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Regionally, diesel prices were highest in New England at 4.06 a gallon, down half a penny from a week ago, followed closely by the West Coast states at 4.05 a gallon, up 2-tenths of a penny. Prices were lowest in the Gulf Coast region at

  14. HVDC submarine cables for the Hokkaido Honshu linkage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minemura, S.; Iso, M.

    1981-04-01

    The direct-current submarine cable interconnecting Hokkaido and Honshu (hereafter called HH linkage) is an example of installation of an undersea cable for long-distance power transmission crossing a sea strait. In particular, the feature of this interconnection is that an oil-filled (OF) cable is used for the high-voltage side with crosslinked polyethylene (XPLE) cable adopted for the return to comprise a conductor return system. The details of the facilities, especially the design of the OF submarine cable are described. 3 refs.

  15. Antenna coupled photonic wire lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reno, John L.; Kao, Tsung-Kao; Cai, Xiaowei; Lee, Alan W. M.; Hu, Qing

    2015-06-22

    Slope efficiency (SE) is an important performance metric for lasers. In conventional semiconductor lasers, SE can be optimized by careful designs of the facet (or the modulation for DFB lasers) dimension and surface. However, photonic wire lasers intrinsically suffer low SE due to their deep sub-wavelength emitting facets. Inspired by microwave engineering techniques, we show a novel method to extract power from wire lasers using monolithically integrated antennas. These integrated antennas significantly increase the effective radiation area, and consequently enhance the power extraction efficiency. When applied to wire lasers at THz frequency, we achieved the highest single-side slope efficiency (~450moremW/A) in pulsed mode for DFB lasers at 4 THz and a ~4x increase in output power at 3 THz compared with a similar structure without antennas. This work demonstrates the versatility of incorporating microwave engineering techniques into laser designs, enabling significant performance enhancements.less

  16. Testing of 3-meter Prototype Fault Current Limiting Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouge, Michael J; Duckworth, Robert C; Demko, Jonathan A; Rey, Christopher M; Thompson, James R; Lindsay, David T; Tolbert, Jerry Carlton; Willen, Dag; Lentge, Heidi; Thidemann, Carsten; Carter, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Two 3-m long, single-phase cables have been fabricated by Ultera from second generation (2G) superconductor supplied by American Superconductor. The first cable was made with two layers of 2G tape conductor and had a critical current of 5,750 A while the second cable had four layers and a critical current of 8,500 A. AC loss was measured for both cables at ac currents of up to 4 kArms. Ultera performed initial fault current studies of both cables in Denmark with limited currents in the range from 9.1 to 44 kA. Results from these tests will provide a basis for a 25-m long, three-phase, prototype cable to be tested at ORNL early next year and a 300-m long, fault current limiting, superconducting cable to be installed in a ConEd substation in New York City.

  17. CABLE AGING AND CONDITION MONITORING OF RADIATION RESISTANT NANO-DIELECTRICS IN ADVANCED REACTOR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duckworth, Robert C; Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Kidder, Michelle; Polyzos, Georgios; Leonard, Keith J

    2015-01-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) nanocomposites have been developed in an effort to improve cable insulation lifetime to serve in both instrument cables and auxiliary power systems in advanced reactor applications as well as to provide an alternative for new or retro-fit cable insulation installations. Nano-dielectrics composed of different weight percentages of MgO & SiO2 have been subjected to radiation at accumulated doses approaching 20 MRad and thermal aging temperatures exceeding 100 C. Depending on the composition, the performance of the nanodielectric insulation was influenced, both positively and negatively, when quantified with respect to its electrical and mechanical properties. For virgin unradiated or thermally aged- samples, XLPE nanocomposites with 1wt.% SiO2 showed improvement in breakdown strength and reduction in its dissipation factor when compared to pure undoped- XLPE, while XLPE 3wt.% SiO2 resulted in lower breakdown strength. When aged in air at 120 C, retention of electrical breakdown strength and dissipation factor was observed for XLPE 3wt.% MgO nanocomposites. Irrespective of the nanoparticle species, XLPE nanocomposites that were gamma irradiated up to the accumulated dose of 18 MRad showed a significant drop in breakdown strength especially for particle concentrations greater than 3 wt.%. Additional attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy measurements suggest changes in the structure of the XLPE SiO2 nanocomposites associated with the interaction of silicon and oxygen. Discussion on the relevance of property changes with respect to cable aging and condition monitoring is presented.

  18. Effects of moisture on the life of power plant cables: Part 1, Medium-voltage cables; Part 2, Low-voltage cables. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toman, G.J.; Morris, G.W.; Holzman, P.

    1994-08-01

    Motivated by the concern that in-service moisture may decrease the useful life of medium and low-voltage electrical cables in power plants, EPRI investigators surveyed plant operators, examined cable failure experience, and assessed the need to develop unproved life prediction techniques. The survey revealed that only 34 medium-voltage cable failures have occurred in the more than 1000 plant-years of experience represented. In addition, moisture effects such as voltage-induced water-freeing have not been the primary cause of the failures but are one contributor among several, including manufacturing defects, installation damage, and inadvertent damage to cable by field equipment the study concludes that medium-voltage cables are rehable and there is insufficient interest on the part of surveyed utilities to warrant further R&D on cable condition evaluation techniques at this time. In addition, moisture-related degradation is not a significant concern for low-voltage cables. This two-part report discusses,the limitations of existing cable field testing techniques and highlights measures for maximizing the useful life of medium- and low-voltage power plant cables.

  19. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Robert W.; Maroone, James P.; Tipping, Donald W.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  20. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  1. Wire-Net | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wire-Net Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wire-Net Address: 4855 W. 130th Street, Suite 1 Place: Cleveland, OHio Zip: 44135 Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Phone...

  2. Little Boy Dropped on Hiroshima | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Little Boy Dropped on Hiroshima Little Boy Dropped on Hiroshima Hiroshima, Japan The gun model uranium bomb, called Little Boy, is dropped on Hiroshima, Japan

  3. Fat Man Dropped on Nagasaki | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fat Man Dropped on Nagasaki August 09, 1945 Fat Man Dropped on Nagasaki Nagasaki, Japan The implosion model plutonium bomb, called Fat Man, is dropped on Nagasaki, Japan....

  4. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botts, Thomas E. (Fairfax, VA); Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Lenard, Roger (Redondo Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  5. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.; Lenard, R.

    1984-12-10

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting energy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  6. Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M.; Soika, Rainer H.

    2002-01-01

    An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

  7. Free-Space optical interconnects for cable-less readout in particle physics detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chramowicz, John; Kwan, Simon; Moretti, Tony; Sugg, Alan; Prosser, Alan; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Particle physics detectors utilize readout data links requiring a complicated network of copper wires or optical fibers. These links are both massive and costly. Upgrades to such detectors may require additional bandwidth to be provisioned with limited space available to route new cables or fibers. In contrast, free-space optical interconnects will offer cable-less readout, thereby resulting in significant reductions of material and labor. A collaborative effort between Fermilab and Vega Wave Systems is pursuing the development of a unique free-space optical link design that utilizes the transparency of silicon at wavelengths including 1310 nm and multiple wavelengths used in standard telecommunications applications such as coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM). The first step in the pursuit of that design is a proof that the concept may be viable. To that end, experiments have been performed to characterize the bit error rate performance of a prototype link over a free-space optical path and through doped silicon at multi-gigabit rates. These experiments have demonstrated that operation within acceptable bit error rates is possible using single and multiple wavelength transmission arrangements.

  8. Development of a coiled tubing cable installation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.R.; Haver, N.A.; Stone, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    A system has been developed which installs and de-installs an electric wireline cable in coiled tubing (CT) while the CT is still on the reel. This cable installation system reduces the cost of a cable installation significantly compared with previous installation methods. This paper discusses the need for such a system, the theory used to develop this system, the various concepts considered, the system that was developed and test installation cases.

  9. Project Fact Sheet Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202 \ 586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power This project involves field-testing of a long-length high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable under real environmental stresses and real electrical loads. The cable system forms an important electrical

  10. Sintered wire cesium dispenser photocathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Eric J; Ives, R. Lawrence; Falce, Louis R

    2014-03-04

    A photoelectric cathode has a work function lowering material such as cesium placed into an enclosure which couples a thermal energy from a heater to the work function lowering material. The enclosure directs the work function lowering material in vapor form through a low diffusion layer, through a free space layer, and through a uniform porosity layer, one side of which also forms a photoelectric cathode surface. The low diffusion layer may be formed from sintered powdered metal, such as tungsten, and the uniform porosity layer may be formed from wires which are sintered together to form pores between the wires which are continuous from the a back surface to a front surface which is also the photoelectric surface.

  11. Development of metal-ceramic coaxial cable Fabry-Pérot interferometric sensors for high temperature monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trontz, Adam; Cheng, Baokai; Zeng, Shixuan; Xiao, Hai; Dong, Junhang

    2015-09-25

    Metal-ceramic coaxial cable Fabry-Pérot interferometric (MCCC-FPI) sensors have been developed using a stainless steel tube and a stainless steel wire as the outer and inner conductors, respectively; a tubular α-alumina insulator; and a pair of air gaps created in the insulator along the cable to serve as weak reflectors for the transmitting microwave (MW) signal. The MCCC-FPI sensors have been demonstrated for high temperature measurements using MW signals in a frequency range of 2–8 GHz. The temperature measurement is achieved by monitoring the frequency shift (Δƒ) of the MW interferogram reflected from the pair of weak reflectors. The MW sensor exhibited excellent linear dependence of Δƒ on temperature; small measurement deviations (±2.7%); and fast response in a tested range of 200–500 °C. The MCCC has the potential for further developing multipoint FPI sensors in a single-cable to achieve in situ and continuous measurement of spatially distributed temperature in harsh environments.

  12. Development of metal-ceramic coaxial cable Fabry-Pérot interferometric sensors for high temperature monitoring

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trontz, Adam; Cheng, Baokai; Zeng, Shixuan; Xiao, Hai; Dong, Junhang

    2015-09-25

    Metal-ceramic coaxial cable Fabry-Pérot interferometric (MCCC-FPI) sensors have been developed using a stainless steel tube and a stainless steel wire as the outer and inner conductors, respectively; a tubular α-alumina insulator; and a pair of air gaps created in the insulator along the cable to serve as weak reflectors for the transmitting microwave (MW) signal. The MCCC-FPI sensors have been demonstrated for high temperature measurements using MW signals in a frequency range of 2–8 GHz. The temperature measurement is achieved by monitoring the frequency shift (Δƒ) of the MW interferogram reflected from the pair of weak reflectors. The MW sensormore » exhibited excellent linear dependence of Δƒ on temperature; small measurement deviations (±2.7%); and fast response in a tested range of 200–500 °C. The MCCC has the potential for further developing multipoint FPI sensors in a single-cable to achieve in situ and continuous measurement of spatially distributed temperature in harsh environments.« less

  13. Heat transfer in forced cooled cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, A.; Donazzi, F.; Taralli, C.; Tencer, C.; Lima, A.J.O. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a calculation method for current continuous rating of cable lines that considers the actual environment conditions, such as different types of soil, change of geometrical disposition, etc... This method is based on the resolution in terms of limit differences. The results of a full scale experimental installation, were used to check the theoretical model precision. The comparison between the measured and calculated rise show a difference of 5% in general and a maximum of 7% which may be considered acceptable for line design.

  14. Method and apparatus for laying wire arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Seymour M.; Nesbitt, Dale D.

    1986-01-01

    Wire arrays (11) having a continuous wire (12) which is formed into a predetermined pattern and adhered to a backing material or substrate (13) are fabricated by applying adhesive material (16a, 16b) along opposite edge portions (17, 18) of the substrate, positioning a row of winding spools (21) along each of the edge portions and repeatedly extending the wire between and around successive spools at the opposite edge portions. The wound wire is then traveled along each spool toward the substrate and into contact with the adhesive. The spools are then removed and a coating of hardenable material (54) is applied to secure the wound wire to the substrate. Tension in the wire is relieved prior to contact of the wire with the adhesive and a small amount of slack is introduced into the wire before the final coating step. Mechanism (32) is provided for lifting the spools away from the substrate without disturbing the wound wire. The method and apparatus enable manufacture of precisely configured wire arrays without complex or costly equipment and do not require structural alterations in the substrate for the purpose of accommodating to fabrication equipment.

  15. LOW-LOSS CABLE AND METHOD OF FABRICATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, R.L. et al.

    1960-09-27

    A radiation-resistant coaxial electrical cable capable of carrying very small currents at high voltages with little leakage is described. The cable comprises an inner axial conductor separated from an outer coaxial tubular conductor by annular layer of fibrous silica insulation. The silica insulation is formed by leaching boron from spun horosilicate glass and then heat treating the silica at a high temperature.

  16. Achievements and principal directions of development of the cable industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peshkov, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    The research and development carried out in the USSR in the field of superconducting cable manufacture and operation is described. Also, the development of cables for particularly exacting operating conditions, such as for petroleum industry or undersea installations, and for telecommunication purposes is discussed.

  17. Wiring reconfiguration saves millions for Trinity supercomputer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wiring reconfiguration saves millions for Trinity supercomputer Wiring reconfiguration saves millions for Trinity supercomputer A moment of inspiration during a wiring diagram review has saved more than $2 million in material and labor costs for the Trinity supercomputer. August 15, 2016 The first row of cabinets for the Trinity supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first row of cabinets for the Trinity supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano

  18. Sound cable crossing brings inexpensive electric power to Long Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzan, J. ); Goyette, R. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that while many electric-utility customers in New York State benefit from inexpensive hydroelectric power from Canada and upstate New York, lack of sufficient transmission connections have prevented this electricity from reaching Long Island. However, a newly constructed underground/underwater link capable of carrying 700-MW now transmits low-cost electricity to the island, saving money for customers. The self-contained fluid-filled cable used for the underwater portion of the project is the largest underwater cable in the world. The use of high-pressure, fluid-filled pipe-type cable on the land portion represents the largest application of paper-polypropylene-paper (PPP) insulated cable in the United States. State-of-the-art technologies were implemented in the use of temperature monitoring and leak detection systems, SF{sub 6} gas-insulated substation, and underwater cable laying and embedment techniques.

  19. System and method for sub-sea cable termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Qin; Yin, Weijun; Zhang, Lili

    2016-04-05

    An electrical connector includes a first cable termination chamber configured to receive a first power cable having at least a first conductor sheathed at least in part by a first insulating layer and a first insulation screen layer. Also, the electrical connector includes a first non-linear resistive layer configured to be coupled to a portion of the first conductor unsheathed by at least the first insulation screen layer and configured to control a direct current electric field generated in the first cable termination chamber. In addition, the electrical connector includes a first deflector configured to be coupled to the first power cable and control an alternating current electric field generated in the first cable termination chamber.

  20. Low voltage secondary network cable reliability study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    In an attempt to find clues to the causes of manhole fires and explosions, researchers removed several aged low voltage network cables from service on the United Illuminating Company system. Examination of their physical, chemical, and electrical properties indicated that any deterioration of the cables that had occurred during their approximately 35 year service life was minor and did not affect reliability for continued service. Cables were found to have retained excellent properties despite their long age in service. For example, AC breakdown strength, dissipation factor, and percent elongation were all satisfactory. Insulation was coherent, not brittle; and the jackets did not crack or craze on bending. The tested cables compare favorably, physically and electrically, with non-jacketed rubber cables presently in service.

  1. Torpedo Speciality Wire Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Carolina-based maker of speciality wires, including ones for interconnecting solar cells and connecting modules. The firm also produces PV junction boxes. References:...

  2. Thin californium-containing radioactive source wires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2012-01-03

    A cermet wire includes at least 1% californium-252 and is characterized by a diameter of no more than 0.0225 inch.

  3. Processing a printed wiring board by single bath electrodeposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltzer, Michael P.; Steffani, Christopher P.; Gonfiotti, Ray A.

    2010-12-07

    A method of processing a printed wiring board. Initial processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board. Copper is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper. Nickel is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper and final processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board.

  4. Processing A Printed Wiring Board By Single Bath Electrodeposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltzer, Michael P. (Oakland, CA); Steffani, Christopher P. (Livermore, CA); Gonfiotti, Ray A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-15

    A method of processing a printed wiring board by single bath electrodeposition. Initial processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board. Copper is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper. Nickel is plated on the printed wiring board from the bath containing nickel and copper and final processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board.

  5. Fluid assisted installation of electrical cable accessories

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Robert W.; Silva, Frank A.

    1977-01-01

    An electrical cable accessory includes a generally tubular member of elastomeric material which is to be installed by placement over a cylindrical surface to grip the cylindrical surface, when in appropriate assembled relation therewith, with a predetermined gripping force established by dilation of the tubular member, the installation being facilitated by introducing fluid under pressure, through means provided in the tubular member, between the tubular member and the cylindrical surface, and simultaneously impeding the escape of the fluid under pressure from between the tubular member and the cylindrical surface by means adjacent one of the ends of the tubular member to cause dilation of the tubular member and establish a fluid layer between the tubular member and the cylindrical surface, thereby reducing the gripping force during installation.

  6. Cryogenic System for a High Temperature Superconducting Power Transmission Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Martin, R.; Sinha, U.; Stovall, J.P.

    1999-07-12

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission are under development that will use pressurized liquid nitrogen to provide cooling of the cable and termination hardware. Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been operating a prototype HTS cable system that contains many of the typical components needed for a commercial power transmission application. It is being used to conduct research in the development of components and systems for eventual commercial deployment. The cryogenic system was built by Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and can circulate up to 0.35 kg/s of liquid nitrogen at temperatures as low as 67 K at pressures of 1 to 10 bars. Sufficient cooling is provided for testing a 5-m-long HTS transmission cable system that includes the terminations required for room temperature electrical connections. Testing of the 5-m HTS transmission cable has been conducted at the design ac conditions of 1250 A and 7.5 kV line to ground. This paper contains a description of the essential features of the HTS cable cryogenic system and performance results obtained during operation of the system. The salient features of the operation that are important in large commercial HTS cable applications will be discussed.

  7. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improves the strain characteristics of the wire.

  8. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  9. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, T.; Klamut, C.J.; Suenaga, M.; Welch, D.

    1979-12-19

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  10. Flywheel system using wire-wound rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiao, Edward Young; Bender, Donald Arthur; Means, Andrew E.; Snyder, Philip K.

    2016-06-07

    A flywheel is described having a rotor constructed of wire wound onto a central form. The wire is prestressed, thus mitigating stresses that occur during operation. In another aspect, the flywheel incorporates a low-loss motor using electrically non-conducting permanent magnets.

  11. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Non-Wires Solutions...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Non-Wires Solutions - October 17, 2012 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Non-Wires Solutions - October 17, 2012 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Non-Wires...

  12. Improved method of preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schmidt, F.A.; Owen, C.V.

    1979-10-17

    An improved method of preparing composite multifilament superconducting wire of Nb/sub 3/Sn in a copper matrix eliminates the necessity of coating the drawn wire with tin. A generalized cylindrical billet of an alloy of copper containing at least 15 weight percent niobium, present in the copper as discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles, is provided with at least one longitudinal opening which is filled with tin to form a composite drawing rod. The drawing rod is then drawn to form a ductile composite multifilament wire containing a filament of tin. The ductile wire containing the tin can then be wound into magnet coils or other devices before heating to diffuse the tin through the wire to react with the niobium forming Nb/sub 3/Sn. Also described is an improved method for making large billets of the copper-niobium alloy by consumable-arc casting.

  13. Method of preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Finnemore, Douglas K.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Owen, Charles V.

    1985-08-06

    An improved method of preparing composite multifilament superconducting wire of Nb.sub.3 Sn in a copper matrix which eliminates the necessity of coating the drawn wire with tin. A generalized cylindrical billet of an alloy of copper containing at least 15 weight percent niobium, present in the copper as discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles, is provided with at least one longitudinal opening which is filled with tin to form a composite drawing rod. The drawing rod is then drawn to form a ductile composite multifilament wire containing a filament of tin. The ductile wire containing the tin can then be wound into magnet coils or other devices before heating to diffuse the tin through the wire to react with the niobium forming Nb.sub.3 Sn. Also described is an improved method for making large billets of the copper-niobium alloy by consumable-arc casting.

  14. Cable Damage Detection System and Algorithms Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, G A; Robbins, C L; Wade, K A; Souza, P R

    2009-03-24

    This report describes the hardware system and the set of algorithms we have developed for detecting damage in cables for the Advanced Development and Process Technologies (ADAPT) Program. This program is part of the W80 Life Extension Program (LEP). The system could be generalized for application to other systems in the future. Critical cables can undergo various types of damage (e.g. short circuits, open circuits, punctures, compression) that manifest as changes in the dielectric/impedance properties of the cables. For our specific problem, only one end of the cable is accessible, and no exemplars of actual damage are available. This work addresses the detection of dielectric/impedance anomalies in transient time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements on the cables. The approach is to interrogate the cable using time domain reflectometry (TDR) techniques, in which a known pulse is inserted into the cable, and reflections from the cable are measured. The key operating principle is that any important cable damage will manifest itself as an electrical impedance discontinuity that can be measured in the TDR response signal. Machine learning classification algorithms are effectively eliminated from consideration, because only a small number of cables is available for testing; so a sufficient sample size is not attainable. Nonetheless, a key requirement is to achieve very high probability of detection and very low probability of false alarm. The approach is to compare TDR signals from possibly damaged cables to signals or an empirical model derived from reference cables that are known to be undamaged. This requires that the TDR signals are reasonably repeatable from test to test on the same cable, and from cable to cable. Empirical studies show that the repeatability issue is the 'long pole in the tent' for damage detection, because it is has been difficult to achieve reasonable repeatability. This one factor dominated the project. The two-step model-based approach is

  15. Project Fact Sheet Long Island HTS Power Cable Superconducting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long Island HTS Power Cable Superconducting Power Equipment www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202-586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power What is the status of the Project? The cable was energized April 22, 2008 and serves the equivalent of 300,000 homes. It is the first HTS power cable to operate at transmission voltage in the grid. LIPA plans to retain

  16. Single wire drift chamber design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krider, J.

    1987-03-30

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 ..mu..m rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles.

  17. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, D.K.; Miller, T.A.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schwartzkopf, L.A.; Sanders, S.C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  18. An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 An Updated Assessement of Copper Wire Thefts from Electric Utilities - October 2010 The U.S. ...

  19. Guide wire extension for shape memory polymer occlusion removal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Guide wire extension for shape memory polymer occlusion removal devices Title: Guide wire extension for shape memory polymer occlusion removal devices A flexible extension for a ...

  20. Towards predicting the voltage drop between electrode and electrolyte...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    drop between electrode and electrolyte in lithium ion batteries. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards predicting the voltage drop between electrode and electrolyte ...

  1. An Internal Coaxial Cable Electrical Connector For Use In Downhole Tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael

    2005-11-29

    A coaxial cable electrical connector more specifically an internal coaxial cable connector placed within a coaxial cable and its constituent components. A coaxial cable connector is in electrical communcation with an inductive transformer and a coaxial cable. The connector is in electrical communication with the outer housing of the inductive transfonner. A generally coaxial center conductor, a portion of which could be the coil in the inductive transformer, passes through the connector, is electrically insulated from the connector, and is in electrical communication with the conductive care of the coaxial cable. A plurality of bulbous pliant tabs on the coaxial cable connector mechanically engage the inside diameter of the coaxial cable thus grounding the transformer to the coaxial cable. The coaxial cable and inductive transformer are disposed within downhole tools to transmit electrical signals between downhole tools within a drill string.

  2. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  3. LANSCE wire scanning diagnostics device mechanical design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is one of the major experimental science facilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The core of LANSCE's work lies in the operation of a powerful linear accelerator, which accelerates protons up to 84% the speed oflight. These protons are used for a variety of purposes, including materials testing, weapons research and isotopes production. To assist in guiding the proton beam, a series of over one hundred wire scanners are used to measure the beam profile at various locations along the half-mile length of the particle accelerator. A wire scanner is an electro-mechanical device that moves a set of wires through a particle beam and measures the secondary emissions from the resulting beam-wire interaction to obtain beam intensity information. When supplemented with data from a position sensor, this information is used to determine the cross-sectional profile of the beam. This measurement allows beam operators to adjust parameters such as acceleration, beam steering, and focus to ensure that the beam reaches its destination as effectively as possible. Some of the current wire scanners are nearly forty years old and are becoming obsolete. The problem with current wire scanners comes in the difficulty of maintenance and reliability. The designs of these wire scanners vary making it difficult to keep spare parts that would work on all designs. Also many of the components are custom built or out-dated technology and are no longer in production.

  4. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  5. Circuits of Atoms on Wires of Light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Circuits of Atoms on Wires of Light 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Circuits of Atoms on Wires of Light A new kind of circuitry-with electrons on conducting wires replaced by atoms on paths of laser light-is ushering in an era of "atomtronic" technology. March 8, 2016 Artist visualization of atomic circuits Los Alamos scientists have developed a reliable new way to create atomtronic circuits with waves of

  6. Cost-Effective Cable Insulation: Nanoclay Reinforced Ethylene-Propylene-Rubber for Low-Cost HVDC Cabling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-24

    GENI Project: GE is developing new, low-cost insulation for high-voltage direct current (HVDC) electricity transmission cables. The current material used to insulate HVDC transmission cables is very expensive and can account for as much as 1/3 of the total cost of a high-voltage transmission system. GE is embedding nanomaterials into specialty rubber to create its insulation. Not only are these materials less expensive than those used in conventional HVDC insulation, but also they will help suppress excess charge accumulation. The excess charge left behind on a cable poses a major challenge for high-voltage insulation—if it’s not kept to a low level, it could ultimately lead the insulation to fail. GE’s low-cost insulation is compatible with existing U.S. cable manufacturing processes, further enhancing its cost effectiveness.

  7. Effects of sudden expansion and contraction flow on pressure drops in the Stirling engine regenerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Yamashita, I.; Hirata, K.

    1998-07-01

    The flow losses in the regenerators greatly influence the performance of the Stirling engine. The losses mainly depend on fluid friction through the regenerator matrix, but are also generated in sudden expansion and contraction flow at the regenerator ends. The latter losses can't be neglected in the case of small area ratio (entrance area/cross-sectional area in regenerator). The pressure drops in regenerators are usually estimated assuming a uniform velocity distribution of working gas in the matrices. The estimation results, however, are generally smaller than practical data. The cross-sectional flow areas of the heater and cooler of typical Stirling engines are smaller than the cross- sectional area of the regenerator. The effects of the small flow passage on the velocity distribution of working fluid in the matrix, that is, a flow transition from tubes or channels to a regenerator matrix, can be often confirmed by the discolored matrix. Especially, the lack of a uniform distribution of velocity in the matrix causes increased flow loss and decreased thermal performance. So, it is necessary to understand the quantitative effects of the sudden change in flow area at the regenerator ends on the velocity distribution and pressure drop. In this paper, using matrices made of stacks of wire screens, the effects of the entrance and exit areas and the length of the regenerator on pressure drops are examined by an unidirectional steady flow apparatus. The experimental data are arranged in an empirical equation. The lack of a uniformity of velocity distribution is visualized using smoke-wire methods. The empirical equation presented is applied to the estimation of pressure loss in an actual engine regenerator. The applicability of the equation is examined by comparison of estimated value with engine data in pressure loss.

  8. Equation determines pressure drop in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1995-12-04

    A single equation can determine the pressure drop in wells with laminar, transitional, and turbulent incompressible fluid flow in coiled tubing or other steel tubulars. The single equation is useful, especially in computer-aided design and operations. The equation is derived and illustrated by an example.

  9. Improvements to Existing Jefferson Lab Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCaughan, Michael D.; Tiefenback, Michael G.; Turner, Dennis L.

    2013-06-01

    This poster will detail the augmentation of selected existing CEBAF wire scanners with commercially available hardware, PMTs, and self created software in order to improve the scanners both in function and utility.

  10. t matrix of metallic wire structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, T. R. Chui, S. T.

    2014-04-14

    To study the electromagnetic resonance and scattering properties of complex structures of which metallic wire structures are constituents within multiple scattering theory, the t matrix of individual structures is needed. We have recently developed a rigorous and numerically efficient equivalent circuit theory in which retardation effects are taken into account for metallic wire structures. Here, we show how the t matrix can be calculated analytically within this theory. We illustrate our method with the example of split ring resonators. The density of states and cross sections for scattering and absorption are calculated, which are shown to be remarkably enhanced at resonant frequencies. The t matrix serves as the basic building block to evaluate the interaction of wire structures within the framework of multiple scattering theory. This will open the door to efficient design and optimization of assembly of wire structures.

  11. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harwell, Lane D.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Greene, Donald L.; Pressly, Gary A.

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  12. Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) final report on aging and condition monitoring of low-voltage cable materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assink, Roger Alan; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes results generated on a 5-year cable-aging program that constituted part of the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) program, an effort cosponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The NEPO cable-aging effort concentrated on two important issues involving the development of better lifetime prediction methods as well as the development and testing of novel cable condition-monitoring (CM) techniques. To address improved life prediction methods, we first describe the use of time-temperature superposition principles, indicating how this approach improves the testing of the Arrhenius model by utilizing all of the experimentally generated data instead of a few selected and processed data points. Although reasonable superposition is often found, we show several cases where non-superposition is evident, a situation that violates the constant acceleration assumption normally used in accelerated aging studies. Long-term aging results over extended temperature ranges allow us to show that curvature in Arrhenius plots for elongation is a common occurrence. In all cases the curvature results in a lowering of the Arrhenius activation energy at lower temperatures implying that typical extrapolation of high temperature results over-estimates material lifetimes. The long-term results also allow us to test the significance of extrapolating through the crystalline melting point of semi-crystalline materials. By utilizing ultrasensitive oxygen consumption (UOC) measurements, we show that it is possible to probe the low temperature extrapolation region normally inaccessible to conventional accelerated aging studies. This allows the quantitative testing of the often-used Arrhenius extrapolation assumption. Such testing indicates that many materials again show evidence of ''downward'' curvature (E{sub a} values drop as the aging temperature is lowered) consistent with the limited elongation results and

  13. Cable bolt support technology in north America. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goris, J.M.; Nickson, S.D.; Pakalnis, R.

    1994-01-01

    Cable bolt supports are becoming an important ground control technique in underground mines in the United States and Canada. They show great versatility and are adaptable for use with many mining techniques, they have high load-carrying capacities, they can be installed in small areas with low roofs, and they are cost effective. Investigators in a number of research institutes in North America have conducted studies to assess the material and support properties of cable bolts, evaluate their support capabilities under various mining conditions, and provide design criteria for using cable bolt supports as roof control systems under varying mining conditions. While conducting these studies, personnel have collected important information on the history, application, performance, and economics of these supports. This Information Circular (IC) documents this information so that ground control personnel unfamiliar with cable bolt supports can gain an understanding and appreciation of their use. A comprehensive bibliography of technical information on cable bolt supports was selected by the authors and is also presented.

  14. Integrated head package cable carrier for a nuclear power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meuschke, Robert E.; Trombola, Daniel M.

    1995-01-01

    A cabling arrangement is provided for a nuclear reactor located within a containment. Structure inside the containment is characterized by a wall having a near side surrounding the reactor vessel defining a cavity, an operating deck outside the cavity, a sub-space below the deck and on a far side of the wall spaced from the near side, and an operating area above the deck. The arrangement includes a movable frame supporting a plurality of cables extending through the frame, each connectable at a first end to a head package on the reactor vessel and each having a second end located in the sub-space. The frame is movable, with the cables, between a first position during normal operation of the reactor when the cables are connected to the head package, located outside the sub-space proximate the head package, and a second position during refueling when the cables are disconnected from the head package, located in the sub-space. In a preferred embodiment, the frame straddles the top of the wall in a substantially horizontal orientation in the first position, pivots about an end distal from the head package to a substantially vertically oriented intermediate position, and is guided, while remaining about vertically oriented, along a track in the sub-space to the second position.

  15. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.

    1998-04-14

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids is disclosed. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities. 5 figs.

  16. Curing system for high voltage cross linked cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bahder, George; Katz, Carlos; Bopp, Louis A.

    1978-01-01

    This invention makes extruded, vulcanized, high voltage cables insulated with thermosetting compounds at much higher rates of production and with superior insulation of reduced thickness and with reduced cavities or voids in the insulation. As the cable comes from an extruder, it passes into a curing chamber with a heat booster that quickly raises the insulation to a temperature at which it is cured much more quickly than with steam heating of the prior art. A high temperature liquid in contact with the insulation maintains the high temperature; and because of the greater curing heat, the cable can travel through the curing chamber at a faster rate and into a cooling tube where it contacts with a cooling liquid under high pressure. The insulation compound is treated to reduce the size of cavities; and the high pressure maintained by the curing and cooling mediums prevent expansion of cavities before the insulation is set.

  17. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauritzen, Ted

    1985-01-01

    The disclosed apparatus produces constant tension in superconducting electrical cable, or some other strand, under conditions of intermittent demand, as the cable is unreeled from a reel or reeled thereon. The apparatus comprises a pivotally supported swing frame on which the reel is rotatably supported, a rotary motor, a drive train connected between the motor and the reel and including an electrically controllable variable torque slip clutch, a servo transducer connected to the swing frame for producing servo input signals corresponding to the position thereof, a servo control system connected between the transducer and the clutch for regulating the torque transmitted by the clutch to maintain the swing frame in a predetermined position, at least one air cylinder connected to the swing frame for counteracting the tension in the cable, and pressure regulating means for supplying a constant air pressure to the cylinder to establish the constant tension in the cable, the servo system and the clutch being effective to produce torque on the reel in an amount sufficient to provide tension in the cable corresponding to the constant force exerted by the air cylinder. The drive train also preferably includes a fail-safe brake operable to its released position by electrical power in common with the servo system, for preventing rotation of the reel if there is a power failure. A shock absorber and biasing springs may also be connected to the swing frame, such springs biasing the frame toward its predetermined position. The tension in the cable may be measured by force measuring devices engageable with the bearings for the reel shaft, such bearings being supported for slight lateral movement. The reel shaft is driven by a Shmidt coupler which accommodates such movement.

  18. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term ...

  19. ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable line stations) (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name ETM (Distribution Network Automation on 10 kV cable...

  20. Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado, Office Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado, ...

  1. Method of fabricating composite superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strauss, Bruce P.; Reardon, Paul J.; Remsbottom, Robert H.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement in the method for preparing composite rods of superconducting alloy and normal metal from which multifilament composite superconducting wire is fabricated by bending longitudinally a strip of normal metal around a rod of superconductor alloy and welding the edges to form the composite rod. After the rods have preferably been provided with a hexagonal cross-sectional shape, a plurality of the rods are stacked into a normal metal extrusion can, sealed and worked to reduce the cross-sectional size and form multifilament wire. Diffusion barriers and high-electrical resistance barriers can easily be introduced into the wire by plating or otherwise coating the faces of the normal metal strip with appropriate materials.

  2. Medium-Voltage Cables in Nuclear Plant Applications - State of Industry and Conditioning Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Braun

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 This report reviews the types of medium-voltage (MV) cables in use in nuclear power plants and the techniques that are currently available to assess the condition of MV cable systems. The project identified the types of cable systems in nuclear plants and their operating conditions and then assessed the aging and failure mechanisms of these cables and suitable diagnostic test techniques. In addition, ways to alleviate conditions that cause the most severe aging were identified.

  3. A cable SGEMP tutorial : running CEPXS, CEPTRE and EMPHASIS/CABANA to evaluate the electrical response of a cable.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liscum-Powell, Jennifer L.; Bohnhoff, William J.; Turner, C. David

    2007-05-01

    This tutorial is aimed at guiding a user through the process of performing a cable SGEMP simulation. The tutorial starts with processing a differential photon spectrum obtained from a Monte Carlo code such as ITS into a discrete (multi-group) spectrum used in CEPXS and CEPTRE. Guidance is given in the creation of a nite element mesh of the cable geometry. The set-up of a CEPTRE simulation is detailed. Users are instructed in evaluating the quality of the CEPTRE radiation transport results. The post-processing of CEPTRE results using Exostrip is detailed. And finally, an EMPHASIS/CABANA simulation is detailed including the interpretation of the output.

  4. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  5. Variational optimization method for calculation of cloud drop growth in an Eulerian drop-size framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qingfu; Kogan, Y.L.; Lilly, D.K.; Khairoutdinov, M.P.

    1997-10-15

    A variational optimization (VO) method that requires specification of only one variable in each bin size for condensation and evaporation calculations in an Eulerian drop-size framework is proposed. The method is tested against the exact solution given by the Lagrangian method using more than 15000 spectra selected from experiments with a three-dimensional large eddy simulation model with explicit microphysics. The results show that the VO method not only conserves the integral parameters of the spectrum, such as drop number, mean radius, liquid water content, and the effective radius, but also provides an accurate calculation of the spectrum itself.

  6. Microfabricated wire arrays for Z-pinch. (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated wire arrays for Z-pinch. Microfabrication methods have been applied to the fabrication of wire arrays suitable for use in ...

  7. Spectroscopic properties of colloidal indium phosphide quantum wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Li, Jingbo; Hang, Qingling; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Janes, David B.; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    Colloidal InP quantum wires are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, and passivated with the traditional quantum dots surfactants 1-hexadecylamine and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide. The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to other experimental results for InP quantum dots and wires, and to the predictions of theory. The photoluminescence behavior of the wires is also investigated. Efforts to enhance photoluminescence efficiencies through photochemical etching in the presence of HF result only in photochemical thinning or photo-oxidation, without a significant influence on quantum-wire photoluminescence. However, photo-oxidation produces residual dot and rod domains within the wires, which are luminescent. The results establish that the quantum-wire band gaps are weakly influenced by the nature of the surface passivation, and that colloidal quantum wires have intrinsically low photoluminescence efficiencies.

  8. Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1986-01-01

    A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

  9. Method for fabricating thin californium-containing radioactive source wires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-08-22

    A method for reducing the cross-sectional diameter of a radioactive californium-containing cermet wire while simultaneously improving the wire diameter to a more nearly circular cross section. A collet fixture is used to reduce the wire diameter by controlled pressurization pulses while simultaneously improving the wire cross-sectional diameter. The method is especially suitable for use in hot cells for the production of optimized cermet brachytherapy sources that contain large amounts of radioactive californium-252.

  10. ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance August 23, 2013 - 4:06pm Addthis The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently released a new study on advances in superconducting wire technology. A team led by ORNL's Amit Goyal demonstrated that the ability to control nanoscale imperfections in superconducting wires results in materials with excellent and customized performance. The team's

  11. Continuous On-Line Partial Discharge Monitor for Medium-Voltage Cable Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Fenger

    2005-11-30

    Partial discharge (PD) assessment is one method of detecting cable conditions that predict approaching failure. While not all PDs in cable systems lead to failure, PDs within the cable's insulation can lead to relatively rapid failure. Accordingly, on-line PD assessment may be more useful than periodic PD assessment because the period of partial discharging at the end of a cable's life may be quite short. The research described in this report studied the feasibility of developing an on-line PD monitor for assessing both shielded and unshielded MV cables.

  12. Composite wire microelectrode and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isaacs, H.S.; Aldykiewicz, A.J. Jr.

    1996-12-03

    A composite wire microelectrode for making electro-chemical measurements, and method of making same, are disclosed. The microelectrode includes an inner conductive sensing wire and an outer tube that is oxidized to form a dielectric, self-healing oxide layer around the sensing wire. 4 figs.

  13. Composite wire microelectrode and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Hugh S.; Aldykiewicz, Jr., Antonio J.

    1996-12-03

    A composite wire microelectrode for making electro-chemical measurements, and method of making same. The microelectrode includes an inner conductive sensing wire and an outer tube that is oxidized to form a dielectric, self-healing oxide layer around the sensing wire.

  14. High Strength Gold Wire for Microelectronics Miniaturization - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal High Strength Gold Wire for Microelectronics Miniaturization Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a high strength gold wire for use in microelectronics that can maintain its electrical and mechanical properties while permitting miniaturization of microelectronics design. Description Gold alloy wires currently used in microelectronics have limited electrical and mechanical

  15. Performance of reduced wall EPR insulated medium voltage power cables. Pat 1: Electrical characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinquemani, P.L.; Wen, Y.; Kuchta, F.L.; Doench, C.

    1997-04-01

    Paper insulated lead covered cables (PILC) have had a long and successful heritage. After almost 100 years, this design of cable is still in operation and continues to be manufactured. However, utilities are now looking for a reliable replacement for PILC cables. This is due to two primary reasons: (1) difficulty in installing and maintaining this type of cable and (2) increasing pressure to replace these cables due to environmental concerns. To date diameter limitations of conventional extruded dielectric cables has impeded their replacement in existing PILC conduits. This paper describes a study for the evaluation for reliably reducing the insulation thickness to achieve a lower diameter cable to effectively replace PILC cable in existing conduits. Part 1 of the investigation reviews the theory of insulation wall determination and the test program carried out to evaluate electrical performance of reduced wall EPR cables. Additionally, cable design concepts and constructions are discussed. In Part 2 the mechanical performance on conventional and reduced wall EPR insulated cables are evaluated. This is reported in a separate paper.

  16. Method Of Making A Vacuum-Tight Continuous Cable Feedthrough Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bazizi, Kamel Abdel (St. Louis, MO); Haelen, Thomas Eugene (Rochester, NY); Lobkowicz, Frederick (Penfield, NY); Slattery, Paul Francis (Rochester, NY)

    2001-07-17

    A vacuum-tight cable feedthrough device includes a metallic first flange that is penetrated by a slot. Passing through the slot is a flat stripline cable that includes a plurality of conductive signal channels encompassed by a dielectric material on whose upper and lower surfaces is disposed a conductive material includes a ground. The stripline cable is sealed within the slot to provide a substantially vacuum-tight seal between the cable and the first flange. In a preferred embodiment, the cable feedthrough device includes a plurality, at least 16, of stripline cables. In a further preferred embodiment, the device includes a second flange and a bellows sealably connecting the first and second flanges, thereby providing a substantially vacuum-tight, flexible housing for the plurality of cables.

  17. Load drop evaluation for TWRS FSAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julyk, L.J.; Ralston, G.L.

    1996-09-30

    Operational or remediation activities associated with existing underground high-level waste storage tank structures at the Hanford Site often require the installation/removal of various equipment items. To gain tank access for installation or removal of this equipment, large concrete cover blocks must be removed and reinstalled in existing concrete pits above the tanks. An accidental drop of the equipment or cover blocks while being moved over the tanks that results in the release of contaminants to the air poses a potential risk to onsite workers or to the offsite public. To minimize this potential risk, the use of critical lift hoisting and rigging procedures and restrictions on lift height are being considered during development of the new tank farm Basis for Interim Operation and Final Safety Analysis Report. The analysis contained herein provides information for selecting the appropriate lift height restrictions for these activities.

  18. High density harp or wire scanner for particle beam diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritsche, C.T.; Krogh, M.L.

    1996-05-21

    Disclosed is a diagnostic detector head harp used to detect and characterize high energy particle beams using an array of closely spaced detector wires, typically carbon wires, spaced less than 0.1 cm (0.040 inch) connected to a hybrid microcircuit formed on a ceramic substrate. A method to fabricate harps to obtain carbon wire spacing and density not previously available utilizing hybrid microcircuit technology. The hybrid microcircuit disposed on the ceramic substrate connects electrically between the detector wires and diagnostic equipment which analyzes pulses generated in the detector wires by the high energy particle beams. 6 figs.

  19. High density harp or wire scanner for particle beam diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritsche, Craig T.; Krogh, Michael L.

    1996-05-21

    A diagnostic detector head harp (23) used to detect and characterize high energy particle beams using an array of closely spaced detector wires (21), typically carbon wires, spaced less than 0.1 cm (0.040 inch) connected to a hybrid microcircuit (25) formed on a ceramic substrate (26). A method to fabricate harps (23) to obtain carbon wire spacing and density not previously available utilizing hybrid microcircuit technology. The hybrid microcircuit (25) disposed on the ceramic substrate (26) connects electrically between the detector wires (21) and diagnostic equipment (37) which analyzes pulses generated in the detector wires (21) by the high energy particle beams.

  20. New Technologies for Repairing Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westman, Matthew P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-11

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept for a technique to repair aging cables that have been subjected to degradation associated with long-term thermal and radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. The physical degradation of the aging cables manifests itself primarily as cracking and increased brittleness of the polymeric electrical insulation. Therefore, the proposed cable-repair concept comprises development of techniques to impart a softening agent within the deteriorated polymer insulation jacket so as to regain the ability of the insulation to stretch without failing and possibly to heal existing cracks in the insulation. Our approach is to use commercially available ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) as the relevant test material, demonstrate the adsorption of chemical treatments in the EPR and quantify changes in resulting physical and mechanical properties. EPR cable samples have been thermally treated in air to produce specimens corresponding to the full range of cable age-performance points from new (>350% elongation at break) to end-of-life (<50% elongation at break). The current focus is on two chemical treatments selected as candidates for restoring age-related cable elasticity loss: a rubber plasticizer and a reactive silane molecule. EPR specimens of 200, 150, 100, and 50% elongation at break have been soaked in the candidate chemical treatments and the kinetics of chemical uptake, measured by change in mass of the samples, has been determined. Mechanical properties as a function of aging and chemical treatment have been measured including ultimate tensile strength, tensile modulus at 50% strain, elongation at break, and storage modulus. Dimensional changes with treatment and changes in glass transition temperature were also investigated. These ongoing experiments are expected to provide insight into the physical-chemical nature of the effect of thermal degradation on EPR rejuvenation limits and to advance novel methods for

  1. Method and device for tensile testing of cable bundles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Lawrence M; Ardelean, Emil V; Goodding, James C; Babuska, Vit

    2012-10-16

    A standard tensile test device is improved to accurately measure the mechanical properties of stranded cables, ropes, and other composite structures wherein a witness is attached to the top and bottom mounting blocks holding the cable under test. The witness is comprised of two parts: a top and a bottom rod of similar diameter with the bottom rod having a smaller diameter stem on its upper end and the top rod having a hollow opening in its lower end into which the stem fits forming a witness joint. A small gap is present between the top rod and the larger diameter portion of the bottom rod. A standard extensometer is attached to the top and bottom rods of the witness spanning this small witness gap. When a force is applied to separate the mounting blocks, the gap in the witness expands the same length that the entire test specimen is stretched.

  2. Rework of parylene coated printed wiring assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.O.

    1991-04-01

    This document describes the recommended method for reworking parylene coated Printed Wiring Assemblies (PWAs). Special training is required to successfully rework PWAs that are parylene coated. Parylene coating rework should not be attempted on production units unless successful parylene coating removal has been completed on non-production assemblies. The rework procedures described in this document are recommended for normal parylene rework. Special situations may dictate slight deviation from the methods described herein. 4 figs.

  3. Ferrite insertion at Recycler Flying Wire System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-02-27

    Ferrite rods are installed inside the flying-wire cavity of the Recycler Ring and at entrance and exit beam pipes in order to absorb high-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by the beam. However, these rods may also deteriorate the vacuum pressure of the ring. An investigation is made to analyze the necessity of the ferrite rods at the entrance and exit beam pipes.

  4. METHOD OF MAKING WIRE FUEL ELEMENTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zambrow, J.L.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for making a nuclear reactor fuel element in the form of a uranium-bearing wire clad with zirconium. A uranium bar is enclosed in a zirconium sheath which is coated with an oxide of magnesium, beryllium, or zirconium. The sheathed bar is then placed in a steel tube and reduced to the desired diameter by swaging at 800 to 900 deg C, after which the steel and oxide are removed.

  5. Method for reducing pressure drop through filters, and filter exhibiting reduced pressure drop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sappok, Alexander; Wong, Victor

    2014-11-18

    Methods for generating and applying coatings to filters with porous material in order to reduce large pressure drop increases as material accumulates in a filter, as well as the filter exhibiting reduced and/or more uniform pressure drop. The filter can be a diesel particulate trap for removing particulate matter such as soot from the exhaust of a diesel engine. Porous material such as ash is loaded on the surface of the substrate or filter walls, such as by coating, depositing, distributing or layering the porous material along the channel walls of the filter in an amount effective for minimizing or preventing depth filtration during use of the filter. Efficient filtration at acceptable flow rates is achieved.

  6. Lightweight, flexible, high-performance carbon nanotube cables made by scalable flow coating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mirri, Francesca; Orloff, Nathan D.; Forser, Aaron M.; Ashkar, Rana; Headrick, Robert J.; Bengio, E. Amram; Long, Christian J.; Choi, April; Luo, Yimin; Hight Walker, Angela R.; et al

    2016-01-21

    Coaxial cables for data transmission are ubiquitous in telecommunications, aerospace, automotive, and robotics industries. Yet, the metals used to make commercial cables are unsuitably heavy and stiff. These undesirable traits are particularly problematic in aerospace applications, where weight is at a premium and flexibility is necessary to conform with the distributed layout of electronic components in satellites and aircraft. The cable outer conductor (OC) is usually the heaviest component of modern data cables; therefore, exchanging the conventional metallic OC for lower weight materials with comparable transmission characteristics is highly desirable. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed to replace themore » metal components in coaxial cables; however, signal attenuation was too high in prototypes produced so far. Here, we fabricate the OC of coaxial data cables by directly coating a solution of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid (CSA) onto the cable inner dielectric. This coating has an electrical conductivity that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater than the best CNT OC reported in the literature to date. In conclusion, this high conductivity makes CNT coaxial cables an attractive alternative to commercial cables with a metal (tin-coated copper) OC, providing comparable cable attenuation and mechanical durability with a 97% lower component mass.« less

  7. Aging, Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA), and high potential testing of damaged cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, R.A.; Jacobus, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of high potential testing of cables and to assess the survivability of aged and damaged cables under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. High potential testing at 240 Vdc/mil on undamaged cables suggested that no damage was incurred on the selected virgin cables. During aging and LOCA testing, Okonite ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables with a bonded jacket experienced unexpected failures. The failures appear to be primarily related to the level of thermal aging and the presence of a bonded jacket that ages more rapidly than the insulation. For Brand Rex crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cables, the results suggest that 7 mils of insulation remaining should give the cables a high probability of surviving accident exposure following aging. The voltage necessary to detect when 7 mils of insulation remain on unaged Brand Rex cables is approximately 35 kVdc. This voltage level would almost certainly be unacceptable to a utility for use as a damage assessment tool. However, additional tests indicated that a 35 kvdc voltage application would not damage virgin Brand Rex cables when tested in water. Although two damaged Rockbestos silicone rubber cables also failed during the accident test, no correlation between failures and level of damage was apparent.

  8. Report on full-scale horizontal cable tray fire tests, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riches, W.M.

    1988-09-01

    In recent years, there has been much discussion throughout industry and various governmental and fire protection agencies relative to the flammability and fire propagation characteristics of electrical cables in open cable trays. It has been acknowledged that under actual fire conditions, in the presence of other combustibles, electrical cable insulation can contribute to combustible fire loading and toxicity of smoke generation. Considerable research has been conducted on vertical cable tray fire propagation, mostly under small scale laboratory conditions. In July 1987, the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory initiated a program of full scale, horizontal cable tray fire tests, in the absence of other building combustible loading, to determine the flammability and rate of horizontal fire propagation in cable tray configurations and cable mixes typical of those existing in underground tunnel enclosures and support buildings at the Laboratory. The series of tests addressed the effects of ventilation rates and cable tray fill, fire fighting techniques, and effectiveness and value of automatic sprinklers, smoke detection and cable coating fire barriers in detecting, controlling or extinguishing a cable tray fire. This report includes a description of the series of fire tests completed in June 1988, as well as conclusions reached from the test results.

  9. Riser-cable development for ocean-thermal-energy conversion plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Developmental testing and analysis of OTEC riser cables and component materials has been undertaken. Two full-size riser cables have been manufactured and tested, one using cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulation, the other using self-contained, oil filled (SCOF) insulation. These cables and their components have been subjected to testing which simulates handling and insulation prior to OTEC service, as well as the electrical and mechanical loads predicted in service. Results of testing and analyses to date indicate that the XLPE cable has significant potential in the OTEC riser application. The cable has performed well in mechanical and electrical testing. The results for the SCOF cable are mixed. The SCOF cable collapses due to pressure at depths typical of OTEC service; slippage may occur within the insulation or between the conductor and insulation which could result in early cable failure. Particular attention must be paid to alleviating these problems in future cable design efforts. Implications of these findings for cable and system development are presented for use by OTEC platform designers. These findings are subject to change as additional test data are obtained.

  10. Advanced Diagnostics and Life Estimation of Extruded Dielectric Cable: Nonproprietary Results Related to Cross-Linked Polyethylene and Ethylene Propylene Rubber Insulated Shielded Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Toman

    2006-03-31

    This report describes research on accelerated aging and diagnostic testing of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulation and an earlier test program on ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables. The XLPE research subjected cable specimens to accelerated cable life tests (ACLTs) and assessed the specimens with six nondestructive electrical tests and two destructive tests. The EPR program subjected EPR insulation to a similar accelerated aging protocol but focused on breakdown voltage to assess aging. Objectives ? To correlate advanced diagnostic test data with time-to-failure data as a means of determining the value of each diagnostic test for cable condition assessment and future life predictions (XLPE program) ? To perform accelerated aging tests of EPR insulated cables under various controlled conditions of temperature and voltage stress in a wet environment (EPR program) ? To ascertain the relative influence of temperature and voltage stress on aging (EPR program)