Sample records for drivers rcra scope

  1. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration: Policy vs. practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. (Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)); Wolff, T.A. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overwhelmed with environmental protection documentation requirements, a number of Federal agencies are grappling with the complexities of attempting to integrate'' the documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). While there is some overlap between the general environmental policy objectives of NEPA, and the much more specific waste cleanup objectives of CERCLA and RCRA, there are also major differences and outright conflicts. This paper identifies both problems and opportunities associated with implementing emerging and evolving Federal agency policy regarding integration of the procedural and documentation requirements of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA. The emphasis is on NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration policy and practice at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The paper provides a comparative analysis of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA processes and discusses special integration issues including scoping, development and analysis of alternatives, risk assessment, tiering, scheduling, and the controversy surrounding applicability of NEPA to CERCLA or RCRA cleanup activities. Several NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy options are evaluated and an annotated outline of an integrated NEPA/CERCLA document is included.

  2. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  3. Key regulatory drivers affecting shipments of mixed transuranic waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, P.B.; Bacigalupa, G.A.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Sinkule, B.J. [and others

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of key regulatory drivers affect the nature, scope, and timing of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) plans for mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which are planned to commence as soon as possible following WIPP`s currently anticipated November, 1997 opening date. This paper provides an overview of some of the key drivers at LANL, particularly emphasizing those associated with the hazardous waste component of LANL`s MTRU waste (MTRU, like any mixed waste, contains both a radioactive and a hazardous waste component). The key drivers discussed here derive from the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its amendments, including the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAU), and from the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (NMHWA). These statutory provisions are enforced through three major mechanisms: facility RCRA permits; the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, set forth in the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 4, Part 1: and compliance orders issued to enforce these requirements. General requirements in all three categories will apply to MTRU waste management and characterization activities at both WIPP and LANL. In addition, LANL is subject to facility-specific requirements in its RCRA hazardous waste facility permit, permit conditions as currently proposed in RCRA Part B permit applications presently being reviewed by the New Mexico Environment Department (NNED), and facility-specific compliance orders related to MTRU waste management. Likewise, permitting and compliance-related requirements specific to WIPP indirectly affect LANL`s characterization, packaging, record-keeping, and transportation requirements for MTRU waste. LANL must comply with this evolving set of regulatory requirements to begin shipments of MTRU waste to WIPP in a timely fashion.

  4. RCRA Corrective Action Plan. Interim report (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RCRA Corrective Action Plan (CAP) will assist in the development of Corrective Action Orders (Section 3008(h)) and corrective action requirements in permit applications and permits (Section 3004(u) (v)). The purpose of the CAP is to aid Regions and States in determining and directing the specific work the owner/operator or respondent must perform, as part of a complete corrective action program. The CAP should be used as a technical framework during the development of Corrective Action Orders and corrective action permit regulations. The CAP provides a framework for the development of a site-specific schedule of compliance to be included in a permit or a compliance schedule in a Corrective Action Order. It does so by laying out scopes of work for the three essential phases of a complete corrective action program. These three phases and their objectives are as follows: (1) RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) - to evaluate thoroughly the nature and extent of the release of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents and to gather necessary data to support the Corrective Measure Study; (2) Corrective Measures Study (CMS) - to develop and evaluate a corrective measure alternative or alternatives and to recommend the final corrective measure or measures; and (3) Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI) - to design, construct, operate, maintain and monitor the performance of the corrective measure or measures selected.

  5. SCOPE CHINA SCOPE CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    SCOPE CHINA SCOPE CHINA 92030006 86-351-7010700 86-351-7010700 E-mail: scope #12;SCOPE-ZHONGYU ENvirONmENtal FOrUm 2012 October 11-14, 2012 Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, China Chair of Environmental Development Dr. Shu Sun, Academician, President of SCOPE CAST China Former Vice President

  6. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA statutory overview updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module presents a brief overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It explains the relationship between RCRA statutory language and codified regulatory language. It describes the major components of each subtitle of RCRA and identifies the major provisions established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA).

  7. RCRA corrective action: Work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Information Brief describes the work plans that owners/operators may have to prepare in conjunction with the performance of corrective action for compliance with RCRA guidelines. In general, the more complicated the performance of corrective action appears from the remedial investigation and other analyses, the more likely it is that the regulator will impose work plan requirements. In any case, most owner/operators will prepare work plans in conjunction with the performance of corrective action processes as a matter of best engineering management practices.

  8. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Solid and hazardous waste exclusions (40 cfr section 261.4) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Resources Conservation and Recovery Act`s (RCRA) Subtitle C hazardous waste management program is a comprehensive and carefully constructed system to ensure wastes are managed safely and lawfully. This program begins with a very specific, formal process to categorize wastes accurately and appropriately called waste identification. The module explains each waste exclusion and its scope, so you can apply this knowledge in determining whether a given waste is or is not regulated under RCRA Subtitle C.

  9. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  10. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA statutory overview, updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module presents a brief overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It explains the relationship between RCRA statutory language and codified regulatory language. It describes the major components of each subtitle of RCRA and identifies the major provisions established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA).

  11. Exclusions and exemptions from RCRA hazardous waste regulation. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The provisions in 40 CFR 261 establish which solid waste and are regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Considered hazardous waste and are regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These provisions also exclude or exempt certain wastes from regulation. Wastes are excluded or exempted from coverage for a variety of reasons. The original RCRA legislation excluded a number of wastes that did not present a significant threat to human health or the environment or that were managed under other environmental programs. Other wastes were excluded by EPA to encourage their recycling or reuse as feedstocks in manufacturing processes. Some exclusions or exemptions serve to establish when a waste material becomes subject to regulation or when waste quantities are too minimal to be fully covered by the Federal hazardous waste regulatory program. As new regulations have caused the universe of RCRA generators and facilities to increase, the number of exclusions and exemptions have increased as well. This information Brief provides an overview of the types of waste and hazardous waste management units/facilities that may be excluded or exempted from regulation under the Federal hazardous waste (RCRA) Subtitle C) regulatory program. These wastes and units/facilities may or may not be excluded or exempted from coverage under authorized State RCRA programs.

  12. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PROCESS DESCRIPTION: Temporary storage for non-RCRA regulated laboratory wastes. Storage containers are placed in plastic containment pans. These wastes were generated from...

  13. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA state programs updated June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module outlines the requirements and procedures for a state to become authorized to manage and oversee its own RCRA program. It also describes how the state authorization system can affect the applicability of certain rules. When one has completed the module they will be familiar with the state authorization process for hazardous waste management programs.

  14. The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Law 273.4 The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims (Fall 2006) Units: 3 CCN (2 of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation (2d ed. 2005) Syllabus Class 1 ­ August 22 Claims Based on Common: 1. Miller & Johnston The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation 2. Ch. III, Intro to RCRA

  15. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA enforcement and compliance updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module describes enforcement procedures and cites the statutory authority and describes the two different types of enforcement (i.e., administrative and judicial). It explains when and how EPA can enforce the RCRA regulations in authorized states. It describes the enforcement mechanisms available to EPA. It states the differences between enforcement at interim status and permitted facilities. It describes enforcement at federal facilities and identifies relevant resource documents.

  16. RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Part A Permit Application: Instructions and Form (EPA Form 8700-23) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit...

  17. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 UNIT NAME: S-709-01 DATE: 01192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Room 113 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 1 ft. X 3 ft. FUNCTION: Storage for PCB RCRA hazardous solid and liquid...

  18. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 UNIT NAME: S-409-20 DATE: 1192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: This SWMU is located in the C-409 Building and is upstairs above the RCRA TCLP laboratory. APPROXIMATE...

  19. RCRA corrective action permit requirements and modifications under proposed Subpart S rule. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coalgate, J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective action is required under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Sections 3004(u) and(v) which were added by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to HSWA, the US Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) proposed a comprehensive corrective action program under 40 CFR 264 Subpart S [55 FR 30798, July 27, 1990]. Although Subpart S is still only proposed, it is being implemented by the EPA Regions until the rule is finalized. Proposed Subpart S corrective action applies to releases to any media from any solid waste management unit (SWMU) at a treatment, storage, or disposal facility (TSDF). Corrective action requirements under proposed Subpart S are imposed through permit conditions or, for interim status facilities, through a RCRA Section 3008(h) order. In general, upon initial regulation of a TSDF, the owner or operator submits a Part A permit application, notifying the regulatory agency of waste management activities. The Part A consists of a form containing general information about the facility, the unit(s) affected, and the wastes managed in the units. Part B of the permit application provides detailed information on the facility, the units affected, and the waste managed. The Part B permit application may consist of several volumes of information. Proposed Subpart S requirements, would be contained in the Part B permit application. The Part B permit application proposes requirements and conditions intended to respond to the various RCRA requirements for permitted units. This submittal initiates the negotiation process for regulated SWMUS, whereby the requirements and conditions for unit operation are established. The term of the permit is typically 5 or 10 years, after which a permit renewal or issuance of a new permit is required. This Information Brief provides information on the permit requirements and process under proposed Subpart S.

  20. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA corrective action updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module discusses the regulatory and statutory requirements and authorities governing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action process. There are minimal regulatory requirements at present, but the Agency has issued a proposed rule (55 FR 30798; July 27, 1990) that would establish a comprehensive regulatory framework for implementing the corrective action program. This proposed rule and other guidance developed pursuant to statutory authorities are used to structure corrective action requirements in facility permits and orders. This module describes the current statutory and regulatory structure and discusses the future of the proposed rule.

  1. Tank farm restoration and safe operation, project W-314, upgrade scope summary report (USSR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, R.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revision to the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), incorporates changes to the project scope from Alternative Generation Analysis (AGA), customer guidance, and changing requirements. It defines the actual upgrades currently in scope, and provides traceability to the requirements and/or drivers.

  2. 9. Driver's Age 13. Driver's Date of Birth 14. Driver's Social Security Number 19. Driver's Telephone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    of Accident (city, state; if on a highway, give number and nearest community) DRIVER INFORMATION OTHER VEHICLE OR PROPERTY Occupied Unoccupied 17. Driver's Age VEHICLE OPERATED BY UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEE Occupied Unoccupied 8. Driver's Name 16. Driver's Name TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT NAME AND ADDRESS AREA

  3. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Other laws that interface with RCRA, updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a brief overview of some of the major environmental laws that interface with RCRA: Clean Air Act (CAA); Clean Water Act (CWA); Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Pollution Prevention Act (PPA); and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund). It also covers regulations administered by other agencies that interface with RCRA, such as health and safety requirements under the occupational health and safety administration, and the hazardous materials transportation requirements administered by the Department of Transportation.

  4. Introduction & Scope Model & Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Matthew R.

    Introduction & Scope Principles Model & Calibration Applications Granular Fabric and Stress / papers / ASME07.pdf LATEX #12;Introduction & Scope Principles Model & Calibration Applications Outline 1 Introduction & Scope 2 Principles 3 Model & Calibration 4 Applications Kuhn -- November 12, 2007 http

  5. The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Law 273.4 The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA, RCRA, & Common Law Claims (Fall 2008) Units: 3 CCN (2, The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation (2d ed. 2005) Syllabus Class 1 ­ August 19 Claims on Federal Law: 1. Miller & Johnston The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation 2. Ch. III, Intro

  6. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Solid and hazardous waste exclusions (40 CFR section 261.4) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This module explains each waste exclusion and its scope, so one can apply this knowledge in determining wheather a given waste is or is not regulated under RCRA Subtitle C. It cites the regulatory section for exclusions and identifies materials that are not solid wastes and solid wastes that are not hazardous wastes. It locates the manufacturing process unit exclusion and identifies the sample and treatability study exclusions and their applicability. It outlines and specifies the conditions for meeting the exclusions for household wastes and mixtures of domestic sewage.

  7. An evaluation of the RCRA Subtitle C financial test mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finney, J.R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Atlanta, GA (United States). Region 4; Clark, E.M.; Platt, D.; Johnson, M.F. [PRC Environmental Management, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the financial test mechanism for providing financial assurance for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF), as required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA Subtitle C regulations require that owners and operators of TSDFs demonstrate financial assurance for closure and post-closure care and third-party liability coverage. Such requirements help to ensure that funds are available to pay to properly close TSDFS, to render post-closure care at TSDFS, and to compensate third parties for bodily injuries and property damage caused by sudden or nonsudden releases of pollution related to the TSDFs operations. The paper provides a detailed analysis of the criteria established under RCRA to use the financial test mechanism to demonstrate financial assurance. From a regulator`s point of view, the analysis explores the potential limitations of using the financial test mechanism. The paper also provides recommendations that EPA and state agencies might consider implementing to improve the current regulations.

  8. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL`s assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  9. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  10. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA enforcement and compliance, update as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module describds enforcement procedures and cites the statutory authority. It describes the two different types of enforcement (i.e., administrative and judicial) and explains when and how EPA can enforce the RCRA regulations in authorized states. It describes the enforcement mechanisms available to EPA. It states the differences between enforcement at interim status, permitted facilities, and Federal facilities. It also identifies relevant resources documents.

  11. Driver eye height measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Anthony Daniel

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRIVER EYF HEIGHT MFASHRFMENT A Thesis by ANTHONY DANIEL ABRAHAMSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Hniversity in partial fulfillment oi the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subje"t: Civil... Engineering DRIVER EYE HEIGHT MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ANTHONY DANIEL ABRAHAMSON Approved as to style and content by: I (C irman of Committee) (Member) (Memb er ) Head of Department) December 1978 ABSTRACT Driver. Eye Height Neasurement. (December...

  12. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  13. Introduction & Scope Model & Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Matthew R.

    Introduction & Scope Principles Model & Calibration Applications Bulk Evolution of Fabric.up.edu / kuhn / papers / EMD2007.pdf LATE #12;Introduction & Scope Principles Model & Calibration Applications Outline 1 Introduction & Scope 2 Principles 3 Model & Calibration 4 Applications Kuhn -- June 4, 2007 http

  14. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  15. CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1.

  16. Vehicle Management Driver Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Vehicle Management and Driver Safety Program Manual Facilities & Operations / Finance & Administration Version 2 April 2012 #12;© 2012 University of Alberta. #12;The Vehicle Management and Driver of employment. Driver Acknowledgement I have received the University of Alberta, Vehicle Management and Driver

  17. RCRA corrective action: Action levels and media cleanup standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Information Brief describes how action levels (ALs), which are used to determine if it is necessary to perform a Corrective Measures Study (CMS), and media cleanup standards (MCSs), which are used to set the standards for remediation performed in conjunction with Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI) are set. It is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA Corrective Action. ALs are health-and-environmentally-based levels of hazardous constituents in ground water, surface water, soil, or air, determined to be indicators for protection of human health and the environment. In the corrective action process, the regulator uses ALs to determine if the owner/operator of a treatment, storage, or disposal facility is required to perform a CMS.

  18. Scoping Materials | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NEPA Reading Room SEIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor Scoping Materials Scoping Materials Scoping Meeting Notice Scoping Meeting...

  19. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy for Environmental Restoration Program, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. (International Technology Corp., Englewood, CO (United States))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses an overall strategy for complying with DOE Order 5400.4 which directs that DOE offices and facilities integrate the procedural and documentation requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) wherever practical and appropriate. Integration of NEPA and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) processes is emphasized because RCRA applies to most of the potential release sites at SNL, Albuquerque. NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA precesses are comparatively analyzed and special integration issues are discussed. Three integration strategy options are evaluated and scheduling and budgeting needs are identified. An annotated outline of an integrated project- or site-specific NEPA/RCRA RFI/CMS EIS or EA is included as an appendix.

  20. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Other laws that interface with RCRA, updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a brief overview of some of the major environmental laws that interface with RCRA: Clean Air Act (CAA); Clean Water Act (CWA); Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Pollution Prevention Act (PPA); and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund). It also covers regulations administered by other agencies that interface with RCRA, such as health and safety requirements under the Occupational Health and Safety Administration, and the Hazardous Materials Transportation Requirements administered by the Department of Transportation.

  1. Video Shoot Scope of Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video Shoot Scope of Work, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  2. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with the Baseline Risk Assessment for the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1997-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment of the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin.

  3. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (40 cfr parts 264/265, subparts a-e) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of hazardous waste at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) plays a large and critical role in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulatory scheme. The training module presents an overview of the general TSDF standards found in 40 CFR Parts 264/265, Subparts A through E.

  4. Authorization and Driving History Form The following information will be retained on file by all agencies on their drivers authorized to operate a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    agencies on their drivers authorized to operate a State vehicle, or a private vehicle for state purposes ___________________________________________ Position: Staff_____ Faculty_____ Student_____ Is employee's primary purpose to drive vehicles? Yes_____ No/her private vehicle in the course and scope of employment? Yes_____ No_____ Date of last Driver Training

  5. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  6. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  7. Exiting RCRA Subtitle C regulation data for supporting a new regulatory path for immobilized mixed debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C.L. [Jetseal, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carson, S.D.; Cheng, Wu-Ching [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents analytical and empirical data that provide technical support for the position that mixed debris (debris contaminated with both radioactive and hazardous constituents) treated by immobilization in accordance with 40 CFR 268.45 can exit RCRA Subtitle C requirements at the time the treatment is complete. Pathways analyses and risk assessments of low-level waste and RCRA mixed waste disposal facilities show that these two types of facilities provide equivalent long-term (> 100 years) performance and protection of human health and the environment. A proposed two-tier approach for waste form performance criteria is discussed.

  8. Ventilation technologies scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the needs of California, determining residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and level of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  9. Approaches to enhance driver situational assessment aids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collision warning systems encounter a fundamental trade-off between providing the driver more time in which to respond and alerting the driver unnecessarily. The probability that a driver successfully avoids a hazard ...

  10. RCRA Waste Minimization and Recycling Initiatives at the Health Center (Rev. 12/09)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    RCRA Waste Minimization and Recycling Initiatives at the Health Center 1/11/08 (Rev. 12/09) PURPOSE, with environmentally-sound recycling as a second and higher priority over treatment and disposal. Section 3002(b feasible; pollution that cannot be prevented should be recycled in an environmentally safe manner, whenever

  11. RCRA groundwater monitoring data. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between April and June 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the April through June quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  12. Radiant cooling research scoping study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Timothy; Bauman, Fred; Huizenga, Charlie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    www.Zurn.com PAGE 35 Radiant Cooling Research Scoping Study1988. “Radiant Heating and Cooling, Displacement VentilationHeat Recovery and Storm Water Cooling: An Environmentally

  13. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 cfr part 261) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. It analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of `hazardous waste.` It explains concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the `mixture` and `derived-from` rules, the `contained-in` policy, and the hazardous waste identification rules (HWIR).

  14. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Air emissions standards, updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a regulatory overview of the RCRA air emission standards as they apply to hazardous waste facilities. It outlines the history of RCRA air emission standards as well as the air emission controls required by the standards. It explains the differences between the parts 264/265, Subpart AA BB, CC, air emission standards and summarizes the requirements of each of these Subparts. It identifies the types of units subject to these requirements as well as specific exemptions.

  15. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Permits and interim status (40 cfr part 270) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Owners/operators of facilities that treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste must obtain an operating permit, as required by Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The module presents an overview of the RCRA permitting process and the requirements that apply to TSDFs operating under interim status until a permit is issued. The regulations governing the permit process are found in 40 CFR Parts 124 through 270.

  16. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  17. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  18. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  19. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period July 1, 1991 through September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and 40 CFR 265, Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (EPA 1989). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303 (Ecology 1991). This submittal provides data obtained from groundwater monitoring activities for July 1, 1991 through September 30, 1991. This report contains groundwater monitoring data from Hanford Site groundwater projects. A RCRA network is currently being established at the 100-D Pond. Groundwater chemistry analyses have not yet been performed.

  20. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993.

  1. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and {open_quotes}Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities{close_quotes} (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  2. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between November 20 and February 25, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  3. Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report The Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES),...

  4. Heating System Modernization, Management of Peripheral Scope...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modernization, Management of Peripheral Scope Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Dec 2010 Heating System Modernization, Management of Peripheral Scope Lessons Learned Report, NNSA,...

  5. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dallum, Gregory E. (Livermore, CA); Pratt, Garth C. (Discovery Bay, CA); Haugen, Peter C. (Livermore, CA); Zumstein, James M. (Livermore, CA); Vigars, Mark L. (Livermore, CA); Romero, Carlos E. (Livermore, CA)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  6. EIS-0458: Scoping Meeting Transcript

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of the public scoping meeting on the draft EIS for the proposed loan guarantee for the First Solar Topaz Solar Farm Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA.

  7. Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping Study Generating Resources Advisory Committee 11 to determine potential, and draw conclusions Determine if realistic, reasonable assumption for hydropower at existing non-powered dams, and upgrades at existing hydropower facilities #12;Questions Asked Can

  8. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-602 Laboratory Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure (HWMA/RCRA) Plan for the CPP-602 laboratory lines was developed to meet the tank system closure requirements of the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.008 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 264, Subpart G. CPP-602 is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The lines in CPP-602 were part of a liquid hazardous waste collection system included in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Liquid Waste Management System Permit. The laboratory lines discharged to the Deep Tanks System in CPP-601 that is currently being closed under a separate closure plan. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards. The closure approach for the CPP-602 laboratory lines is to remove the lines, components, and contaminants to the extent practicable. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site CPP-117 includes the CPP-602 waste trench and the area beneath the basement floor where waste lines are direct-buried. Upon completion of rinsing or mopping to remove contamination to the extent practicable from the waste trench and rinsing the intact buried lines (i.e., stainless steel sections), these areas will be managed as part of CERCLA Site CPP-117 and will not be subject to further HWMA/RCRA closure activities. The CPP-602 building is being decontaminated and decommissioned under CERCLA as a non-time critical removal action in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement/Consent Order. As such, all waste generated by this CERCLA action, including closure-generated waste, will be managed in coordination with that CERCLA action in substantive compliance with HWMA/RCRA regulations. All waste will be subject to a hazardous waste determination for the purpose of supporting appropriate management and will be managed in accordance with this plan. ii

  9. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  10. Visualization drivers for Geant4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beretvas, Andy; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is on Geant4 visualization tools (drivers), evaluating pros and cons of each option, including recommendations on which tools to support at Fermilab for different applications. Four visualization drivers are evaluated. They are OpenGL, HepRep, DAWN and VRML. They all have good features, OpenGL provides graphic output without an intermediate file. HepRep provides menus to assist the user. DAWN provides high quality plots and even for large files produces output quickly. VRML uses the smallest disk space for intermediate files. Large experiments at Fermilab will want to write their own display. They should proceed to make this display graphics independent. Medium experiment will probably want to use HepRep because of it's menu support. Smaller scale experiments will want to use OpenGL in the spirit of having immediate response, good quality output and keeping things simple.

  11. HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONVERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper.

  12. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  13. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  14. 4, 615650, 2007 Drivers of storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 615­650, 2007 Drivers of storage water use in Scots pine H. Verbeeck et al. Title Page drivers of storage water use in Scots pine H. Verbeeck1 , K. Steppe2 , N. Nadezhdina3 , M. Op De Beeck1 Correspondence to: H. Verbeeck (hans.verbeeck@ua.ac.be) 615 #12;BGD 4, 615­650, 2007 Drivers of storage water use

  15. Selected Texas Driver Education Instructors’ Feelings About A Driver Education Cultural Awareness Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saint, Nina Jo

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined what items driver education instructors felt should be included in a cultural awareness survey to assess instructors' preparedness to teach a culturally diverse student clientele. In addition, the study examined the ways driver...

  16. Scopes Trial and Fundamentalism in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was the least significant person at the trial. Born in Paducah, Kentucky, Scopes developed a strong interest

  17. Drivers of Future Energy Demand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy :and1. Total3.9Drivers

  18. P5 Science Drivers: Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversight BoardP-GlycoproteiniiiScience Drivers:

  19. Software Support for Improved Driver Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swift, Michael

    .6.23, 2007 esp.c, a serial port driver static int rs_write(struct tty_struct * tty, const unsigned char *buf

  20. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  1. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  2. Construction of a driver-vehicle model and identification of the driver model parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Jemeng

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by , JEMENG SU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requiremr nt for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by JEMENG SU Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe ) / I...

  3. Construction of a driver-vehicle model and identification of the driver model parameters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Jemeng

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by , JEMENG SU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requiremr nt for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by JEMENG SU Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe ) / I...

  4. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations.

  5. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1, 1993 through March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. This quarterly report contains data received between March 8 and May 24, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  6. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 48-acre David Witherspoon, Inc. (DWI) 1630 Site operated as an unregulated industrial landfill and scrap yard. The Tennessee Division of Superfund (TDSF) closed the landfill in 1974. During the period of operation, the site received solid and liquid wastes from salvage and industrial operations. The site consists of five separate tracts of land including a small portion located across the Norfolk Southern Railroad track. The landfill occupies approximately 5 acres of the site, and roughly 20 acres of the 48 acres contains surface and buried debris associated with the DWI dismantling business operation. Beginning in 1968, the state of Tennessee licensed DWI to receive scrap metal at the DWI 1630 Site, contaminated with natural uranium and enriched uranium (235U) not exceeding 0.1 percent by weight (TDSF 1990). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to undertake remedial actions at the DWI 1630 Site as specified under a Consent Order with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) (Consent Order No. 90-3443, April 4, 1991), and as further delineated by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between DOE and the State of Tennessee (MOU Regarding Implementation of Consent Orders, October 6, 1994). The soil and debris removal at the DWI 1630 Site is being performed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. Remediation consists of removing contaminated soil and debris from the DWI 1630 site except for the landfill area and repairing the landfill cap. The DWI 1630 remediation waste that is being disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as defined as waste lot (WL) 146.1 and consists primarily of soils and soil like material, incidental debris and secondary waste generated from the excavation of debris and soil from the DWI 1630 site. The WL 146.1 includes soil, soil like material (e.g., shredded or chipped vegetation, ash), discrete debris items (e.g., equipment, drums, large scrap metal, cylinders, and cable) and populations of debris type items (e.g., piles of bricks, small scrap metal, roofing material, scaffolding, and shelving) that are located throughout the DWI 1630 site. The project also generates an additional small volume of secondary waste [e.g., personal protective equipment (PPE), and miscellaneous construction waste] that is bagged and included in bulk soil shipments to the EMWMF. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF does not allow for material that does not meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs). The waste being excavated in certain areas of the DWI 1630 site contained soil that did not meet RCRA LDR criteria; therefore this waste had to be segregated for treatment or alternate disposal offsite. This document identifies the approach taken by the DWI 1630 project to further characterize the areas identified during the Phase II Remedial Investigation (RI) as potentially containing RCRA-characteristic waste. This document also describes the methodology used to determine excavation limits for areas determined to be RCRA waste, post excavation sampling, and the treatment and disposal of this material.

  7. Driver comprehension of railroad-highway grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messick, Jennifer

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    each year; however, collisions at grade crossings are still a major concern. In order to continue improving safety at grade crossings, driver comprehension and driver attitudes must be investigated. This research investigated driver comprehension...

  8. 9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

  9. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

  10. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  11. RCRA/UST, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 CFR part 261) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. Analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of hazardous waste. It explains the following concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the mixture and derived-from rules, the contained-in policy, and the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule (HWIR).

  12. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Air emission standards (40 cfr parts 264/265, subparts aa, bb, and cc) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a regulatory overview of the RCRA air emission standards as they apply to hazardous waste facilities. It outlines the history of RCRA air emission standards as well as the air emission controls required by the standards. It explains the difference in the parts 264/265 and subparts AA, BB and CC, air emission standards. It summarizes the requirements of each of these subparts and identifies the types of units subject to these requirements as well as specific exemptions.

  13. V-217: Microsoft Windows NAT Driver ICMP Packet Handling Denial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in the Windows NAT Driver PLATFORM: Windows Server 2012 ABSTRACT: This security update resolves a vulnerability in the Windows NAT Driver in Microsoft...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Gate Driver Optimizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gate Driver Optimization for WBG Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Gate Driver Optimization for WBG Applications Presentation given by Oak Ridge National...

  15. Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term? Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape...

  16. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post-closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report.

  18. Drawing driver's attention to potentially dangerous objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurugöl, Orc?un

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drivers often have difficulties noticing potentially dangerous objects due to weather or lighting conditions or when their field of view is restricted. This thesis presents a display method for potentially dangerous objects ...

  19. A Landscape of Driver Mutations in Melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    Despite recent insights into melanoma genetics, systematic surveys for driver mutations are challenged by an abundance of passenger mutations caused by carcinogenic UV light exposure. We developed a permutation-based ...

  20. Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

  1. Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers: AAAAnnnn UpdatedUpdatedUpdatedUpdated Literature ReviewLiterature ReviewLiterature ReviewLiterature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , such as unexpected fluctuations in energy demand, energy prices (e.g., oil, gas, coal) and weather conditions1 Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers: AAAAnnnn the factors that shape the price of carbon, where one European Union Allowance is equal to one ton of CO2

  2. Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Dawn Suzette

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990... Major Subject: Industrial Engineering DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Approved as to style and content by: R. Dale Huchi son (Chair of Committee) Rodger . . ppa (Member) Waymon L ohnston (M er...

  3. Drivers of Commercial Building Operator Skills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domanski, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 Drivers of Commercial Building Operator Skills C&W OVERVIEW C&W SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES GROUP WHAT?S DRIVING THE NEED FOR TRAINING? NECESSARY SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE C&W DEVELOPMENT & TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES International Conference... from: ? Owners/investors 4 DRIVERS ? OWNER/INVESTOR DEMAND ?UN Global Compact / Accenture 2010 CEO survey: ?93% of CEOs believe sustainability is ?critical? ?96% believe should be integrated into core business/operations ?C&W 2011survey...

  4. Phase report 1C, TA-21 operable unit RCRA Facility Investigation, Outfalls Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This phase report summarizes the results of field investigations conducted in 1992 at Technical Area 21 of Los Alamos National Laboratory, as prescribed by the RCRA Facility Investigation work plan for the Technical Area 21 operable unit (also known as OU 1106). This phase report is the last part of a three-part phase report describing the results of field work conducted in 1992 at this operable unit. Phase Report lA, issued on l4 June l993, summarized site geologic characterization activities. Phase report 1B, issued on 28 January 1994, included an assessment of site-wide surface soil background, airborne emissions deposition, and contamination in the locations of two former air filtration buildings. The investigations assessed in Phase Report 1C include field radiation surveys and surface and near-surface sampling to characterize potential contamination at 25 outfalls and septic systems listed as SWMUs in the RFI work plan. Based on the RFI data, it is recommended that no further action is warranted for 8 SWMUs and further action is recommended for 3 SWMUs addressed in this phase report. For 14 SWMUs which represent no immediate threat to human health or environment, deferral of further action/no further action decisions is recommended until outstanding analytical data are received, sampling of adjacent SWMUs is completed, or decisions are made about the baseline risk assessment approach.

  5. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  6. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  7. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  8. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 20 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring projects and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Most of the projects no longer receive dangerous waste; a few projects continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 20 RCRA projects comprise 30 waste management units. Ten of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration, distribution, and rate of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect contamination, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1992 and September 1993. Recent groundwater quality is also described for the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas and for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides.

  9. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  10. Results of RCRA groundwater quality assessment program at the 216-U-12 crib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, B.A.; Chou, C.J.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 216-U-12 crib has been in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) interim-status groundwater quality assessment program since the first quarter of 1993. Specific conductance measured in downgradient wells 299-W22-41 and 299-W22-42 exceeds its critical mean. This report presents the results and findings of Phases I and II of the assessment monitoring program, as required by 40 CFR 265.93. The elevated levels of specific conductance in the downgradient {open_quotes}triggering{close_quotes} wells are attributed to nitrate, the mobile anion released when nitric acid is diluted in water, and calcium which is released from the sediments as acid is neutralized. Technetium-99 levels have been elevated in these same downgradient wells since 1991. The source of these constituents is the 216-U-12 crib. Downward migration of nitrate and technetium-99 from the vadose zone (and continued elevated specific conductance in the two downgradient wells) is still occurring because the driving force is still present.

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  12. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

  13. Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: The Effect of Modality and Level of Assistance on Driver Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: The Effect of Modality and Level of Assistance on Driver¨ucken, Germany christian.mueller@dfki.de ABSTRACT Local danger warning is an important function of Advanced presentation) is particularly crucial to a successful danger avoidance. We present a user study investigating

  14. EIS-0429: Scoping Meeting Transcript, 12/3/2009 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1232009 EIS-0429: Scoping Meeting Transcript, 1232009 Indiana Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Rockport, IN and CO2 Pipeline Public Scoping Meeting - 12...

  15. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22, 2002-July 22, 2002 Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22,...

  16. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  17. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  18. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: State programs, updated as July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module outlines the requirements and procedures for a state to become authorized for the RCRA program. It describes how the State Authorization System can affect the applicability of certain rules, specifies why states are authorized by EPA and lists the elements of an authorized state program. It outlines the delegation process and identifies components of an authorization application. It specifies the applicability of hazardous and solid waste amendments (HSWA) and non-HSWA provisions in authorized and unauthorized states and defines and provides the citation for the cluster rule.

  19. Fall Semiannual Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. F. Gianotto

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  20. Detection of Driver Fatigue Caused by Sleep Deprivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Joseph F.

    This paper aims to provide reliable indications of driver drowsiness based on the characteristics of driver-vehicle interaction. A test bed was built under a simulated driving environment, and a total of 12 subjects ...

  1. Evaluation of teenage driver understanding of traffic control devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Garry Lee

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research documents the evaluation of teenage graphics. drivers with regards to their understanding of 53 traffic control devices. A multiple choice survey was developed and administered to a group of teenage drivers between 15 and 18 years...

  2. Solar Supply Chain and Market Driver Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Nicholas 1990-

    2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to explore the evolution of the photovoltaic supply chain in the United States and the drivers which foster growth of the solar market. The study will gather knowledge on the growth of the solar market and roles of different firms...

  3. MOTOR VEHICLE USE PROGRAM DRIVER SAFETY TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOTOR VEHICLE USE PROGRAM DRIVER SAFETY TIPS Observe Speed Limits and Traffic Laws ­ Allow - Employees who drive Institute or privately owned vehicles on Institute business must possess and carry person. Insurance - Employees who operate their privately owned vehicles on Institute business shall

  4. Commercial Building Energy Alliance Exterior Lighting Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael

    2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a scoping study about challenges and energy saving potential regarding exterior lighting.

  5. ScopingStudyReport-AppxC-Homework-013105.doc -1 -DEMAND RESPONSE RESEARCH CENTER SCOPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ScopingStudyReport-AppxC-Homework-013105.doc - 1 - DEMAND RESPONSE RESEARCH CENTER SCOPING STUDYStudyReport-AppxC-Homework-013105.doc - 2 - Preparing for the Roundtable Session (HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT) The PIER Demand Response that advances the near-term adoption of Demand Response technologies, policies, programs, strategies

  6. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR {section}261.4(a)(4), ``Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,`` as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues.

  7. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Groundwater monitoring (40 cfr parts 264/265, subpart f) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module presents the requirements for groundwater monitoring at interim status and permitted treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The goal of the module is to explain the standards and specific requirements for groundwater monitoring programs at interim status and permitted facilities.

  8. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

  9. Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Dawn Suzette

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Industrial Engineering DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Approved as to style and content by: R. Dale Huchi son (Chair of Committee) Rodger . . ppa (Member) Waymon L ohnston (M er... assessment of automotive industry practices in 1971 and concluded that only 50% of controls/displays on various models could be said to have a common location. Perel (1974) reviewed prior research and found that it would be difficult to pinpoint...

  10. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  11. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  12. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Municipal solid waste disposal facility criteria updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a summary of the regulatory criteria for municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) and provides the statutory authority under RCRA and the Clean Water Act (CWA) directing EPA to develop the MSWLF criteria in 40 CFR Part 258. It gives the part 258 effective date and the compliance dates for providing demonstrations to satisfy individual regulatory requirements. It identifies the types of facilities that qualify for the small landfill exemption. It explains the requirements of each subpart of part 258 as they apply to states with EPA-approved MSWLF permit programs and states without approved permit programs. It compares the MSWLF environmental performance standards described in part 258 to the corresponding requirements for hazardous waste TSDFs in part 264, which are generally more stringent.

  13. RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pamela R. Cunningham

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

  14. Transmission-Planning Research & Development Scoping Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -99-013 Prepared For: Linda Kelly, Project Manager Energy Systems Integration Program Laurie ten Hope, PIER ProgramTransmission-Planning Research & Development Scoping Project CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION, California Institute for Energy and the Environment under Contract No. 500-99-013 and by the U.S. Department

  15. Laser Safety Manual Scope and Applicability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Laser Safety Manual Scope and Applicability This manual applies to all personnel working at or visiting ASU who procure or utilize Class III and Class IV lasers and laser systems. Procurement and user of Class I and Class II laser equipment, such as laser pointers and compact disk players, do not normally

  16. Hydropower Potential Scoping Study Gauging Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/19/2013 1 Hydropower Potential Scoping Study ­ Gauging Interest Generating Resources Advisory and associated technologies. ­ Hydropower upgrades, new hydropower projects 2 Purpose Develop a hydro supply curve to determine the hydropower development potential in the NW region ­ Council's Seventh Power Plan

  17. Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC...

  18. Energy Efficiency Post-2011 Review Scoping Document and Process...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FINALDRAFT: January 7December 6, 2013, 2014 1 Energy Efficiency Post-2011 Review Scoping Document and Process Approach NOTE TO READER: The September 16 th version of the scoping...

  19. Energy Efficiency Post-2011 Review Scoping Document and Process...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FINAL: January 7, 2014 1 Energy Efficiency Post-2011 Review Scoping Document and Process Approach NOTE TO READER: The September 16 th version of the scoping document has been...

  20. Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, Lee; Szilagyi, Bela [Theoretical Astrophysics 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new gauge driver is introduced for the generalized harmonic (GH) representation of Einstein's equation. This new driver allows a rather general class of gauge conditions to be implemented in a way that maintains the hyperbolicity of the combined evolution system. This driver is more stable and effective and, unlike previous drivers, allows stable evolutions using the dual-frame evolution technique. Appropriate boundary conditions for this new gauge driver are constructed, and a new boundary condition for the 'gauge' components of the spacetime metric in the GH Einstein system is introduced. The stability and effectiveness of this new gauge driver are demonstrated through numerical tests, which impose a new damped-wave gauge condition on the evolutions of single black-hole spacetimes.

  1. Regulatory Drivers | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberg and SondershausenRegulatory Drivers In July 7,

  2. Analyzing Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  3. analysis identifies driver: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    et al. 2010 Invasive sensors to monitor physiological signals EEG, ECG, pulse@utdallas.edu MSP - CRSS Long-Term Goal: Monitoring Driver Behavior 5 "%"&'(...

  4. aged drivers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    et al. 2010 Invasive sensors to monitor physiological signals EEG, ECG, pulse@utdallas.edu MSP - CRSS Long-Term Goal: Monitoring Driver Behavior 5 "%"&'(...

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.

  6. RCRA closure plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk- In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1987, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval. TDEC modified and issued the plan approved on September 30, 1987. Subsequently, this plan was modified again and approved as Y/TS-395, Revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (February 29, 1988). Y/TS-395 was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits of BCBG. However, a concept was developed to include the B Area (non-RCRA regulated) in the Walk-In Pits so that both areas would be closed under one cap. This approach included a tremendous amount of site preparation with an underlying stabilization base of 16 ft of sand for blast protection. The plan was presented to the state of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. This amended closure plan goes further to include inspection and maintenance criteria along with other details.

  7. CLAIMANT AUTO ACCIDENT REPORT For Completion by Driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    CLAIMANT AUTO ACCIDENT REPORT For Completion by Driver D E P A R T M E N T O F A D M I N I S T R Address City State Zip For what purpose was car being used at time of accident? Has damage been repaired signals did you give? Other Driver? Who investigated? Who Cited and Why? Describe Accident CONTINUE

  8. Ris Energy Report 5 Global drivers for transformation of energy systems 3 Global drivers for transformation of energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of greenhouse gases has brought a new political rationale for the development of more climate-friendly energy in the global energy market of rapidly-expanding national economies, notably China and India. TogetherRisø Energy Report 5 Global drivers for transformation of energy systems 3 Global drivers

  9. Nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, David M.; Hoff, Brad W.; Tang Wilkin; Heidger, Susan; Shiffler, Don [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Allen-Flowers, Jordan [Program in Applied Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gated field emission cathodes can provide short electron pulses without the requirement of laser systems or cathode heating required by photoemission or thermionic cathodes. The large electric field requirement for field emission to take place can be achieved by using a high aspect ratio cathode with a large field enhancement factor which reduces the voltage requirement for emission. In this paper, a cathode gate driver based on the output pulse train from a nonlinear transmission line is experimentally demonstrated. The application of the pulse train to a tufted carbon fiber field emission cathode generates short electron pulses. The pulses are approximately 2 ns in duration with emission currents of several mA, and the train contains up to 6 pulses at a frequency of 100 MHz. Particle-in-cell simulation is used to predict the characteristic of the current pulse train generated from a single carbon fiber field emission cathode using the same technique.

  10. Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    primary directions, speed consistency and driver workload. Speed consistency consists of analyzing predicted speeds on a highway and striving to keep those speeds within a narrow range. Several major research studies have provided methodologies... participating in the Texas Department of Transportation's Masters in Civil Engineering (MSCE) program, and performed the research that formed the basis for this report under the auspices of the Texas Transportation Institute. The data used as a basis...

  11. REBUILD AMERICA PROGRAM SCOPE OF WORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Brown; Bruce Exstrum

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities carried out by Aspen Systems Corporation in support of the Department of Energy's Rebuild America program during the period from October 9, 1999 to October 31, 2004. These activities were in accordance with the Scope of Work contained in a GSA MOBIS schedule task order issued by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report includes descriptions of activities and results in the following areas: deployment/delivery model; program and project results; program representative support activities; technical assistance; web site development and operation; business/strategic partners; and training/workshop activities. The report includes conclusions and recommendations. Five source documents are also provided as appendices.

  12. Paducah Cleanup Scope | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMakeEducation ProgramsTourPPPO WebsiteCommunity OutreachScope

  13. Portsmouth Remediation Scope | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613Portsmouth Site » Portsmouth Community Outreach » PortsmouthRemediation Scope

  14. Scoping Materials | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis andBHoneywell9/%2ARequest|Scoping Materials |

  15. DOE Issues Request for Information for Scope Requirements Planning...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    with successfully completing this type of work scope, which includes items such engineering services and environmental consulting services. The type of contract, period of...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Final CLWR SEIS PUBLIC SCOPING PRESENTATION...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Statement for the Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Commercial Light Water Reactor Public Scoping Meeting October 20 2011 October 20, 2011...

  17. Case Studies and Computing: Broadening the scope of statistical education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Deborah

    Case Studies and Computing: Broadening the scope of statistical education Deborah Nolan University theoretical statis- tics course. Sixty students enrolled in this course, including graduate students

  18. Public Scoping for Preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0 Public Scoping for Preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Deepwater........................................................................................................................................1 III. Natural Resources Damage Assessment..........................................................................................................................7 VIII. Environmental Consequences of Restoration Types

  19. An Optimization Framework for Driver Feedback Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL; Aguilar, Juan P. [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern vehicles have sophisticated electronic control units that can control engine operation with discretion to balance fuel economy, emissions, and power. These control units are designed for specific driving conditions (e.g., different speed profiles for highway and city driving). However, individual driving styles are different and rarely match the specific driving conditions for which the units were designed. In the research reported here, we investigate driving-style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy and construct an optimization framework to optimize individual driving styles with respect to these driving factors. In this context, we construct a set of polynomial metamodels to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. Then, we compare the optimized driving styles to the original driving styles and evaluate the effectiveness of the optimization framework. Finally, we use this proposed framework to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in response to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  20. FFAG ACCELERATOR PROTON DRIVER FOR NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO, A.

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the summary of a conceptual study of a Proton Driver for Neutrino Factory based on the use of a Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) Accelerator. The required proton energy range for an optimum neutrino production is 5 to 12 GeV. This can be accomplished with a group of three concentric rings each with 807 m circumference [1]. FFAG Accelerators [2] have the capability to accelerate charged particles over a large momentum range ({+-}30-50%) and the feature of constant bending and focusing fields. Particles can be accelerated very fast at the rate given by the accelerating field of RF cavities placed in proper locations between magnets. The performance of FFAG accelerators is to be placed between that of Super-Conducting Linear Accelerators (SCL), with which they share the fast acceleration rate, and Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS), as they allow the beam to re-circulate over fewer revolutions. Brookhaven National Laboratory is involved in the study of feasibility of FFAG Accelerators to accelerate intense beams of protons in the GeV energy range for a variety of applications the most important of which is the Upgrade of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) with a new FFAG injector [3] accelerating from 400 MeV to 1.5 GeV. The ring would be housed in the AGS tunnel and has henceforth a circumference of 807 m.

  1. Threat assessment design for driver assistance system at intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoude, Georges

    This paper considers the decision-making problem for a human-driven vehicle crossing a road intersection in the presence of other, potentially errant, drivers. Our approach relies on a novel threat assessment module, which ...

  2. active gate driver: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chip for SiC FET-driver chip is intended to drive SiC power FETs in DC-DC converters in a hybrid electric vehicle Tolbert, Leon M. 7 Current Balancing Control for Parallel...

  3. A Retroreflective Sheeting Selection Technique for Nighttime Drivers' Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulus, Susan C.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the author developed a retroreflective sheeting selection technique for traffic signs. Previous research was used to determine the luminance needed by drivers (demand luminance). The author used roadways scenarios to determine...

  4. Visual Attention and Driver Performance at Horizontal Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brimley, Bradford K.

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the frequency with which drivers encounter curves on highways, curves are regularly identified as locations that experience disproportionately high crash rates. Crash data suggest that inattention is one of the leading causes of crashes...

  5. ambulance drivers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: BGD 9, 14437-14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from...

  6. Your Role as a Jefferson Lab Fleet Vehicle Driver | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Your Role as a Jefferson Lab Fleet Vehicle Driver Responsibility Number One - Safe Driving As a vehicle operator, it is up to you to drive safely and sensibly to avoid crashes. The...

  7. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  8. Look-ahead Driver Feedback and Powertrain Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Rajeev

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial medium and heavy vehicles, though only a small portion of total vehicle population, play a significant role in energy consumption. In 2012, these vehicles accounted for about 5775.5 trillion btu of energy consumption and 408.8 million tons of CO2 emissions annually, which is a quarter of the total energy burden of highway transportation in the United States [1]. This number is expected to surpass passenger car fuel use within the next few decades. In the meantime, most commercial vehicle fleets are running at a very low profit margin. It is a wellknown fact that fuel economy can vary significantly between drivers, even when they operate the same vehicle on the same route. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Natural Resource Canada (NRCan), there is up to 35% fuel economy difference between drivers within the same commercial fleet [2] [3], [4]. Similar results were obtained from a Field Operation Test conducted by Eaton Corporation [5]. During this test as much as 30% fuel economy difference was observed among pick-up-and-delivery drivers and 11% difference was observed among line-haul drivers. The driver variability can be attributed to the fact that different drivers react differently to driving conditions such as road grade, traffic, speed limits, etc. For instance, analysis of over 600k miles of naturalistic heavy duty truck driving data [5] indicates that an experienced driver anticipates a downhill and eases up on the throttle to save fuel while an inexperienced driver lacks this judgment.

  9. Alternative highway sign alphabet styles for older drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Carol Hannah

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ALTERNATIVE HIGHWAY SIGN ALPHABET STYLES FOR OLDER DRIVERS A Thesis by Carol Hannah Tan Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... (Member) Jame T. . Yao (Head of partment) May 1991 ABSTRACT Alternative Highway Sign Alphabet Styles for Older Drivers. (May 1991) Carol Hannah Tan, B. S. , Texas A8 M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Daniel B. Farnbro In the United...

  10. Driver tension responses generated by various levels of intersection illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Weldon Clifford

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRIVER TENSION RESPONSES GENERATED BY VARIOUS LEVELS OF INTERSECTION ILLUMINATION A Thesis By WELDON CLIFFORD FRANKLIN Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1962 Major Subj ect: Civil Engineering DRIVER TENSION RESPONSES GENERATED BY VARIOUS LEVELS OF INTERSECTION ILLUMINATION A Thesis By WELDON CLIFFORD FRANKLIN Approved as to style and content by...

  11. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste incinerators (40 cfr parts 264/265, subpart o) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module introduces the concept of burning hazardous wastes in units regulated under RCRA and outlines the requirements for one type of device - the incinerator. It explains what an incinerator is and how incinerators are regulated, and states the conditions under which an owner/operator may be exempt from subpart O. It defines principal organic hazardous constituent (POHC) and describes the criteria under which a POHC is selected. It defines destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) and describes the interaction between compliance with performance standards and compliance with incinerator operating conditions established in the permit. It defines and explains the purpose of a `trial burn`.

  12. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Containers (40 cfr parts 264/265, subpart i; section 261.7) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module reviews two sets of regulatory requirements for containers: requirements that pertain to the management of hazardous waste containers and regulations governing residues of hazardous waste in empty containers. It defines `container` and `empty container` and provides examples and citations for each. It provides an overview of the requirements for the design and operation of hazardous waste containers. It explains the difference between the container standards set out in part 264 and part 265. It states the requirements for rendering a hazardous waste container `RCRA empty`. It explains when container rinsate must be managed as a hazardous waste.

  13. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste incinerators (40 CFR parts 264/265, subpart O) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module introduces the concept of burning hazardous wastes in units regulated under RCRA and outlines the requirements for one type of device - the incinerator. It explains what an incinerator is and how incinerators are regulated and states the conditions under which an owner/operator may be exempt from Subpart O. It defines principal organic hazardous constituent (POHC) and describes the criteria under which a POHC is selected and defines destruction and removal efficiency (DRE). It describes the interaction between compliance with performance standards and compliance with incinerator operating conditions established in the permit. It also defines and explains the purpose of a trial burn.

  14. On-Line Transient Stability Assessment Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On-Line Transient Stability Assessment Scoping Study Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering PSERC #12;Power Systems Engineering Research Center On-Line Transient Stability Assessment Scoping Study With the increase in transactions on the bulk power system, there is a critical need to determine transient security

  15. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  16. Borehole Data Package for RCRA Well 299-W22-47 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX in fiscal year (FY) 2005 to fulfill commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for the new well, well 299-W22-47, was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/ Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, spectral gamma ray logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, aquifer testing, and sample collection/analysis activities. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets, the Well Construction Summary Report, the geologist's Borehole Log, well development and pump installation records, and well survey results. Appendix B contains analytical results from groundwater samples collected during drilling. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma ray logs and borehole deviation surveys.

  17. Combination RCRA groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX cribs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, J.W.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a groundwater quality assessment monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements for three RCRA sites in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area: 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 cribs (PUREX cribs). The objectives of this monitoring plan are to combine the three facilities into one groundwater quality assessment program and to assess the nature, extent, and rate of contaminant migration from these facilities. A groundwater quality assessment plan is proposed because at least one downgradient well in the existing monitoring well networks has concentrations of groundwater constituents indicating that the facilities have contributed to groundwater contamination. The proposed combined groundwater monitoring well network includes 11 existing near-field wells to monitor contamination in the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the PUREX cribs. Because groundwater contamination from these cribs is known to have migrated as far away as the 300 Area (more than 25 km from the PUREX cribs), the plan proposes to use results of groundwater analyses from 57 additional wells monitored to meet environmental monitoring requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 to supplement the near-field data. Assessments of data collected from these wells will help with a future decision of whether additional wells are needed.

  18. amine-directed hydroboration scope: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    process simulator scoping study Mike Walkden March 2005 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 73 12;1 Coastal process simulator scoping study Dr Mike...

  19. EIS-0407: Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Refinery Project near Hugoton, Kansas Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the...

  20. EIS-0385: Notice to Extend the Public Scoping Period and Reschedule...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Extend the Public Scoping Period and Reschedule Public Scoping Meetings Strategic Petroleum Reserve Due to the extraordinary circumstances created by Hurricane Katrina in the...

  1. Cementitious waste option scoping study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

  2. Analyzing Vehicle Fuel Saving Opportunities through Intelligent Driver Feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driving style changes, e.g., improving driver efficiency and motivating driver behavior changes, could deliver significant petroleum savings. This project examines eliminating stop-and-go driving and unnecessary idling, and also adjusting acceleration rates and cruising speeds to ideal levels to quantify fuel savings. Such extreme adjustments can result in dramatic fuel savings of over 30%, but would in reality only be achievable through automated control of vehicles and traffic flow. In real-world driving, efficient driving behaviors could reduce fuel use by 20% on aggressively driven cycles and by 5-10% on more moderately driven trips. A literature survey was conducted of driver behavior influences, and pertinent factors from on-road experiments with different driving styles were observed. This effort highlighted important driver influences such as surrounding vehicle behavior, anxiety over trying to get somewhere quickly, and the power/torque available from the vehicle. Existing feedback approaches often deliver efficiency information and instruction. Three recommendations for maximizing fuel savings from potential drive cycle improvement are: (1) leveraging applications with enhanced incentives, (2) using an approach that is easy and widely deployable to motivate drivers, and (3) utilizing connected vehicle and automation technologies to achieve large and widespread efficiency improvements.

  3. EC Driver - 41" Stroke Hydraulic Cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaques, A.; /Fermilab

    1990-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It was decided to use a hydraulic cylinder resting on the floor of the argon spill trough in the EC carriage to drive the EC's motion on the center beam. Space was limited due to the spill bellows and their required support and containment system. The 0.0. of the cylinder had to be limited to 3 to 3-1/2 inches, maximum. The weight of a wet EC and carriage is estimated to be 320 tons. The rolling coefficient of friction of the Tychoway rollers chosen to guide the EC and carriage along the hardened centerbeam ways is claimed to be less than 0.0025. The driver will also need to overcome the forces produced by moving (rotating) the numerous bayonets located at the top of the cryostats in the many piping systems. These forces were conservatively estimated at 1000 lbs. The drive force required to overcome these forces was then calculated to be: 320(2,000) x 0.0025 + 1,000 = 2.600 lbs. (min. required). Due to the uncertainty in the actual roller coefficient of friction and the various unknowns in estimating the resistive forces contained in the piping and cabling systems attached to the cryostat, a conservative design factor of 5 was chosen. This should account for any uncertainty in our estimation of the minimum required drive force and also leaves us with a reserve to fall back on in case any unforeseen problems might arise. Thus the desired capacity of the driver was set at: (2,600) x 5 = 13,000 lbs. (design capacity). Assuming a 3 inch O.D. cylinder with a 1/2 inch wall (2 inch bore), we first analyzed a 1-3/8 inch diameter piston rod. Using Shigley & Mischke's 'Mechanical Engineering Design' (5th Ed.) and it's formulas for long columns with central loading, it was determined that a 1-3/8 inch diameter rod would not suffice, given our safety factor of 2. Increasing the piston rod diameter to 1-1/2 inches proved to be sufficient. The maximum allowable load came out to be approximately 17,000 lbs., which is greater than the 13,000 lbs. design capacity. With a 1-1/2 inch rod, a 2 inch bore and 10,000 psi capacity, the maximum return (retraction) force is: ({pi}/4)(2{sup 2}-1.52) x (10,000) = 13,744 lbs. (return force). This meets the desired design capacity of the cylinder. On the extension of the cylinder, the pressure will be limited such to produce only the 13,000 lb. design capacity. Through the use of a regulator on the cylinder extension inlet, the pressure will be limited to: 13,000/[({pi}/4)(2){sup 2}] {approx_equal} 4,200 psi. (regulator setting) and 4,200 x ({pi}/4)(2){sup 2} = 13,195 lbs. (thrust force). Another reference used by some Fermi engineers in designing hydraulic cylinders is the 'Design Engineers Handbook', Bulletin 0224-B1 published by the Parker-Hannifin Corporation. The piston rod-stroke selection table on page b-5 is used to determine the stroke factor. Our setup most approximates Case II of the table which gives a stroke factor of 0.70. Multiplying this by the actual stroke (41-inch) gives us a basic length of 28.7-inch. Using the piston rodstroke selection graph on page b-6, the 1-1/2 inch rod and 28.7-inch basic length indicate an allowable thrust of approximately 13,000 lbs. According to the Chief Application Engineer at the Parker-Hannifin regional sales office in Des Plaines, IL, a min imum safety factor of 4 can be assumed in the piston rod-stroke selection graph, possibly even higher. This would be at least twice as high as our initial safety factor of 2. Thus we feel our cylinder design falls well within the acceptable region of this reference.

  4. Radiological Scoping Survey of the Scotia Depot, Scotia, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E. N.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the radiological scoping survey were to collect adequate field data for use in evaluating the radiological condition of Scotia Depot land areas, warehouses, and support buildings.

  5. 5 Inventory 5.1.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    154 5 Inventory 5.1.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope The intent of the Inventory section, wildlife, and ecosystem resources. The third section is an inventory of past and ongoing restoration

  6. BodyScope: A Wearable Acoustic Sensor for Activity Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    , speaking, laughing, and coughing. The F-measure of the Support Vector Machine classification of 12 of activities (e.g., eating, drinking, speaking, laughing and coughing) with BodyScope reveals that the system

  7. Patent Scope and Innovation in the Software Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    Patent Scope and Innovation in the Software Industry Julie E. Cohen Mark A. Lemley Table.................................................................................................4 I. Software Patents: History, Practice, and Theory .....................................7 A. History: The Section 101 Patentability Debate..............................8 B. Practice: Anything Goes

  8. Scope for industrial applications of production scheduling models and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    ERP Level 4 MES / CPM Production & Control Level 3 Control systems/sensors (DCS, PLC, SCADA, BMS management, planning, scheduling, quality control, recipe management, setpoint definition, integrationScope for industrial applications of production scheduling models and solution methods Iiro

  9. Plans for a proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kephart, R.D.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last several years, stunning experimental results have established that neutrinos have nonzero masses and substantial mixing. The Standard Model must be extended to accommodate neutrino mass terms. The observation that neutrino masses and mass splittings are all many orders of magnitude smaller than those of any of the other fundamental fermions suggests radically new physics, perhaps originating at the GUT or Planck Scale, or perhaps the existence of new spatial dimensions. In some sense we know that the Standard Model is broken, but we don't know how it is broken. Whatever the origin of the observed neutrino masses and mixing, it is likely to require a profound extension to our picture of the physical world. The first steps in understanding this revolutionary new physics are to pin down the measurable parameters and to address the next round of basic questions: (1) Are there only three neutrino flavors, or do light, sterile neutrinos exist? (2) If there are only three generations, there is one angle ({theta}{sub 13}) in the mixing matrix that is unmeasured. How large is it? (3) Which of the two possible orderings of the neutrino mass eigenstates applies? (4) If {theta}{sub 13} is large enough one it may be possible to measure the quantum-mechanical phase {delta}. If {theta}{sub 13} and {delta} are non-zero there will be CP violation in the lepton sector. These questions can be addressed by accelerator based neutrino oscillation experiments. The answers will guide our understanding of what lies beyond the Standard Model, and whether the new physics provides an explanation for the baryon asymmetry of the Universe (via leptogenesis), or provides deep insight into the connection between quark and lepton properties (via Grand Unified Theories), or perhaps leads to an understanding of one of the most profound questions in physics: Why are there three generations of quarks and leptons? The answers may well further challenge our picture of the physical world, and will certainly have important implications for our understanding of cosmology and the evolution of the early Universe. The current Fermilab Program is an important part of the world-wide accelerator based effort to explore and understand the physics of neutrino oscillations. By early 2005, with both MINOS and MiniBooNE taking data, Fermilab will be able to answer some of the most pressing first-round questions raised by the discovery that neutrinos have mass. Fermilab's high-intensity neutrino beams are derived from 8- and 120-GeV proton beams. MiniBooNE is currently taking data using 8 GeV Protons from the Booster. The 120 GeV NuMI beam will start to operate in early 2005 using a 0.25 MW proton beam power from the Main Injector. Future neutrino programs will build on these existing facilities. New short and long baseline experiments have been proposed. There are proposals to increase the available number of protons at 8 and 120 GeV with the goal of addressing the full range of questions presented by neutrino oscillations. Key to that vision is a new intense proton source that usually is referred to as the Proton Driver.

  10. Automated diagnostics scoping study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quadrel, R.W.; Lash, T.A.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Automated Diagnostics Scoping Study was to investigate the needs for diagnostics in building operation and to examine some of the current technologies in automated diagnostics that can address these needs. The study was conducted in two parts. In the needs analysis, the authors interviewed facility managers and engineers at five building sites. In the technology survey, they collected published information on automated diagnostic technologies in commercial and military applications as well as on technologies currently under research. The following describe key areas that the authors identify for the research, development, and deployment of automated diagnostic technologies: tools and techniques to aid diagnosis during building commissioning, especially those that address issues arising from integrating building systems and diagnosing multiple simultaneous faults; technologies to aid diagnosis for systems and components that are unmonitored or unalarmed; automated capabilities to assist cause-and-effect exploration during diagnosis; inexpensive, reliable sensors, especially those that expand the current range of sensory input; technologies that aid predictive diagnosis through trend analysis; integration of simulation and optimization tools with building automation systems to optimize control strategies and energy performance; integration of diagnostic, control, and preventive maintenance technologies. By relating existing technologies to perceived and actual needs, the authors reached some conclusions about the opportunities for automated diagnostics in building operation. Some of a building operator`s needs can be satisfied by off-the-shelf hardware and software. Other needs are not so easily satisfied, suggesting directions for future research. Their conclusions and suggestions are offered in the final section of this study.

  11. BEAM SIMULATIONS USING VIRTUAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DRIVER LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. York; X. Wu; Q. Zhao

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    End-to-end beam simulations for the driver linac have shown that the design meets the necessary performance requirements including having adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances. However, to achieve reliable operational performance, the development of appropriate beam diagnostic systems and control room procedures are crucial. With limited R&D funding, beam simulations provide a cost effective tool to evaluate candidate beam diagnostic systems and to provide a critical basis for developing early commissioning and later operational activities. We propose to perform beam dynamic studies and engineering analyses to define the requisite diagnostic systems of the driver linac and through simulation to develop and test commissioning and operational procedures.

  12. WIPP RCRA Documents menu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural Public Reading* (star)8

  13. SCOPING SUMMARY FOR THE P-AREA OPERABLE UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupar, J; Sadika Baladi, S; Mark Amidon, M

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping summary supports development of the combined Remedial Investigation (RI)/Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA)/Feasibility Study (FS) for the P-Area Operable Unit (PAOU), or Combined document, which will be submitted on or before 09/28/2007. The objective of this Feasibility Study scoping summary meeting is to agree on the likely response actions to be evaluated and developed as alternatives in the combined document and agree on the uncertainties identified and whether they have been adequately managed.

  14. Comparative Oncogenomic Analysis of Copy Number Alterations in Human and Zebrafish Tumors Enables Cancer Driver Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, GuangJun

    The identification of cancer drivers is a major goal of current cancer research. Finding driver genes within large chromosomal events is especially challenging because such alterations encompass many genes. Previously, we ...

  15. Driver mental workload requirements on horizontal curves based on occluded vision test measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Mark Anthony

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents an evaluation of driver mental workload requirements on horizontal curves based on occluded vision test measurements. Driver workload is an important concept in the design of highway systems. A successful highway design...

  16. Assessment of older driver understanding of certain traffic control devices in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulett, Stephanie Renee

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to assess older Texas drivers on their understanding of nine traffic control devices and identify the devices that are misunderstood by people 65 years and older. Additionally, older driver education programs were...

  17. Evaluation of driver braking performance to an unexpected object in the roadway 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picha, Dale Louis

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components, specifically whether the equation accurately reflects driver and vehicle behaviors during a braking maneuver. This research evaluated the two components of the SSD equation. Four field studies were conducted that evaluated driver braking...

  18. Final Report on the Fuel Saving Effectiveness of Various Driver Feedback Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report quantifies the fuel-savings opportunities from specific driving behavior changes, identifies factors that influence drivers' receptiveness to adopting fuel-saving behaviors, and assesses various driver feedback approaches.

  19. Evaluation of driver braking performance to an unexpected object in the roadway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picha, Dale Louis

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components, specifically whether the equation accurately reflects driver and vehicle behaviors during a braking maneuver. This research evaluated the two components of the SSD equation. Four field studies were conducted that evaluated driver braking...

  20. Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on fossil fuel-fired facilities: Final report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimation of the costs associated with implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for non-hazardous and hazardous material disposal in the utility industry are provided. These costs are based on engineering studies at a number of coal-fired power plants in which the costs for hazardous and non-hazardous disposal are compared to the costs developed for the current practice design for each utility. The relationship of the three costs is displayed. The emphasis of this study is on the determination of incremental costs rather than the absolute costs for each case (current practice, non-hazardous, or hazardous). For the purpose of this project, the hazardous design cost was determined for minimum versus maximum compliance.

  1. Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on fossil fuel-fired facilities: Final report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimation of the costs associated with implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for non-hazardous and hazardous material disposal in the utility industry are provided. These costs are based on engineering studies at a number of coal-fired power plants in which the costs for hazardous and non-hazardous disposal are compared to the costs developed for the current practice design for each utility. The relationship of the three costs is displayed. The emphasis of this study is on the determination of incremental costs rather than the absolute costs for each case (current practice, non-hazardous, or hazardous). For the purpose of this project, the hazardous design cost was determined for both minimum and maximum compliance.

  2. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Permits and interim status (40 CFR part 270) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module presents an overview of the RCRA permitting process and the requirements that apply to treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) operating under interim status until a permit is issued. It lists the types of activities that do and do not require a permit. It provides CFR cites for definitions of existing hazardous waste facility and new hazardous waste facility and identifies CFR sections relevant to Part A and Part B permit information requirements and describes the difference between them. It outlines steps in the process from interim status to receipt of permit. It identifies the differences among permit modification classes, and lists the special forms of permits. It lists the permit-by-rule applications, status and eligibility requirements for interim status and the conditions for termination of interim status and lists the conditions for changes during interim status.

  3. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Municipal solid waste disposal facility criteria, updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module provides a summary of the regulatory criteria for municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs). It provides the statutory authority under RCRA and the Clean Water Act (CWA) directing EPA to develop the MSWLF criteria in 40 CFR Part 258. It also provides the Part 258 effective date and the compliance dates for providing demonstrations to satisfy individual regulatory requirements. It identifies the types of facilities that qualify for the small landfill exemption. It explains the requirements of each subpart of Part 258 as they apply to states with EPA-approved MSWLF permit programs and states without approved permit programs. It compares the MSWLF environmental performance standards described in Part 258 to the corresponding requirements for hazardous waste TSDFs in Part 264, which are generally more stringent.

  4. Termites, elephants and fire are key drivers of tree mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mortality: 2 dominated by elephant damage, 2 by termite attack and 1 by fire. Wind and human activity wereTermites, elephants and fire are key drivers of tree mortality 5 plots suffered substantial tree not major causes of tree mortality. Sample sizes are too small to reasonably determine the most significant

  5. Next Story > SC DMV lifting drivers' suspensions this week

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    The State Next Story > SC DMV lifting drivers' suspensions this week Researcher: Zombie fads peak COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Zombies seem to be everywhere these days. In the popular TV series "The Walking Dead at the University of California at Davis. Lauro said she keeps track of zombie movies, TV shows and video games

  6. Energy for 500 million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sourcesLBNL-2417E Energy for 500 million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*, Michael A. McNeil, Mark Levine Keywords

  7. Project: Driver and controller for a thermoelectric cooler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project: Driver and controller for a thermoelectric cooler Supervisor: Prof. Sam Ben-Yaakov Year solutions. Based on one of the three thermoelectric phenomena ­ the Peltier effect ­ bi-directional control is achieved. The TEC (which is a Thermoelectric Cooler) uses this effect. The direction of the current through

  8. Integrating Concurrency Control and Energy Management in Device Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levis, Philip

    Integrating Concurrency Control and Energy Management in Device Drivers Kevin Klues , Vlado@cs.berkeley.edu dgay@intel-research.net Abstract Energy management is a critical concern in wireless sensornets. De- spite its importance, sensor network operating systems today pro- vide minimal energy management support

  9. Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system Lee Lindblom and Bela Szilagyi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindblom, Lee

    Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system Lee Lindblom and Be´la Szila´gyi

  10. A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid impedance Reggie Weecea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    bone vibrator transducers for clinical measurements, the transfer of energy from the bone driver by known masses. This absolute calibration is based upon a circuit model of the driver, describing specialized equipment not available in the clinic, and a refined bone driver circuit model is proposed

  11. Research Paper A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    vibrator transducers for clinical measurements, the transfer of energy from the bone driver depends. This absolute calibration is based upon a circuit model of the driver, describing it with three frequency in the clinic, and a refined bone driver circuit model is proposed to better capture the observed behaviors. Ã?

  12. Testing Closed-Source Binary Device Drivers with DDT Volodymyr Kuznetsov, Vitaly Chipounov, and George Candea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Testing Closed-Source Binary Device Drivers with DDT Volodymyr Kuznetsov, Vitaly Chipounov (EPFL), Switzerland Abstract DDT is a system for testing closed-source binary de- vice drivers against think of it as a pesticide against device driver bugs. DDT combines virtualization with a spe- cialized

  13. Design and Evaluation of a Safe Driver Machine Interface ANDREA BONDAVALLI5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firenze, Università degli Studi di

    Computer (EVC) and the Driver Machine Interface (DMI). The EVC is the core of the on- board ATC system; it supervises the movement of the train by using the information re- ceived from the trackside systems. The DMI is the interface between the EVC and the driver; it acquires driver's commands and transforms EVC commands

  14. Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: TEENG-1181R3 Full Title: Modelling Automobile Driver to develop a random utility based discrete multinomial choice model for the behaviour of automobile drivers

  15. EIS-0394: Notice of Public Scoping Meetings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartment of Energy :to Extend ScopingPublic Scoping Meetings

  16. Low-jitter, hydrogen thyratron Pockels cell driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oicles, J.A.; Kitchin, H.D.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements to be met by Pockels cell drivers for incorporation into the Novette and Nova Laser systems are presented, and critical aspects of the specification examined. A high-performance pulse generator has been developed to meet these requirements using new thyratron technology from the English Electric Valve Co. Ltd. Two closely related versions have been built; a 10KV output unit with 9 nsec risetime into five parallel 50-ohm loads and a faster 5KV output driver with 3.5 nsec risetime into a single 50-ohm load. The design approach for optimizing performance, using the new tubes in relation to the LLNL specification is described, including the techniques used for control of electromagnetic interference.

  17. Simple SPICE model for comparison of CMOS output driver circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermann, John Karl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to monitor the ground nodes of output driver circuits for noise. Both relative performance and noise levels are generated through the simulations. A test device was built to confirm that the model was effective in speed and noise comparisons. Values were... on CMOS technologies. Journal model is IEEE 'I?ansactions on Automatic Control. A. Literature Survey Research has been done in the past concerning noise generated by digital logic de- vices. In particular, Advanced CMOS Logic (ACL) integrated circuits...

  18. 59136 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 186 / Monday, September 27, 2010 / Rules and Regulations (c) Certain farm vehicle drivers. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Certain farm vehicle drivers. The rules in this part except for § 391.15(e) do not apply to a farm vehicle driver except a farm vehicle driver who drives an articulated (combination) commercial motor vehicle, as defined in § 390.5. For limited exemptions for farm vehicle drivers of articulated commercial motor

  19. Belief Revision Revisited Thoughts on the Scope of Belief Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Anthony

    Belief Revision Revisited or: Thoughts on the Scope of Belief Revision James Delgrande Simon Fraser University Canada NMR 2006 Windermere, UK, May 31, 2006 1 #12;Belief Revision · Current interest in belief revision is regarded as going back to the seminal work of Alchourr´on, G¨ardenfors, and Makinson (e.g. [AGM

  20. Scope and Description Laboratory Robotics and Automation seeks to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    #12;Scope and Description Laboratory Robotics and Automation seeks to communicate developments and information about the automation of the laboratory. Application areas generally include analytical peripherals, and other robotics developments that may have an impact on laboratory automation. In the area

  1. 5 Inventory 5.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    162 5 Inventory 5.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope The inventory of the Wenatchee subbasin. The Inventory also identifies management programs and projects that target fish and wildlife or otherwise provide substantial benefit to fish and wildlife. The inventory includes programs and projects extant

  2. 5 Inventory 5.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Inventory 5.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope The inventory of the Entat subbasin summarizes. The Inventory also identifies management programs and projects that target fish and wildlife or otherwise provide substantial benefit to fish and wildlife. The inventory includes programs and projects extant

  3. Hazardous Waste Management Compliance Guidelines INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Hazardous Waste Management Compliance Guidelines INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE Arizona State University Management, generate a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. ASU is classified as a hazardous waste generator) and has been assigned an EPA identification number (AZD042017723). As a hazardous waste generator facility

  4. REPORT TO FEAC "0.0 THE APPROPRIATE SCOPE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I PANEL #1 REPORT TO FEAC O N "0.0 THE APPROPRIATE SCOPE AND MISSION OF ITER..." January 31, 1992 mqjor machine modifications, is the programmatic risk that the second phase will be unacceptably delayed to demonstrate levels of machine availability exceeding about 5%. On the basis of analysis carried out during

  5. CREATIVE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN: EXTENDING THE SCOPE BY INFUSED DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shai, Offer

    1 CREATIVE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN: EXTENDING THE SCOPE BY INFUSED DESIGN Offer Shai School of Mechanical infused design that guarantees generating design solutions by transforming systems and methods from remote. This process is partially supported by a computer tool. We describe the method of infused design and illustrate

  6. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. F. Emer

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999-October 2000 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in August 2000. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began seven years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. Precipitation for the period October 1999 through October 2000 was 10.44 centimeters (cm) (4.11 inches [in.]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2000). The prior year annual rainfall (January 1999 through December 1999) was 10.13cm (3.99 in.). The highest 30-day cumulative rainfall occurred on March 8, 2000, with a total of 6.63 cm (2.61 in.). The heaviest daily precipitation occurred on February 23,2000, with a total of 1.70 cm (0.67 in.) falling in that 24-hour period. The recorded average annual rainfall for this site, from 1972 to January 1999, is 15.06 cm (5.93 in.). All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches.

  7. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  8. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: RCRA Borehole 299-E33-338 Located Near the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.8. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in June 2003. The overall goals of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are: 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid via collection of geotechnical information and data, future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank waste management areas. For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at the B-BX-BY tank farm waste management area are found in CH2M HILL (2000).

  9. The effects of driver gas contamination on shock tube test time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkins, Garry Owen

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF DRIVER GAS CONTAMINATION ON SHOCK TUBE TEST TIME A Thesis by CARRY OWEN HAWKINS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Memb e r) (Member) (Member) (Membe r) (Member) December 1970... AB S TRACT The Effects of Driver Gas Contamination on Shock Tube Test Time. (December 1970) Garry 0. Hawkins, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. Richard E. Thomas The effects of driver gas contamination are manifested in a change...

  10. P5 Science Drivers: Accelerator Experiments Panagiotis Spentzouris

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversight BoardP-GlycoproteiniiiScience Drivers:

  11. Philips Light Sources & Electronics is Developing an Efficient, Smaller, Cost-Effective Family of LED Drivers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Philips Light Sources & Electronics is developing a new family of LED drivers that are more efficient and cost-effective as well as smaller in size than currently available drivers. The new drivers are switch-mode power supplies that are similar to today's drivers, but with an improved design. In addition, they have a different topology—boost plus LLC—for wattages of 40W and above, but they retain the commonly used flyback topology at lower wattages.

  12. Factors Associated with Hit-and-Run Pedestrian Fatalities and Driver Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLeod, Kara E.; Griswold, Julia; Arnold, Lindsay S.; Ragland, David R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hit-and-run Crashes. Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol.Circumstances and Drivers. Accident Analysis and Prevention,Hit-and-run Crashes. Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol.

  13. Earthquake warning system for infrastructures : a scoping analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Nancy S.; O'Connor, Sharon L.; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Kelic, Andjelka; Fogleman, William E. (GRIT, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Vugrin, Eric D.; Corbet, Thomas Frank, Jr.; Brown, Theresa Jean

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of a scoping study evaluating the potential risk reduction value of a hypothetical, earthquake early-warning system. The study was based on an analysis of the actions that could be taken to reduce risks to population and infrastructures, how much time would be required to take each action and the potential consequences of false alarms given the nature of the action. The results of the scoping analysis indicate that risks could be reduced through improving existing event notification systems and individual responses to the notification; and production and utilization of more detailed risk maps for local planning. Detailed maps and training programs, based on existing knowledge of geologic conditions and processes, would reduce uncertainty in the consequence portion of the risk analysis. Uncertainties in the timing, magnitude and location of earthquakes and the potential impacts of false alarms will present major challenges to the value of an early-warning system.

  14. Scoping calculations of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Difilippo, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical memorandum describes models and calculational procedures to fully characterize the nuclear island of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. Two computer codes were written: one for the gas-cooled NERVA derivative reactor and the other for liquid metal-cooled fuel pin reactors. These codes are going to be interfaced by NASA with the balance of plant in order to making scoping calculations for mission analysis.

  15. Further Developments on the Geothermal System Scoping Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antkowiak, M.; Sargent, R.; Geiger, J. W.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses further developments and refinements for the uses of the Geothermal System Scoping Model in an effort to provide a means for performing a variety of trade-off analyses of surface and subsurface parameters, sensitivity analyses, and other systems engineering studies in order to better inform R&D direction and investment for the development of geothermal power into a major contributor to the U.S. energy supply.

  16. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Scope | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) |Footprints Scope

  17. UWB multi-burst transmit driver for averaging receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dallum, Gregory E

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a sequence of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. There are two oscillators in the transmitter circuit, a gated burst rate oscillator and a gated RF burst or RF power output oscillator. The burst rate oscillator produces a relatively low frequency, i.e., MHz, square wave output for a selected transmit cycle, and drives the RF burst oscillator, which produces RF bursts of much higher frequency, i.e., GHz, during the transmit cycle. The frequency of the burst rate oscillator sets the spacing of the RF burst packets. The first oscillator output passes through a bias driver to the second oscillator. The bias driver conditions, e.g., level shifts, the signal from the first oscillator for input into the second oscillator, and also controls the length of each RF burst. A trigger pulse actuates a timing circuit, formed of a flip-flop and associated reset time delay circuit, that controls the operation of the first oscillator, i.e., how long it oscillates (which defines the transmit cycle).

  18. Gaz de France ordering high-efficiency drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Biasi, V.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For natural gas transmission, distribution, and storage operations, Gaz de France is installing Creusot-Loire's new line of high-efficiency gas-turbine packages, powered by Allison 501 and 570 generators for compressor speeds exceeding 10,000 rpm. The Type CA.3 driver comprises a 501 generator coupled to a two-stage power turbine; the ISO base rating is 3265 kW on gas fuel with a heat rate of 12,050 Btu/kWhr. The CA.5 driver with the stronger 570 gas-turbine engine is base-rated at 4805 kW with a heat rate of 11,360 Btu/kWhr. Designed for direct-drive, with no intermediary gearing, the high-speed compressor operates on the 13,820-rpm output shaft speed of the CA.3 for baseload requirements or on 11,500 rpm for the more powerful CA.5 set. These compressor packages will serve as boosters for the transmission and storage of regasified LNG from Algeria and natural gas from the North Sea, USSR, and France's own Lacq fields.

  19. Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module W. A. Stygar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module W. A. Stygar,1 W. E. Fowler,1 K. R a linear-transformer- driver (LTD) module that drives an internal water-insulated transmission line-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 030401 (2008)]. DOI: 10

  20. Submitted to Vehicle System Dynamics An Adaptive Lateral Preview Driver Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    of the vehicle. The proposed driver model is developed using the adaptive predictive control (APC) framework inspires our interest in understanding human steering actions and the development of a driver model on the response of the vehicle. These tests can be performed with a steering and speed control robot, and thus can

  1. 1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation 3 A. Sen Gupta,1 A), 29 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean equatorial 30 circulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, LXXXXX, doi:10.1029/ 31 2012GL051447. 32 1. Introduction 33 [2] The equatorial Pacific Ocean

  2. AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation by automation and in- vehicle device use. Specifically, this study investigated the implications of adaptive; investigate the effect of varying reliability of in-vehicle automation (navigation aids) on driver SA

  3. Nighttime driver needs: an analysis of sign usage based on luminance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Jerremy Eugene

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ? With brighter signs being visible from farther away, there is an increased opportunity for the driver to look at the sign. This thesis assesses the impact of sign brightness on the nighttime driver�s sign viewing behavior; such as the number of glances...

  4. Expert Recommendation based on Social Drivers, Social Network Analysis, and Semantic Data Representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    Expert Recommendation based on Social Drivers, Social Network Analysis, and Semantic Data-Theoretical Multi-Level (MTML) framework which investigates social drivers for network formation in the communities computational techniques from social network analysis and representational techniques from the semantic web

  5. UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE Driving Records for Designated Employees and Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    when employees are convicted of motor vehicle violations and when actions are taken against a driver a special certificate (ambulance, private school bus, farm labor vehicle, special construction equipment with this policy. C. There are criminal penalties for employing or continuing to employ as a driver a person who

  6. Catadioptric Sensor for a Simultaneous Tracking of the Driver's Face and the Road Scene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    using head mounted devices but these systems are too intrusive in the driving task. The most popular non-intrusive to be non-intrusive and compact (to avoid distracting the driver in his task), able to observe the driver on Omnidirectional Vision, Camera Networks and Non-classical Cameras - OMNIVIS (2008)" #12;2 J-F. Layerle, X

  7. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -GENERAL SERVICES -RISK AND INSURANCE MANAGEMENT STATE DRIVER ACCIDENT REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA - GENERAL SERVICES - RISK AND INSURANCE MANAGEMENT STATE DRIVER ACCIDENT REVIEW STD. 274 (REV. 1/2003) PLEASE PRINT OR TYPE SUPERVISOR'S REVIEW - FOR DEPARTMENTAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PURPOSE: To have supervisor investigate each driver accident, report facts and circumstances, confirm

  8. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep Tanks System Phase 1. These monitoring wells are intended to monitor for the occurrence of contaminants of concern in the perched water beneath and adjacent to the CPP-601/627/640 Landfill. The wells were constructed to satisfy requirements of the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Plan for the CPP 601/627/640 Landfill.

  9. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Containers (40 CFR parts 264/265, subpart I; section 261.7) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module reviews two sets of regulatory requirements for containers: requirements that pertain to the manage of hazardous waste containers and regulations governing residues of hazardous waste in empty containers. It defines container and empty container and provides examples and citations for each. It provides an overview of the requirements for the design and operation of hazardous waste containers and explains the difference between the container standards set out in Part 264 and Part 265. It states the requirements for rendering a hazardous waste container RCRA empty. It also explains when container rinsate must be managed as a hazardous waste.

  10. Linac-Based Proton Driver for a Neutrino Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garoby, R; Aiba, M; Meddahi, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Neutrino Factory Proton Driver based on a superconducting proton linac has been designed in the CERN context. The 5 GeV/4 MW H- beam from the linac is accumulated using charge exchange injection in a fixed-energy synchrotron and afterwards transferred to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place. The lattices of the accumulator and compressor are described, as well as magnet technology and RF manipulations. Critical issues related to charge-exchange injection, space-charge effects in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator, are addressed. The analysis is focused on the baseline scenario, which provides 6 bunches on the target. Results of preliminary analysis of options with less bunches (three and one) are also presented.

  11. Recirculating induction accelerators as drivers for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J.J.; Deadrick, F.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Griffith, L.V.; Kirbie, H.C.; Neil, V.K.; Newton, M.A.; Paul, A.C.; Sharp, W.M.; Shay, H.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Bangerter, R.O.; Faltens, A.; Fong, C.G.; Judd, D.L.; Lee, E.P.; Reginato, L.L.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Godlove, T.F. (FM Technologies, Inc., 10529-B Braddock Rd., Fairfax, Virginia 22302 (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-year study of recirculating induction heavy ion accelerators as low-cost driver for inertial-fusion energy applications was recently completed. The projected cost of a 4 MJ accelerator was estimated to be about $500 M (million) and the efficiency was estimated to be 35%. The principal technology issues include energy recovery of the ramped dipole magnets, which is achieved through use of ringing inductive/capacitive circuits, and high repetition rates of the induction cell pulsers, which is accomplished through arrays of field effect transistor (FET) switches. Principal physics issues identified include minimization of particle loss from interactions with the background gas, and more demanding emittance growth and centroid control requirements associated with the propagation of space-charge-dominated beams around bends and over large path lengths. In addition, instabilities such as the longitudinal resistive instability, beam-breakup instability and betatron-orbit instability were found to be controllable with careful design.

  12. Warm Water Oxidation Verification - Scoping and Stirred Reactor Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Scoping tests to evaluate the effects of agitation and pH adjustment on simulant sludge agglomeration and uranium metal oxidation at {approx}95 C were performed under Test Instructions(a,b) and as per sections 5.1 and 5.2 of this Test Plan prepared by AREVA. (c) The thermal testing occurred during the week of October 4-9, 2010. The results are reported here. For this testing, two uranium-containing simulant sludge types were evaluated: (1) a full uranium-containing K West (KW) container sludge simulant consisting of nine predominant sludge components; (2) a 50:50 uranium-mole basis mixture of uraninite [U(IV)] and metaschoepite [U(VI)]. This scoping study was conducted in support of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Phase 2 technology evaluation for the treatment and packaging of K-Basin sludge. The STP is managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy. Warm water ({approx}95 C) oxidation of sludge, followed by immobilization, has been proposed by AREVA and is one of the alternative flowsheets being considered to convert uranium metal to UO{sub 2} and eliminate H{sub 2} generation during final sludge disposition. Preliminary assessments of warm water oxidation have been conducted, and several issues have been identified that can best be evaluated through laboratory testing. The scoping evaluation documented here was specifically focused on the issue of the potential formation of high strength sludge agglomerates at the proposed 95 C process operating temperature. Prior hydrothermal tests conducted at 185 C produced significant physiochemical changes to genuine sludge, including the formation of monolithic concretions/agglomerates that exhibited shear strengths in excess of 100 kPa (Delegard et al. 2007).

  13. EIS-0391: Notice to Extend Scoping Period | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartment of Energy :to Extend Scoping Period EIS-0391: Notice

  14. EIS-0403: Notice to Extend Public Scoping | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartment of Energy :toStatement |EnvironmentalStatementScoping

  15. Title 40 CFR 1501.7 Scoping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson,OpenOpen EnergyR. 297water0 CFR 1501Scoping

  16. RUS Bulletin 1794-A-603: Scoping Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevada <RECServices, Inc.A-603: Scoping

  17. Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as “on the fly” adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include • AC Power Factor Correction; • High power efficiency; • Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular “white” light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

  18. Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. EIS-0466: Re-opening of Public Scoping Period and Announcement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Scoping Meetings Continued Operation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Comment Period Ends: 9122011 Submit Comments to: Ms. Jeanette Norte NNSA Sandia...

  20. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001. “Electricity Demand Side Management Study: Review ofEpping/North Ryde Demand Side Management Scoping Study:Energy Agency Demand Side Management (IEA DSM) Programme:

  1. EIS-0463: Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Scoping Meetings, Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement Department of Energy - Presidential Permit Application for Northern Pass Transmission, New Hampshire DOE...

  2. Physics at an upgraded proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Geer

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The accelerator-based particle physics program in the US is entering a period of transition. This is particularly true at Fermilab which for more than two decades has been the home of the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider, the World's highest energy hadron collider. In a few years time the energy frontier will move to the LHC at CERN. Hence, if an accelerator-based program is to survive at Fermilab, it must evolve. Fermilab is fortunate in that, in addition to hosting the Tevatron Collider, the laboratory also hosts the US accelerator-based neutrino program. The recent discovery that neutrino flavors oscillate has opened a new exciting world for us to explore, and has created an opportunity for the Fermilab accelerator complex to continue to address the cutting-edge questions of particle physics beyond the Tevatron Collider era. The presently foreseen neutrino oscillation experiments at Fermilab (MiniBooNE [1] and MINOS [2]) will enable the laboratory to begin contributing to the Global oscillation physics program in the near future, and will help us better understand the basic parameters describing the oscillations. However, this is only a first step. To be able to pin down all of the oscillation parameters, and hopefully make new discoveries along the way, we will need high statistics experiments, which will require a very intense neutrino beam, and one or more very massive detectors. In particular we will require new MW-scale primary proton beams and perhaps ultimately a Neutrino Factory [3]. Plans to upgrade the Fermilab Proton Driver are presently being developed [4]. The upgrade project would replace the Fermilab Booster with a new 8 GeV accelerator with 0.5-2 MW beam power, a factor of 15-60 more than the current Booster. It would also make the modifications needed to the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) to upgrade it to simultaneously provide 120 GeV beams of 2 MW. This would enable a factor of 5-10 increase in neutrino beam intensities at the MI, while also supporting a vigorous 8 GeV fixed-target program. In addition, a Proton Driver might also serve as a stepping-stone to future accelerators, both as an R&D test bed and as an injector, with connections to the Linear Collider, Neutrino Factories, and a VLHC. Hence, although neutrino physics would provide the main thrust for the science program at an upgraded Fermilab proton source, the new facility would also offer exciting opportunities for other fixed-target particle physics (kaons, muons, neutrons, antiprotons, etc.) and a path towards new accelerators in the future.

  3. Dynamic analysis of policy drivers for bioenergy commodity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Jeffers; Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin M. Searcy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass is increasingly being considered as a feedstock to provide a clean and renewable source of energy in the form of both liquid fuels and electric power. In the United States, the biofuels and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and have different drivers which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets given policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from exporter dominance.

  4. Temperature as a driver for the expansion of the microalga Gonyostomum semen in Swedish lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature as a driver for the expansion of the microalga Gonyostomum semen in Swedish lakes Karin is an example of invasive harmful microalgae (Neilan et al., 2003). Another presumably invasive species

  5. Fourth Annual Ethical Leadership Conference Panel Drivers, Challenges, and Strategies for Future of Corporate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Fourth Annual Ethical Leadership Conference Panel Drivers, Challenges, and Strategies for Future, Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Perspectives, Business & Society, Long Range Planning Social Responsibility for Hess Corporation, a global integrated energy company based in New York City

  6. Emergency vehicle driver training by Texas municipal police departments: a descriptive study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westmoreland, Robert Lawrence

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the increase in the number of monetary civil judgments arising out of police emergency driving situations, law enforcement agencies are taking a critical look at their emergency driver training programs. At the present time...

  7. Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdinand, R.; /Saclay; Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

  8. The physics issues that determine inertial confinement fusion target gain and driver requirements: A tutorial*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with simple models for hohlraum wall energy loss to predict coupling efficiencies and a simple one into running the driver. More- over, the unrecycled portion of energy produced must be sufficient to sell

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Look-Ahead Driver Feedback and Powertrain Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Eaton at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about look-ahead driver feedback and...

  10. Efficacy, national/international practices and motivational factors of lifelong driver education for the aging population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israels, Richard (Richard Steven)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a society facing a significant increase in its aging population, older driver education/training is emerging as a potential solution to help seniors drive more safely, thus maintaining their mobility and quality of life. ...

  11. active-load laser driver: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: BGD 9, 14437-14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from...

  12. Age and cross-cultural comparison of drivers' cognitive workload and performance in simulated urban driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, J.

    Driving demands significant psychomotor attention and requires even more when drivers are engaged in secondary tasks that increase cognitive workload and divert attention. It is well established that age influences driving ...

  13. act rcra rcra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    115 Boalt, The Law of Hazardous Waste Disposal and Remediation (2d ed. 2005) Syllabus Class 1 - August 19 Claims Kammen, Daniel M. 2 The Law of Hazardous Waste: CERCLA,...

  14. Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kav, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  15. Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  16. Adaptacin de un driver WLAN Linux a una arquitectura NIOS-Avalon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autònoma de Barcelona, Universitat

    Adaptación de un driver WLAN Linux a una arquitectura NIOS-Avalon B. Martínez , I. Tarruella, D de un driver Linux se realiza un mapeo sobre una arquitectura basada en un procesador integrado dentro de un SoC. La elección de la partición Hw/Sw y de ciertos parámetros de la arquitectura se

  17. Review of a Spoke-Cavity Design Option for the RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petr Ostroumov; Kenneth Shepard; Jean Delayen

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A design option for the 1.4 GV, multiple-charge-state driver linac required for the U. S. Rare Isotope Accelerator Project based on 345 MHz, 3-cell spoke-loaded cavities has been previously discussed [1]. This paper updates consideration of design options for the RIA driver, including recent results from numerically-modeling the multi-charge-state beam dynamics and also cold test results for prototype superconducting niobium 3-cell spoke-loaded cavities.

  18. Scope of the Export Administration Regulations Part 734-page 1 Export Administration Regulations August 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    Scope of the Export Administration Regulations Part 734-page 1 Export Administration Regulations August 2001 §734.1 INTRODUCTION (a) In this part, references to the Export Adminis- tration Regulations (EAR) are references to 15 CFR chapter VII, subchapter C. This part de- scribes the scope of the Export

  19. PIER Demand Response Research Center SCOPING STUDY ROUNDTABLE RESEARCH TARGET AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PIER Demand Response Research Center SCOPING STUDY ROUNDTABLE ­ RESEARCH TARGET AREAS (Draft Areas #12;PIER Demand Response Research Center SCOPING STUDY ROUNDTABLE ­ RESEARCH TARGET AREAS (Draft the Value of Demand Response: Develop an Integrated Efficiency / Demand Response Framework Introduction

  20. Scanning Optical Mosaic Scope for Micro-Manipulation Benjamin Potsaid, Yves Bellouard, John T. Wen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, John Ting-Yung

    Scanning Optical Mosaic Scope for Micro-Manipulation Benjamin Potsaid, Yves Bellouard, John T. Wen microscopy, which we call scanning optical mosaic scope (SOMS), that addresses the limitation of the field of vision. The key idea is to use high-speed scanners and a high- speed camera to scan the workspace

  1. SCOPES'05 Dallas, TX, Sept., 2005 Risk-Based Quality Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    (tian@engr.smu.edu) Southern Methodist University Dallas, Texas, USA Contents · Quality, Reliability for ES Jeff Tian, SMU #12;SCOPES'05, Dallas, TX, Sept., 2005 Slide. 2 Quality, Reliability, and Risk 0. SE Panel: New SE Paradigms for ES Jeff Tian, SMU #12;SCOPES'05, Dallas, TX, Sept., 2005 Slide. 3 Risk

  2. 10/15/03 LBNL-53800 Residential Ventilation Standards Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10/15/03 LBNL-53800 Residential Ventilation Standards Scoping Study T-01 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Report Number: LBNL-53800 OVERVIEW This document presents contract no. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;VENTILATIONS STANDARDS SCOPING STUDY PAGE LBNL-53800 2 TABLE

  3. Associated Students, CSUF, Inc. Purpose and Scope of the Logo Style Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Associated Students, CSUF, Inc. L O G O S T Y L E G U I D E #12;Purpose and Scope of the Logo Style Guide: In accordance with ASI Policy, this style guide has been produced to ensure that the logos. This style guide does not attempt to mandate for every conceivable use of logos or text within the wide scope

  4. DRIVERS OF H I TURBULENCE IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Warren, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, CSS Building, Room 1024, Stadium Drive, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Koribalski, Baerbel [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral hydrogen (H I) velocity dispersions are believed to be set by turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM). Although turbulence is widely believed to be driven by star formation, recent studies have shown that this driving mechanism may not be dominant in regions of low star formation surface density ({Sigma}{sub SFR}), such those as found in dwarf galaxies or the outer regions of spirals. We have generated average H I line profiles in a number of nearby dwarfs and low-mass spirals by co-adding H I spectra in subregions with either a common radius or {Sigma}{sub SFR}. We find that the individual spatially resolved ''superprofiles'' are composed of a central narrow peak ({approx}5-15 km s{sup -1}) with higher velocity wings to either side, similar to their global counterparts as calculated for the galaxy as a whole. Under the assumption that the central peak reflects the H I turbulent velocity dispersion, we compare measures of H I kinematics determined from the superprofiles to local ISM properties, including surface mass densities and measures of star formation. The shape of the wings of the superprofiles do not show any correlation with local ISM properties, which indicates that they may be an intrinsic feature of H I line-of-sight spectra. On the other hand, the H I velocity dispersion is correlated most strongly with baryonic and H I surface mass density, which points toward a gravitational origin for turbulence, but it is unclear which, if any, gravitational instabilities are able to operate efficiently in these systems. Star formation energy is typically produced at a level sufficient to drive H I turbulent motions at realistic coupling efficiencies in regimes where {Sigma}{sub SFR} {approx}> 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, as is typically found in inner spiral disks. At low star formation intensities, on the other hand, star formation cannot supply enough energy to drive the observed turbulence, nor does it uniquely determine the turbulent velocity dispersion. Nevertheless, even at low intensity, star formation does appear to provide a lower threshold for H I velocity dispersions. We find a pronounced decrease in coupling efficiency with increasing {Sigma}{sub SFR}, which would be consistent with a picture where star formation couples to the ISM with constant efficiency, but that less of that energy is found in the neutral phase at higher {Sigma}{sub SFR}. We have examined a number of potential drivers of H I turbulence, including star formation, gravitational instabilities, the magneto-rotational instability, and accretion-driven turbulence, and found that, individually, none of these drivers is capable of driving the observed levels of turbulence in the low {Sigma}{sub SFR} regime. We discuss possible solutions to this conundrum.

  5. Report of workshop on radiological effects of nuclear war, SCOPE-ENUWAR workshop, Moscow, USSR, March 21-25, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, C.S.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop on radiological consequences of nuclear war addressed specific issues that built on the foundation of the results that were published in the SCOPE-ENUWAR report (SCOPE-28) in 1986. 14 refs.

  6. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  7. Electrochemical corrosion-scoping experiments: An evaluation of the results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.D.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to emplacement in a nuclear waste repository, each waste form must be well characterized with respect to its behavior in the environments expected to develop in the repository. This scoping study was designed to obtain a qualitative idea of how spent fuel cladding would respond to a hot water environment that could develop in a tuff repository at a time when temperatures have cooled to {approximately}95{degree}C and hot liquid water has infiltrated the repository horizon. That information would then be used to establish more definitive tests on cladding behavior in a tuff repository. For this study bundles of spent fuel cladding held together with a 304 stainless steel (SS) wrap were constructed which simulate the geometries and materials associations in a breached 304L SS container. They were exposed to 90{degree}C tuff-equilibrated Well J-13 water for periods of 2, 6, and 12 mo. During the experiments, the water level, temperature, conductivity, and pH were monitored on a regular basis. The water was also checked periodically for carbon (organic, inorganic, and later in the experiment Carbon-14) and zirconium. More extensive water analyses were carried out at the midpoint and completion of the experiments. 12 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the LSST science drivers led to these choices of system parameters.

  9. The Geant4 Visualisation System - a multi-driver graphics system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Allison; Laurent Garnier; Akinori Kimura; Joseph Perl

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From the beginning the Geant4 Visualisation System was designed to support several simultaneous graphics systems written to common abstract interfaces. Today it has matured into a powerful diagnostic and presentational tool. It comes with a library of models that may be added to the current scene and which include the representation of the Geant4 geometry hierarchy, simulated trajectories and user-written hits and digitisations. The workhorse is the OpenGL suite of drivers for X, Xm, Qt and Win32. There is an Open Inventor driver. Scenes can be exported in special graphics formats for offline viewing in the DAWN, VRML, HepRApp and gMocren browsers. PostScript can be generated through OpenGL, Open Inventor, DAWN and HepRApp. Geant4's own tracking algorithms are used by the Ray Tracer. Not all drivers support all features but all drivers bring added functionality of some sort. This paper describes the interfaces and details the individual drivers.

  10. Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  11. Woodfuel scoping study Increasing the use of woodfuel as a substitute for fossil fuels is important

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodfuel scoping study Increasing the use of woodfuel as a substitute for fossil fuels is important tonnes of material a year from currently UMW in England by 2020. New government subsidies for heat

  12. PHYSICS DIVISION ESH BULLETIN 2004-7 CHANGES IN THE SCOPE OF WORK THAT REQUIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHYSICS DIVISION ESH BULLETIN 2004-7 3/24/04 CHANGES IN THE SCOPE OF WORK THAT REQUIRE RESEARCH additional Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Subject Matter Expert (SME) involvement. *Laser procedures

  13. Collection Policy: NEUROBIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: NEUROBIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies Neurobiology and Behavior, one of seven sections in the Division of Biological Sciences, is organized "vertically," encompassing everything from molecular neurobiology to ethology and sociobiology. Its particular

  14. CarSafe: A Driver Safety App that Detects Dangerous Driving Behavior using Dual-Cameras on Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    CarSafe: A Driver Safety App that Detects Dangerous Driving Behavior using Dual}@cs.dartmouth.edu ABSTRACT Driving while being tired or distracted is dangerous. We are developing the CafeSafe app on the phone to detect and alert drivers to dangerous driving conditions inside and outside the car. Car

  15. 1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Global and regional drivers of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Global and regional drivers to climate change #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Global and regional drivers

  16. Abstract--There are two types of drivers in production machine systems: constant velocity (CV) motor and servo-motor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, WJ "Chris"

    ) motor and servo-motor. If a system contains two drivers or more, among which some are of the CV motor while the other are the servo-motor, the system has the so-called hybrid driver architecture is stable. A simulation is performed to show verify the proposed controller. The CV motor has the velocity

  17. UA researchers develop develop a device for moving industrial vehicles without drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    in settings with extreme human conditions (cold storage, waste management , etc....) The device is availableUA researchers develop develop a device for moving industrial vehicles without drivers Researchers Localization And Mapping). This technology is applicable to any business or industrial environment where

  18. Design and characterization of a signal insulation coreless transformer integrated in a CMOS gate driver chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Design and characterization of a signal insulation coreless transformer integrated in a CMOS gate the implementation of numerous distinct power transistor gate drivers, the control signal insulation is becoming more results will be shown in order to validate the functionality. I. INTRODUCTION An insulation system

  19. Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices Michael@maths.ox.ac.uk (01865 280613) Sam Howison Oxford-Man Institute, University of Oxford, Blue Boar Court, 9 Alfred Street on stochastic processes for underlying factors (fuel prices, power demand and generation capacity availability

  20. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, R.; Nangle, J.; Boeckman, G.; Miller, M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal fleets are a frequent subject of legislative and executive efforts to lead a national transition to alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. Section 701 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that all dual-fueled alternative fuel vehicles in the federal fleet be operated on alternative fuel 100% of the time when they have access to it. However, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, drivers of federal flex fuel vehicles (FFV) leased through the General Services Administration refueled with E85 24% of the time when it was available--falling well short of the mandate. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory completed a 2-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to identify the factors that influence the refueling behavior of federal FFV drivers. The project began with two primary hypotheses. First, information scarcity increases the tendency to miss opportunities to purchase E85. Second, even with perfect information, there are limits to how far drivers will go out of their way to purchase E85. This paper discusses the results of the project, which included a June 2012 survey of federal fleet drivers and an empirical analysis of actual refueling behavior from FY 2009 to 2012. This research will aid in the design and implementation of intervention programs aimed at increasing alternative fuel use and reducing petroleum consumption.

  1. A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Changxu (Sean)

    A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous University of New York, Buffalo, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Vehicle fuel economy Eco-driving Human developed and validated a new fuel-economy optimization system (FEOS), which receives input from vehicle

  2. IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D propagate in thick-liquid-wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers. KEYWORDS: heavy ion fusion, ion beam transport, reactor chamber design I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. heavy ion fusion ~HIF! program is working toward

  3. DRIVER ASSISTED CONTROL STRATEGIES: THEORY AND EXPERIMENT Mark DePoorter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    performance is specified as a Reference Model. The driver maintains nominal control of the vehicle by direct actuation of the front steering inputs. The controller then determines the appropriate rear steer inputs. An appropriate vehicle model is developed and a polynomial pole placement technique is used to control

  4. Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions Anthony D. Barnosky,000 and 3,000 years ago. Estimates of megafauna biomass (including hu- mans as a megafauna species) for before, during, and after the extinction episode suggest that growth of human biomass largely matched

  5. Multimodal Presentation of Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: A Situation-Dependent Assessment of Usability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Multimodal Presentation of Local Danger Warnings for Drivers: A Situation-Dependent Assessment danger warning function. To achieve high-quality assistance, the communication mode needs to be adaptive. Moreover, regardless of communication mode, the local danger warning function was considered as the most

  6. Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation, and dispersal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konar, Megan

    Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation Centre for Hydrology, ``Dino Tonini'', Padua, Italy a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Available online 3 March 2012 Keywords: Hydrology Biodiversity Dispersal Carrying capacity Niches Climate change

  7. 2002-21-0041 Performance Driver Information Systems, Enhancing the Fun-to-Drive Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in automobiles today display vehicle speed, fluid levels, fluid temperatures, and some basic diagnostic information (warnings, panel lamps). Optional driver information systems add to this list by offering fuel to be very complex. Essentially, all that is required is a speedometer and a fuel gauge. The speedometer

  8. A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid Reggie Weece a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    2010 Available online xxxx a b s t r a c t When using bone vibrator transducers for clinical a circuit model of the driver, describing it with three frequency-dependent parameters. Once these three circuit model is proposed to better capture the observed behaviors. Ã? 2010 Published by Elsevier B.V. 1

  9. Offshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp-Johansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the next generation of offshore wind farms are designed. The aim of this paper is to discuss existingOffshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp@civil.auc.dk leje@elsam-eng.com Abstract: Current offshore wind turbine design methods have matured to a 1st

  10. An investigation of driver behavior at highway-railroad grade crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Lee Anne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crossing results, in that the presence of a crossing (rather than the presence of a train) is indicated by the location of the crossbucks. The driver is ultimately responsible for achieving safe passage across a passive crossing because no warning devices...

  11. Young drivers and the efficacy of the Texas drug and alcohol driving awareness program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darnell, Richard

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of the Texas Drug and Alcohol Driving Awareness Program (TDADAP) in relation to alcohol-related offenses among young drivers. Participants in this study were students in pre-license programs...

  12. What kind of charging infrastructure do Chevrolet Volts Drivers in The EV Project use?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes key conclusions from analysis of data collected from Chevrolet Volts participating in The EV Project. Topics include how much Volt drivers charge at level 1 vs. level 2 rates and how much they charge at home vs. away from home.

  13. Perception Drivers for Treated Wood by U.S. South Homebuilders and Remodelers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    Perception Drivers for Treated Wood by U.S. South Homebuilders and Remodelers Sanna M. Kallioranta1 for the use of treated wood products in construction is considerable, especially in the U.S. South for termite protection and to mitigate moisture related decay. This research investigates the perception about treated

  14. Evolution styles: using architectural knowledge as an evolution driver Carlos E. Cuesta1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    Evolution styles: using architectural knowledge as an evolution driver Carlos E. Cuesta1 , Elena+D, 02006, Albacete, Spain ABSTRACT Software evolution is an increasingly challenging and compelling concern software evolution is carried out, software architecture emerges as one of the cornerstones that should

  15. Evolution on a Restless Planet: Were Environmental Variability and Environmental Change Major Drivers of Human Evolution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    223 7 Evolution on a Restless Planet: Were Environmental Variability and Environmental Change Major Drivers of Human Evolution? Peter J. Richerson, Robert L. Bettinger, and Robert Boyd 7.1 Introduction Two kinds of factors set the tempo and direction of organic and cultural evolution, those external to biotic

  16. Setup, tests and results for the ATLAS TileCal Read Out Driver production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valero, Alberto; Castillo, V; Cuenca, C; Ferrer, A; Fullana, E; González, V; Higón, E; Munar, A; Poveda, J; Ruiz-Martínez, A; Salvachúa, B; Sanchís, E; Solans, C; Soret, J; Torres, J; Valls, J A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the performance and test results of the production of the 38 ATLAS TileCal Read Out Drivers (RODs). We first describe the basic hardware specifications and firmware functionality of the modules, the test-bench setup used for production and the test procedure to qualify the boards. We then finally show and discuss the performance results.

  17. HIGH INTENSITY LINAC DRIVER FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT : DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING 88 MHZ QUARTER WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . For the high-energy section of the linac, a superconducting 88 MHz Quarter Wave Resonator (beta 0.12) has been WAVE RESONATORS (BETA 0.12), POWER COUPLERS AND CRYOMODULES T. Junquera, G. Olry, H. Saugnac, J Abstract A superconducting linac driver, delivering deuterons with an energy up to 40 MeV (5 mA) and heavy

  18. Using Vision-Based Driver Assistance to Augment Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauchemin, Steven S.

    a Vision-Based Driver Assistance (VBDA) system that monitors the environment surrounding the vehicle using in the surrounding environment. The concept of a CCWS has been introduced, studied and validated by a number adoption of the Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) set of standards in production vehicles

  19. Scoping Study to Evaluate Feasibility of National Databases for EM&V Documents and Measure Savings: Appendices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document is the appendices to the Scoping Study to Evaluate Feasibility of National Databases for EM&V Documents and Measure Savings document.

  20. Comprehensive Summary and Analysis of Oral and Written Scoping Comments on the Hawaii Geothermal Project EIS (DOE Review Draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains summaries of the oral and written comments received during the scoping process for the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Oral comments were presented during public scoping meetings; written comments were solicited at the public scoping meetings and in the ''Advance Notice of Intent'' and ''Notice of Intent'' (published in the ''Federal Register'') to prepare the HGP EIS. This comprehensive summary of scoping inputs provides an overview of the issues that have been suggested for inclusion in the HGP EIS.

  1. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  2. SUPPLEMENTAL PACKAGE FOR THE SCOPING SUMMARY FOR THE P-AREA OPERABLE UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupar, J; Sadika Baladi, S; Mark Amidon, M

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic and selenium were tentatively identified as ecological RCOCs for the PAOU Ash Basin (PAOU Post-Characterization/Problem Identification Scoping Meeting, March 2007). Core Team agreed to consider eliminating these constituents as RCOCs based on a revised uncertainty discussion. The ecological risk tables and revised text (in its entirety) for the PAOU Ash Basin are provided in the Supplemental Information Package for the FS Scoping Meeting (June 2007). Arsenic and selenium have been traditionally carried through as ecological RCOCs (D-Area Ash Basin, A-Area Ash Pile).

  3. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

  4. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

  5. OPERATION AND COMMISSIONING OF THE JEFFERSON LAB UV FEL USING AN SRF DRIVER ERL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Legg; S. Benson; G. Biallas; K. Blackburn; J. Boyce; D. Bullard; J. Coleman; C. Dickover; D. Douglas; F. Ellingsworth; P. Evtushenko; F. Hannon; C. Hernandez-Garcia; C. Gould; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; K. Jordan; M. Klopf; J. Kortze; M. Marchlik; W. Moore; G. Neil; T. Powers; D. Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G. Wilson

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the operation and commissioning of the Jefferson Lab UV FEL using a CW SRF ERL driver. Based on the same 135 MeV linear accelerator as the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL, the UV driver ERL uses a bypass geometry to provide transverse phase space control, bunch length compression, and nonlinear aberration compensation necessitating a unique set of commissioning and operational procedures. Additionally, a novel technique to initiate lasing is described. To meet these constraints and accommodate a challenging installation schedule, we adopted a staged commissioning plan with alternating installation and operation periods. This report addresses these issues and presents operational results from on-going beam operations.

  6. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  7. Evaluation of four selected servo hand controls for severely handicapped drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sexton, Donna Jean

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering EVALUATION OF FOUR SELECTED SERVO HAND CONTROLS FOR SEVERELY HANDICAPPED DRIVERS A Thesis by DONNA JEAN SEXTON Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of Committee) (Co... CURRENT TRENDS IN AUTOMOTIVE ADAPTIVE CONTROLS Mechanical Adaptive Controls Power Assist Adaptive Controls Joystick Controls METHOD Subjects The Tracking Task Apparatus DATA REDUCTION Analog to Digital Conversion Data Cleanup Calculation...

  8. Studies of a Linac Driver for a High Repetition Rate X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Doolittle, L.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Ryne, R.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zolotorev, M.; Zholents, A.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on on-going studies of a superconducting CW linac driver intended to support a high repetition rate FEL operating in the soft x-rays spectrum. We present a pointdesign for a 1.8 GeV machine tuned for 300 pC bunches and delivering low-emittance, low-energy spread beams as needed for the SASE and seeded beamlines.

  9. DRIVER ACCELERATOR DESIGN FOR THE 10 KW UPGRADE OF THE JEFFERSON LAB IR FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRIVER ACCELERATOR DESIGN FOR THE 10 KW UPGRADE OF THE JEFFERSON LAB IR FEL D. Douglas, S. V, Newport News, VA23606, USA Abstract An upgrade of the Jefferson Lab IR FEL [1] is now un- der construction. It will provide 10 kW output light power in a wavelength range of 2­10 µm. The FEL will be driven by a modest

  10. Where do Nissan Leaf drivers in The EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Don Scoffield

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper invesigates where Nissan Leaf drivers in the EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work. Do they charge at work, home, or some other location?

  11. Where do Chevrolet Volt drivers in The EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Don Scoffield

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates where Chevy Volt drivers in the EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work. Do they charge at home, work, or some other location.

  12. Analytic Framework for Evaluation of State Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Policies with Reference to Stakeholder Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.; Mosey, G.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the framework that was developed to analyze energy efficiency and renewable energy policies on the state level based on how well they meet the stakeholder drivers.

  13. Compact, Intelligent, Digitally Controlled IGBT Gate Drivers for a PEBB-Based ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.; Olsen, J.J.; Macken, K.; /SLAC; ,

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has built and is currently operating a first generation prototype Marx klystron modulator to meet ILC specifications. Under development is a second generation prototype, aimed at improving overall performance, serviceability, and manufacturability as compared to its predecessor. It is designed around 32 cells, each operating at 3.75 kV and correcting for its own capacitor droop. Due to the uniqueness of this application, high voltage gate drivers needed to be developed for the main 6.5 kV and droop correction 1.7 kV IGBTs. The gate driver provides vital functions such as protection of the IGBT from over-voltage and over-current, detection of gate-emitter open and short circuit conditions, and monitoring of IGBT degradation (based on collector-emitter saturation voltage). Gate drive control, diagnostic processing capabilities, and communication are digitally implemented using an FPGA. This paper details the design of the gate driver circuitry, component selection, and construction layout. In addition, experimental results are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the protection circuit.

  14. Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  15. Highway crash rates and age-related driver limitations: Literature review and evaluation of data bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Young, J.R. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Lu, An [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a larger proportion of older individuals in the population. Moreover, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort a decade ago. However, they continue to take shorter trips than younger drivers and they avoid driving during congested hours. This recent demographic transformation in our society, the graying of America, coupled with the increasing mobility of the older population impose a serious highway safety issue that cannot be overlooked. Some of the major concerns are the identification of ``high-risk`` older drivers and the establishment of licensing guidelines and procedures that are based on conclusive scientific evidence. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) objectives in this project can be characterized by the following tasks: Review and evaluate the 1980 American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) licensing guidelines. Determine whether the license restriction recommended in the 1980 AAMVA and NHTSA guidelines was based on scientific evidence or on judgement of medical advisors. Identify in the scientific literature any medical conditions which are found to be highly associated with highway crashes, and which are not mentioned in the 1980 guidelines. Summarize States` current licensing practices for drivers with age-related physical and mental limitations. Identify potential data sources to establish conclusive evidence on age-related functional impairments and highway crashes.

  16. Analysis of the Ultra-fast Switching Dynamics in a Hybrid MOSFET/Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, T.; Burkhart, C.; /SLAC

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The turn-on dynamics of a power MOSFET during ultra-fast, {approx} ns, switching are discussed in this paper. The testing was performed using a custom hybrid MOSFET/Driver module, which was fabricated by directly assembling die-form components, power MOSFET and drivers, on a printed circuit board. By using die-form components, the hybrid approach substantially reduces parasitic inductance, which facilitates ultra-fast switching. The measured turn on time of the hybrid module with a resistive load is 1.2 ns with an applied voltage of 1000 V and drain current of 33 A. Detailed analysis of the switching waveforms reveals that switching behavior must be interpreted differently in the ultra-fast regime. For example, the gate threshold voltage to turn on the device is observed to increase as the switching time decreases. Further analysis and simulation of MOSFET switching behavior shows that the minimum turn on time scales with the product of the drain-source on resistance and drain-source capacitance, R{sub DS(on)}C{sub OSS}. This information will be useful in power MOSFET selection and gate driver design for ultra-fast switching applications.

  17. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  18. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

  19. Use of the National Driver Register in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Reliability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip M. Kannan, Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Driver Register (NDR) is a complex information network established and maintained by the Secretary of the Department of Transportation (DOT) under the National Driver Register Act of 1982. This report analyzes the question of whether information from the NDR is available to officials making Human Reliability Program (HRP) certification and recertification decisions and to Department of Energy (DOE) personnel security specialists making access authorization determinations.

  20. IACR Policy on Irregular Submissions Scope. Simultaneous submission of substantially similar papers to multiple venues, resubmis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    IACR Policy on Irregular Submissions April 2012 Scope. Simultaneous submission of substantially such steps are taken. Policy. IACR does not tolerate plagiarism and parallel submissions among the submissions to its scientific publications. Any submission that violates this policy must be rejected

  1. 4 Inventory of Existing Activities 4.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    249 4 Inventory of Existing Activities 4.1 Introduction, Purpose, and Scope The information what BPA has actually funded in the 2001-2003 period. Inventory of existing activities is a key element which represent each agency's role in the management of the subbasin. In addition, an inventory

  2. Choreographed Scope Maneuvering in Robotically-Assisted Laparoscopy with Active Vision Guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuan-Fang

    algorithms are designed for image analysis, modeling, and matching in a exible, deformable environment (the visual modeling, recognition, and servoing capa- bilities for assisting the surgeon in maneuvering the scope (camera) in laparoscopy is proposed. The proposed framework integrates top-down model guidance

  3. 1. Scope and Applicability This document outlines guidelines for research space allocation and management within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    1. Scope and Applicability This document outlines guidelines for research space allocation and management within the Wayne State University School of Medicine (SOM) and applies to wet-bench laboratory and therefore must be allocated and managed to ensure its productivity as a capital asset. 3. Responsibility

  4. M.S. in Library and Information Science (M.S.(LIS)) 1. Scope and Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    M.S. in Library and Information Science (M.S.(LIS)) 1. Scope and Objectives This is an advanced programme in Library and Information Science with special emphasis on applications of Information technology of information systems. Contributing to the discipline of Library and Information science in terms of research

  5. Scoping assessment on medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, S.W.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scoping Assessment addresses the need for medical isotope production and the capability of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide such isotopes. Included in the discussion are types of isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals, which types of cancers are targets, and in what way isotopes provide treatment and/or pain relief for patients.

  6. Research and Development at U.S. Research Universities: An Analysis of Scope Economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    and synergies arising between traditional university research outputs (articles and doctorates) and academic traditional university research outputs (articles and doctorates) and academic patents. We propose a new data from 92 research universities show significant economies of scope between articles and patents

  7. Work Scope for Developing Standards for Emergency Preparedness and Response: Fiscal Year 2004 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the fiscal year 2004 work completed on PNNL's Department of Homeland Security Emergency Preparedness and Response Standards Development Project. Also, the report includes key draft standards, in various stages of development and publication, that were associated with various tasks of the fiscal year 2004 scope of the project.

  8. Author's personal copy A note on the scope of the journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    Author's personal copy Editorial A note on the scope of the journal Agricultural and Forest Meteorology is an international journal for the publication of original articles and reviews on the inter experimental data. In recent years, the journal has seen a rapid increase in submission numbers. This growth

  9. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Desotell; D. Wieland; V. Yucel; G. Shott; J. Wrapp

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is planning to close the 92-Acre Area of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Closure planning for this facility must take into account the regulatory requirements for a diversity of waste streams, disposal and storage configurations, disposal history, and site conditions. This paper provides a brief background of the Area 5 RWMS, identifies key closure issues, and presents the closure strategy. Disposals have been made in 25 shallow excavated pits and trenches and 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes at the 92-Acre Area since 1961. The pits and trenches have been used to dispose unclassified low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform waste, and to store classified low-level and low-level mixed materials. The GCD boreholes are intermediate-depth disposal units about 10 feet (ft) in diameter and 120 ft deep. Classified and unclassified high-specific activity LLW, transuranic (TRU), and mixed TRU are disposed in the GCD boreholes. TRU waste was also disposed inadvertently in trench T-04C. Except for three disposal units that are active, all pits and trenches are operationally covered with 8-ft thick alluvium. The 92-Acre Area also includes a Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) operating under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status, and an asbestiform waste unit operating under a state of Nevada Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit. A single final closure cover is envisioned over the 92-Acre Area. The cover is the evapotranspirative-type cover that has been successfully employed at the NTS. Closure, post-closure care, and monitoring must meet the requirements of the following regulations: U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Title 40 CFR Part 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, RCRA requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632, and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). A grouping of waste disposal units according to waste type, location, and similarity in regulatory requirements identified six closure units: LLW Unit, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111 under FFACO, Asbestiform LLW Unit, Pit 3 MWDU, TRU GCD Borehole Unit, and TRU Trench Unit. The closure schedule of all units is tied to the closure schedule of the Pit 3 MWDU under RCRA.

  10. The role of the cant and lateral position of the steering wheel in the orientation of drivers to the location of the automotive pedals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrod, M. G

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examined the effects of three steering wheel cants and three steering wheel lateral positions on drivers' preferred automotive foot pedal locations and separation distances. The dependent variables were the preferred vertical and horizontal positions... in orienting the driver to the locations of the pedals and should be part of any design recommendations detailing the relationship between the driver and the foot pedals. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the chairman of my Advisory Committee, Dr...

  11. Battery Electric Vehicles: Range Optimization and Diversification for the U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properly selecting the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the market acceptance and the resulting social benefits of BEVs. Analysis of transportation technology transition could be biased against battery electric vehicles (BEV) and mislead policy making, if BEVs are not represented with optimal ranges. This study proposes a coherent method to optimize the BEV driving range by minimizing the range-related cost, which is formulated as a function of range, battery cost, energy prices, charging frequency, access to backup vehicles, and the cost and refueling hassle of operating the backup vehicle. This method is implemented with a sample of 36,664 drivers, representing U.S. new car drivers, based on the 2009 National Household Travel Survey data. Key findings are: 1) Assuming the near term (2015) battery cost at $405/kWh, about 98% of the sampled drivers are predicted to prefer a range below 200 miles, and about 70% below 100 miles. The most popular 20-mile band of range is 57 to77 miles, unsurprisingly encompassing the Leaf s EPA-certified 73-mile range. With range limited to 4 or 7 discrete options, the majority are predicted to choose a range below 100 miles. 2) Found as a statistically robust rule of thumb, the BEV optimal range is approximately 0.6% of one s annual driving distance. 3) Reducing battery costs could motivate demand for larger range, but improving public charging may cause the opposite. 4) Using a single range to represent BEVs in analysis could significantly underestimate their competitiveness e.g. by $3226/vehicle if BEVs are represented with 73-mile range only or by $7404/BEV if with 150-mile range only. Range optimization and diversification into 4 or 7 range options reduce such analytical bias by 78% or 90%, respectively.

  12. Charged particle driver for ICF using an accelerated, focused compact torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeker, D.J.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the status of evaluating an accelerated and focused compact torus as a driver for ICF. We are studying the acceleration and focusing aspects experimentally in the RACE facility, a recently completed ring generator coupled to a 260 kJ acceleration bank. Compact torus and ICF target interaction is being investigated with PIC codes and LASNEX, a 2D magneto-hydrodynamics code. Final conditions required of the CT are discussed as well as coupling issues such as superthermal electron production. We conclude with an economic evaluation of a few 100 MW reactor driven by a compact torus. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. What are the main drivers of the Bitcoin price? Evidence from wavelet coherence analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bitcoin has emerged as a fascinating phenomenon of the financial markets. Without any central authority issuing the currency, it has been associated with controversy ever since its popularity and public interest reached high levels. Here, we contribute to the discussion by examining potential drivers of Bitcoin prices ranging from fundamental to speculative and technical sources as well as a potential influence of the Chinese market. The evolution of the relationships is examined in both time and frequency domains utilizing the continuous wavelets framework so that we comment on development of the interconnections in time but we can also distinguish between short-term and long-term connections.

  14. Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Finis W.; McKee, G. Randall; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McKenney, John Lee; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John L.; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; LeChien, Keith, R.; Van De Valde, David M. (EG& G, Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that a wide variety of current-pulse shapes can be generated using a linear-transformer-driver (LTD) module that drives an internal water-insulated transmission line. The shapes are produced by varying the timing and initial charge voltage of each of the module's cavities. The LTD-driven accelerator architecture outlined in [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)] provides additional pulse-shaping flexibility by allowing the modules that drive the accelerator to be triggered at different times. The module output pulses would be combined and symmetrized by water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 030401 (2008)].

  15. Low-jitter high-power thyristor array pulse driver and generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanks, Roy L. (Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for generating low-jitter, high-voltage and high-current pulses for driving low impedance loads such as detonator fuses uses a MOSFET driver which, when triggered, discharges a high-voltage pre-charged capacitor into the primary of a toroidal current-multiplying transformer with multiple isolated secondary windings. The secondary outputs are suitable for driving an array of thyristors that discharge a precharged high-voltage capacitor and thus generating the required high-voltage and high-current pulse.

  16. Linear beam raster magnet driver based on H-bridge technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinkine, Nikolai I.; Yan, Chen; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Dail, Jeffrey Glenn; Wojcik, Randolph Frank; Gunning, William

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved raster magnet driver for a linear particle beam is based on an H-bridge technique. Four branches of power HEXFETs form a two-by-two switch. Switching the HEXFETs in a predetermined order and at the right frequency produces a triangular current waveform. An H-bridge controller controls switching sequence and timing. The magnetic field of the coil follows the shape of the waveform and thus steers the beam using a triangular rather than a sinusoidal waveform. The system produces a raster pattern having a highly uniform raster density distribution, eliminates target heating from non-uniform raster density distributions, and produces higher levels of beam current.

  17. Data acquisition with a VAX 11/780 and MBD branch driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC); Lau, Y.C.; Gould, C.R.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and implemented a general purpose data acquisition system, XSYS, for the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory VAX-11/780. The interface is a CAMAC Branch Highway connected to a Microprogrammed Branch Driver (MBD-11). A single general reentrant MBD program handles CAMAC operations and data transfers to and from the VAX using a DMA transfer. Each of the eight MBD channels is controlled by an independent subprocess in the VAX which communicates with the MBD via the UNIBUS. Data are double buffered and are sorted by VAX user written EVAL codes after the MBD wakes a hibernating subprocess image. Scalar operations and control of external devices are also supported.

  18. Overview of proton drivers for neutrino super beams and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a world-wide interest in Proton Drivers in the past decade. Numerous design proposals have been presented in Asia, Europe and North America, ranging from low energy rapid cycling synchrotrons, normal or superconducting linacs to high energy slow cycling synchrotrons and FFAGs. One thing in common is that all these machines provide MW beam power and are used primarily for neutrino experiments. This paper gives an overview of these activities. In the last section the author expresses his personal opinion on the future of this field.

  19. Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), for site-specific tower measurement years and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from #12;Supplement Table 2. Brasil flux sites instrumentation and measuring methods. *: non aspirated

  20. Acceptance of changes in program scope by county Extension personnel in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denmark, Kenneth Lloyd

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . II. REVIEW OF LITERATURE Functions of Extension Changing Environment of Extension Changes in Program Scope Youth clevelopment Leadership development Community development Public affairs Acceptance of' Change 8 11 13 17 18 19 20 21 III.... PROCEDURE IV. ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA 25 28 Degree of Change Acceptance Youth cLevelopment Leadership development Community development Public affairs Relationship to Variable Type of agent Age of' agent Tenure . V. SUMMARY...

  1. Inequalities in Taxation of Farm Lands and City Property Due to Scope and Method of Assessment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

    1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Scope and Method of Assessment AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President STATION Administr2tion : A. B. Conner, M. S., Director R. E. Karper. M. S.. Vice-Director Clarice Mixson, B. A., Secretary M. P. Holleman, Jr... *Dean School of Veterinary Medicine. !As of September 1. ' 1932. **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. a,.alysis of our assessment system reveals two outstanding weak- nesses; namely, the failure to tax intangible personal property...

  2. Modeling requirements for full-scope reactor simulators of fission-product transport during severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, P.G.; Monson, P.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Mitchell, H.A. (Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes in the needs and requirements to properly and efficiently model fission product transport on full scope reactor simulators. Current LWR simulators can be easily adapted to model severe accident phenomena and the transport of radionuclides. Once adapted these simulators can be used as a training tool during operator training exercises for training on severe accident guidelines, for training on containment venting procedures, or as training tool during site wide emergency training exercises.

  3. Modeling requirements for full-scope reactor simulators of fission-product transport during severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, P.G.; Monson, P.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Mitchell, H.A. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes in the needs and requirements to properly and efficiently model fission product transport on full scope reactor simulators. Current LWR simulators can be easily adapted to model severe accident phenomena and the transport of radionuclides. Once adapted these simulators can be used as a training tool during operator training exercises for training on severe accident guidelines, for training on containment venting procedures, or as training tool during site wide emergency training exercises.

  4. Development of the Supply Chain Optimization and Planning for the Environment (SCOPE) Tool - Applied to Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Fletcher, Tristan; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, 2006. [5] F.SCOPE) Tool - Applied to Solar Energy Corinne Reich-Weiser,gases and energy de- mand of solar energy technology using a

  5. Plasma properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwickl, R.D.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; Smith, E.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma fluid parameters calculated from solar wind and magnetic field data obtained on ISEE 3 were studied to determine the characteristic properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks. Of 54 shocks observed from August 1978 to February 1980, 9 contained a well defined driver gas that was clearly identifiable by a discontinuous decrease in the average proton temperature across a tangential discontinuity. While helium enhancements were present in all of 9 of these events, only about half of them contained simultaneous changes in the two quantities. Often the He/H ratio changed over a period of minutes. Simultaneous with the drop in proton temperature the helium and electron temperature decreased abruptly. In some cases the proton temperature depression was accompanied by a moderate increase in magnetic field magnitude with an unusually low variance and by an increase in the ratio of parallel to perpendicular temperature. The drive gas usually displayed a bi-directional flow of suprathermal solar wind electrons at higher energies (>137 eV).

  6. Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

  7. Optimizing and Diversifying Electric Vehicle Driving Range for U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properly determining the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the sales and social benefits of battery electric vehicles (BEVs). This study proposes a framework for optimizing the driving range by minimizing the sum of battery price, electricity cost, and range limitation cost referred to as the range-related cost as a measurement of range anxiety. The objective function is linked to policy-relevant parameters, including battery cost and price markup, battery utilization, charging infrastructure availability, vehicle efficiency, electricity and gasoline prices, household vehicle ownership, daily driving patterns, discount rate, and perceived vehicle lifetime. Qualitative discussion of the framework and its empirical application to a sample (N=36,664) representing new car drivers in the United States is included. The quantitative results strongly suggest that ranges of less than 100 miles are likely to be more popular in the BEV market for a long period of time. The average optimal range among U.S. drivers is found to be largely inelastic. Still, battery cost reduction significantly drives BEV demand toward longer ranges, whereas improvement in the charging infrastructure is found to significantly drive BEV demand toward shorter ranges. The bias of a single-range assumption and the effects of range optimization and diversification in reducing such biases are both found to be significant.

  8. A thirty-two clock hour driver education classroom curriculum guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, William Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM CURRICULUM GUIDE A R e c o r d o f St u d y by WILLIAM LEE RICHARDSON S u b m i t t e d t o t h e O f f i c e o f G r a d u a t e S t u d i e s o f Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i... a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r t h e de g r e e o f DOCTOR OF EDUCATION December 1990 M a j o r S u b j e c t : I n d u s t r i a l E d u c a t i o n A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM...

  9. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  10. A thirty-two clock hour driver education classroom curriculum guide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, William Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM CURRICULUM GUIDE A R e c o r d o f St u d y by WILLIAM LEE RICHARDSON S u b m i t t e d t o t h e O f f i c e o f G r a d u a t e S t u d i e s o f Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i... a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r t h e de g r e e o f DOCTOR OF EDUCATION December 1990 M a j o r S u b j e c t : I n d u s t r i a l E d u c a t i o n A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM...

  11. Scoping Process*

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    encompasses the natural and physical environment (i.e., air, water, geography, and geology) as well as the relationship of people with that environment (i.e., health and...

  12. Threat Assessment Design for Driver Assistance System at Intersections Georges S. Aoude, Brandon D. Luders, Kenneth K. H. Lee, Daniel S. Levine, and Jonathan P. How

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How, Jonathan P.

    Threat Assessment Design for Driver Assistance System at Intersections Georges S. Aoude, Brandon D, potentially errant, drivers. Our approach relies on a novel threat assessment module, which combines an intention predictor based on support vector machines with an efficient threat assessor using rapidly

  13. Factors influencing field performance: utilizing the drug evaluation and classificaiton (DEC) program to identify suspected impaired drivers as reported by selected certified police officers in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Melissa Noggle

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    impaired drivers. Specifically, this study explored how particular factors observed as part of the DEC Program’s decision-making process influence the DRE’s prediction of a drug category that was impairing a suspected impaired driver in the enforcement...

  14. Scoping Meeting Summary , Pahoa, Hawai'i, March 1992, 2 PM Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.

    1992-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The meeting began with presentations by the facilitator, Mr. Spiegel, and the representative from DOE, Dr. Lewis. The facilitator introduced those on the podium. He then described the general structure of the meeting and its purpose: to hear the issues and concerns of those present regarding the proposed Hawaiian Geothermal Project. He described his role as assuring the impartiality and fairness of the meeting. Dr. Lewis of DOE further defined the scope of the project, introduced those of the EIS team present and briefly described the EIS process.

  15. Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis of the Relationship of Roadway, Driver, Vehicle Characteristics in Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis of the Relationship of Roadway, Driver, Vehicle Characteristics in Oregon Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis,000 population among Oregon counties from 2000-2005 ranged from 6.64-211.17. In the event of a severe motor

  16. Driving, Aging & Dementia: On-Line Resources Division of Motor Vehicles & Driver Licensing, Missouri Department of Revenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driving, Aging & Dementia: On-Line Resources Missouri Division of Motor Vehicles & Driver Licensing for Responsible Driving, Inc. http://www.drivingsafe.org/ Alzheimer's Association, St. Louis Chapter (Driving & Driving (The Hartford Insurance Corp.) http://www.thehartford.com/alzheimers/ Family Conversations

  17. WIPP Documents - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (RCRA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka AnalyticsLarge fileHazardous Waste

  18. Environmental Laws Affecting Farmers and Ranchers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEowen, Roger A.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 subjects solid hazardous waste to federal regulation. Dump sites located on farms and ranches may be subject to the permit- ting requirements of RCRA. While RCRA con- tains a pesticide exemption for farmers, the scope... of the Act, first priority will probably be given to noxious industrial and urban odors. Federal Regulatory Approach?Water Water pollution is usually divided into two categories: point source and nonpoint source. Point source water pollution is waste...

  19. Perspective on the local fallout model used in the SCOPE/ENUWAR study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, T.F.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The graphical local fallout model used in the SCOPE/ENUWAR study, and its progenitor, KDFOC2, are compared to several fallout models. These include the numerical models SEER3, WSEG10, and DELFIC, as well as the analytical fallout model found in Glasstone and Dolan's ''The Effects of Nuclear Weapons - 1977''. DELFIC is considered by many to be the standard that other fallout models should be calibrated against. Visual, graphical, and tabular comparisons of the results of various models are made for a hypothetical 1-Mt, fission, nuclear explosion. Some results are compared down to 0.1 Gy/hr. We find that KDFOC2 and the scope model patterns compare extremely well with DELFIC patterns below 30 Gy/hr. However, WSEG10 and SEER3 compare less well. The Glasstone and Dolan model is in even poorer agreement, in that it substantially overpredicts both the downwind distances and area coverages for all dose-rate isopleths when compared to DELFIC. At low yields, KDFOC2, SEER3 and DELFIC predictions have been compared to Nevada Test Site measurements. When these results are reviewed, KDFCO2 is shown to be the superior model, with DELFIC second, and SEER3 a distant third. 13 refs., 7figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The U.S. Department of Energy is reopening the public scoping period for the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy is reopening the public scoping period for the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

  1. Air Quality Scoping Study for Sarcobatus Flat, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  2. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  3. Scoping Study for Demand Respose DFT II Project in Morgantown, WV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping study describes the underlying data resources and an analysis tool for a demand response assessment specifically tailored toward the needs of the Modern Grid Initiatives Demonstration Field Test in Phase II in Morgantown, WV. To develop demand response strategies as part of more general distribution automation, automated islanding and feeder reconfiguration schemes, an assessment of the demand response resource potential is required. This report provides the data for the resource assessment for residential customers and describes a tool that allows the analyst to estimate demand response in kW for each hour of the day, by end-use, season, day type (weekday versus weekend) with specific saturation rates of residential appliances valid for the Morgantown, WV area.

  4. Fourier Heat Conduction as a phenomenon described within the scope of the Second Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesudason, Christopher G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The historical development of the Carnot cycle necessitated the construction of isothermal and adiabatic pathways within the cycle that were also mechanically "reversible" which lead eventually to the Kelvin-Clausius development of the entropy function where the heat absorption is for the diathermal (isothermal) paths of the cycle only. It is deduced from traditional arguments that Fourier heat conduction involves mechanically "reversible" heat transfer with irreversible entropy increase. Here we model heat conduction as a thermodynamically reversible but mechanically irreversible process. The MD simulations conducted shows excellent agreement with the theory. Such views and results as these, if developed to a successful conclusion could imply that the Carnot cycle be viewed as describing a local process of energy-work conversion and that irreversible local processes might be brought within the scope of this cycle, implying a unified treatment of thermodynamically (i) irreversible, (ii) reversible, (iii) isot...

  5. Fourier Heat Conduction as a phenomenon described within the scope of the Second Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher G. Jesudason

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The historical development of the Carnot cycle necessitated the construction of isothermal and adiabatic pathways within the cycle that were also mechanically "reversible" which lead eventually to the Kelvin-Clausius development of the entropy function where the heat absorption is for the diathermal (isothermal) paths of the cycle only. It is deduced from traditional arguments that Fourier heat conduction involves mechanically "reversible" heat transfer with irreversible entropy increase. Here we model heat conduction as a thermodynamically reversible but mechanically irreversible process. The MD simulations conducted shows excellent agreement with the theory. Such views and results as these, if developed to a successful conclusion could imply that the Carnot cycle be viewed as describing a local process of energy-work conversion and that irreversible local processes might be brought within the scope of this cycle, implying a unified treatment of thermodynamically (i) irreversible, (ii) reversible, (iii) isothermal and (iv) adiabatic processes.

  6. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

  7. Low impedance z-pinch drivers without post-hole convolute current adders.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, Mark Edward; Seidel, David Bruce; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Present-day pulsed-power systems operating in the terawatt regime typically use post-hole convolute current adders to operate at sufficiently low impedance. These adders necessarily involve magnetic nulls that connect the positive and negative electrodes. The resultant loss of magnetic insulation results in electron losses in the vicinity of the nulls that can severely limit the efficiency of the delivery of the system's energy to a load. In this report, we describe an alternate transformer-based approach to obtaining low impedance. The transformer consists of coils whose windings are in parallel rather than in series, and does not suffer from the presence of magnetic nulls. By varying the pitch of the coils windings, the current multiplication ratio can be varied, leading to a more versatile driver. The coupling efficiency of the transformer, its behavior in the presence of electron flow, and its mechanical strength are issues that need to be addressed to evaluate the potential of transformer-based current multiplication as a viable alternative to conventional current adder technology.

  8. BEAM DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SARAF ACCELERATOR INCLUDING ERROR PROPAGATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EURISOL DRIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Rodnizki, D. Berkovits, K. Lavie, I. Mardor, A. Shor and Y. Yanay (Soreq NRC, Yavne), K. Dunkel, C. Piel (ACCEL, Bergisch Gladbach), A. Facco (INFN/LNL, Legnaro, Padova), V. Zviagintsev (TRIUMF, Vancouver)

    AbstractBeam dynamics simulations of SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting RF linear accelerator have been performed in order to establish the accelerator design. The multi-particle simulation includes 3D realistic electromagnetic field distributions, space charge forces and fabrication, misalignment and operation errors. A 4 mA proton or deuteron beam is accelerated up to 40 MeV with a moderated rms emittance growth and a high real-estate gradient of 2 MeV/m. An envelope of 40,000 macro-particles is kept under a radius of 1.1 cm, well below the beam pipe bore radius. The accelerator design of SARAF is proposed as an injector for the EURISOL driver accelerator. The Accel 176 MHZ ?0=0.09 and ?0=0.15 HWR lattice was extended to 90 MeV based on the LNL 352 MHZ ?0=0.31 HWR. The matching between both lattices ensures smooth transition and the possibility to extend the accelerator to the required EURISOL ion energy.

  9. Studies Of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation And Longitudinal Space Charge In The Jefferson Lab FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Tsai, C.-Y. [Virginia Polytechnic University

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL Driver provides an ideal test bed for studying a variety of beam dynamical effects. Recent studies focused on characterizing the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with the goal of benchmarking measurements with simulation. Following measurements to characterize the beam, we quantitatively characterized energy extraction via CSR by measuring beam position at a dispersed location as a function of bunch compression. In addition to operating with the beam on the rising part of the linac RF waveform, measurements were also made while accelerating on the falling part. For each, the full compression point was moved along the backleg of the machine and the response of the beam (distribution, extracted energy) measured. Initial results of start-to-end simulations using a 1D CSR algorithm show remarkably good agreement with measurements. A subsequent experiment established lasing with the beam accelerated on the falling side of the RF waveform in conjunction with positive momentum compaction (R56) to compress the bunch. The success of this experiment motivated the design of a modified CEBAF-style arc with control of CSR and microbunching effects.

  10. SPL-based Proton Driver for a nu-Factory at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetto, E; Garoby, R; Meddahi, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design and feasibility studies for a nu-Factory Proton Driver based on the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) have been com- pleted. In the proposed scenario, the 4 MW proton beam (H- beam) is acceler- ated with the upgraded High Power (HP)-SPL to 5 GeV, stored in an accumu- lator ring and Þnally transported to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place, in order to achieve the speciÞc time structure. We here summa- rize the choices in terms of lattice, magnet technology and RF manipulations in the two rings. The possible critical issues, such as heating of the foil for the charge-exchange injection, space-charge problems in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator ring, have been addressed and are shown not to be show-stoppers. The analysis focuses on the baseline scenario, consider- ing 6 bunches in the accumulator, and preliminary studies are discussed for the option of 3 or a single bunch per burst.

  11. MHz repetition rate solid-state driver for high current induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooksby, C; Caporaso, G; Goerz, D; Hanks, R; Hickman, B; Kirbie, H; Lee, B; Saethre, R

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Bechtel Nevada Corporation is developing an all solid-state power source for high current induction accelerators. The original power system design, developed for heavy-ion fusion accelerators, is based on the simple idea of using an array of field effect transistors to switch energy from a pre-charged capacitor bank to an induction accelerator cell. Recently, that idea has been expanded to accommodate the greater power needs of a new class of high-current electron accelerators for advanced radiography. For this purpose, we developed a 3-stage induction adder that uses over 4,000 field effect transistors to switch peak voltages of 45 kV at currents up to 4.8 kA with pulse repetition rates of up to 2 MHz. This radically advanced power system can generate a burst of five or more pulses that vary from 200 ns to 2 µs at a duty cycle of up to 25%. Our new source is precise, robust, flexible, and exceeds all previous drivers for induction machines by a factor of 400 in repetition rate and a factor of 1000 in duty cycle.

  12. Ferroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    a , P.C. Efthimion a , I.D. Kaganovich a , J.W. Kwan b , S.M. Lidia b , P.A. Ni b , P.K. Roy b , PFerroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n , R.C. Davidson, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey, 08543, USA b Lawrence Berkeley National

  13. Using a growth and yield model (PTAEDA2) as a driver for a biological process model (MAESTRO). Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, V.C.; Burkhart, H.E.; Dougherty, P.M.; Teskey, R.O.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives, approach, and results of the modeling required to adapt the management oriented growth and yield model (PTAEDA2) to function as a driver for the biologically based process model (MAESTRO) are discussed in the report.

  14. System model Scope of Work Short term power constraint Long term power constraint Imperfect CSIR Prediction Summary Spatial and Temporal Power Allocation for MISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhashyam, Srikrishna

    System model Scope of Work Short term power constraint Long term power constraint Imperfect CSIR Prediction Summary Spatial and Temporal Power Allocation for MISO Systems with Delayed Feedback Srikrishna) feedback #12;System model Scope of Work Short term power constraint Long term power constraint Imperfect

  15. Assessing Energy Impact of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Significance of Daily Distance Variation over Time and Among Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate assessment of the impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on petroleum and electricity consumption is a necessary step toward effective policies. Variations in daily vehicle miles traveled (VMT) over time and among drivers affect PHEV energy impact, but the significance is not well understood. This paper uses a graphical illustration, a mathematical derivation, and an empirical study to examine the cause and significance of such an effect. The first two methods reveal that ignoring daily variation in VMT always causes underestimation of petroleum consumption and overestimation of electricity consumption by PHEVs; both biases increase as the assumed PHEV charge-depleting (CD) range moves closer to the average daily VMT. The empirical analysis based on national travel survey data shows that the assumption of uniform daily VMT over time and among drivers causes nearly 68% underestimation of expected petroleum use and nearly 48% overestimation of expected electricity use by PHEVs with a 40-mi CD range (PHEV40s). Also for PHEV40s, consideration of daily variation in VMT over time but not among drivers similar to the way the utility factor curve is derived in SAE Standard SAE J2841 causes underestimation of expected petroleum use by more than 24% and overestimation of expected electricity use by about 17%. Underestimation of petroleum use and overestimation of electricity use increase with larger-battery PHEVs.

  16. Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment, it is therefore possible that large (~45%) reductions in CO2 emissions from UK electricity generation couldC/year. If required, however, a reduction in CO2 emissions of 15 MtC/year in the electricity generation sector by 2020

  17. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

  18. A scoping study of fission product transport from failed fuel during N Reactor postulated accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagrman, D.L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a scoping study of cesium, iodine, and tellurium behavior during a cold leg manifold break in the N Reactor. More detail about fission product behavior than has previously been available is provided and key parameters that control this behavior are identified. The LACE LA1 test and evidence from the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage tests are used to test the key model applied to determine aerosol behavior. Recommendations for future analysis are also provided. The primary result is that most of the cesium, iodine, and tellurium remains in the molten uranium fuel. Only 0.0035 of the total inventory is calculated to be released. Condensation of the most of the species of cesium and iodine that are released is calculated, with 0.998 of the released cesium and iodine condensing in the spacers and upstream end of the connector tubes. Most of the tellurium that is released condenses, but the chemical reaction of tellurium vapor with surfaces is also a major factor in the behavior of this element.

  19. On-site radiation exposure in severe reactor accidents: Scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warman, E.A.; Karahalios, P.; Celnick, J.; McInall, S.; Frank, S. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a scoping study of onsite radiation exposures which could take place in each of three types of postulated reactor accidents are presented. The accident types are (1) a fuel handling accident at a Mark III BWR; an interfacing system LOCA or V sequence at a PWR; and and Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) at a Mark I BWR. Both external and internal dose pathways are considered. The results of the study indicate the prohibitively high radiation doses could be received in some plant areas if personnel were to remain there. However, times of the order of a few minutes to a few hours, depending on the type of accident, would be available before life-threatening doses would be accumulated assuming that the provided full face respiratory protection equipment were used promptly. Special attention was given radiation doses possibly received by control room personnel for several control room air in-leakage assumptions. For occupancy during severe accidents it would be advisable for control room personnel to use self-contained apparatus (SCBA) to limit exposure via inhalation. The results of this study will be useful to individuals responsible for accident management procedures. It is indicated that it will be important for each plant to develop estimates of the time of onset of prohibitively high radiation levels in various important plant areas. It is concluded that respiratory protection is a major factor owing to the large inhalation doses which might otherwise be encountered. 20 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  1. Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph; Budhraja, Vikram; Ballance, John; Dyer, Jim; Mobasheri, Fred; Eto, Joseph

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California is on a path to increase utilization of renewable resources. California will need to integrate approximately 30,000 megawatts (MW) of new renewable generation in the next 20 years. Renewable resources are typically located in remote locations, not near the load centers. Nearly two/thirds or 20,000 MW of new renewable resources needed are likely to be delivered to Los Angeles Basin transmission gateways. Integration of renewable resources requires interconnection to the power grid, expansion of the transmission system capability between the backbone power grid and transmission gateways, and increase in delivery capacity from transmission gateways to the local load centers. To scope the transmission, operations, and reliability issues for renewables integration, this research focused on the Los Angeles Basin Area transmission gateways where most of new renewables are likely. Necessary actions for successful renewables integration include: (1) Expand Los Angeles Basin Area transmission gateway and nomogram limits by 10,000 to 20,000 MW; (2) Upgrade local transmission network for deliverability to load centers; (3) Secure additional storage, demand management, automatic load control, dynamic pricing, and other resources that meet regulation and ramping needed in real time operations; (4) Enhance local voltage support; and (5) Expand deliverability from Los Angeles to San Diego and Northern California.

  2. Results of scoping tests in corium-water thermal interactions in ex-vessel geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, B.W.; McUmber, L.; Sehgal, B.R.; Sienicki, J.J.; Squarer, D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of scoping tests are reported which were performed in the ANL/EPRI Corium Ex-vessel interactions (COREXIT) Facility located at ANL. These tests are examining issues related to containment loading (i.e., steam generation, H/sub 2/ production, and debris dispersal) for hypothetical LWR accidents that are postulated to progress to the point of molten corium breaching the vessel bottom head and entering the reactor cavity. The geometry selected for these tests is a 1 : 30 linear scale of the Zion PWR containment design in which the cavity is connected to the containment volume by an open tunnel through which pass the in-core detector guide tubes. The effects of the corium-water mixing modes were investigated in the first two tests in the series. In test CWTI-1 the molten corium was ejected into water which filled the cavity mockup volume to one-half the passageway height. In CWTI-2, the molten corium was dropped atop the refractory base in the cavity mockup without the presence of water, and water was injected atop the corium melt immediately afterward as per accumulator discharge. These tests have shown significant differences in fuel fragmentation, steam generation rate, hydrogen production, and fuel dispersal. Particularly noteworthy was the significant amount of dispersal of both water and corium debris from the cavity mockup due to the initially rapid steam generation rate in CWTI-1.

  3. 1/12-Scale scoping experiments to characterize double-shell tank slurry uniformity: Test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Million gallon double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford are used to store transuranic, high-level, and low-level wastes. These wastes generally consist of a large volume of salt-laden solution covering a smaller volume of settled sludge primarily containing metal hydroxides. These wastes will be retrieved and processed into immobile waste forms suitable for permanent disposal. The current retrieval concept is to use submerged dual-nozzle pumps to mobilize the settled solids by creating jets of fluid that are directed at the tank solids. The pumps oscillate, creating arcs of high-velocity fluid jets that sweep the floor of the tank. After the solids are mobilized, the pumps will continue to operate at a reduced flow rate sufficient to maintain the particles in a uniform suspension. The objectives of these 1/12-scale scoping experiments are to determine how Reynolds number, Froude number, and gravitational settling parameter affect the degree of uniformity achieved during jet mixer pump operation in the full-scale double-shell tanks; develop linear models to predict the degree of uniformity achieved by jet mixer pumps operating in the full-scale double-shell tanks; apply linear models to predict the degree of uniformity that will be achieved in tank 241-AZ-101 and determine whether contents of that tank will be uniform to within {+-} 10% of the mean concentration; and obtain experimental concentration and jet velocity data to compared with the TEMPEST computational and modeling predictions to guide further code development.

  4. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Scoping Summary Report - Part B Preliminary Technical Analysis Appendix A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes in general terms the nature of the voltage instability problem facing the Puget Sound area. The following two chapters cover the technical aspects of the problem. It deals with load growth, the root cause of the problem. Also addressed is the capacity of the current power system and the criteria for future system planning. It also explains the technical results of transmission system modeling which confirm the system's vulnerability to voltage instability, the principal symptom of the problem. The results of the scoping process in each of the four measure categories are presented. Included are lists of all options identified, a discussion of the screening criteria, and descriptions of the measures that survived the screening process and are proposed for further evaluation in Phase 2. We discuss the evaluation methodology which will be used to refine the analyses. The next steps in the planning process are outlined. It also describes the short term operational agreements that will assure continued reliable service until a long term solution is in place. 8 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. Puget Sound Reinforcement Project : Planning for Peak Power Needs : Scoping Report, Part A, Summary of Public Comments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes public participation in the environmental scoping process for the Puget Sound Reinforcement Project, a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Puget Sound area utilities study of voltage stability in northwestern Washington state. The environmental scoping phase of the Puget Sound project consisted of a series of public meetings and a public comment period. The content of these meetings is summarized in 2.0, Public Involvement. In 3.0, Comment Summary, the report summarizes comments received via meetings, mail and phone. The report ends with a description of the next steps in the project. Chapter 4.0, describes the decision process to be used by BPA and area utilities. Chapter 5.0 describes opportunities for public participation in decisions to be made about the future reliability of Puget Sound's electricity supply.

  6. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970, suggesting that human land use and management contribute to seasonal changes in the CO2 exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere.

  7. Rapid embedded wire heating via resistive guiding of laser-generated fast electrons as a hydrodynamic driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Pasley, J. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom) [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistively guiding laser-generated fast electron beams in targets consisting of a resistive wire embedded in lower Z material should allow one to rapidly heat the wire to over 100 eV over a substantial distance without strongly heating the surrounding material. On the multi-ps timescale, this can drive hydrodynamic motion in the surrounding material. Thus, ultra-intense laser solid interactions have the potential as a controlled driver of radiation hydrodynamics in solid density material. In this paper, we assess the laser and target parameters needed to achieve such rapid and controlled heating of the embedded wire.

  8. Improving Natural Uranium Utilization By Using Thorium in Low Moderation PWRs - A Preliminary Neutronic Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilles Youinou; Ignacio Somoza

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Th-U fuel cycle is not quite self-sustainable when used in water-cooled reactors and with fuel burnups higher than a few thousand of MWd/t characteristic of CANDU reactors operating with a continuous refueling. For the other industrially mature water-cooled reactors (i.e. PWRs and BWRs) it is economically necessary that the fuel has enough reactivity to reach fuel burnups of the order of a few tens of thousand of MWd/t. In this particular case, an additional input of fissile material is necessary to complement the bred fissile U-233. This additional fissile material could be included in the form of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) at the fabrication of the Th-U fuel. The objective of this preliminary neutronic scoping study is to determine (1) how much HEU and, consequently, how much natural uranium is necessary in such Th-U fuel cycle with U recycling and (2) how much TRansUranics (TRU=Pu, Np, Am and Cm) are produced. These numbers are then compared with those of a standard UO2 PWR. The thorium reactors considered have a homogeneous hexagonal lattice made up of the same (Th-U)O2 pins. Furthermore, at this point, we are not considering the use of blankets inside or outside the core. The lattice pitch has been varied to estimate the effect of the water-to-fuel volume ratio, and light water as well as heavy water have been considered. For most cases, an average burnup at discharge of 45,000 MWd/t has been considered.

  9. Scoping survey of perceived concerns, issues, and problems for near-surface disposal of FUSRAP waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, J.E.; Gilbert, T.L.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a scoping summary of concerns, issues, and perceived problems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste, based on a survey of the current literature. Near-surface disposal means land burial in or within 15 to 20 m of the earth's surface. It includes shallow land burial (burial in trenches, typically about 6 m deep with a 2-m cap and cover) and some intermediate-depth land burial (e.g., trenches and cap similar to shallow land burial, but placed below 10 to 15 m of clean soil). Proposed solutions to anticipated problems also are discussed. The purpose of the report is to provide a better basis for identifying and evaluating the environmental impacts and related factors that must be analyzed and compared in assessing candidate near-surface disposal sites for FUSRAP waste. FUSRAP wastes are of diverse types, and their classification for regulatory purposes is not yet fixed. Most of it may be characterized as low-activity bulk solid waste, and is similar to mill tailings, but with somewhat lower average specific activity. It may also qualify as Class A segregated waste under the proposed 10 CFR 61 rules, but the parent radionuclides of concern in FUSRAP (primarily U-238 and Th-232) have longer half-lives than do the radionuclides of concern in most low-level waste. Most of the references reviewed deal with low-level waste or mill tailings, since there is as yet very little literature in the public domain on FUSRAP per se.

  10. Opportunities for Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, Gary; Wilcox, Edmund; Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank

    2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    California agricultural irrigation consumes more than ten billion kilowatt hours of electricity annually and has significant potential for contributing to a reduction of stress on the grid through demand response, permanent load shifting, and energy efficiency measures. To understand this potential, a scoping study was initiated for the purpose of determining the associated opportunities, potential, and adoption challenges in California agricultural irrigation. The primary research for this study was conducted in two ways. First, data was gathered and parsed from published sources that shed light on where the best opportunities for load shifting and demand response lie within the agricultural irrigation sector. Secondly, a small limited survey was conducted as informal face-to-face interviews with several different California growers to get an idea of their ability and willingness to participate in permanent load shifting and/or demand response programs. Analysis of the data obtained from published sources and the survey reveal demand response and permanent load shifting opportunities by growing region, irrigation source, irrigation method, grower size, and utility coverage. The study examines some solutions for demand response and permanent load shifting in agricultural irrigation, which include adequate irrigation system capacity, automatic controls, variable frequency drives, and the contribution from energy efficiency measures. The study further examines the potential and challenges for grower acceptance of demand response and permanent load shifting in California agricultural irrigation. As part of the examination, the study considers to what extent permanent load shifting, which is already somewhat accepted within the agricultural sector, mitigates the need or benefit of demand response for agricultural irrigation. Recommendations for further study include studies on how to gain grower acceptance of demand response as well as other related studies such as conducting a more comprehensive survey of California growers.

  11. Development of Waste Acceptance Criteria at 221-U Building: Initial Flow and Transport Scoping Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Chen, Yousu

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents numerical flow and transport simulations performed that establish initial waste acceptance criteria for the potential waste streams that may be safely sequestered in the 221-U Building and similar canyon structures. Specifically, simulations were executed to identify the maximum loading of contaminant mass (without respect to volume) that can be emplaced within the 221-U Building with no more than 1 pCi/m2 of contaminant migrating outside the structure within a 1,000 year time period. The initial scoping simulations were executed in one dimension to assess important processes, and then two dimensions to establish waste acceptance criteria. Two monolithic conditions were assessed: (1) a grouted canyon monolith; and (2) a canyon monolith filled with sand, both assuming no cracks or fissures were present to cause preferential transport. A three-staged approach was taken to account for different processes that may impact the amount of contaminant that can be safely sequestered in canyon structure. In the first stage, flow and transport simulations established waste acceptance criteria based on a linear (Kd) isotherm approach. In the second stage, impacts on thermal loading were examined and the differences in waste acceptance criteria quantified. In the third stage of modeling, precipitation/dissolution reactions were considered on the release and transport of the contaminants, and the subsequent impact on the maximum contaminant loading. The reactive transport modeling is considered a demonstration of the reactive transport capability, and shows the importance of its use for future performance predictions once site-specific data have been obtained.

  12. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

  13. Currently, in countries where automobiles are moving on the right, drivers are required to drive in the rightmost lane. To overtake another vehicle, they move one lane to the left, pass, and return to their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Summary Currently, in countries where automobiles are moving on the right, drivers are required automobiles travel on the left. Finally, in "Further Thinking", we try to integrate more factors to improve February 11, 2014 Abstract Currently, in countries where automobiles are moving on the right, drivers

  14. Scoping Meeting Summary, Wailuku, Maui, March 9, 1992, 2 PM Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.

    1992-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The meeting began with presentations by the facilitator, Mr. Spiegel, and Dr. Lewis, the program director from DOE. The facilitator introduced those on the podium. He then described the general structure of the meeting and its purpose: to hear the issues and concerns of those present regarding the proposed Hawaiian Geothermal Project. He described his role in ensuring the impartiality and fairness of the meeting. Dr. Lewis further defined the scope of the project, introduced members of the EIS team, briefly described the EIS process, and answered several process questions, noting that cable feasibility would be examined and that Native Hawaiian concerns would be addressed. Ms. Borgstrom stated that the ISIS Implementation Plan will be continuously refined and that impacts of reasonably foreseeable future activities would be examined. During the meeting, more than 90% of the commenters requested that the EIS identify and assess the relative merits and impacts of energy alternatives to the proposed action. Nearly 80% requested that the EIS investigate conservation and renewable forms of energy, such as wind, solar, and biomass. They suggested that integrated resource planning should be used, noting that the State is initiating such a process. More than 30% of the commenters asked that the EIS examine geothermal alternatives to the action including developing geothermal resources on Maui and using geothermal power on Hawai'i only on that island. One commenter proposed an alternative cable route that proceeds from Hawai'i to Lana'i and from Lana'i to Oahu with spur lines to Moloka'i and Maui as needed. Nearly 70% of the commenters made general statements concerning potential short- and long-term environmental costs and impacts of the HGP (particularly on pristine environments). Others were concerned about environmental costs to Maui, particularly the impacts of a land-based cable route on the south side of Maui and on Hawaiian homestead lands. More than half the commenters were concerned about the potential impacts of the HGP to cultural resources. They stated that the BIS should respect and address Native Hawaiian religious and cultural concerns noting that the lands from Ulupalakua to Kaupo are Native Hawaiian homelands replete with archeological sites and endangered plants used for rituals. Many (>30%) were concerned about impacts of the HGP on the life styles of the general population, in particular, on life styles of Native Hawaiians. Another 30% mentioned aesthetic impacts of HGP on pristine environments.

  15. Critical Drivers for Safety Culture: Examining Department of Energy and U.S. Army Operational Experiences - 12382

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowes, Elizabeth A. [The S.M. Stoller Corporation, Broomfield, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating operational incidents can provide a window into the drivers most critical to establishing and maintaining a strong safety culture, thereby minimizing the potential project risk associated with safety incidents. By examining U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) versus U.S. Army drivers in terms of regulatory and contract requirements, programs implemented to address the requirements, and example case studies of operational events, a view of the elements most critical to making a positive influence on safety culture is presented. Four case studies are used in this evaluation; two from DOE and two from U.S. Army experiences. Although the standards guiding operations at these facilities are different, there are many similarities in the level of hazards, as well as the causes and the potential consequences of the events presented. Two of the incidents examined, one from a DOE operation and the other from a U.S. Army facility, resulted in workers receiving chemical burns. The remaining two incidents are similar in that significant conduct of operations failures occurred resulting in high-level radioactive waste (in the case of the DOE facility) or chemical agent (in the case of the Army facility) being transferred outside of engineering controls. A review of the investigation reports for all four events indicates the primary causes to be failures in work planning leading to ineffective hazard evaluation and control, lack of procedure adherence, and most importantly, lack of management oversight to effectively reinforce expectations for safe work planning and execution. DOE and Army safety programs are similar, and although there are some differences in contractual requirements, the expectations for safe performance are essentially the same. This analysis concludes that instilling a positive safety culture comes down to management leadership and engagement to (1) cultivate an environment that values a questioning attitude and (2) continually reinforce expectations for the appropriate level of rigor in work planning and procedure adherence. A review of the root causes and key contributing causes to the events indicate: - Three of the four root cause analyses cite lack of management engagement (oversight, involvement, ability to recognize issues, etc.) as a root cause to the events. - Two of the four root cause analyses cite work planning failures as a root cause to the events and all cause analyses reflect work planning failures as contributing factors to the events. - All events with the exception of the Tuba City plant shutdown indicate procedure noncompliance as a key contributor; in the case of Tuba City the procedure issues were primarily related to a lack of procedures, or a lack of sufficiently detailed procedures. - All events included discussion or suggestion of a lack of a questioning attitude, either on the part of management/supervision, work planners, or workers. This analysis suggests that the most critical drivers to safety culture are: - Management engagement, - Effective work planning and procedures, and - Procedure adherence with a questioning attitude to ensure procedural problems are identified and fixed. In high-hazard operational environments the importance of robust work planning processes and procedure adherence cannot be overstated. However, having the processes by themselves is not enough. Management must actively engage in expectation setting and ensure work planning that meets expectations for hazard analysis and control, develop a culture that encourages incident reporting and a questioning attitude, and routinely observe work performance to reinforce expectations for adherence to procedures/work control documents. In conclusion, the most critical driver to achieving a workforce culture that supports safe and effective project performance can be summarized as follows: 'Management engagement to continually reinforce expectations for work planning processes and procedure adherence in an environment that cultivates a questioning attitude'. (authors)

  16. Aluminum and tungsten X-pinch experiments on 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Jian [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10086 (China); Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sun Tieping; Wu Gang; Wang Liangping; Han Juanjuan; Li Mo; Cong Peitian; Qiu Aici [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Lv Min [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10086 (China)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-pinch experiments have been carried out on a 100 kA, 100 ns linear transformer driver stage recently built up. The X-pinches exhibited a source size of about 10 {mu}m, a pulse duration of 3 ns, 3-5 keV radiation energy of 3.9 mJ, and a burst time jitter of tens of nanosecond with the 2-wire 8 {mu}m W X-pinch load. The generator output current and the X-pinch characteristics depended on the X-pinch wire materials in the tests. X-ray backlighting images from the insects showed the significant phase-contrast effect.

  17. Migration: An engine for social change The movement of people into societies that offer a better way of life is a more powerful driver of cultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    Migration: An engine for social change The movement of people into societies that offer a better way of life is a more powerful driver of cultural evolution than conflict and conquest, say Peter effect on how societies evolve cul- turally because it is selective. People move to societies

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. , NO. , 2012 1 Dynamic Driver Supply Voltage Scaling for Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Dynamic Driver Supply Voltage Scaling for Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays Donghwa Shin, Student, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Organic light emitting diode (OLED) display is a self-illuminating device]. On the other hand, an organic light emitting diode (OLED) is self-illuminating using organic light emission

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--I: REGULAR PAPERS, VOL. 57, NO. 8, AUGUST 2010 2099 A 4 GHz Non-Resonant Clock Driver With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemieux, Guy

    capacitance back to the on-chip power-distribution grid. We call this type of return energy recycling in this new clock driver is about 6% of a local clock region. Index Terms--Charge recycling, energy recycling in battery-powered applications, but also in other designs because of packaging, cooling and operating costs

  20. SiGe Prototype Chip Design Implementing CMOS Fixed Bit-Load Drivers and Receivers for Next Generation High-Speed Board-Level Interconnect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakos, Jason D.

    SiGe Prototype Chip Design Implementing CMOS Fixed Bit-Load Drivers and Receivers for Next. These designs were fabricated as part of a multi-project die in IBM's .5um 5HP SiGe process. 1. Introduction Figure 1 shows our multi-project test die, manufactured in IBM's .5 um 5HP SiGe process. In this paper

  1. Scoping Meeting Summary, Kaunakakai, Moloka'i, March 12, 1992, 2 PM Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meeting began with presentations by the facilitator, Mr. Spiegel, and Dr. Lewis, the program manager from DOE. The facilitator introduced those on the podium. He then described the general structure of the meeting and its purpose: to hear the issues and concerns of those present regarding the proposed Hawaiian Geothermal Project. He described his role as assuring the impartiality and fairness of the meeting. Dr. Lewis of DOE further defined the scope of the project, introduced members of the EIS team, and briefly described.the EIS process. The overwhelming concerns of the meeting were Native Hawaiian issues. The presenters [more than 70%, most of whom addressed no other issue] want the EIS to respect Native Hawaiian religion, race, rights, language, and culture, noting that they believe that geothermal development is a desecration of Pele [{approx}60% of all presenters]. They expressed concern that their ancestors and burials should not be desecrated. The EIS should address Native Hawaiian concerns that the HGP would negatively impact Native Hawaiian fisheries, subsistence lifestyles, and religious practices. Virtually all the speakers expressed frustration with government. Most (> 70%) of the speakers voiced concern and frustration regarding lack of consideration for Native Hawaiians by government and lack of trust in government. One commenter requested that the EIS should consider the international implications of the U.S allowing their rainforests to be cleared, when the U.S. government asks other nations to preserve theirs. Nearly 30% of the commenters want the EIS to address the concern that people on Moloka'i will bear major environmental consequences of the HGP, but not gain from it. The commenters question whether it is right for Moloka'i to pay for benefits to Oahu, particularly using an unproven technology. After questioning the reliability and feasibility of the marine cable:, nearly 30% of the presenters were concerned about the impacts of the submarine cable. In specific, they suggested that the EIS investigate the impacts the cable would have on fisheries and marine life due to electromagnetic fields, dredging, and oil-release. The EIS should study the impacts of the HGP on the humpback whale and other marine species, particularly their birthing grounds, noting whales' hypersensitivity to emf and sound. One commenter suggested that the EIS examine the economics of the cable, including the need to build specialized ships to lay it, harbour(s), and the cable itself. One commenter was concerned about the future uses of the cable suggesting that the EIS should address the impacts that would result if the cable connecting Moloka'i to Oahu is used to transmit power from large coal or other types of power generation facilities constructed on Moloka'i. Commenters questioned the reliability of geothermal development in a region that is both seismically and volcanically active. One suggested that the EIS examine the merits of projects that conserve energy. With respect to land use, commenters asked that the EIS examine the propriety of using Native Hawaiian homelands and ceded lands for the HGP, questioning specifically the land exchange in Puna [Campbell Estate for Wao Kele o Puna]. The commenters want the EIS to address the issue of air, water and sail quality preservation. More than 20% of the commenters asked that the EIS examine concerns about the environmental consequences of the HGP to the rainforest, including possible species extinction. In particular, the EIS should address the impacts of roads associated with the HGP in the rainforest, including the resulting importation of exotic species (for example banana poko), which successfully compete against native species; and the effects of noise and fumes which negatively impact plants, birds, animals, and insects.

  2. Scoping Study on the Safety Impact of Valve Spacing in Natural Gas Pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulfredge, Charles David [ORNL

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) is responsible for ensuring the safe, reliable, and environmentally sound operation of the nation's natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines. Regulations adopted by PHMSA for gas pipelines are provided in 49 CFR 192, and spacing requirements for valves in gas transmission pipelines are presented in 49 CFR 192.179. The present report describes the findings of a scoping study conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assist PHMSA in assessing the safety impact of system valve spacing. Calculations of the pressures, temperatures, and flow velocities during a set of representative pipe depressurization transients were carried out using a one-dimensional numerical model with either ideal gas or real gas properties for the fluid. With both ideal gas and real gas properties, the high-consequence area radius for any resulting fire as defined by Stevens in GRI-00/0189 was evaluated as one measure of the pipeline safety. In the real gas case, a model for convective heat transfer from the pipe wall is included to assess the potential for shut-off valve failures due to excessively low temperatures resulting from depressurization cooling of the pipe. A discussion is also provided of some additional factors by which system valve spacing could affect overall pipeline safety. The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) Using an adaptation of the Stephens hazard radius criteria, valve spacing has a negligible influence on natural gas pipeline safety for the pipeline diameter, pressure range, and valve spacings considered in this study. (2) Over the first 30 s of the transient, pipeline pressure has a far greater effect on the hazard radius calculated with the Stephens criteria than any variations in the transient flow decay profile and the average discharge rate. (3) Other factors besides the Stephens criteria, such as the longer burn time for an accidental fire, greater period of danger to emergency personnel, increased unavoidable loss of gas, and possible depressurization cooling of the shut-off valves may also be important when deciding whether a change in the required valve spacing would be beneficial from a safety standpoint. (4) The average normalized discharge rate of {lambda}{sub avg} = 0.33 assumed by Stephens in developing his safety criteria is an excellent conservative value for natural gas discharge at the pressures, valve spacings, and pipe diameter used in this study. This conclusion remains valid even when real rather than ideal gas properties are considered in the analysis. (5) Significant pipe wall cooling effects (T{sub w} < -50 F or 228 K) can extend for a mile or more upstream from the rupture point within 30 s of a break. These conditions are colder than the temperature range specifications for many valve lubricants. The length of the low-temperature zone due to this cooling effect is also essentially independent of the system shut-off valve spacing or the distance between the break and a compressor station. (6) Having more redundant shut-off valves available would reduce the probability that pipe cooling effects could interfere with isolating the broken area following a pipeline rupture accident.

  3. Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri,; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of the design of an advanced dry feed system that was carried out under Task 4.0 of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0007902 with the US DOE, “Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the use of Low- Rank Coal.” The resulting design will be used for the advanced technology IGCC case with 90% carbon capture for sequestration to be developed under Task 5.0 of the same agreement. The scope of work covered coal preparation and feeding up through the gasifier injector. Subcomponents have been broken down into feed preparation (including grinding and drying), low pressure conveyance, pressurization, high pressure conveyance, and injection. Pressurization of the coal feed is done using Posimetric1 Feeders sized for the application. In addition, a secondary feed system is described for preparing and feeding slag additive and recycle fines to the gasifier injector. This report includes information on the basis for the design, requirements for down selection of the key technologies used, the down selection methodology and the final, down selected design for the Posimetric Feed System, or PFS.

  4. Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000–2025, CRADA No. ORNL98-0500 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S. [ORNL] [ORNL; Jones, Donald W. [ORNL] [ORNL; Reuscher, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Schmoyer, Richard S. [ORNL] [ORNL; Truett, Lorena F. [ORNL] [ORNL

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the turn of the century – the 20th century that is – the median age in the United States was under 30 years; America was 60% rural in nature; and there were only 36 highway fatalities all year. As we leave the 20th century behind, the route into the 21st century is very different. “Intelligent” cars speed down multi-lane “smart” highways in a nation that is 75% urban. According to the Federal Highway Administration’s Highway Statistics, there are 28,000 times more vehicles on the road in 2000 than there were in 1900, and these vehicles travel about 2.6 trillion miles each year. Annual fatalities resulting from highway crashes have also increased – by over 1100%. We see other changes as well. The face of America is changing. It is growing older. In 2025, persons 65 and over will make up 18.5% of the total population. The number of persons aged 85 and over is increasing more rapidly than any other age group. More importantly, the elderly are taking more trips, driving further, and continuing to drive much later in life. These conditions lead to concerns about traffic safety. Although the elderly are healthier and drive safer cars than they did just two decades ago, their frailty makes them more susceptible to injury than younger persons involved in traffic crashes of the same severity. In addition, visual, physical, and cognitive skills, all of which contribute to driving abilities, decrease with advancing age. The familiar “U”-shaped curve depicting the rate of fatalities per vehicle miles traveled, shows that the elderly experience a higher highway fatality rate than any other age group except teenagers. While the overall number of highway fatalities has decreased regularly since 1972, the number of fatalities of elderly travelers has continued to increase steadily. This increase is cause for concern for both the elderly driver and for other persons on the roads who migh tbe placed in danger through crashes involving elderly drivers.

  5. Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for former waste management units, legacy contamination source areas and distribution of contamination in soils, and environmental infrastructure (e.g., caps, monitoring systems, etc.) that is in place or planned in association with RAs. (3) Regulatory considerations and processes for management and disposition of waste soil upon generation, including regulatory drivers, best management practices (BMPs), waste determination protocols, waste acceptance criteria, and existing waste management procedures and BMPs for Y-12. This Soil Management Plan provides information to project planners to better coordinate their activities with other organizations and programs with a vested interest in soil disturbance activities at Y-12. The information allows project managers and maintenance personnel to evaluate and anticipate potential contaminant levels that may be present at a proposed soil disturbance site prior to commencement of activities and allows a more accurate assessment of potential waste management requirements.

  6. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  7. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  8. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  9. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  10. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  11. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  12. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  13. California Energy Commission Public Interest EnergyResearch/Energy System Integration -- Transmission-Planning Research&Development Scoping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard; Widergren, Steven

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Public Interest Energy Research (PIER)scoping project is to identify options for public-interest research and development (R&D) to improve transmission-planning tools, techniques, and methods. The information presented was gathered through a review of current California utility, California Independent System Operator (ISO), and related western states electricity transmission-planning activities and emerging needs. This report presents the project teams findings organized under six topic areas and identifies 17 distinct R&D activities to improve transmission-planning in California and the West. The findings in this report are intended for use, along with other materials, by PIER staff, to facilitate discussions with stakeholders that will ultimately lead to development of a portfolio of transmission-planning R&D activities for the PIER program.

  14. Scoping evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Langkopf, B.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a scoping evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of the hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Eight hazardous metals were evaluated: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. The analysis considered transport only through the groundwater pathway. The results are reported as site-specific estimates of maximum concentrations of each hazardous metal in treated mixed low-level waste that do not exceed the performance measures established for the analysis. Also reported are site-specific estimates of travel times of each hazardous metal to the point of compliance.

  15. The screening and scoping of Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment of Carbon Capture and Storage in the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koornneef, J.; Faaij, A.; Turkenburg, W. [University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) are procedural tools which have as goal to assess and evaluate possible environmental effects of, respectively, a proposed project or policy plan. The goal of this article is to explore possible bottlenecks in applying both the EIA and SEA procedures on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) activities in the Netherlands, as experience is currently minimal or lacking. In this study we focus mainly on the institutional and procedural aspects of the screening and scoping phases of both procedures. This is achieved by reviewing EIA and SEA procedures for analogue projects for the three distinctive process steps of a CCS project, namely the power plant with capture, the transport and finally the underground storage of the CO{sub 2}. Additionally, EIA and SEA or similar procedures on CCS in other countries are reviewed and the legal framework for the Dutch EIA and SEA is studied. This article shows a concise overview of the EIA and SEA procedure in the Netherlands and the relation between both procedures. Based on our findings we have constructed a conceptual taxonomy for the scope of both procedures for CCS in the Netherlands. This taxonomy conceptualizes the possible integration of assessing the environmental impacts for tiered levels of decision making. This integration might be needed for first CCS projects as decisions on the strategic (spatial planning) level are currently absent for CCS in the Netherlands. Perpendicular to such integration is the integration of linked activities in the CCS chain and their alternatives, into one procedure. We argue that it would be beneficial to combine the separate EIA procedures for CCS activities into one procedure or at least provide close linkage between them.

  16. Design of a 7-MV Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) for down-hole flash x-ray radiography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordova, Steve Ray; Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Bryan Velten; Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, David Lee (L-3 Communications - Pulse Sciences, San Leandro, CA); Bruner, Nichelle Lee (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Leckbee, Joshua J.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed power driven flash x-ray radiography is a valuable diagnostic for subcritical experiments at the Nevada Test Site. The existing dual-axis Cygnus system produces images using a 2.25 MV electron beam diode to produce intense x-rays from a small source. Future hydrodynamic experiments will likely use objects with higher areal mass, requiring increased x-ray dose and higher voltages while maintaining small source spot size. A linear transformer driver (LTD) is a compact pulsed power technology with applications ranging from pulsed power flash x-ray radiography to high current Z-pinch accelerators. This report describes the design of a 7-MV dual-axis system that occupies the same lab space as the Cygnus accelerators. The work builds on a design proposed in a previous report [1]. This new design provides increased diode voltage from a lower impedance accelerator to improve coupling to low impedance diodes such as the self magnetic pinch (SMP) diode. The design also improves the predicted reliability by operating at a lower charge voltage and removing components that have proven vulnerable to failure. Simulations of the new design and experimental results of the 1-MV prototype are presented.

  17. (A2LA Cert. No. 2937.01) Revised 11/27/2013 Page 1 of 1 SCOPE OF ACCREDITATION TO ISO/IEC 17025:2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    (A2LA Cert. No. 2937.01) Revised 11/27/2013 Page 1 of 1 SCOPE OF ACCREDITATION TO ISO/IEC 17025 of Mechanical Testing This laboratory is accredited in accordance with the recognized International Standard ISO management system (refer to joint ISO-ILAC-IAF Communiqué dated 8 January 2009). Presented this 26th day

  18. Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of NewRenewable Generation in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, markets for renewable generation--especially wind power--have grown substantially in recent years. This growth is typically attributed to technology improvements and resulting cost reductions, the availability of federal tax incentives, and aggressive state policy efforts. But another less widely recognized driver of new renewable generation is poised to play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Common in the late-1980s to mid-1990s, but relegated to lesser importance as many states took steps to restructure their electricity markets in the late-1990s, IRP has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions such as the western United States, where retail competition has failed to take root. As practiced in the United States, IRP is a formal process by which utilities analyze the costs, benefits, and risks of all resources available to them--both supply- and demand-side--with the ultimate goal of identifying a portfolio of resources that meets their future needs at lowest cost and/or risk. Though the content of any specific utility IRP is unique, all are built on a common basic framework: (1) development of peak demand and load forecasts; (2) assessment of how these forecasts compare to existing and committed generation resources; (3) identification and characterization of various resource portfolios as candidates to fill a projected resource deficiency; (4) analysis of these different ''candidate'' resource portfolios under base-case and alternative future scenarios; and finally, (5) selection of a preferred portfolio, and creation of a near-term action plan to begin to move towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarely considered seriously in utility IRP. In the western United States, however, the most recent resource plans call for a significant amount of new wind power capacity. These planned additions appear to be motivated by the improved economics of wind power, an emerging understanding that wind integration costs are manageable, and a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities. Equally important, utility IRPs are increasingly recognizing the inherent risks in fossil-based generation portfolios--especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk of future carbon regulation--and the benefits of renewable energy in mitigating those risks. This article, which is based on a longer report from Berkeley Lab,i examines how twelve investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in the western United States--Avista, Idaho Power, NorthWestern Energy (NWE), Portland General Electric (PGE), Puget Sound Energy (PSE), PacifiCorp, Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Nevada Power, Sierra Pacific, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E)--treat renewable energy in their most recent resource plans (as of July 2005). In aggregate, these twelve utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. In reviewing these plans, our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable generation in the United States, and (2) to suggest possible improvements to the methods used to evaluate renewable generation as a resource option. As such, we begin by summarizing the amount and types of new renewable generation planned as a result of these twelve IRPs. We then offer observations about the IRP process, and how it might be improved to more objectively evaluate renewable resources.

  19. A method for EIA scoping of wave energy converters-based on classification of the used technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margheritini, Lucia, E-mail: lm@civil.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Department of Civil Engineering, Sohngardsholmsvej 57, DK - 9000, Aalborg (Denmark); Hansen, Anne Merrild, E-mail: merrild@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Department of Planning and Development, Fibigerstraede 13, DK - 9220, Aalborg (Denmark); Frigaard, Peter, E-mail: pf@civil.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Department of Civil Engineering, Sohngardsholmsvej 57, DK - 9000, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first decade of the 21st Century the World faces spread concern for global warming caused by rise of green house gasses produced mainly by combustion of fossil fuels. Under this latest spin all renewable energies run parallel in order to achieve sustainable development. Among them wave energy has an unequivocal potential and technology is ready to enter the market and contribute to the renewable energy sector. Yet, frameworks and regulations for wave energy development are not fully ready, experiencing a setback caused by lack of understanding of the interaction of the technologies and marine environment, lack of coordination from the competent Authorities regulating device deployment and conflicts of maritime areas utilization. The EIA within the consent process is central in the realization of full scale devices and often is the meeting point for technology, politics and public. This paper presents the development of a classification of wave energy converters that is based on the different impact the technologies are expected to have on the environment. This innovative classification can be used in order to simplify the scoping process for developers and authorities.

  20. Microsoft Word - 2012 RCRA CRP comment table.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community Relations Plan Annual Summary of Comments for July 2011 through August 2012 Last saved on: 8242012 Annual Summary of...

  1. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPE, used air filters from compressors, motors, pumps, filter bags, oil filters, and PVC pipe. WASTE QUANTITY: Three 55-gallon drums and six 5-gallon drums as of 1501. The...

  2. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gallon drums on pallets on the ground. WASTE DESCRIPTION: PPE, plastic sheeting, and PVC tubing. WASTE QUANTITY: According to Geo Consultants personnel this GSA held a maximum...

  3. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    requirements. WASTE DESCRIPTION: PCB light ballast, PCB solids, PCB waste water, PVC pipe fittings, ductwork, and poly sheets. WASTE QUANTITY: Seven 55-gallon drums as of...

  4. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NAME: C-404 Landfill DATE: Revised 33103 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: North of Virginia Ave., west -central portion of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). See...

  5. RCRA designation of discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many sealed sources containing americium and beryllium are used throughout construction, industry, and research, and will eventually require disposal. For planning purposes it is necessary to determine whether these sources, when disposed, constitute a mixed waste, i.e., a waste containing hazardous constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and radioactive constituents regulated under the Atomic Energy Act. Waste designation criteria contained in 40 CFR 261 are evaluated in detail in this report. It is determined that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources do not contain any wastes listed in Subpart D of 40 CFR 261, nor do the discarded sources exhibit any hazardous characteristics. Therefore, it is concluded that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources are not a mixed waste under regulations established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Hazardous waste regulatory programs delegated to States, however, may have regulations that differ from those of the Federal government.

  6. act rcra facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to construct a solar farm capable of generating up to 75 direct current megawatts of photovoltaic solar energy (Project). At the time of the August submittal, it was projected...

  7. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was designated as a temporary storage area for bushings removed from switchyard transformers. OPERATIONAL STATUS: Inactive DATES OPERATED: Approximately 3 weeks during 799....

  8. accumulation areas rcra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ivn 10 PV production Accumulator Physics Websites Summary: European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, HAMBURG : Germany (2009)" 12;))).(.(1.( 110 s economic (and...

  9. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 UNIT NAME: G-755-T-07-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: West end, south wall of C-755-T-07-01 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 4 ft. X 4 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging...

  10. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 UNIT NAME: S-755-T-3-2-03 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: This GSA was located in a temporary field laboratory trailer hooked to location C-755-T-3-2....

  11. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 UNIT NAME: G-710-20 DATE: Original: 011901 Revised: 122303 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: C-711 dock (east of C-710) APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 5 ft. X 6 ft. FUNCTION:...

  12. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 UNIT NAME: G-333-08 DATE: 01192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column Ma 29 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 15 ft. X 20 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  13. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 UNIT NAME: C-745-J Yard DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: SWMU 469 is located inside the plant security fence, northeast area of plant. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 150...

  14. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 UNIT NAME: G-340-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-340, ground floor Column A13 to A14 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 4 ft. X 8 ft. FUNCTION:...

  15. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 UNIT NAME: S-335-09 DATE: 1192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column T-9 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 4 ft. X 4 ft. FUNCTION: Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  16. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 UNIT NAME: S-310-04 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column D 5 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 3 ft. x 3 f t. FUNCTION: Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  17. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 UNIT NAME: G-333-03 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column Gb 25 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 20 ft. x 20 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  18. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 UNIT NAME: G-340-06 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Northwest corner of C-340-D APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: Approximately 8 ft. X 15 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging...

  19. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 UNIT NAME: G-533-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: NE corner, ground floor. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 5 ft. X 5 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF...

  20. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 UNIT NAME: G-335-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column P8-P9; P9-R9 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 20 ft. x 40 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF...

  1. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 UNIT NAME: G-755-C-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: C-755-C-01 is a small garage-type building. This GSA is located in the center of it. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION:...

  2. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 UNIT NAME: G-745-B-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: South end of C-745-B cylinder yard. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 30 ft. X 45 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area...

  3. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 UNIT NAME: S-710-06 DATE: 01192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Room 13 of the C-710 building. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 2 ft. X 4 ft. FUNCTION: Satellite Accumulation Area...

  4. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    47 UNIT NAME: S-710-09 DATE: Original: 01192001 Revised: 122303 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: C-710 Room 15 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 2 ft. X 4 ft. FUNCTION: Satellite...

  5. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40 UNIT NAME: S-410-05 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column L-10 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 3 ft. X 3 ft., according to BJC personnel. FUNCTION: Storage of waste...

  6. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 UNIT NAME: G-746-G-2-01 DATE: 01192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: NW corner of C-746-G, outside. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 12 ft. X 10 ft. X 8 ft. FUNCTION: Generator...

  7. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 UNIT NAME: G-611-U-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Parking lot south of C-611-U APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 7 ft. X 11 ft. as of 1801. According to USEC...

  8. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 UNIT NAME: C-416 Decontamination Pad DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: North of C-631 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 30 ft. X 50 ft. FUNCTION: Decontamination of drilling...

  9. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 UNIT NAME: G-600-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Outside, westside of C-600 near the nitrogen tanks. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 12 ft. X 15 ft. as of 1801....

  10. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 UNIT NAME: G-746-G-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: C-745-G north of C-746-D and building located southwest of C-360. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 50 ft. X 25 ft....

  11. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    56 UNIT NAME: S-755-T-16-02 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: This SAA was in a temporary subcontractor trailer hooked to location C-755-T-2-2. APPROXIMATE...

  12. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 UNIT NAME: G-333-04 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column Ca 43 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 3 ft. x 3 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  13. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    380 UNIT NAME: G-340-04 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-340, ground floor Column A14 to A15 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: Approximately 4 ft. X 10...

  14. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 UNIT NAME: G-612-A-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: South of C-612 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 100 ft. x 50 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area BRIEF HISTORY: In...

  15. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 UNIT NAME: G-745-T-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: East of the C-745-T cylinder yard APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 4 ft. X 4 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area...

  16. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 UNIT NAME: G-612-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: East Wall of the C-612 facility APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 8 ft. X 10 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA)...

  17. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 UNIT NAME: G-333-20 DATE: 01192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column Sa 33 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 40 ft. X 20 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  18. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 UNIT NAME: G-720-22 DATE: 01192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column J-8. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 20 ft. X 40 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  19. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 UNIT NAME: S-755-T-16-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: This SAA was in a temporary subcontractor trailer hooked to location C-755-T-3-2. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION:...

  20. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 UNIT NAME: G-746-X-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Just south of C-746, west of the C-745-H cylinder yard. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 6 ft. X 13 ft. FUNCTION:...

  1. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 UNIT NAME: G-333-10 DATE: 1192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column Na 26 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 3 ft. X 4 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  2. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 UNIT NAME: S-710-16 DATE: 01192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Room 13 of the C-710 building. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 2 ft. X 3 ft. FUNCTION: Satellite Accumulation Area...

  3. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 UNIT NAME: G-400-02 DATE: 1192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column D 13 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 12 ft. X 12 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  4. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    45 UNIT NAME: S-710-05 DATE: 01192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Building C-710, Attic. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 1 ft. X 3 ft. FUNCTION: Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA)...

  5. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 UNIT NAME: S-340-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-340, ground floor Column A-15 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: Approximately 3 ft. X 4 ft....

  6. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 UNIT NAME: G-755-T-2-3-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: This GSA was outside a temporary field laboratory trailer hooked to location C-755-T-2-3. APPROXIMATE...

  7. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 UNIT NAME: G-400-01 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column D 10 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 4 ft. X 24 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  8. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 UNIT NAME: G-333-02 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Column N 25 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 5 ft. x 5 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY:...

  9. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 UNIT NAME: Concrete Cylinder Holders Storage Area on Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: SWMU 467 is located on...

  10. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 UNIT NAME: Outside C-746-B South Storage Area DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: SWMU 471 is located inside the plant security fence, south of C-746-B. APPROXIMATE...

  11. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    52 UNIT NAME: S-710-44 DATE: Original: 011901 Revised: 122303 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Room 34B of the C-710 building. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 4 ft. X 7 ft. FUNCTION:...

  12. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 UNIT NAME: G-710-04 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Room 13 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 3 ft. X 5 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY: USEC...

  13. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 UNIT NAME: S-337-11 DATE: 1192001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Between columns Sa 26 and Sb 26. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 4 ft. X 4 ft. FUNCTION: Satellite Accumulation Area...

  14. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    377 UNIT NAME: G-337-22 DATE: Original: 011901 Revised 122303 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: C-337 Area Control Room APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 3 ft. X 3 ft. FUNCTION: Generator...

  15. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 UNIT NAME: S-743-T-17-01 DATE: 11901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: C-743-T-17 Laboratory APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 43 in. X 45 in. FUNCTION: Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA)...

  16. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 UNIT NAME: G-710-24 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Room 65 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 2 ft. x 2 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF HISTORY: USEC...

  17. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 UNIT NAME: G-540-A-1-02 DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: South of C-540 APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: 6 ft. X 8 ft. X 10 ft. FUNCTION: Generator Staging Area (GSA) BRIEF...

  18. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 UNIT NAME: West of Vortec Site DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: SWMU 474 is located outside the plant security fence, west of the Vortec construction site....

  19. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70 UNIT NAME: C-746-V Yard DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: SWMU 470 is located inside the plant security fence, adjacent to C-753-A TSCA Storage Building....

  20. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    475 UNIT NAME: C-745-G-01 DATE: February 8, 2001 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: SWMU 475 is located inside the plant security fence, inside the C-745-G5 Cylinder Paint...